US2459121A - Acoustical tile - Google Patents

Acoustical tile Download PDF

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Publication number
US2459121A
US2459121A US502728A US50272843A US2459121A US 2459121 A US2459121 A US 2459121A US 502728 A US502728 A US 502728A US 50272843 A US50272843 A US 50272843A US 2459121 A US2459121 A US 2459121A
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United States
Prior art keywords
acoustical
surface
tile
base
grooves
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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US502728A
Inventor
Grant S Willey
Orecutt W Frost
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United States Gypsum Co
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United States Gypsum Co
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Publication date
Application filed by United States Gypsum Co filed Critical United States Gypsum Co
Priority to US502728A priority Critical patent/US2459121A/en
Priority claimed from US6371848 external-priority patent/US2581993A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2459121A publication Critical patent/US2459121A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/62Insulation or other protection; Elements or use of specified material therefor
    • E04B1/74Heat, sound or noise insulation, absorption, or reflection . Other building methods affording favourable thermal or acoustical conditions, e.g. accumulating of heat within walls
    • E04B1/82Heat, sound or noise insulation, absorption, or reflection . Other building methods affording favourable thermal or acoustical conditions, e.g. accumulating of heat within walls specifically with respect to sound only
    • E04B1/84Sound-absorbing elements
    • E04B1/86Sound-absorbing elements slab-shaped
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/62Insulation or other protection; Elements or use of specified material therefor
    • E04B1/74Heat, sound or noise insulation, absorption, or reflection . Other building methods affording favourable thermal or acoustical conditions, e.g. accumulating of heat within walls
    • E04B1/82Heat, sound or noise insulation, absorption, or reflection . Other building methods affording favourable thermal or acoustical conditions, e.g. accumulating of heat within walls specifically with respect to sound only
    • E04B1/84Sound-absorbing elements
    • E04B2001/8457Solid slabs or blocks
    • E04B2001/8476Solid slabs or blocks with acoustical cavities, with or without acoustical filling
    • E04B2001/848Solid slabs or blocks with acoustical cavities, with or without acoustical filling the cavities opening onto the face of the element
    • E04B2001/849Groove or slot type openings

Description

'Jam l1, 1949. s. s.w1LLEY E'TAL, 2,459,121

AVCOUSTCAL TILE Fnedvsept. 17, 194s WA TTQRNEY Patented Jan. 11, 1949 y'Ao/ous'rrcnr. TILE g t Grant S. WilleyyChicago, and 'Orcutt W.r Frost, Highland Park, Ill., assignors to United Statesv Gypsum Company, Chicago, Ill., 'a'rcorporation of Illinois Apphcatihseptember 17, 194s, serial No. 502,728

yfromme. (c1. 181-33) This invention pertainsv toan acoustical construction. More particularly it is directed to a fibrous acoustical base having a' decorative coating receptive surface and theprocess of making,

the same.

Though the principles underlying this inven`y i tion are adapted to the preferred type ofan acoustical base comprising brillated ligno 'cellulosic materials felted in a sheet form in accordance with conventional methods of formation, it is not this nature though it is somewhat impervious to the intention to limit the same to the preferred embodiment, since obviously, with slightchanges and modification, the principles underlying' this invention canbe adapted with equalfacility to other inorganic and Organic `fibrous acoustical f bases.

For a more complete understanding of the principles underlying this invention reference, should be had to the accompanying rdrawings forming a part hereof, in which Figure 1 is a perspectiveview of an acoustical tile madey in accordance with the principles of this invention.

Figure 2 is a transversesection taken along line 2--2 of Figure 1 showing as one preferred embodiment' the depth to which thegrrooyesare cutin the acoustical tile bOdy.` t

Figure 3 is taken along lines 343 of Figure 1, partly broken away to show a section throughone of the grooves and indicate but one type ofzperiphery or arc impressed within the acoustical base. f

Figure 4 shows in a partly 4broken away section another type'of arc of a semicircular nature,l that may be also impressed'dependingon other relative conditions inherently present inthe acoustical base.

Figure 5 illustrates in a transverse sectionfanother modification of this invention.

An acoustical base I0, preferably comprising feltejd ligno cellulose fibrous materials such as used in conventional insulation board is treated to a simultaneous application of heat and pressure to develop in the surface thereof an autogeneously formed thermo plastic resin that not only binds the fibrous material on the surface I2 to form a more dense, and decorative medium receptive plane but also maintains the contiguous area I2a at a greater density in comparison with interior I 2b. The development and formation of sound,` it is, however, more protective, resistant to scuffin'gand denting, and moreeasily adapted to use under erection conditions.

To form this surface yit is desirable that the ligno cellulosic blanks be placed in contact with a heated surface maintained under very slight pressure toprevent undue compression in the interior` I2b of the acoustical base Il).l If great pressure is applied the interior I2b has a tendency to densify asthe heat from the surface penetrates the depth of the acoustical base III.y In practice it was found desirable to use a temperature of about 485 F. to lcatalyse and aid in the formation of the autogeneously'created ligno cellulosic resins on the surface I2, and the surface contiguously underlying area I2a. The length of heat'and pressure application will vary with the nature of the base. Though kit is desirable to pre-dry the acoustical blanks, it is not essential since the open, cellular structure permits the ready escape 4 of, gases and water generated during the autogeneous Yformation of the thermo plastic ligno i capable of absorbing sound. In any event it is desirable that the depth of the cut or groove is be at least one half of the thickness of ther acousf tical base I0. v

- Inv practice the parallel grooves are formed in the acoustical base I0, and extend approximately this autogeneously created thermo plastic ligno one third of the Way across the face l2 of the acoustical base I Il. At this point 24, another series I8a, b, c, d, etc. set off `or staggered in relationship to the previous series Ilia, b, c, d, etc. is started across anotherapproximate third of the way of the face to the point 26. The ends of the series I8, a, b, c, d, etc. is slightly overlapped but not joined by ends of the series I6a, b, c,.d, etc. at point 2,4,

and by the lends of the series 20, a, b, c, d, etc. at point 26. This type of construction provides for more acoustical base material between the grooves I'B and I8 and prevents a transverse planeI of rcleavage or weakness along successive grooves at this junction. Obviously other patterns employp ing these principles can also be made.

To aid and reinforce this junction well as for other reasons given below, the end sides 30 of the grooves I6 near the points 24 and 26, as

well as at the edges of the acoustical base I0,

gradually slope I2 in a form of an arc to the bottom 28 of the groove. The substantially elliptical type arc of the groove (as shown in Figure 3) is obtained by impressing the cutting means (not shown) into the interior |2b and then moving the cutting means longitudinally the desired distance. This particular type of groove construction is particularly useful in slotting acoustical bases having a thickness of less than one inch.

Obviously another type is the circular arc as shown in Figure 4. lf relatively small diameter cutting saws are used, the proper depth can be readily reached without cutting longitudinally.

To finish the tile a bevel lil can be formed on all edges either during the pressing operations or at subsequent stages of operation before the application of coating compositions to the formed surface.

A slot 22 is also formed in at least two of the sides of the acoustical base l0 to provide a means for insertion of a bridgeclip (not shown) or other suitable retaining means, to attach the tile mechanically to the surface, such as a wall or a ceiling. In practice, it frequently is desirable to use an adhesive backing on the tile, which is then erected and retained in place by the adhesive.

The slope 32 curves gradually to the bottom 28 of the groove. Though the interior IZb of the acoustical base i0, is generally darker in color, it is, however, not noticeable at the distance normally encountered between the eyes and the ceiling or wall upon which it is installed. In the course of applying the paint, there is a tendency for the excess amount to gradually flow down the slope and come to the surface l2 at points 24 and 2S. It should be noted that an acoustical tile when in use as for instance on a ceiling is inverted and the slots or grooves I6 face the source of sound. Under those conditions, as well as when it is used on the wall the excess of the coating composition will obviously under influence of gravity flow down the slope 32 to the surface i2. This flow not only decorates the visible part of the groove and thereby blending it into the foreground to decrease its visibility, but also prevents excessive accumulation of the coating composition within the groove itself and thereby destroy or impair its sound absorbing characteristics.

At times it may be desirable to increase still further the sound absorption and decrease the effect of the depth shadow of the groove. This can be readily accomplished by slotting the grooves i6, diagonally from the surface I2, into the body I2b as shown in Figure 5. Of course, when this particular modification is erected on the wall it is desirable that the grooves point downwardly to eliminate collection of dirt and facilitate future redecoration.

In making acoustical tile according to the principles underlying this invention, the surface of a fibrous base such as ligno cellulose felted sheets is simultaneously treated with heat and pressure under conditions mentioned previously. In practice it is preferred to mold simultaneously the bevel Il while heat and pressure are applied to the surface. This process provides a smooth, suitable coating receptive surface. In the preferred mode of operation, the whole series of grooves are simultaneously cut by means of the desired number of high speed saws. Each series ofsaws is mounted on a common shaft or spindle which in turn is driven by a high speed electric motor. The slotted or grooved acustica] tile is then decorated in the customary manner, allowed to dry; and packaged for further disposition.

Though the above description describes in considerable detail the outstanding features and characteristics of the principles underlying this invention, it is obvious that many adaptations, extensions, modifications and uses can readily be discerned by a. person skilled in this art, and it is not intended to be limited to the specic embodiments described herein but only by the spirit of principles of this invention as indicated in the attached clams.

It is claimed:

1. A sound absorbent consisting essentially of interlaced fibrillated lignocellusic fibers formed into a rigid cellular porous mat, the said mat having on one surface therein a series of discontinuous, parallel slots, the said slots sloping within the body of said mat to within the other surface thereof.

2. The product of claim 1 wherein the said slots are substantially circular.

3. The product of claim 1 wherein the said slots are elliptical.

4. The product of claim 1 wherein the said grooves have a depth of not less than one-half of the thickness of said base.

GRANT S. WILLEY. ORCUI'I W. FROST.

REFERENCES CITED LThe following references are of record in the file of thispatent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

US502728A 1943-09-17 1943-09-17 Acoustical tile Expired - Lifetime US2459121A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

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US502728A US2459121A (en) 1943-09-17 1943-09-17 Acoustical tile
US6371848 US2581993A (en) 1943-09-17 1948-12-06 Process of making acoustical tile

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Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2567070A (en) * 1945-12-28 1951-09-04 Hjartsater Jacob Johansson Sound absorbing fibrous material for covering the walls or ceilings of rooms
US2671522A (en) * 1950-03-31 1954-03-09 Bourgeois Charles Sound-absorbing panel
DE960500C (en) * 1954-12-25 1957-03-21 Gruenzweig & Hartmann Plate with loose microstructures, in particular sound-absorbing plate
US2944622A (en) * 1957-01-28 1960-07-12 Fenestra Inc Sound absorbing structure
US3013626A (en) * 1957-06-18 1961-12-19 Armstrong Cork Co Acoustical material
US3022607A (en) * 1953-12-01 1962-02-27 Ohio Commw Eng Co Sound deadening tile
US3074505A (en) * 1959-11-03 1963-01-22 Kurt W Schulz Acoustical tile or the like and its manufacture
US3077945A (en) * 1959-08-07 1963-02-19 Wood Conversion Co Production of acoustic tile material and tile therefrom
US3087576A (en) * 1958-06-20 1963-04-30 Pittsburgh Corning Corp Sound absorbers
US3137364A (en) * 1958-10-06 1964-06-16 Wood Conversion Co Manufacture of perforated acoustic bodies
US3357847A (en) * 1963-12-13 1967-12-12 Flintkote Co Method of treating the outer surface of softboard products
US4548010A (en) * 1981-06-25 1985-10-22 Decoustics Limited Concealed suspended ceiling system
US20080000717A1 (en) * 2006-06-29 2008-01-03 Patrick William P Anechoic visco-thermal liner
US20080029336A1 (en) * 2006-06-10 2008-02-07 Patrick Sigler Acoustic panel
US20080289901A1 (en) * 2007-03-27 2008-11-27 Coury Charles C Acoustic panel
US20110168484A1 (en) * 2010-01-08 2011-07-14 Lenz Richard L Systems and methods for providing an asymmetric cellular acoustic diffuser
US20120018247A1 (en) * 2010-07-20 2012-01-26 Hendrik David Gideonse Wedge-shaped acoustic diffuser and method of installation
US20130199872A1 (en) * 2010-10-07 2013-08-08 Lg Hausys, Ltd. Gypsum panel having outstanding sound-absorbing properties and a production method therefor
US8640427B2 (en) 2012-03-30 2014-02-04 Door Components, Inc. Sound insulating door
US20150047921A1 (en) * 2013-08-17 2015-02-19 Engineering & Scientific Innovations, Inc. Fluid flow noise mitigation structure and method
US20160379616A1 (en) * 2014-02-11 2016-12-29 Leena Rose Wilson Acoustic absorber and use of said type of acoustic absorber

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1483365A (en) * 1918-06-27 1924-02-12 Mazer Jacob Sound-absorbing method and material
US1628090A (en) * 1924-09-26 1927-05-10 Weiss Johannes Sound-insulating plate, sheet, or slab
US1751249A (en) * 1927-06-23 1930-03-18 Maurice C Rosenblatt Acoustic treatment
US1929117A (en) * 1932-06-23 1933-10-03 Charles P Leyner Method of finishing surfaces of materials composed in part of vegetable fibers
US2029441A (en) * 1933-12-12 1936-02-04 Johns Manville Acoustical structure
US2160638A (en) * 1937-08-19 1939-05-30 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Sound-absorbing unit
US2301538A (en) * 1938-06-04 1942-11-10 Waldorf Paper Prod Co Sound insulating construction
US2337525A (en) * 1941-04-21 1943-12-21 Gen Tire & Rubber Co Sound deadener
US2410413A (en) * 1943-02-10 1946-11-05 Albert B Hurley Acoustic tile
US2413568A (en) * 1941-07-17 1946-12-31 Albert B Hurley Vibratile board for acoustic treatment

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1483365A (en) * 1918-06-27 1924-02-12 Mazer Jacob Sound-absorbing method and material
US1628090A (en) * 1924-09-26 1927-05-10 Weiss Johannes Sound-insulating plate, sheet, or slab
US1751249A (en) * 1927-06-23 1930-03-18 Maurice C Rosenblatt Acoustic treatment
US1929117A (en) * 1932-06-23 1933-10-03 Charles P Leyner Method of finishing surfaces of materials composed in part of vegetable fibers
US2029441A (en) * 1933-12-12 1936-02-04 Johns Manville Acoustical structure
US2160638A (en) * 1937-08-19 1939-05-30 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Sound-absorbing unit
US2301538A (en) * 1938-06-04 1942-11-10 Waldorf Paper Prod Co Sound insulating construction
US2337525A (en) * 1941-04-21 1943-12-21 Gen Tire & Rubber Co Sound deadener
US2413568A (en) * 1941-07-17 1946-12-31 Albert B Hurley Vibratile board for acoustic treatment
US2410413A (en) * 1943-02-10 1946-11-05 Albert B Hurley Acoustic tile

Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2567070A (en) * 1945-12-28 1951-09-04 Hjartsater Jacob Johansson Sound absorbing fibrous material for covering the walls or ceilings of rooms
US2671522A (en) * 1950-03-31 1954-03-09 Bourgeois Charles Sound-absorbing panel
US3022607A (en) * 1953-12-01 1962-02-27 Ohio Commw Eng Co Sound deadening tile
DE960500C (en) * 1954-12-25 1957-03-21 Gruenzweig & Hartmann Plate with loose microstructures, in particular sound-absorbing plate
US2944622A (en) * 1957-01-28 1960-07-12 Fenestra Inc Sound absorbing structure
US3013626A (en) * 1957-06-18 1961-12-19 Armstrong Cork Co Acoustical material
US3013937A (en) * 1957-06-18 1961-12-19 Armstrong Cork Co Method of making acoustical material
US3087576A (en) * 1958-06-20 1963-04-30 Pittsburgh Corning Corp Sound absorbers
US3137364A (en) * 1958-10-06 1964-06-16 Wood Conversion Co Manufacture of perforated acoustic bodies
US3077945A (en) * 1959-08-07 1963-02-19 Wood Conversion Co Production of acoustic tile material and tile therefrom
US3074505A (en) * 1959-11-03 1963-01-22 Kurt W Schulz Acoustical tile or the like and its manufacture
US3357847A (en) * 1963-12-13 1967-12-12 Flintkote Co Method of treating the outer surface of softboard products
US4548010A (en) * 1981-06-25 1985-10-22 Decoustics Limited Concealed suspended ceiling system
US20080029336A1 (en) * 2006-06-10 2008-02-07 Patrick Sigler Acoustic panel
US20080000717A1 (en) * 2006-06-29 2008-01-03 Patrick William P Anechoic visco-thermal liner
US7469770B2 (en) * 2006-06-29 2008-12-30 United Technologies Corporation Anechoic visco-thermal liner
US7721847B2 (en) * 2007-03-27 2010-05-25 9 Wood, Inc. Acoustic panel
US20080289901A1 (en) * 2007-03-27 2008-11-27 Coury Charles C Acoustic panel
US8424637B2 (en) * 2010-01-08 2013-04-23 Richard L. Lenz, Jr. Systems and methods for providing an asymmetric cellular acoustic diffuser
US20110168484A1 (en) * 2010-01-08 2011-07-14 Lenz Richard L Systems and methods for providing an asymmetric cellular acoustic diffuser
US20120018247A1 (en) * 2010-07-20 2012-01-26 Hendrik David Gideonse Wedge-shaped acoustic diffuser and method of installation
US8607925B2 (en) * 2010-07-20 2013-12-17 Hendrik David Gideonse Wedge-shaped acoustic diffuser and method of installation
US8739927B2 (en) * 2010-10-07 2014-06-03 Lg Hausys, Ltd. Gypsum panel having outstanding sound-absorbing properties and a production method therefor
US20130199872A1 (en) * 2010-10-07 2013-08-08 Lg Hausys, Ltd. Gypsum panel having outstanding sound-absorbing properties and a production method therefor
US8640427B2 (en) 2012-03-30 2014-02-04 Door Components, Inc. Sound insulating door
US20150047921A1 (en) * 2013-08-17 2015-02-19 Engineering & Scientific Innovations, Inc. Fluid flow noise mitigation structure and method
US9169750B2 (en) * 2013-08-17 2015-10-27 ESI Energy Solutions, LLC. Fluid flow noise mitigation structure and method
US20160379616A1 (en) * 2014-02-11 2016-12-29 Leena Rose Wilson Acoustic absorber and use of said type of acoustic absorber
US10102841B2 (en) * 2014-02-11 2018-10-16 Leena Rose Wilson Acoustic absorber and use of said type of acoustic absorber

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