US2439150A - Internal-combustion engine - Google Patents

Internal-combustion engine Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2439150A
US2439150A US481224A US48122443A US2439150A US 2439150 A US2439150 A US 2439150A US 481224 A US481224 A US 481224A US 48122443 A US48122443 A US 48122443A US 2439150 A US2439150 A US 2439150A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
cylinder block
track
piston
exhaust
provide
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US481224A
Inventor
Frederick H Smith
Original Assignee
Frederick H Smith
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Frederick H Smith filed Critical Frederick H Smith
Priority to US481224A priority Critical patent/US2439150A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2439150A publication Critical patent/US2439150A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B75/00Other engines
    • F02B75/26Engines with cylinder axes coaxial with, or parallel or inclined to, main-shaft axis; Engines with cylinder axes arranged substantially tangentially to a circle centred on main-shaft axis
    • F02B75/265Engines with cylinder axes substantially tangentially to a circle centred on main-shaft axis

Description

April 6, 1948. F. H. SMITH INTERNAL- COMBUS TION ENG INE Filed March 51, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet mmoC ATTORNEYS I a April 1948- F. HisMlTli 2,439,150

INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINE Filed March 31, 1945 2 Sheets$heet 2 INVENTO izoqs ATTORNEYS Patented A r. 6,1948

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ENGINE Frederick H. Smith, Builalo, N. Y. Application March 31, 1943, Serial No. 481,224

r r 2 (Cl. 123-43) This invention relates tion engine and more particularly to a tour cycle internal combustion engine in which the pistons act against a single cam track, in converting the reciprocating motion of the pistons into rotary motion, in contradlstinction to the usual crank shaft.

One of the principal objects of the invention is to provide such an internal combustion engine with explosions occurring during each revolution and which is inherently balanced without a crank shaft, and which has a constant maximum lever arm thereby to eliminate the dead center top and bottom pause which is incident to the use of a crank shaft.

Another object of the invention is to provide a reliable, lightweight, high power and high speed internal combustion engine of this type which can be used as an airplane engine.

Another object is to provide such an internal combustion engine which is very compact and also is self-contained.

Another object is to provide such an internal combustion engine which will stand up under conditions of severe and constant use and also in which sliding parts are avoided in the drive connection between the pistons and the oval cam track against which they act.

Another object is to provide such an internal combustion engine which is composed of simple castings and parts and readily lends itself to mass production methods.

Another object of the invention is to provide such an internal combustion engine which can be adapted to any type of fuel and in which the admission and control of the air and fuel can be effected in a simple and efilcient manner.

Another object of theinvention is to provide such an internal combustion engine which can be either of the rotating or stationary cylinder type.

Another object is to provide a simple and effective ignition system which insures combustion of the charges of the several cylinders in proper sequence.

Another object of the invention is'to provide a simple and eifectivemeans whereby the form of the oval track can be varied to vary the inlet or suction time or stroke with reference to the exhaust time or stroke thereby to permit increased expansionof the gases and increasing the volumetric efliciency of the engine.

Another aim is to provide such an internal combustion engine in which the cylinders and their end heads are an integral unit.

to an internal combus- Another object oi! the invention is to provide such an internal combustion engine which can be operated as 9. Diesel motor.

Another object is to provide such a motor having a large bore extending through the cylinder block among the several cylinders thereoi and through which central cooling of the cylinder block can be effected.

Another object is to provide such a motor in which this relatively large bore extending through the cylinder block and among the several cylinders can be used to carry the intake and exhaust manifolds for the motor.

Another object is to provide such an internal combustion engine in which this relatively large cylindrical bore extending through the cylinder block and among the several cylinders is arranged coaxially of the axis 01 rotation of the cylinder block so that a cannon can be tired through this bore, thereby to adapt the invention to this particular type of fighter plane.

Another object of the invention is to provide such an internal combustion engine in which the various walls of the cylinder block are of thin cross section thereby to reduce the weight of the motor to a minimum and also increase.

the cooling efliciency thereof.

Other objects and advantages ,will appear from the following description and drawings in which: Fig. 1 is a vertical section taken transversely of the ,axis of rotation through an internal combustion engine embodying my invention, this section being taken on line l--l, Fig. 2.

Fig. 2 is a vertical section taken parallel with the axis oi rotation, this section being taken on line 2--Z, Fig. 1.

As shown .in the accompanying drawings, the internal combustion engine embodying my invention includes a rotating cylinder block 5 which is shown as formed to provide six cylinders 6 or more, the axes of these cylinders being arranged tangential to a comm-on circle coaxial connecting or piston rod 8. The outer end of each or the piston rods Btraverses a stationary cam track, indicated generally at Hi, this cam track being shown as oval in form, although its shape can be varied to obtain a differential in the indicated generallyat I4, this spider comprising spaced end rings II, It which are preferably L-shaped in cross section, and integrally formed arched arms II which connect the two end rings l5, I6 and arch outwardly to carry the oval track It, the supporting ring l2 of this track being secured to the centers of these arched arms. While the spider I canhave any number of arched arms I! to carry the oval rail I0, six are shown in the drawings.

In each of the end rings l5, l8 of the spider I4 is fitted the outer race of a main bearing 20, the inner races of these hearings being carried bya ring 2| which in turn is secured, in any suitable manner, to the corresponding end of the engine block 5. It will therefore be seen that the cylinder block 5 is free to rotate in the main roller bearings 20 carried by the stationary spider I4 and which spider also carries the oval track It. The fixed piston or connecting rods 8 work against the inner rail ll of the oval track and for this purpose the outer end of each of the piston rods 8 is bifurcated to provide two arms 24 which embrace the inner rail ll of this track. Between these arms of each piston is arranged a relatively large thrust roller 25, the axis of which is arranged parallel with the axis of rotation of the cylinder block 5 and the thrust of these rollers being against the inner elliptical face 26 of the rail H. The outer end of each of the arms 24 of each piston rod is also shown as carrying a small outboard roller 28 which can engage the corresponding outwardly facing shoulder l3 of the rail ll, although these small rollers 28 are not essential to the operation of the engine. With the above arrangement of elliptical-cam track and tangentially arranged pistons, it will be seen that one revolution of the cylinder block 5 effects two reciprocations of each of the pistons 1. Thus. while each roller 25 is passing from point A to point B on the rail I l of the oval track It, its piston 'l is moved inwardly a complete stroke, as indicated by the arrow associated with the left hand piston in Fig. 1. This movement of each piston while its roller is traveling from point A to point B can therefore be utilized as the compression stroke of the engine.

While the rollers 25 are moving from point B to point C of the elliptical track the corresponding piston 1 moves outwardly, this movement being indicated by the arrow associated with the lowermost cylinder in Fig. 1. Therefore, this movement can be used to provide the-firing stroke vide the exhaust stroke of the engine- When each roller 25 moves from the point D to the point A on the elliptical track, the corresponding piston is moved outwardly as indicated by the arrow associated with the uppermost cylinder in Fig. 1. Therefore, this movethe intake stroke of the engine. It will accordingly be seen that as the cylinder block rotates the oval or elliptical cam track It provides a four cycle action, each piston being carried through a compression, firing, exhaust and intake stroke in this revolution of the cylinder block.

To provide the charge of fuel and air for the intake stroke of each piston,'the integral end ring it of the supporting spider i4 is shown as formed to provide a bracket 30 on which a carburetor (not shown) can be mounted. The air from the carburetor mounted on the bracket 30 is drawn through a duct 3| into an annular stationary intake manifold 32, this annular stationary intake manifold being U-shaped in cross section and being open on its inside and provided with straight side walls.' The entire cylinder block 5 is formed to provide a large bore 34 extending therethrough and coaxial with its axis of rotation and at its center the cylinder block tending annular flange 35. A sleeve 38 is fitted in this bore 34 at the end thereof adjacent the annular stationary intake manifold 32 and this sleeve is formed to provide a radially outwardly extending flange 38 which is in closely spaced relation to the inner vertical side wall of the annular stationary intake manifold 32, To prevent air from being drawn through the space between the rotating flange 38 and the adjacent inner side wall of the annular stationary intake manifold 32, a labyrinth seal 32 is preferably provided.

The sleeve 36 and its flange 38 forms one wall of an annular rotating intake manifold passage 40 of the engine and the other wall of this annular rotating intake manifold is formed by a sheet metal drum 4| having an inwardly extending annular flange 42 at its inner endwhich can be secured to the inward1y extending flang'e 35 of the motor block 5 by bolts 43; and having a cylindrical part which is in contact with'the bore 34 of the cylinder block 5; and also having a reduced portion 45 which is spaced from the sleeve 36 to provide the annular intake manifold space 40. At its outer end the sheet metal drum 42 is formed to' provide a radially outwardlyextending flange 48 which is disposed in closely spaced relation to the outer straight wall of the annular stationary intake manifold 32;

To prevent leakage between the rotating flange 48 and the annular stationary intake manifold 32, a labyrinth seal 48 is provided therebetween.

The air and fuel from the annular intake manifold 40 is drawn into each of the cylinders 6 through an intake passage 50 formed in the cylinder block and under control of an intake valve indicated generally at 5|. While any suitable valve can be employed each of the valves 5| is shown as being a poppet valve comprising a cylindrical valve body 52 having an inlet opening 53 registering with the corresponding opening 50 in the cylinder block and having a seat at its inner end against which the head 54 of the valve seats. This head is shown as having a stem which is slidably carried by a small sleeve 55 arranged in the center of the valve body and the valve is shown as yieldingly held in its closed position by a helical compression spring 56. The outer end of the stem of the valve is shown as held against a sliding tappet pin 60 which is mounted in a horizontal guideway formed in the corresponding end ring 2| of the cylinder block and carries a roller 62." This roller engages a cam track 32 provided on the inner face of the ring l8 of the supporting spider l4 and this cam track 83 is formed to provide a salient face so as to open each intake valve 5| as the corresponding piston traverses its intake cycle. This would be those pistons whose rollers 25 are traversing the elliptical track from the point C to the point D with'the operation first assumed. At other times the valves 5| remain closed under the influence of their springs 58.

The passage 85 through which fuel and air. is drawn into each cylinder 8 under control of its intake valve 5| also serves as the exhaust Dassage for each cylinder. The exhaust of each cylinder is under control of an exhaust valve 5|a which is shown as being identical-in construction to the corresponding intake valve 5| and the description is hence not repeated, the same numerals being applied to'the-exhaust valve 5|a and distinguished from the corresponding parts of the intake valve by the sufllx a. The cam track for the exhaust valves, designated at 63a, is likewise similar to the cam track controlling the intake valves 5| except that its salient part is arranged to open the exhaust valves 5|a' as the pistons traverse the exhaust cycle. Under the condition of operation first assumed this would be when the rollers 25 on the piston rods 8 are traversing the elliptical track from the point C to the point D. The left hand end of the crank case 5, as viewed in Fig. 2, is formed to provide a cylindrical extension 18 which has a radially extending flange II, this flange being provided with bolt holes 12 which permit 01' attaching the propeller (not shown) directly to the cylinder block or to a gear drive mechanism.

Each of the exhaust valves discharges into a passage 58a provided in the cylinder block and thence into an annular exhaust manifold 14 formed within the bore 34 of the cylinder block by a sheet metal drum I5. This sheet metal drumis shown as having an inwardly extending annular flange 16 at its inner end which is secured by the bolts 43 to the central inwardly projecting flange 35 of the cylinder block 5 and as having an adjacent cylindrical part 11 which flts into the bore 34. Beyond this the drum 15 is contracted, as indicated at 18, so as to form the exhaust manifold space 14 and at its outer extremity the drum is formed to provide an axially extending flange 18 which can be secured, in

any suitable manner, within the cylindrical extension 18 of the cylinder block.

To relieve the exhaust from'the annular exhaust manifold I4 the left hand extension of the cylinder block 5 is formed to provide a plurality of ports 88 leading from the exhaust manifold space 14 to the exterior or the cylindrical extension 18 of the cylinder block. These ports 88 lead into the space between apair of sheet metal flanges 8| which are secured to the lexterior of the cylindrical extension 18 in any suitable manner and are embraced by a stationary annular exhaust manifold 82. As with the annular stationary intake manifold,.82, the annular stationary exhaust manifold 82 is U-shaped in cross section and is provided with straight side walls which are arranged in closely spaced relation to the flanges 8|, leakage being prevented therebetween by labyrinth seals 83.

The stationary exhaust manifold 82 is provided with an exhaust duct '84 at one side.

The firing of the cylinders can be effected by means of a track and a contactor traversing this which can be pivotally secured to the cylinder block 5 in any suitable manner and arranged to traverse the track and its strip of metal. Each contactor is shown as connected by a. wire 88 with a spark plug 88 for the corresponding cyl-' inder.

The metallic' strip83 is provided in the track 85 of insulating'material in proper position to efiect firing of the cylinders in proper sequence. This, under the operation assumed, would be at the end of the compression stroke and at the beginning of the firing stroke, this being when each roller 25 traverses the point B of the elliptical-track.

In the operation of the engine as above described, the cylinder block 5 rotates counterclockwise, as viewed in Fig. 1, and when each roller 25 passes beyond the point C of the oval track |8,.the corresponding piston I is moved inwardly. At this point the salient part of the cam track 83a moves the pin 68a to the right, as viewed in Fig. 2, thereby to open the exhaust valve 5|a against the resistance of the return spring 5611. The inward movement of this piston thereby causes the spent products of combustion to be exhausted through its passage 65, open valve 5|a, passages 53a and 58a, rotating exhaust manifold 14 and through the passages 88 inthe cylindrical extension 18 of the cylinder block into the annular stationary exhaust manifold 82 and through its outlet 84 to the atmosphere. The escape of exhaust gases from between the stationary annular exhaust manifold 82 and the flanges 8| on the cylindrical extension 18 of the cylinder block is prevented by the labyrinth seals 83.

When each roller 25 reaches the point D of the elliptical track, the roller 82a of the exhaust valve 5|a associated with its cylinder passes beyond the salient part of the cam track 63a so that its exhaust valve 5|a closes under the influence of the return spring 55a. At the same time the form of the oval track l8 causes the corresponding piston 1 to move outwardly. At this time the roller 82 of the corresponding intake valve 5| encounters the salient part of the track 63 so that the pin 68 and valve 5| are moved to the left, as viewed in Fig. 2, against the resist ance of the return spring 56. The outward movement of the piston 1 thereby draws a charge of combustible mixture into the cylinder, this being supplied by the carburetor (not shown) mounted on the bracket 38 and being drawn through the duct 3| and stationaryannular intake manifold 32 into the rotating annular manifold 48. As with the exhaust manifold, labyrinth seals 39 and 48 are provided between the stationary and rotating parts of the intake manifold to prevent air from being drawn into the manifold 48 except through the carburetor. The charge is drawn into the cylinder through the passages 58 and 53, past the open intake valve 5| and through the passage 65 into the cylinder.

I Whenthe roller 28 of each piston reaches the point A of the oval track I8; the roller 62 and its associated intake valve passes beyond the salient part of the cam track 63 so that the corresponding intake valve 5| closes under the influence or its return spring 88. As each roller 25 continues beyond the point A of the elliptical track, the corresponding piston I is forced inwardly so as to compress the combustible mixsaid annular rotatable intake manifold to each or said cylinders, an inlet valve arranged at the side of the corresponding cylinder and control- I ling the flow or the combustible mixture through each of said passages, means for exhausting each or said cylinders, means for igniting the combustible charge in each 01 said cylinders, and means for actuating said valves, exhausting means and igniting means in a sequence to eflect said relative rotation of said cylinder block and oval cam track through the thrust of said piston rods wire 88 to the corresponding spark plug 88. The

compressed charge within the cylinder is thereby ignited.

The expansion of the gas in the cylinder thereby drives the piston outwardly, this comprising the power stroke of the engine and during which stroke the corresponding thrust roller 26 is traversing the elliptical track from point B to point C.

With the engine as above described, it will be seen that it is not essential that the cam track It! be truly elliptical and that the shape of this cam track can be varied to adjust the time of the strokes of the piston during any desired cycle.

against said oval cam track, said rotatable intake manifold defining a large. unobstructed tubular coaxial passage extending completely through the engine.

2. An internal combustion engine, comprising a cylinder block having a large bore extending therethrough and having a plurality of cylinders with their axes tangential to a circle concentric For example, by elongating the elliptical track,

the engine. Further, it will be understood that supercharged air could be supplied through the carburetor to the engine.

It will be noted that by providing the large axial bore 36 through the cylinder block, the cylinder block can be centrally cooled thereby to simplify the problem of maintaining the desired operating temperature of the motor. Further it will be seen that the design of the motorp'rovides thin cylinder blocksection's throughou tj 's'o as to provide high cooling efficiency. It will also be seen that the large axial bore, through the cylinder block, permits of discharging a cannon axially through the motor so as to render the motor particularly applicable to combat planes. The motor can also be of the internal combustion type as shown, or can be readily modified to operate on the Diesel principle.

I claim as my invention:

1. An internal combustion engine, comprising a cylinder block having a large bore extending therethrough and having a plurality of cylinders with their axes tangential to a circle concentric with said bore, an oval cam track surrounding said cylinder block and arranged in the plane of the axes of said cylinders, said cylinder block and oval cam track being rotatable relative to each other about the axis of said bore, a piston in each of said cylinders, a piston-rod secured to and maintained in substantially coaxial relation to each piston and having thrust engagement with said track, a ring-shaped stationary intake manifold adjacent to and concentric with one end of said bore and having an inlet opening and an outlet-opening through which a combustible mixture is supplied to said cylinders, a ring-shaped rotatable intake manifold secured within said bore and directly coacting with said annular stationary intake manifold to receive the combustible mixture therefrom, a passage leading from with said bore, an oval cam track surrounding said cylinder block and'arranged in the plane of the axes of said cylinders, said cylinder block and oval cam track being rotatable relative to each other about the axis of said bore, a piston in each of said cylinders, a piston rod secured to and maintained in substantially coaxial relation to each piston and having thrust engagement with said track, a ring-shaped stationary exhaust manifold adjacent to and concentric with-one end of saidbore and having an outlet opening and an inlet opening, axing-shaped rotatable exhaust manifold secured within said bore and directly coacting with said ring-shaped stationary exhaust manifold to discharge the products of combustion therein, an exhaust passage leading from each cylinder to said annular rotatable exhaust manifold, an exhaust valve arranged at the side of the corresponding cylinder and controlling the flow of the products of combustion through each of said exhaust passages, means for admitting a combustible charge to each of said cylinders, means for igniting the charge in each of said cylinders, and means for actuating said admitting means, igniting means and exhaust valves in a sequence to efiect relative rotation of said cylinder block and oval cam track through the thrust of said piston rods against said oval cam track, said rotatable exhaust manifold defining a large, unobstructed passage extending completely through the engine.

FREDERICK H. SMITH.

REFERENCES- CITED- The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STA'lIES PATENTS Number Name Date 835,483 Walker Nov. 6, 1906 847,489 Millar Mar. 19, 1907 677,977 Axtell Feb. 4, 1908 1,149,528 McCrorcy Aug. 10, 1915 1,347,762 Shepard July 27, 1920 1,456,479 Atkinson May 22, 1923 1,612,046 Owens Dec. 28 1926 1,787,673 De Lange Jan. 6, 1931 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 432,377 France 1911 577,663 Germany 1933

US481224A 1943-03-31 1943-03-31 Internal-combustion engine Expired - Lifetime US2439150A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US481224A US2439150A (en) 1943-03-31 1943-03-31 Internal-combustion engine

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US481224A US2439150A (en) 1943-03-31 1943-03-31 Internal-combustion engine

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2439150A true US2439150A (en) 1948-04-06

Family

ID=23911128

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US481224A Expired - Lifetime US2439150A (en) 1943-03-31 1943-03-31 Internal-combustion engine

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2439150A (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3788286A (en) * 1971-04-02 1974-01-29 J Brewer Piston engine
US3807370A (en) * 1972-12-29 1974-04-30 A Baugh Rotary engine

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US835483A (en) * 1906-11-06 Benjamin Franklin Walker Rotary explosive-engine.
US847489A (en) * 1904-07-29 1907-03-19 Charles Herbert Millar Rotary engine.
US877977A (en) * 1907-03-19 1908-02-04 Frank C Axtell Motor.
FR432377A (en) * 1911-07-20 1911-12-05 Enrique Juan Conill Improvements to such machines, particularly the rotary multi-cylinder internal combustion engines
US1149528A (en) * 1910-06-29 1915-08-10 William H Mccrory Rotary engine.
US1347762A (en) * 1917-09-19 1920-07-27 World Gas Engine Company Hydrocarbon-engine
US1456479A (en) * 1920-04-15 1923-05-22 Atkinson Dale Sydney Combined internal-combustion and turbine engine
US1612046A (en) * 1924-01-28 1926-12-28 Dabney P Owens Rotary engine
US1787673A (en) * 1926-11-16 1931-01-06 Lange Improved Two Cycle Motor Two-cycle radial engine
DE577663C (en) * 1929-02-21 1933-06-02 Martin Heine Piston engine, in particular internal combustion engine

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US835483A (en) * 1906-11-06 Benjamin Franklin Walker Rotary explosive-engine.
US847489A (en) * 1904-07-29 1907-03-19 Charles Herbert Millar Rotary engine.
US877977A (en) * 1907-03-19 1908-02-04 Frank C Axtell Motor.
US1149528A (en) * 1910-06-29 1915-08-10 William H Mccrory Rotary engine.
FR432377A (en) * 1911-07-20 1911-12-05 Enrique Juan Conill Improvements to such machines, particularly the rotary multi-cylinder internal combustion engines
US1347762A (en) * 1917-09-19 1920-07-27 World Gas Engine Company Hydrocarbon-engine
US1456479A (en) * 1920-04-15 1923-05-22 Atkinson Dale Sydney Combined internal-combustion and turbine engine
US1612046A (en) * 1924-01-28 1926-12-28 Dabney P Owens Rotary engine
US1787673A (en) * 1926-11-16 1931-01-06 Lange Improved Two Cycle Motor Two-cycle radial engine
DE577663C (en) * 1929-02-21 1933-06-02 Martin Heine Piston engine, in particular internal combustion engine

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3788286A (en) * 1971-04-02 1974-01-29 J Brewer Piston engine
US3807370A (en) * 1972-12-29 1974-04-30 A Baugh Rotary engine

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3895614A (en) Split piston two-stroke four cycle internal combustion engine
US7383797B2 (en) Double piston cycle engine
US4075986A (en) Rotary-poppet valve internal combustion engine
US4022167A (en) Internal combustion engine and operating cycle
US4003351A (en) Rotary engine
US3084678A (en) Internal combustion engine with shifting cylinders
US3911878A (en) Internal combustion engine having continuous combustion
CA1325897C (en) Crankless reciprocating machine
US6443110B2 (en) Rotary valve head system for multi-cylinder internal combustion engines
US5052349A (en) Rotary valve for internal combustion engine
USRE30565E (en) Internal combustion engine and operating cycle
US3481314A (en) Means for optimizing the performance of internal combustion engines
US3584610A (en) Internal combustion engine
US1569525A (en) Rotary engine
US6895922B1 (en) Rotary opposed piston engine
US7677207B2 (en) Rotary internal combustion engine
US4683852A (en) Internal combustion engine having rotating pistons
US7273023B2 (en) Steam enhanced double piston cycle engine
US20090007861A1 (en) Double Action Piston Assembly
US2401466A (en) Internal-combustion engine
TW363109B (en) Improvements in axial piston rotary engines
US4149498A (en) Internal combustion engine
US2080846A (en) Internal combustion engine
US4157079A (en) Internal combustion engine and operating cycle
US4072132A (en) Rotary internal combustion engine