US2508122A - Instrument supporting stand - Google Patents

Instrument supporting stand Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2508122A
US2508122A US725251A US72525147A US2508122A US 2508122 A US2508122 A US 2508122A US 725251 A US725251 A US 725251A US 72525147 A US72525147 A US 72525147A US 2508122 A US2508122 A US 2508122A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
shaft
pinion
base
crank
support shaft
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US725251A
Inventor
Mooney Raymond
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
QUICK SET Inc
Original Assignee
QUICK SET Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by QUICK SET Inc filed Critical QUICK SET Inc
Priority to US725251A priority Critical patent/US2508122A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2508122A publication Critical patent/US2508122A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16MFRAMES, CASINGS, OR BEDS OF ENGINES OR OTHER MACHINES OR APPARATUS NOT SPECIFIC TO AN ENGINE, MACHINE, OR APPARATUS PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE; STANDS OR SUPPORTS
    • F16M11/00Stands or trestles as supports for apparatus or articles placed thereon Stands for scientific apparatus such as gravitational force meters
    • F16M11/20Undercarriages with or without wheels
    • F16M11/24Undercarriages with or without wheels changeable in height or length of legs, also for transport only, e.g. by means of tubes screwed into each other
    • F16M11/26Undercarriages with or without wheels changeable in height or length of legs, also for transport only, e.g. by means of tubes screwed into each other by telescoping, with or without folding
    • F16M11/28Undercarriages for supports with one single telescoping pillar
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16MFRAMES, CASINGS, OR BEDS OF ENGINES OR OTHER MACHINES OR APPARATUS NOT SPECIFIC TO AN ENGINE, MACHINE, OR APPARATUS PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE; STANDS OR SUPPORTS
    • F16M11/00Stands or trestles as supports for apparatus or articles placed thereon Stands for scientific apparatus such as gravitational force meters
    • F16M11/02Heads
    • F16M11/04Means for attachment of apparatus; Means allowing adjustment of the apparatus relatively to the stand
    • F16M11/06Means for attachment of apparatus; Means allowing adjustment of the apparatus relatively to the stand allowing pivoting
    • F16M11/08Means for attachment of apparatus; Means allowing adjustment of the apparatus relatively to the stand allowing pivoting around a vertical axis, e.g. panoramic heads
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16MFRAMES, CASINGS, OR BEDS OF ENGINES OR OTHER MACHINES OR APPARATUS NOT SPECIFIC TO AN ENGINE, MACHINE, OR APPARATUS PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE; STANDS OR SUPPORTS
    • F16M11/00Stands or trestles as supports for apparatus or articles placed thereon Stands for scientific apparatus such as gravitational force meters
    • F16M11/02Heads
    • F16M11/16Details concerning attachment of head-supporting legs, with or without actuation of locking members thereof
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16MFRAMES, CASINGS, OR BEDS OF ENGINES OR OTHER MACHINES OR APPARATUS NOT SPECIFIC TO AN ENGINE, MACHINE, OR APPARATUS PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE; STANDS OR SUPPORTS
    • F16M11/00Stands or trestles as supports for apparatus or articles placed thereon Stands for scientific apparatus such as gravitational force meters
    • F16M11/02Heads
    • F16M11/18Heads with mechanism for moving the apparatus relatively to the stand
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16MFRAMES, CASINGS, OR BEDS OF ENGINES OR OTHER MACHINES OR APPARATUS NOT SPECIFIC TO AN ENGINE, MACHINE, OR APPARATUS PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE; STANDS OR SUPPORTS
    • F16M11/00Stands or trestles as supports for apparatus or articles placed thereon Stands for scientific apparatus such as gravitational force meters
    • F16M11/20Undercarriages with or without wheels
    • F16M11/24Undercarriages with or without wheels changeable in height or length of legs, also for transport only, e.g. by means of tubes screwed into each other
    • F16M11/26Undercarriages with or without wheels changeable in height or length of legs, also for transport only, e.g. by means of tubes screwed into each other by telescoping, with or without folding
    • F16M11/32Undercarriages for supports with three or more telescoping legs

Description

May 16, 1950 R. MOONEY INSTRUMENT SUPPORTING STAND 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 30, 1947 INVENTOR. Raga 77207245 fiioozzgy, BY

May 16, 1950 R. MOONEY INSTRUMENT SUPPORTING STAND 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 50. 1947 INVENTOR. WnwzczWw/zqy, BY WM, @24

y 1950 R. MOONEY. 2,508,122

INSTRUMENT SUPPORTING STAND Filed Jan. 30, 1947 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 IN VEN TOR.

Patented May 16, 195

UNITED STATES ATNT OFFICE INSTRUMENT SUPPORTING STAND Raymond Mooney, Kenilworth, Ill., assignor to Quick-Set, Incorporated, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois 14 Claims.

1 This invention relates to an adjustable supporting stand for cameras and like instruments and more particularly to a supporting stand having an instrument supporting platform which may be raised or lowered without the necessity of adjusting the position or length of the supporting legs.

In supporting stands of this character it is desirable to have a maximum amount of flexibility in the possible positioning of the supported instrument with only a minimum amount of adjustment being required. Some flexibility has previously been obtained in connection with the possible positioning of the instrument supporting platform in such supporting stands by utilizing a swivel mounting such as that disclosed in applicants Patent No. 2,143,606, issued January 10, 1939. Such a construction provides for a single :control member adapted to adjust the position of the platform, the latter being pivotally and rotatably mounted in relation to a base member supported by extensible legs.

However, although the platform is so mounted and has some flexibility as to possible positioning, changing the height at which the platform is supported requires a considerable amount of adjustment of the whole supporting stand, since it is usually necessary to adjust all of the extensible legs to raise or lower the platform.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a supporting stand for cameras and the like which not only provides a maximum amount of flexibility in the possible azimuth and angle of elevation of the supported instrument, with a minimum amount of adjustment, but also provides for an equally simple adjustment of the height of the instrument when desired.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a supporting stand of the character described which has control members for adjusting the azimuth, angle of elevation and height of the instrument, disposed adjacent to the supported instrument where they are easily accessible during the actual operation of the instrument.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a supporting stand of the character described in which control members for adjusting the azimuth, angle of elevation and height of the instrument are disposed in relation to each other and to the supporting legs so that they are r readily accessible with a minimum amount of interference from adjacent parts.

Another object of this invention is to provide a supporting stand of the. character described which is capable of beingfolded'compactly when not in use, with all control members locked in a substantially unprotruding position.

Another object is to provide a supporting stand of the character described which has means for making large adjustments in height, as Well as means, operable after the large adjustment has been made, for making smaller adjustments.

Another object is to provide a supporting stand which because of its unique construction may be set up for use, with the supported instrument properly positioned, more rapidly than conventional types of such supporting stands.

Another object is to provide a supporting stand having a longitudinally movable shaft supporting the instrument supporting platform, which shaft be moved to any desired position by a manually operated crank member, and secured in that position by a manually operated brake member.

Another object is to provide a novel braking member for the movable shaft carrying the in- .strument supporting platform which is adapted to lock the shaft against further movement when the instrument has been adjusted to the desired height.

Further objects, features, capabilities and advantages are comprehended by the invention, as will become evident as the description proceeds and from an examination of the accompanying drawings which illustrate one embodiment of the invention and in which simila numerals refer to similar parts-throughout the several views.

in the drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of a tripod embodying the invention.

Figure 2 is an enlarged fragmentary view from above of the base member of the tripod and associated parts.

Figure 3 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevation shown partly in vertical cross-section of the base member, of the tripod and associated parts, taken substantially in the plane of the line 3-3 of Figure 2.

Figure 4 is an enlargedfragmentary side elevation shown partly in vertical cross-section of the base member of the tripod and associated parts taken substantially in the plane of the line of i--l of Figure 2.

above the base member and associated parts of a modified form of tripod embodying the invention.

Figure 8 is an enlarged fragmentary elevation shown partly in vertical cross-section of the base member and associated parts shown in Figure '7, taken substantially along the line 88 of Figure 7.

Referring now to Figure 1, which illustrates a tripod embodying one form of the invention shown in position for use with a camera or like instrument, the extensible legs I are locked in an extended position and spread to form a firm support for the triradial base member l2. As shown in the remaining figures, the legs II] are each pivotally secured to an arm of the base member [2. These arms have a vertical crosssection of inverted U-shape and the upper end of each leg is pivotally secured within the depending sides of one of the arms by the bolt [4. The depending lugs IS on the lower surface of each arm act as stop means to limit the outward swing of the legs [0.

As shown in Figs. 2, 3 and 4, the sleeve I8 is mounted in the central opening in the base member E2, the flange 22 on the sleeve 18 being secured to the base member l2 by the securing means 24. Inserted within the sleeve l8 and supported thereby is the shaft 26. The projecting pin 28 extends inwardly from the inner wall of the sleeve into the longitudinal groove 30 in the shaft 26. The shaft 26 may thus be moved longitudinally, but the pin 28 will prevent the shaft from rotating. The shaft 26 also has the longitudinal rack 32 formed on its outer surface with which the pinion 34 is adapted to cooperate. The pinion 34 is carried by the shaft 36 which is journalled in the projecting arms 38 and 39 formed as extensions of the upper end of the Wall of the sleeve l8 immediately above the flange 22, an opening being formed in the sleeve between said arms. The shaft 36 is so positioned with respect to said opening that the teeth 40 of the pinion 34 are disposed slightly within the inner circumference of the sleeve, and the shaft 26 is so aligned with respect to the sleeve that the teeth of the rack 32 will normally mesh with the teeth 40 of the pinion 34. One end of the shaft 36 extends outwardly from the sleeve 18 at a point substantially midway between two of the arms of the base member i2. The crank member 44 is pivotally secured within an axially aligned transverse slot 46 in the outer end 42 of the shaft 36. The threaded sleeve 48 which is carried by the crank member 44 is adapted to be threaded upon the threaded outer end 42 of the shaft 36 to form a rigid joint between the crank member 44 and the shaft 36 when so desired. When the sleeve 48 is so positioned on the shaft 36 the crank member 44 may be manually rotated by utilizing the rotatable handle member 50. Rotation of the crank member 44 is transmitted to the shaft 36 and the pinion 34, and the rotation of the pinion 34, in turn, will cause the shaft 26 to be moved up or down, depending upon the direction of rotation of the crank member 44.

The shaft 23 has the shoulder 52 adjacent its upper end as shown in Figure 5, and the resilient washer 54 is mounted on the shaft 26 adjacent the shoulder 52. When the shaft 26 is moved sufficiently in a downward direction, the washer 54 will bear against the cap 56 which is adapted to form a protective cover for the top of the sleeve [8 and the pinion 34 and will thus serve to limit the downward movement of the shaft. The opposite end of the shaft 26 is threaded to receive a stop means in the form of a removable collar 58, which when threaded thereon operates to limit the upward movement of the shaft 26 by bearing against the lower end 60 of the sleeve l8 when the shaft is moved sufficiently in an upward direction. Any other suitable form of removable stop means could be utilized, of course.

The platform 62 is pivotally and rotatably secured to the upper end of the shaft 26 in a manner disclosed in applicants Patent No. 2,143,606, issued January 10, 1939. This type of swivel mounting of the platform enables it to be moved to and secured in any desired position by operation of the control member 64 which extends outwardly therefrom. The instrument to be supported is secured to the platform by the set screw 65 which projects through the platform and which may be operated by rotating the milled wheel 68.

As shown in Figure 3, the sleeve l8 has a longitudinal slot 10 formed therein, which is adapted to receive the brake shoe 12. The length of the slot at the outer surface of the sleeve is greater than the length of the slot at the inner surface of the sleeve. This characteristic may readily be obtained by forming the slot with a circular cutter, so that the end walls of the slot are short arcs of a common circle, and the edges of the slot are chords of that common circle.

The length of the brake shoe 12 is greater than the length of the slot at the inner surface of the sleeve, but shorter than the length of the slot at the outer surface of the sleeve. In addition, the ends of the brake shoe adjacent the inner face of the shoe are beveled to permit the shoe to be moved inwardly in the slot 10 a distance sufficient to cause the inner face of the shoe to project inwardly from the inner surface of the sleeve [8 and to bear against the shaft 26, the inner face of the shoe being suitably curved to fit the shaft so that the effective frictional surface of the shoe is increased. The main body of the shoe, however, is too long to permit it to pass through the inner side of the slot 10 so that the shoe cannot fall through the slot if the shaft 26 is withdrawn from the sleeve l 8.

The spring member 14 abuts the brake shoe [2 at both ends and normally has a convex disposition with respect to the adjacent side of the brake shoe. The thumb screw 76 is adapted to be moved inwardly or outwardly in the threaded opening E8 in the base member 12, which opening is so aligned with the slot 10 that the reduced portion 88 of the inner end of the thumb screw is adapted to extend through the centrally located opening 82 in the spring member 14 and to be received by the recess 84 in the outer face of the brake shoe '12. The slot 10 in the sleeve l8 and the opening 18 in the base I 2 are also so disposed that the thumb screw 13 will be centrally located between two of the arms of the base 2 at a point opposite the pinion 34, which permits the operator to have ready access to the thumb screw with one hand while operating the crank member 44 with the other hand.

The thumb screw 16 has the stop pin 1'! secured therein adjacent the shoulder 86. This pin will act as a stop to limit the possible outward movement of the thumb screw so that the various components of the brake mechanism cannot be sufficiently displaced to make the mechanism inoperative.

When the thumb screw 16 is tightened, the

thumb screw "I6 is movedinwardly the pressure exerted by the shoulder 86 on the spring member "I4 will tend to compress the latter, increasing the pressure on the brake shoe I2, which'will in turn exert a gradually increasing pressure on the shaft 26. As the screw I6is movedf-arther inward, the -reducedportion 80 will-move farther into the recess 84in the outer surface of the brake shoe I2 and will eventually bear against the base of this recess. Any further inward movement of the screw I6will then be transmitted directly to the brake shoe 12 without further compressing the spring-member I4.

This arrangement permits only a predetermined amount of compression of the spring member I4, which amount is well below the elastic limit of the spring. The possibility of breaking orper'manently 'deforming'the spring is therefore substantially eliminated. Inaddition, it may be desirable'at times to apply substantially more braking force than can be exerted by the compression of the spring member within the limit described, and the direct transfer of pressure from the end 86 of the thumb screw I6 to the brake shoe I2 may then be utilized.

The braking mechanism may therefore be easily adjusted to exert a moderate amount of pressure over a rather wide range, or a much heavier pressure when desired. This is particularly advantageous since the moderate pressure adjustment may be usedto create sufficient friction to counterbalance the weight of the instrument when it is placed on thesuppor'ting platform. By proper adjustment of the brake mechanism within this moderate pressure range it will be found possible to find apoint where the instrument may be moved up and down by rotating the crank, but will remain in the adjusted position when there is no pressure applied to the crank.

This is a very convenient methodof handling pressure and range of adjustment desirable for maintaining the counterbalance efiect as previously described. Consequently the direct transfer of pressure to the brakeshoe that occurs when the thumb screw is moved inwardly a predetermined distance is designed to produce this larger pressure. By this means it is possible to lock the shaft to support a weight much greater than that of any instrument which might be placed on the supporting platform, and at the same time to eliminate all possibility of side motions of the shaft in relation to the sleeve, whichstability is of primary importance when working with a camera or like instrument.

As mentioned above, the collar 58 or other stop means normally secured to one end of the shaft i 26 maybe removed when desired. The shaft 26 may then be drawn out of the sleeve I8. This feature provides an additional advantage in that the shaft 26 may be inverted from the previously described position and reinserted into the sleeve 1B in the opposite direction so that the platform 62 is at the lower, rather'than the'upper end. The collar 58 may then be threaded back onto what is now the upper end of the shaft 26 and the position of the platform relative to the base 112 may be adjusted in the same manner as previouslydescribed. --The possible positioning of the supported-instrument is thus not restricted by the unextended length of the extensible legs Hi. By such-adjustment the instrument may be supported substantially at the level of the surface supporting the legs, if desired.

As shownin Figure 6, 'when-the*shaft 26 is moved in a downward direction until-the resilient washer-54 abutsthe cap 56, the shaft 36-and the crank member '44 are left in such a position'that the sleeve member la-may be loosened and *drawn back on the'crank member 44, and the latter may then be folded back adjacent the cap 56 between the-platform"62 and the base [2. The control member 64 maythen be adjusted so that it overlies the crank member-44 and extends downwardly substantially parallel to the shaft 26 between the two arms'of the'basemember l2 which do not have the thumb screw I6 or the shaft 36 disposed therebetween. The control member 64 may be secured in' this position since it operates to clamp the platform '62 in any desired position at will. This folding of the crank member and the depressing and locking of the control member 64 provides a convenient method of collapsing the supporting stand whennot in use. As shown in Figure 6, theextensible leg members It] may also be folded inwardly so that they are substantially parallel to the shaft-26.

In order to facilitate returning the pinion and rack to their proper relative position after the shaft'26 has been removed from the sleeve I8, so that the crank44 will be'properly disposed for folding as described, the effective number of teeth in the rac'k 32'may be made awhole multiple of the number of teeth in the pinion 34. Consequently, if, when theshaft 26 is'being inserted in the sleeve l8'fromabove,the crank44is held in the position required for proper folding and the rack 34 is meshed initially with the pinion 32 while the crank is inthat position; then, after moving the shaft to its lowermost position with the required whole number of turns of the crank, the latter will automatically be disposed in the original starting position. The possibility of having to make several attempts-at obtaining the 'proper relative positions between the rack and pinion is therefore substantially eliminated.

:As mentioned above, the thumb screw I6 and the shaft 36 are centrally located between two adjacent pairs of the arms of the base member 12. This enables the supporting stand to be set up'so that the arm of the base member 12 between the thumb screw 16 and the'protruding end 42 of the shaft 36 extends in the direction in which the camera or the like instrument is pointed. The thumb-screw I6 and the crank member are then in a conveniently accessible position during the operation of the supported instrument and the dispositionof the legs '16 is such that they will not interfere with the free movement of the operator.

The stepsin-setting up the supporting stand from the collapsed position in which it will normally be carried will usually be as follows: The operator 'will'release the :control' member 64 from itsdepressed-position and will rotate the thumb screw 76 in the .properdirec'tion to release the brake shoe I2 and provide-for the free movement of the shaft-26. -He will then unfold the crank "member'M and thread the sleeve 48 onto the shaft 36 and rotate the crank member 44 untilth'e shaft 26 has reached a position substantiallyin the midpoint of its possible travel,

The shaft may then be locked in this position by tightening the thumb screw 16 and the legs may be unfolded and extended to approximately the desired height. After placing the supporting stand securely on its legs I0 and securing the camera or other instrument to the platform 62 with the set screw 66, the thumb screw f6 may then again be loosened and the exact height desired attained by rotating the crank member 44 in the appropriate direction. All of this may be done quite rapidly, which is a decided advantage, particularly in photographic work, and any minor corrections which are found to be desirable later on may be easily made by operating the set screw f6 and the crank member 44 simultaneously, without disrupting the adjustment of the other portions of the supporting stand.

It is thus apparent that a rough setting of the height of the supporting stand may be made initially, and subsequent changes within the limits of the length of the shaft 26 may be made without resorting to adjustments in the length of the legs It]. At the same time these later adjustments may be made without the necessity of interrupting the operation of the instrument substantially, since the hands of the operator need be moved only a very short distance to accomplish such adjustments.

Another possible embodiment of the invention is that shown in Figures 7 and 8. The relative position of the two control members is somewhat diiferent in that the pinion 34 is disposed directly above the brake mechanism. The brake shoe 88 is provided with a flat rather than a concave inner face, since the shoe now bears against the flat teeth of the rack 32, rather than the convex surface of the shaft 26. This arrangement permits the elimination of the pin 28 and the groove 30 previously provided to maintain the shaft 26 in proper alignment. The two abutting fiat faces of the brake shoe 88 and the rack 32 now provide for sufficient alignment without any additional means.

In addition, this embodiment has the coil spring 50 in place of the arcuate spring 14, but the function of the coil spring is identical with that of the arcuate spring member. The washer 92 is inserted between the shoulder 86 on the thumb screw 1-6 and the spring 90 to provide an enlarged bearing surface for the outer end of said spring.

This disposition of the two control members in this modification is such that the operation may conveniently stand between the legs between which the thumb screw is disposed and have ready access to both the thumb screw 16 and the crank member 44, th advantages of which have been fully explained above. It is obvious, of course, that the shaft 36 and the pinion 34 could be disposed so that the crank member 44 would extend out from the sleeve 94 in the opposite direction if such an arrangement would be more desirable.

In the foregoing description of the illustrative embodiments of this invention, reference has been made to the sleeves l8 and 94 being located centrally of the base member [2. It is to be understood, however, that the sleeves need not be disposed centrally of the base member, although such central disposition will generally be preferred. In other words, the utility of the invention can be fully realized in certain constructions where the sleeve member is located eccentrically to the base member. Furthermore, the invention contemplates constructions wherein the sleeve l8 or 94 and the base member P2 are made as a single unitary piece rather than as two pieces assembled in the manner here illustrated.

The drawings and the above discussion are not intended to represent the only forms of this invention which are possible, in regard to details of the construction. Changes in form and in the proportion of parts, as well as the substitution of equivalents are contemplated, as circumstances may suggest or render expedient, without departing from the spirit or scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A supporting stand for cameras and the like comprising a base, a plurality of legs adapted to support said base, a support shaft mounted for slidable movement through said base, one end of said support shaft being adapted tosupportaplatform, a longitudinal rack on said support shaft, a pinion carried by a pinion shaft rotatably supported by said base, said pinion being disposed to engage said rack, a crank member pivotally connected to one end of said pinion shaft, means for locking the pivotal connection between said crank member and said pinion shaft at will so that said crank member becomes fixed with respect to said pinion shaft and is adapted to rotate said pinion for causing said support shaft to move longitudinally with respect to said base, stop means establishing at least one limit of longitudinal movement of said support shaft, the length of said rack and the diameter of said pinion being such that said pinion and said rack may be initially brought into an engaging relationship of such a character that when said support shaft is moved so that said end of said support shaft adapted to support a platform is brought into close relation to said base and further movement in that direction is prevented by said stop means, said crank member will be disposed so that when said locking means is released from said pivotal connection between said crank member and said pinion shaft and said crank member is pivoted toward said upper end of said support shaft, said crank member will fold adjacent said support shaft in close association with said base, so that it is substantially within the general outline of that end of said supporting stand, and adjustable brake means adapted to be caused to exert frictional pressure of selected amounts on said support shaft at will.

2. A supporting stand for cameras and the like comprising a multiradial base, a supporting leg pivotally secured to each arm of said base, a support shaft adapted to be inserted in said base for slidable movement through said base, one end of said support shaft being adapted to support a platform, a longitudinal rack on said support shaft, a pinion carried by a pinion shaft rotatably supported by said base, said pinion being disposed to engage said rack, a crank member pivotally connected to one end of said pinion shaft, means for locking the pivotal connection between said crank member and said pinion shaft at will so that said crank member becomes fixed with respect to said pinion shaft and is adapted to rotate said pinion for causing said support shaft to move longitudinally with respect to said base, stop means establishing at least one limit of Iongitudinal movement of said support shaft, the length of said rack and the diameter of said rack and the diameter of said pinion being such that said pinion and said rack may be initially brought into an engaging relationship of such a charactor that when said support shaft is moved so that said end on said support shaft supporting said platform is brought into close relation to said base and further movement in that direction is prevented by said'stop means, said crank member will be disposed so that when said looking means is released from said pivotal connection between said crank member and saidpinion shaft, and said'crank member is pivoted toward said end of said support shaft, said crank member will foldadjacent to said support shaft in close association with saidbase, so that it is substantially within the general outline of that end of said supporting stand, said pinion shaft being 50 disposed in relation to said base that the end of saidpinion shaft to which said crank member is pivotally attached extends outwardly from said base in a vertical plane disposed between one pair of said arms of saidbase, adjustable brake means adapted to be caused to exert frictional pressure of selected amounts on said support shaft at will against longitudinal movement, and an operating member adapted to control the operation of said brake means, said brake means and said operating member being so disposed in relation to said base that said operating member extends outwardly from said base in a vertical plane disposed between a second pair of said arms of said base.

3. A supporting stand for cameras and the like comprising a multiradial base, a supporting leg pivotally secured to each arm of said base, a support shaft adapted to be inserted for sliding movement through said base, a platform mounted-on one end of said support shaft, a handle member extending from said platform and adapted to control the position of said platform relative'to said support shaft, a longitudinal rack on said support shaft, a pinion carried by a pinion shaft rotatably supported by said base, said pinion being disposed to engage said rack, a crank memberpivotally connected to one end of said pinion shaft, means for locking the pivotal connection betweensaid crank member and said pinion shaft at will so that said crank member becomes fixed with respect to said pinion shaft and is adapted to rotate said pinion for causing said support shaft to move longitudinally with respect to'said base, stop'means establishing at least one limit of longitudinal movement of said support shaft, length of said rack and the diameter of said pinion being such that said pinion and said rack may be initially'brought into an engaging relationship of such a character that when said support shaft is moved so that said platform is brought into close relation-to said base and further movement in that direction is prevented by said stop means, said crank member will be disposed so that when said locking means is re leased from saidpivotal connection between said crank member and said pinion shaft, and said crankmember is pivoted toward said endof said support shaft, said crank member will fold adjacent to said support shaft in close association with said base, so that it is substantially within the general outline of that end of said supporting stand, said handle member and said platform being adaptedto be secured in a position such that said handle member overlies said crank member when said crank member is so folded adjacent to saidsupportshaft, and'adjustable brake means adapted'to'be'caused to'exert frictional pressure of selected'amounts on saidsupport shaft at will.

4. Ina supporting stand for cameras-and? the like, having a longitudinally adjustable shaft adapted" to carry a platform, brake means comprising a-brake-shoe adapted tobe moved at will into abutting relation to said shaft, an arcuate spring member abutting saidbrake-shoe at both ends, and normally bowing out fromsaid brakeshoe, anoperating member having areducedend portion-adapted to extend through a-central opening in. said spring member and axially aligned with a recess inthe face of said brake-shoe abutted by'said spring member, and. a shoulder on said operating member between said reduced end and the main body of said operating member, said shoulder being of greater diameter than said opening in said spring member and therefore being adapted to bear against said spring member when said reduced end is inserted through said opening, the length of said reducedend being greater. than the depth of said recess so that said springimember ma be compressed only a predetermined amount before said reduced end-of said operating member abuts the base of said recess.

5. In a supporting stand for cameras and the like, having a longitudinally adjustable shaft adapted to carry a platform, brake means comprising abrake-shoe adapted to be moved at will into-abutting relation to said shaft, a spring. member abutting said brake-shoe, an operating member adapted to be moved to compress said spring member against said shoe, stop means carried by said operating member limiting its outward movement, areduced end portion'on said operating member axially aligned with and adapted'to enter into a recess in the face of said shoe abutted by said spring member, the length of said reduced end being greater than the depth ofsaid recess so that said reduced end will abut thebase of said recess when said operating member is moved to compress said spring member a predetermined amount which amount is withinithe elastic limits of said spring.

6. In a supporting stand-for cameras and the like, having a longitudinally adjustable shaft adapted to carry a platform, brake means comprising a brake-shoe adapted to be moved at will into abutting relation to said shaft, a coiled spring member abutting said brake-shoe, an operating member having a reduced end portion adapted to extend through said coiled spring and axially aligned with a recess in the face of said brakeshoe abutted by said coiled spring, the length of said reduced end being greater than the depth of said recess, a bushing carried by said reduced end of said operating member and'abutting the outer end of said coiled spring, inward movement of said operating member causing said spring to be compressed, and said reduced end of said operating member to abut the base of said recess after said spring is compressed a predetermined amount which amount is within the elastic limits of said spring.

7. A supporting stand for cameras and the like comprising a base, a plurality of legs adapted to support said base, a support shaft mounted-for slidable movement through an opening insaid base, a platform on one end of said shaft, a 1ongitudinal rack on said support shaft, a pinion shaft'rotatably supported by said base, a pinion carried by'saidpinion shaft, said pinion and said pinion shaft being normally disposed so that said pinion engages said rack, a crank member pivotally connected to one end of said pinionshaft, means for locking the pivotal connection between said crank member and said pinion shaft at will so that said crank member becomes fixed with respect to said pinion shaft and when moved is adapted to rotate sa-id'pinion to cause-said-support shaft to move longitudinally with respect to said base, stop means establishing at least one limit of longitudinal movement of said support shaft, said pinion and said rack being disengageable but capable of being reengaged so as to cause said crank member to return to a selected position of adjustment when said support shaft is moved so that said platform is brought into close relation to said base and further movement in that direction is prevented by said stop means, said selected position of adjustment of said crank member being such that when said locking means is released from said pivotal connection between said crank member and said pinion shaft, and said crank member is pivoted toward said support shaft, said crank member will be disposed in close association with said base and said platform so that it is disposed substantially within the general outline of that end of said supporting stand and adjustable brake means adapted to be caused to exert frictional pressure of selected amounts on said support shaft at will- 8. A supporting stand for cameras and the like comprising a base, a plurality of legs adapted to support said base, a support shaft mounted for sliding movement in said base, one end of said support shaft being adapted to support a platform, a longitudinal rack on said support shaft, a pinion carried by a pinion shaft journaled in said sleeve, said pinion being disposed to engage said rack, a crank member pivotally connected to one end of the pinion shaft, means for locking the pivotal connection between said crank member and said pinion shaft at will so that said crank member becomes fixed with respect to said pinion shaft and is adapted to rotate said pinion for causing said support shaft to move longitudinally with respect to said base, a brake member adapted to bear against said support shaft, means for urging said brake member toward said support shaft, and resilient compressible means interposed between said brake member and said second named means, so that pressure of finely selected amounts may be exerted on said support shaft by said brake member.

9. A supporting stand for cameras and the like comprising a base, a plurality of legs adapted to support said base, a support shaft mounted for sliding movement in said base, one end of said support shaft being adapted to support a platform, a longitudinal rack on said support shaft,

a pinion carried by a pinion shaft journaled in said sleeve, said pinion being disposed to engage said rack, a crank member pivotally connected to one end of the pinion shaft, means for locking the pivotal connection between said crank member and said pinion shaft at will so that said crank member becomes fixed with respect to said pinion shaft and is adapted to rotate said pinion for causing said support shaft to move longitudinally with respect to said base, a brake member adapted to bear against said support shaft, means for urging said brake member toward said support shaft, and resilient compressible means interposed between said brake member and said first named means, said resilient means being sufficiently compressible to allow said first named means to move into abutment with said brake member when sufficient pressure is applied thereto by said first named means.

10. A supporting stand for cameras and the like comprising a base, a plurality of legs adapted to support said base, a support shaft mounted for sliding movement in said base, one end of said support shaft being adapted to support a platform, a longitudinal rack on said support shaft, a pinion carried by a pinion shaft journaled in said base, said pinion being disposed to engage said rack, a crank member pivotally connected to one end of the pinion shaft, means for locking the pivotal connection between said crank member and said pinion shaft at will so that said crank member becomes fixed with respect to said pinion shaft and is adapted to rotate said pinion for causing said support shaft to move longitudinally with respect to said base, and a brake member having a concave surface thereon normally disposed adjacent the smooth, convex surface of said support shaft but adapted to be moved into abutment with said smooth surface of said support shaft at will and to apply adjustable amounts of pressure thereto.

11. A supporting stand for cameras and the like comprising a base, a plurality of legs adapted to support said base, a support shaft mounted for sliding movement through said base, one end of said support shaft being adapted to support a platform, a longitudinal rack on said support shaft, a pinion rotatably supported by said base in cooperative engagement with said rack, crank means for rotating said pinion to cause said support shaft to move longitudinally with respect to said base, a brake member having a concave surface thereon normally disposed adjacent the smooth, convex surface of said support shaft, means for moving the concave surface of said brake member into abutment with said smooth surface of said support shaft at will, and a resilient, compressible member interposed between said brake member and said last named means, so that pressure of finely selected amounts may be exerted on said support shaft by said brake member.

12. A supporting stand for cameras and the like comprising a base, a plurality of legs adapted to support said base, a support shaft mounted for sliding movement through said base, one end of said support shaft being adapted to support a platform, a longitudinal rack on said support shaft, a pinion rotatably supported by said base in cooperative engagement with said rack, crank means for rotating said pinion to cause said support shaft to move longitudinally with respect to said base, a brake member having a concave surface thereon normally disposed adjacent the smooth, convex surface of said support shaft, means for moving the concave surface of said brake member into abutment with said smooth surface of said support shaft at will, and a resilient, compressible member interposed between said brake member and said last named means, said resilient member being sufiiciently compressible to allow said first named means to move into abutment with said brake member when sufficient pressure is applied thereto by said first named means.

13. A supporting stand for cameras and the like comprising a base, a plurality of legs adapted to support said base, a support shaft mounted for slidable movement through an opening in said base, a platform on one end of said support shaft, a longitudinal rack on said support shaft, a pinion shaft rotatably supported by said base, a pinion carried by said pinion shaft, said pinion and said pinion shaft being normally disposed so that said pinion engages said rack, a crank member pivotally connected to one end of said pinion shaft, means for locking the pivotal connection between said crank member and said pinion shaft at will so that said crank member becomes fixed with respect to said pinion shaft and when moved is adapted to rotate said pinion to cause said support shaft to move longitudinally with respect to said base, stop means establishing at least one limit of longitudinal movement of said support shaft, said pinion and said rack being disengageable but capable of being ire-en aged so as to cause said crank member to return to a selected position of adjustment when said support shaft is moved so that said platform, is brought into close relation to said base and further movement in that direction is prevented by said stop means, said selected position of adjustment of said crank member being such that when said locking means is released from said pivotal connection between said crank member and said pinion shaft, and said crank member is pivoted toward said support shaft, said crank member will be disposed in close association with said base and said platform so that it is disposed substantially within the general outline of that end of said supporting stand, a brake member having a concave surface thereon normally disposed adjacent the smooth, convex surface of said support shaft but adapted to be moved into abutment with said smooth surface of said support shaft at will and to apply adjustable amounts of pressure thereto.

14. A supporting stand for cameras and the like comprising a base, a plurality of legs adapted to support said base, a support shaft mounted for sliding movement in said base, one end of said support shaft being adapted to support a platform, a longitudinal rack on said support shaft, a pinion shaft rotatably supported by said base, a pinion carried by said pinion shaft normally disposed in engagement with said rack, a crank member pivotally connected to said pinion 14 shaft, means for releasably locking the pivotal connection between said crank member and said pinion shaft at will so that said crank member becomes fixed with respect to said pinion shaft and said pinion may be rotated to thereby cause,v said support shaft to move longitudinally with respect to said base, said crank member and said pinion shaft being capable of being positioned so that said crank member may be pivoted toward said support shaft when said locking means is released and thus be disposed in close association with said base and said platform in unprotruding relation to and substantially Within the general outline of that end of said supporting stand, and adjustable brake means adapted to be caused to exert frictional pressure of selected amounts on said shaft at will.

RAYMOND MOONEY.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Certificate of Correction Patent No. 2,508,122 May 16, 1950 RAYMOND MOONEY It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows:

Column 9, line 18, strike out the words against longitudinal movement;

and that the said Letters Patent should be read as corrected above, so that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Ofifice.

Signed and sealed-this 17th day of October, A. D. 1950.

[SEAL] THOMAS F. MURPHY,

Assistant Commissioner of Patents.

US725251A 1947-01-30 1947-01-30 Instrument supporting stand Expired - Lifetime US2508122A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US725251A US2508122A (en) 1947-01-30 1947-01-30 Instrument supporting stand

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US725251A US2508122A (en) 1947-01-30 1947-01-30 Instrument supporting stand

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2508122A true US2508122A (en) 1950-05-16

Family

ID=24913771

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US725251A Expired - Lifetime US2508122A (en) 1947-01-30 1947-01-30 Instrument supporting stand

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2508122A (en)

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2670634A (en) * 1951-08-13 1954-03-02 Robert J Pagliuso Automatic crank latch
US2883875A (en) * 1954-11-12 1959-04-28 Donald E Davidson Elevator for tripod
US3012350A (en) * 1959-02-02 1961-12-12 Frank E Wold Bench rest pedestal
US3207206A (en) * 1962-02-26 1965-09-21 Ralph E Braddon Projection screens
US3208711A (en) * 1963-06-03 1965-09-28 Hollywood Products Corp Extension means for tripods
US3703046A (en) * 1970-06-03 1972-11-21 Antonio C Barone Micro adjustable shooters' tripod
US5058446A (en) * 1989-11-27 1991-10-22 Asanuma & Company Ltd. Elevation mechanism of tripod
US20070205341A1 (en) * 2006-03-03 2007-09-06 Ting-Hui Chih Rotatable apparatus
US20120141221A1 (en) * 2010-12-02 2012-06-07 Wu Kuo-Shen Stroke controller for a key duplicator
US20130086835A1 (en) * 2011-10-10 2013-04-11 Steven W. Minneman Weapon rest
US20130270405A1 (en) * 2012-04-13 2013-10-17 Seco Manufacturing Company, Inc. Portable support having extendable rod
US20140231601A1 (en) * 2013-02-20 2014-08-21 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Tripod with adjustable leg
USD766879S1 (en) * 2014-12-30 2016-09-20 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Stand for speaker
US10575635B1 (en) * 2018-11-16 2020-03-03 Jaime Ward Portable garment caddy

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US228518A (en) * 1880-06-08 Portable and adjustable staging
US295519A (en) * 1884-03-25 John p
US498703A (en) * 1893-05-30 Gabriel a
US1286161A (en) * 1917-11-28 1918-11-26 Albert Ferdenand Wagner Jack-handle.
US1573496A (en) * 1925-04-11 1926-02-16 Ansco Photoproducts Inc Tripod
US1708761A (en) * 1927-08-23 1929-04-09 Horbath Michael Crossbar setter
FR668214A (en) * 1928-12-29 1929-10-29 Photographer Tripod

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US228518A (en) * 1880-06-08 Portable and adjustable staging
US295519A (en) * 1884-03-25 John p
US498703A (en) * 1893-05-30 Gabriel a
US1286161A (en) * 1917-11-28 1918-11-26 Albert Ferdenand Wagner Jack-handle.
US1573496A (en) * 1925-04-11 1926-02-16 Ansco Photoproducts Inc Tripod
US1708761A (en) * 1927-08-23 1929-04-09 Horbath Michael Crossbar setter
FR668214A (en) * 1928-12-29 1929-10-29 Photographer Tripod

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2670634A (en) * 1951-08-13 1954-03-02 Robert J Pagliuso Automatic crank latch
US2883875A (en) * 1954-11-12 1959-04-28 Donald E Davidson Elevator for tripod
US3012350A (en) * 1959-02-02 1961-12-12 Frank E Wold Bench rest pedestal
US3207206A (en) * 1962-02-26 1965-09-21 Ralph E Braddon Projection screens
US3208711A (en) * 1963-06-03 1965-09-28 Hollywood Products Corp Extension means for tripods
US3703046A (en) * 1970-06-03 1972-11-21 Antonio C Barone Micro adjustable shooters' tripod
US5058446A (en) * 1989-11-27 1991-10-22 Asanuma & Company Ltd. Elevation mechanism of tripod
US20070205341A1 (en) * 2006-03-03 2007-09-06 Ting-Hui Chih Rotatable apparatus
US9004828B2 (en) * 2010-12-02 2015-04-14 Kuo-shen Wu Stroke controller for a key duplicator
US20120141221A1 (en) * 2010-12-02 2012-06-07 Wu Kuo-Shen Stroke controller for a key duplicator
US20130086835A1 (en) * 2011-10-10 2013-04-11 Steven W. Minneman Weapon rest
US20130270405A1 (en) * 2012-04-13 2013-10-17 Seco Manufacturing Company, Inc. Portable support having extendable rod
US9027895B2 (en) * 2012-04-13 2015-05-12 Seco Manufacturing Company, Inc. Portable support having extendable rod
US20140231601A1 (en) * 2013-02-20 2014-08-21 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Tripod with adjustable leg
US9091394B2 (en) * 2013-02-20 2015-07-28 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Tripod with adjustable leg
USD766879S1 (en) * 2014-12-30 2016-09-20 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Stand for speaker
US10575635B1 (en) * 2018-11-16 2020-03-03 Jaime Ward Portable garment caddy

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4062372A (en) Articulated walking cane
US3396928A (en) Leg mounting
US4523256A (en) Variable position light stand
US4113221A (en) Locking device
US3870264A (en) Stand
US2826107A (en) Ratcheting torque-limiting wrench
US3804355A (en) Collapsible supporting stand
US2763456A (en) Bipod camera support
US2947556A (en) Vertically adjustable standard for music racks
US3445082A (en) Bipod gunmount
US3377893A (en) Wrench having pivoted jaws adjustable by a lockable exterior camming sleeve
US3632073A (en) Tripod
US2603134A (en) Camera support
US4215839A (en) Tripod
US2090550A (en) Adjustable lock
US2388778A (en) Crutch
US4453204A (en) Support assembly for lamp swing arm
US2751271A (en) Combined box and easel for painting in the open country
US2016132A (en) Adjustable standard for stools
US2794612A (en) Portable camera stand
US6688565B1 (en) Multi-leg stand
US1726372A (en) Adjustable chair
US6283484B1 (en) Braking device
US2162181A (en) Supporting strut
US2111368A (en) Tilting camera support