US2442846A - Wind-driven helicopter kite - Google Patents

Wind-driven helicopter kite Download PDF

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US2442846A
US2442846A US628817A US62881745A US2442846A US 2442846 A US2442846 A US 2442846A US 628817 A US628817 A US 628817A US 62881745 A US62881745 A US 62881745A US 2442846 A US2442846 A US 2442846A
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frame
propeller
lift
wind
drive
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US628817A
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Harold E Dunn
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Harold E Dunn
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS OR BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H27/00Toy aircraft; Other flying toys ; Starting or launching devices therefor
    • A63H27/08Kites

Description

June 8, 1948. H. E. DUNN WIND DRIVEN HELICOPTER KITE I s Shets-Shet 1 Filed NOV. 15, 1945 ATTORNEYS June 8, 1948.

Filed NOV.

H. E. DUNN WIND DRIVEN HELICOPTER KI'IE 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

ArmE/Vm June 8, 1948. DUNN 2,442,846

WIND DRIVEN HELICOPTER KITE Filed Nov. 15, 1945 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVEN TOR.

A TTOE/VHJI June 8, 1948. H. E. DUNN 2,442,846

WIND DRIVEN HELICOPTER KITE IN VEN TOR.

/iw #AZM;

Patented June 8, 1948 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE WIND-DRIVEN HELICOPTER KITE Harold E. Dunn, Corpus Christi, Tex.

Application November 15, 1945, Serial No. 628,817

7 Claims.

This invention relates to a flying toy, which is intended to be flown in wind at the end of a string in a manner somewhat similar to the flying of familiar toy kites.

More specifically, the invention relates to a flying toy embodying at least two propellers which are arranged to rotate in planes at a right angle to each other. One of the propellers, which may be termed the drive propeller, is arranged to be rotated in a vertical plane by the passage of wind through its blades. The second propeller, which may be termed the lift propeller, is arranged to be rotated in a horizontal plane by power derived from the first or drive propeller. The second or lift propeller furnishes the lift which sustains the toy in flight. In one form of my invention only one drive propeller and one lift propeller are used, while in other forms two drive propellers and two lift propellers are used. It will be obvious that a greater number of drive or lift propellers could be used.

For a better understanding of my invention I call attention to the following detailed description and the accompanying drawings which illustrate exemplary forms of the invention.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevation view of one form of the invention, which embodies a single drive propeller and a single lift propeller;

Figure 2 is a top plan view of the device shown in Fi ure 1;

Figure 3 is a front elevation view of the same device;

Figure 4 is a fragmentary sectional view shov. ing the power transmission gearing used in the form of the invention illustrated in Figures 1 to 3;

Figure 5 is a front elevation view of a modilied form of the invention, which embodies two drive propellers and two lift propellers;

Figue 6 is a top plan view of the form of the invention illustrated in Figure 5;

Figure 7 is a side elevation view of the form of my invention illustrated in Figure 5;

Figure 8 is a side elevation view of a further modification of my invention; and

Figure 9 is a front elevation view of the form of my invention illustrated in Figure 8.

Referring first to the form of the invention illustrated in Figures 1 to 4, the toy comprises a frame, which is designated generally by the reference numeral Ill, and which consists of a box-like gear frame 1 I, upwardly and outwardly extending struts l2 and I3, an upper cross member 14, and a depending tail support 15. A

2 stabilizing rudder assembly t6, consisting of vertical fins I! and horizontal fins I8, is secured to the frame by means'of a rudder supporting mem-- ber IS. The member l9 extends forwardly to a clip secured to the cross member M and thence downwardlyand rearwardly to a bearing support 21, which extends rearwardily from the gear frame 1 l.

A drive propeller 2! is fixed on a horizontal shaft 23 which is journaled for rotation in bearings in the gear frame H and the bearing sup port 2 I. A lift propeller 24 is fixed on a vertical shaft 25 which is journaled for rotation in bearing-s in the clip 2! and the upper portion of the gear frame l-I.

As is best illustrated in Figure 4, the horizontal shaft 23 is provided with a miter gear 2% while the vertical shaft 25 is provided with a somewhat similar miter gear 21. These miter gears are held in operative engagement by means of a collar 28 on the gear 26 and collars 29 and 30 on the gear 21.

The propellers 22 and 24 are here illustrated as of the four-blade type, but it will be obvious that a greater or lesser number of blades may be used.

A three-string bridle arrangement for attaching a tether string 3| to the toy is best illustrated in Figures 1 and 2. A lower bridle string 32 is secured to the upper end of the tail support l5, while upper bridle strings '33 and '34 are attached to'the cross member 14 near opposite ends thereof.

The foregoing explanation is sufiicient for an understanding of the principle of operation of my toy. When the tether string Si is secured and the toy is released in a wind, it will ascend in a manner similar to the flying of a familiar toy kite. It will b apparent that wind passing through the drive propeller 22 will cause rotation thereof which, in turn, will drive the lift propeller 24 through the shaft 23, the gear 2%, the gear 21, and the shaft 25. I have found, however, that when using a single drive propeller and a single lift propeller, forces are set up during the operation of the toy which render it inherently unstable. One reason for this instab'i-lity is due to the fact that during any instant of operation the lift propeller has one or more blades which are moving into the wind and also has one or more blades which are moving with the wind. Those blades which are moving into the wind have greater lift than those blades which are moving with the wind and this greater lift on one side of the shaft 25 would tend to cause the entire toy to rotate bodily with respect to the tether string 3|. To prevent this, I provide a compensating wing 35, which is designed to provide additional lift on that side of the toy which is deficient in lift due to the fact that the blades of the lift propeller are moving with the wind. This compensating wing 35 brings the entire assembly into very near balance. Any slight unbalanced condition of the toy is compensated for by the flexible tail member 36, which depends from the tail support l5. The rudder assembly l6 maintains the toy in proper position for the drive propeller 22 to utilize the full force of the wind.

The form of the invention disclosed in Figures 5, 6 and 7 consists essentially of a pair of drive propellers and a pair of lift propellers. The drive propellers are designed to rotate in opposite directions and to drive the lift propel1e'rs'in'op-' posite directions. This arrangement eliminates the necessity for a compensating wing and a tail member since the opposite rotation of the propellers makes the device automatically compensating,

A .pair of transverse struts 31 and 38 support at their opposite ends frame members which are designated generally by the reference numerals 39 and 49. Since these frame members are of similar construction, it is necessary to describe only the member 39. A bearing support 4| is secured to the end of the strut 38 and supports a gear frame 42 secured thereto. A supporting member 43 extends upwardly from the rear end of the bearing support 4| and is secured to a clip 44. Another supporting member 45 extends from intermediate the ends of the supporting member 43 to a bearing member 46. A rudder-supporting member 41 is secured to the end of the transverse strut 3], passes through the clip 44, thence upwardly and backwardly to a point of attachment to the supporting member 45 and rearwardly to the rudder assembly 48.

As best shown in Figure 5, a supporting member 49 extends from a point adjacent one end of the transverse strut 38 to the clip 44. Secured intermediate the ends of the supporting member 49 is a supporting member which extends to the bearing member 46.

The frame member 40 is similar to the frame member 39, which has just been described.

A drive propeller 5| is fixed on a horizontal shaft 52 which is mounted in bearings in the bearing support 4| and the gear frame 42. Secured to the shaft 52is a gear 53, which is arranged to engage and drive a gear 54 attached to a vertical shaft 55 which is mounted in bearings in gear frame 42, the clip 44 and the bearing member 46. A lift propeller 56 is fixed at the upper end of the shaft 55. The blades of the drive propeller 5| and the lift .propeller 56 are so disposed as to cause rotation of the lift propeller 56 in a direction to cause lift when wind passes through the drive propeller. Mounted in the frame member 40 is a second drive propeller 51 and a second lift propeller 58. The lift propeller also furnishes lift upon passage of wind through the drive propeller 51, but it should be noted that the drive propeller 51 rotates in a direction opposite to that of the rotation of the drive propeller 5| and the lift propeller 58 rotates in a direction opposite to that of the lift propeller 56. This opposite rotation automatopposite rotation of the propellers also automatically compensates for any torque reactions and eliminates the necessity for a tail member.

- tating in opposite directions and a pair of lift ically compensates for reduced lift from those propeller blades traveling with the wind and thus eliminates the need for a compensating wing, such as wing 35 disclosed in Figures 1 to 3. The

propellers also rotating in opposite directions. In this case, however, the drive propellers rotate on coincident axes and the same is true of the lift propellers.

In this case, a gear frame 6| supports a bearing support 62 upwardly and outwardly diverging struts 63 and '64, a rudder support 65 and a bearing member 66, which is secured on a transverse strut 61 extending between the upper ends of the struts 63 and 64 to form the frame of the toy. A tubular shaft 68 is mounted in bearings in the gear frame 6| and the bearing support 62 and has fixed on its rearward end a drive propeller 69. Fixed to the forward end of the tubular shaft 68 is a gear Til which engages a gear 7| on the lower end of a tubular shaft 12, which is mounted for rotation in the bearing member 66 and in a bearing in the gear frame 6|. At its upper end, the tubular shaft 72 carries a lift propeller 13. A second drive propeller 14, which has blades causing it to rotate in a direction opposite to that of the drive propeller 69, is mounted on a shaft 15 which passes through the tubular shaft 68 and carries at its forward end a gear '16. The gear TI is fixed on a shaft I8 which extends through the tubular shaft 12 and carries at its upper end a second lift propeller .19. It will be apparent from the foregoing description that the lift propellers 13 and 19 also rotate in opposite directions. This form of the invention is also self-balancing and there is no need for a compensating wing or a tail member.

A stabilizing rudder assembly 89, consisting of vertical and horizontal fins, is carried at the rear end of the rudder-supporting member 65. A three-string bridle is secured at opposite ends of the transverse strut 61 and at the forward end of the bearing support 62. This bridle assembly is designated generally by the reference numeral 8| and extends forwardly to a tether string, not shown.

The foregoing description will enable those skilled in the art to clearly understand my invention, In all its various forms, the toy should be constructed of materials of the lightest weight possible consistent with requisite strength and rigidity.

The foregoing specific description relates to what are now considered to be the preferred forms of my invention, but it will be obvious that various modifications may be resorted to without departing from the fundamental concept of the invention as defined by the following claims;

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A tethered toy for sustained flight in wind comprising a drive propeller arranged to rotate in a vertical plane upon passage of wind therethrough, a lift propeller arranged to be rotated in a horizontal plane by power derived from said drive propeller, and means for stabilizing and retaining said propellers in their respective planes of rotation.

2. A tethered toy for sustained flight in wind comprising a frame, a tether secured to said frame, a stabilizing rudder disposed rearwardly of said frame, a driving shaft extending rearwardly from said frame, a drive propeller fixed on said driving shaft to rotate said shaft when wind imparts rotation to said drive propeller, a driven shaft extending upwardly from said frame, a lift propeller fixed on said driven shaft upwardly of said frame, and means operative to rotate said driven shaft and said lift propeller on rotation of said driving shaft whereby said toy is sustained in flight.

3. A tethered toy for sustained flight in wind comprising a frame, a stabilizing rudder disposed rearwardly of said frame, a drive propeller arranged to rotate in a vertical plane upon passage of wind therethrough, a lift propeller arranged to be rotated in a horizontal plane above said frame by power derived from said drive propeller, a compensating wing secured to said frame and extending laterally therefromin a direction to compensate for reduced lift on that side of the toy on which the blades of said lift propeller are traveling rearwardly with the wind, and a tail member depending from said frame.

4. A tethered toy for sustained flight in wind comprising a frame, stabilizing rudder means extending rearwardly from said frame, a pair of drive propellers located rearwardly of said frame and arranged to rotate in opposite directions on horizontal axes upon passage of wind therethrough, and a pair of lift propellers located upwardly of said frame and arranged to be rotated in opposite directions on vertical axes by power derived from said drive propellers.

5. A tethered toy for sustained flight in wind comprising a frame, stabilizing rudder means extending rearwardly from said frame, a pair of drive propellers arranged to rotate in opposite directions in a vertical plane upon passage of wind therethrough, and a pair of lift propellers arranged to be rotated in opposite directions in a horizontal plane above said frame by power derived from said drive propellers.

6. A tethered toy for sustained flight in wind comprising a frame, stabilizing rudder means on said frame, a pair of drive propellers located rearwardly of said frame and arranged to rotate in opposite directions on coincident horizontal axes upon passage of wind therethrough, and a pair of lift propellers located upwardly of said frame and arranged to be rotated in opposite directions on coincident vertical axes by power derived from said drive propellers.

7. A tethered toy for sustained flight in wind comprising a frame, a tether secured to said frame by means of a bridle attached at vertically spaced points on said frame to maintain said frame in approximately vertical position, a rudder supporting member extending rearwardly from the upper portion of said frame, vertical and horizontal fins carried by said rudder supporting member, a horizontal shaft mounted for rotation in the lower portion of said frame, a wind driven propeller secured to said horizontal shaft for rotation in a vertical plane to the rear of said frame, a vertical shaft mounted for rotation in said frame, a lift propeller secured to said vertical shaft for rotation in a horizontal plane above said frame, and means for rotating said vertical shaft and said lift propeller upon rotation of said wind driven propeller and said horizontal shaft.

HAROLD E. DUNN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,051,659 Ames Jan. 28, 1913 1,052,204 Austin Feb. 4, 1913 1,278,358 Lake Sept. 10, 1918 2,181,477 Chupp Nov. 28, 1939

US628817A 1945-11-15 1945-11-15 Wind-driven helicopter kite Expired - Lifetime US2442846A (en)

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Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2675199A (en) * 1950-01-19 1954-04-13 Aylor Elmo Edison Rotor kite
US4765567A (en) * 1987-03-10 1988-08-23 Tech Serv, Inc. Helicopter target
US5149020A (en) * 1991-09-26 1992-09-22 Rundle Craig V Tethered rotary kite
US5199670A (en) * 1991-05-13 1993-04-06 Eugene Cheltenham Helicopter stunt kite
US5598988A (en) * 1995-04-13 1997-02-04 Bukur; Thomas J. Rotary flyer
US5909859A (en) * 1996-03-28 1999-06-08 Janicki; Stephen J. Multi-rotor kite glider
US5954297A (en) * 1995-04-13 1999-09-21 Bukur; Thomas J. Rotary flyer
US5996934A (en) * 1997-11-24 1999-12-07 Murph; Ellis G. Tethered autogyro
FR2786405A1 (en) * 1998-11-30 2000-06-02 Janick Simeray Autogire helicopter kite
US20050006532A1 (en) * 2003-07-10 2005-01-13 Don Tabor Propeller system for kite
US20060091260A1 (en) * 2004-11-03 2006-05-04 Plottner Jarl V Plottner rotor kite
WO2007147639A1 (en) * 2006-06-23 2007-12-27 Alessandro Quercetti & C. - Fabbrica Giocattoli Formativi - S.P.A. A flying toy supported by a birotor whose blades are partially flexible
US20110139928A1 (en) * 2009-12-12 2011-06-16 John William Morris Autogyro air vehicle
US20120091259A1 (en) * 2010-08-23 2012-04-19 John William Morris Towable air vehicle
US9038941B2 (en) 2009-05-22 2015-05-26 Heliplane, Llc Towable autogyro system having repositionable mast responsive to center of gratvity calculations

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1051659A (en) * 1908-04-27 1913-01-28 Butler Ames Apparatus employed in flight through the air.
US1052204A (en) * 1912-02-26 1913-02-04 George Brougham Hubert Austin Automatic balancing and horizontal sustaining aeroplane.
US1278358A (en) * 1917-12-01 1918-09-10 Franklin William Lake Aeroplane.
US2181477A (en) * 1936-08-01 1939-11-28 Carl B Chupp Aerial device

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1051659A (en) * 1908-04-27 1913-01-28 Butler Ames Apparatus employed in flight through the air.
US1052204A (en) * 1912-02-26 1913-02-04 George Brougham Hubert Austin Automatic balancing and horizontal sustaining aeroplane.
US1278358A (en) * 1917-12-01 1918-09-10 Franklin William Lake Aeroplane.
US2181477A (en) * 1936-08-01 1939-11-28 Carl B Chupp Aerial device

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2675199A (en) * 1950-01-19 1954-04-13 Aylor Elmo Edison Rotor kite
US4765567A (en) * 1987-03-10 1988-08-23 Tech Serv, Inc. Helicopter target
US5199670A (en) * 1991-05-13 1993-04-06 Eugene Cheltenham Helicopter stunt kite
US5149020A (en) * 1991-09-26 1992-09-22 Rundle Craig V Tethered rotary kite
US5598988A (en) * 1995-04-13 1997-02-04 Bukur; Thomas J. Rotary flyer
US5954297A (en) * 1995-04-13 1999-09-21 Bukur; Thomas J. Rotary flyer
US5909859A (en) * 1996-03-28 1999-06-08 Janicki; Stephen J. Multi-rotor kite glider
US5996934A (en) * 1997-11-24 1999-12-07 Murph; Ellis G. Tethered autogyro
FR2786405A1 (en) * 1998-11-30 2000-06-02 Janick Simeray Autogire helicopter kite
WO2000032289A1 (en) * 1998-11-30 2000-06-08 Janick Simeray Dirigible autogyro helicopter kite
US20050006532A1 (en) * 2003-07-10 2005-01-13 Don Tabor Propeller system for kite
US20060091260A1 (en) * 2004-11-03 2006-05-04 Plottner Jarl V Plottner rotor kite
US7048232B1 (en) * 2004-11-03 2006-05-23 Jarl Vernon Plottner Plottner rotor kite
WO2007147639A1 (en) * 2006-06-23 2007-12-27 Alessandro Quercetti & C. - Fabbrica Giocattoli Formativi - S.P.A. A flying toy supported by a birotor whose blades are partially flexible
US9038941B2 (en) 2009-05-22 2015-05-26 Heliplane, Llc Towable autogyro system having repositionable mast responsive to center of gratvity calculations
US20110139928A1 (en) * 2009-12-12 2011-06-16 John William Morris Autogyro air vehicle
US8540183B2 (en) 2009-12-12 2013-09-24 Heliplane, Llc Aerovehicle system including plurality of autogyro assemblies
US20120091259A1 (en) * 2010-08-23 2012-04-19 John William Morris Towable air vehicle
US8646719B2 (en) * 2010-08-23 2014-02-11 Heliplane, Llc Marine vessel-towable aerovehicle system with automated tow line release
US20140246538A1 (en) * 2010-08-23 2014-09-04 Heliplane, Llc Towable air vehicle
US9187173B2 (en) * 2010-08-23 2015-11-17 Heliplane, Llc Towable autogyro having a re-positionable mast

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