US2437821A - Hydraulic pulsator system and make-up means therefor - Google Patents

Hydraulic pulsator system and make-up means therefor Download PDF

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US2437821A
US2437821A US47700443A US2437821A US 2437821 A US2437821 A US 2437821A US 47700443 A US47700443 A US 47700443A US 2437821 A US2437821 A US 2437821A
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piston
cylinder
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make
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Leigh E Hughes
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Leigh E Hughes
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04BPOSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS
    • F04B47/00Pumps or pumping installations specially adapted for raising fluids from great depths, e.g. well pumps
    • F04B47/06Pumps or pumping installations specially adapted for raising fluids from great depths, e.g. well pumps having motor-pump units situated at great depth
    • F04B47/08Pumps or pumping installations specially adapted for raising fluids from great depths, e.g. well pumps having motor-pump units situated at great depth the motors being actuated by fluid

Description

March 16, 1948. E. HUGHES 2,437,321

HYDRAULIC PULSATOR SYSTEM AND MAKE-UP MEANS THEREFOR Original Filed Jan. 29, 1940 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 fi 15 I E515- March 16, 1948.

L. E. HUGHES HYDRAULIC PULSATOR SYSTEM AND MAKE-UP MEANS THEREFOR J7 Hza 2 Original Filed Jan. 29, 1940 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 1157a Z. flua/ms.

EYS.

L. E. HUGHES March 1 1948. 2,437,821

HYDRAULIC PULSATOR SYSTEM AND MAKE-UP MEANS THEREFOR Original Fil e d Jan. 29, 1940 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 w w TTORNEYS.

Patented Mar. 16, 1948 HYDRAULIC PULSATOR SYSTEM AND MAKE-UP MEANS THEREFOR Leigh. E. Hughes, Indianapolis, Ind.

Original application January 29, 1940, Serial No.

316,128, now Patent No. 2,312,337, dated March 2, 1943. Divided and this application February 25, 1943, Serial No. 477, 04

(01. Gil-54.5)

6 Claims. 1

This invention relates to improvements in deep well pumps.

This application is a division of: application, Serial No. 316,128, f led January 29, 194.0, and entitled Hydraulic well pump, now Patent No. 2,312,337, dated March 2, 1943.

One object of this invention is to provide a hydraulic pump, having a plurality of completely separated hydraulic circuits.

Another object of the invention is to provide in a deep well pump a double stroke pumping cylinder, an operating circuit and automatic means for restoring liquid to said circuit at such times as may be necessary.

A further object of the invention is to provide in a pump a hydraulic operating system embracing a power system and an operating system.

Another object of the invention is to provide a hydraulically operated pump including an operating fluid under pressure, and means for controlling such pressure and automatically compensating for loss of any of said fluid.

A still further object of the invention is to make it possible to position the operating head at a distance from the well.

A principal object of the invention is to provide'in a hydraulically operated pump having a fluid actuated operating piston, in which the load on one side of the said piston is normally greater than on the opposite side thereof, means for carefully balancing at all times the said fluid pressure with the load and to by-pass the fluid at the end of the stroke.

With the above and such other objects in view, as may appear more fully hereinafter, the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which like reference numerals indicate like parts and in which:

Fig. l. is a diagrammatic elevation illustrative of the invention.

2 is a vertical section of a p mp head.

Fig. 3 is a section of a pressure control pump.

Fig. 4 is a section thereof taken on line, 4 4 of Fig. 5 is a bottom Plan View of the pressure control pump.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged section taken on line S--5 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 7 is a diagrammatic view of a pressure control system.

Fig. ,8 is a longitudinal section of a pumping mechanism.

Fig. 9 is a diagrammatic view, showing the con nection between the cylinder, shown in Fi 8, and the oil pump shown in Fig. 2.

Fi s- 10 o la, inclusive. each areenlareed sec tions taken, respectively, on lines Ill-40, H-.-! I, l2-el2, Id -l3. and [4- 14 of. F1543.

Fig. 15 is a section taken on line li -I5. of Fig. 13.

i 1.6 is an enlarged diagrammatic. sectional detail of a motor cylinder.

Fig. 17 is a vertical section taken on line |1. -i1 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 18 is a vertical section taken on line. l8-| 8; of Fig. 19, While Fig. 19 is a horizontal section taken on line Iii-.49 of Fig. 8,

In the several figures, 1 indicates a hydrauli deep well pump embodying the invention and in.- cluding a pump head 2 upon which is mounted, or otherwise connected, a motor 3 for operating the crank 4 throu h gear 5, see Figs. 1, 2 and 9, or other suitable connection. Mounted. on the housing 6 of the pump head is a pressure control and fluid replacement pump 1, see Figs. 2, 3, '7 and 17 having cylinders 8 and 9, see Figs. 3 and con.- nected at their lower ends by reduced bores Ill and II to bores l2 and I3.

Normally closing the lower ends of ports or bores 10 and H are ball valves l4 and I5, pressed by springs It and I1. Threaded into the lower ends of ports or'bores I2 and I3 are tubes [8 and 8. The lower end of tube [8 is threaded into ,the three way connection 20, see lower end 01 Fig.

2, and the lower end of tube [9 is threaded into the three-way connection 2| thereabove.

There is another bore 22 in the cylinder block 23, see Figs. 3, 4 and 17, to which is threaded the tube 24, the other end 25 of which is connected to the port 26 of bore 21 passing down through block 28, see Fig. 2, extending from the intermediate portion of the housing 6. The passa e 21 extends vertically down to and enters the transverse passage 29 in said block '23, said latter passage connecting at its outer end with bore 30 in said block 28, and being connected through the port 3|, controlled by the ball valve 32, to the rela tively large bore 313 to which thethree-way connection 2| is threaded at one inlet,

The ball 32 is pressed by spring 34, the tension of which is controlled. by screw plug 35. The inner end of passage 29 opens into the oil sump 36 provided in the upper chamber 31 of housing 5, while the inner end of passage 33 enters the upper end 5! of cylinder 38 in the pedestal 39 of said pump head '2, see Fig. 2, said cylinder being separated from chamber 31 by the wall 40.

The bore 22 enters a cross-bore 4!, see Figs. 3 and 4, one end being connected with cylinder 8 aforesaid and the other end with the cylinder 9 of said pump I. Both ends of said bore 4| are controlled by spring pressed ball valves 42 and 43, see Fig. 4. A bore 44, see Fig. 2, connects member 29' with a passage 45, see Fig. '7, in block 28 with the sump 36, said passage being controlled by a spring pressed ball valve 46, see Fig. '7, the tension of which is adjusted through screw plug 41.

The end 48 of crank 4 extends beyond its hearing 49, see Fig. 2, to operate the pistons 59 and 5|, see Figs. 2, 3 and 1'7, through its cams 59' and 5|, which pistons are provided with heads 52 and 53, between which and the head of block 23 are provide-d springs 54 and 55 for raising of the pistons.

Operating in the crank 4 is the connecting rod 56, see Fig. 2, connected to a piston rod 51 by a crosshead 58. The rod 51 operates through a packing box 59 in the wall 49, and carries the piston 59 operating in the cylinder 38, said piston separating the cylinder into two chambers 6| and 62 above and below the piston, respectively.

As above indicated, the passage 33 enters at the top of the chamber 6| and the passage 63, at the bottom of the chamber 62, has one port of the three-way connectio threaded thereto.

As shown in Figs. 2 to 7, inclusive, the piston 59 in cylinder 8 draws liquid from reservoir 36 through 29, 21, 25, 24, etc., and discharges same under pressure by line 18 to end 62 of cylinder 38, excess flowing through bore 44 and escaping through adjustable pressure relief valve 46 to chamber 45 in free communication with reservoir 36 by line 29, see Fig. '7. This is a closed cycle for make-up liquid supply.

In like manner, piston 5| in cylinder 9 draws liquid from reservoir 36 through 29, 21, 25, 24, etc., and discharges same under pressure by line 19 to end 6| of cylinder 38, excess flowing through bore 3| and escaping through adjustable pressure relief valve 32 to chamber 34 in free communication with reservoir 36 as at 29, see Figs. 6. and '7.

This is a second closed cycle for make-up liquid supplyrand these two liquid circuits normally are independent of each other, except for the common reservoir 36, the common suction line 24 and the common discharge line 29, see Fig. 6, for in this diagrammatic view the line 29 extends oppositely from the lower end of chamber 36 positioned between chambers 34 and 45 and at the outer ends is connected thereto, so the three chambers, 34, 45 and 36, see Fig. 7, are in free communication. The only communication between these systems is that shown at the make-up supply end and in Figs. 9 and 16 shown at the power piston cylinder and in Fig. 16, and otherwise referred to herein.

Threaded to one port of said three-way connection, member 29 is a pipe line 64 and threaded to one port of the connection 2| is a pipe line 65, bothof which lines, see Figs. 9 and 16, extend down into a well and terminate in ports 66 and 61 in a cylinder 68. It is through the action of the fluid in the cylinder 68 that the water pumping piston 69 in cylinder I9, see Figs. 8 and 9, is actuated. I

The tubing or water pipe line H is of a diameter sufficient to accommodate the cylinder 68, see Figs. 1 and 8, the pump cylinder I9, the surrounding operating fluid pipe lines and water passages to which reference will be had hereinafter. These elements when desired may be independent (external) of piping II, if found desirable or necessary.

' Operating in the cylinder 68 is the upper end I2 of a piston rod I3, said upper end carrying a piston I4, which separates said cylinder 68 into chambers I5 and I6 above and below, respectively, said piston. The lower end 11 of the pipe line 64 enters chamber 65 through the port 66, see Figs. 15, 16 and 18, and the lower end I8 of pipe line 65 enters the bottom of chamber I3 through port 61.

A by-pass I9 leads from the upper end of chamber I5 to pipe line 64 and is controlled by a spring pressed ball valve 89. Said by-pass is so located that it will come just below the bottom wall of piston I4, when in its uppermost position. Another by-pass 8| is provided in the lower part of said chamber I5 just above the upper wall of said piston I4 when in its lowermost position. This by-pass leads to the pipe 65 and is controlled by a spring pressed ball valve 82.

A buffer spring 83 is fixed to the upper wall 84 of cylinder 68 and a similar spring 85 is attached to the bottom wall 86 of said cylinder in order to obviate any possibility of hammering of the piston in this cylinder. On the lower end 61 of the piston rod I3 is carried piston 69, see Figs. 8 and 9, operating in said water pumping cylinder I9 which has a reduced portion 88 on side of wall 89 of which is seated a valve 99 normally covering passage 99' and on the opposite wall 9| of which is a screw plug 92 through which said valve may be seated.

In theiower end of the pipe line I I, just below the cylinder I9 is a valve case 93 carrying the removable core 94 which separates the case into the water inlet port 95 and chambers 96 and 91, and. passage 98 by means of its sinuously arranged center wall 99 and the valves I99, I01 and 92. The said formation of wall 99 permits the use of much larger valves than otherwise could be used within the comparative diameter of casing 93. This particular subject matter is claimed in the copending application, now Patent No. 2,312,337, dated March 2, 1943.

Operation Crank 4, see Fig. 9, operates piston 69 to drive oil down through pipe 64 to port 66 in cylinder 68 (chamber I6 being at this time filled with oil). Piston I4, in said cylinder, being driven down, moves piston 69 in cylinder I9 which action drives water in chamber 91 through valve I92 into passage 98 in turn driving the water therein up through the water pipe line H, to tank I.

The reverse action of oil piston 69 drives the oil from chamber 61 of cylinder 39 through pipe 65 into lower chamber I6 of cylinder 68, driving piston I4 up forcing the oil in chamber I5 back up through pipe 64 into cylinder 38. This action, of course, raises piston 69 in cylinder I9 drawing water in through port 95 and through valve 18E into chamber 9'! and cylinder I9.

The down movement of piston 69 drives water in chamber 91 through valve I92 into chamber 98 forcing the water therein through its passage continuation and out through connections I93 into pipe line II. Chamber 96 connects with the upper end I94 of cylinder I9 through port I95 and exhausts into passage 98 through check valve 99 controlled port 99 as the piston 69 rises in cylinder 19. Chamber 96 is filled from water intake passage 95 through the check valve I98 controlled port when the piston 69 is moved downwardly in cylinder I9.

The water piston 69 is double acting for supplying water into the pressure water pipe line II for each direction of movement of piston 69. This piston is power operable by piston I4 to which it is directly connected by rod 13. Piston 14 is operable in each direction by oil pressure applied thereto and derived from cylinder 38- 6! when piston Bil is mechanically reciprocated therein.

Pumps of this general character heretofore tried out have failed to properly function due to the fact that no practical automatic means has heretofore been provided for maintaining the exact necessary fluid pressure in the oil system for operation piston 14 which operates piston 69, therefore as leakage or evaporation or other exhaustion is bound to occur in the system, the

failure of the proper action of the pump results. The inventor has overcome this difficulty in his pump, through the automatic means for .resupplying oil, or other operatin fluid, as needed, and in maintaining the same at proper pressure through the following means: An extra supply of the operating fluid is provided in the oil sump 35, immediately above cylinder 38, see Fig. 2, through the port 29 of which the fluid may pass, either through ports 3%, entering outlet 33, the bored passage M into passage 29, or the passage 27 into pipe 24, oil pump inlet 22, thence to the passage it from whence it may be drawn through valves 42 and 43 into cylinders 8 and 9, on the up stroke of pistons 59 and operated by cams. On the down stroke of said pistons the oil in cylinders 8 and 9 is forced down through the valve controlled ports l9 and ll.

Through pipe lines l8 and 19, connections 20 and 2|, pipe lines 64 and 55 and into the upper and lower chambers and 76 of cylinder 68 through the ports 66 and 61, consecutively, thus aiding in driving piston M, first up and then down, which, in turn operates water piston 59, through their common piston rod iii. The bypasses 79 and 8! controlled by valves 80 and 82, are provided to prevent the piston is from creeping at either end of the cylinder 58, and causing a hammer in the pumping operation. Springs 33 and 85 are used to further obviate striking of the pistons against the cylinder ends. It is clearly obvious that through the above explained system the exact necessary fluid pressure for perfect operation is at all times maintained, and that the necessary quantity of fluid in the system is also automatically maintained at all times, no matter what the cause of loss therefrom, other than failure to keep a suflicient supply of oil in the sump 56.

Reference is had to Fig. 2 and attention directed to cams 5i! and 5! (see also Figs. 3 and 17 for larger illustrations) and the chamber 38-452 in which is mounted piston Bil on rod 51. The position of these cams relative to the piston is such that refilling pressure fluid is forced into the lines during the respective power strokes of piston. ti] and when the pressures upon the respective sides thereof are at or near their maximums.

It is also to be noted that while oil is mentioned as the pressure fluid, this is not restrictive, for any suitable relatively incompressible fluid may be used instead of oil.

While the invention has been illustrated and described in great detail in the drawings and foregoing description, the same is to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive in character.

The several modifications described herein, as well as others which will readily suggest themselves to persons skilled in this art, all are considered to be within the broad scope of the invention, reference being had to the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a hydraulically operable system having a Working unit including a pressure operable piston and a cylinder therefor, said pressure operable piston being of floating type and a power supplying pressure unit including a cylinder and a piston therein, both pistons being double acting, a power operable rod for actuating the last mentioned piston, a power transmitting rod connected to the first piston, means for maintaining the synchronous movement of said pistons, a conduit connecting the rod end of the second cylinder to the rod end of the first cylinder, and another conduit independent of the first conduit and connecting the opposite rodless end of the second cylinder to the opposite rodless end of the first cylinder, each rod being slidably supported by the first mentioned rod ends of the cylinders, and for balanced operation of the system, the combination of a pressure liquid make-up supply conduit for each of the conduits near one end thereof, said make-up conduits having no direct communication with each other, a single make-up reservoir, dual pump means connected to the reservoir and to each of the make-up conduits, an interdependent adjustable pressure relief valve to maintain the proper relationship of pressure to load on the rod end of both cylinders, and an interdependent adjustable pressure relief valve to maintain the proper relationship of pressure to load on the rodless end of said cylinders, said dual pump means combined with both relief valves and including their mutual interdependence comprising the means for maintaining the floating piston in synchronous movement with the piston of the power supplying unit.

2. In a hydraulically operable system having a working unit including a pressure operable piston and a cylinder therefor, said pressure operable piston being ofifloating type, and a power supplying pressure unit including a cylinder and a piston therein, both pistons being double acting, a power operable rod for actuating the last mentioned piston, a power transmitting rod connected to the first piston, means for maintaining the synchronous movement of said pistons, a conduit connecting the rod end of the second cylinder to the rod end of the first cylinder, and another conduit independent of the first conduit and connecting the opposite rodless end of the second cylinder to the opposite rodless end of the first cylinder, each rod being slidably supported by the first mentioned rod ends of the cylinders, and for balanced operation of the system, the combination of a pressure liquid make-up supply conduit for each of the conduits near one end thereof, said make-up conduits having no direct communication with each other, a single make-up reservoir, dual pump means connected to the reservoir and to each of the make-up conduits, interdependent adjustable pressure relief valves controlling the discharges from the pump means to said reservoir for establishing the interrelated pressure to load equilibrium required for maintaining the synchronous movement of the first mentioned pistons.

3. In a hydraulically operable system having a working unit including a pressure operable piston and a cylinder therefor, said pressure operable piston being of floating type, and a power supplying pressure unit including a cylinder and a piston therein, both pistons being double acting, a power operable rod for actuating the last mentioned piston, a power transmitting rod connected to the first piston, means for maintaining the synchronous movement of said pistons, a conduit connecting the rod end of the second cylinder to the rod end of the first cylinder, and another conduit independent of the first conduit and connecting the opposite rodless end of the second cylinder to the opposite rodless end of the first cylinder, each rod being slidably supported by the first mentioned rod ends of the cylinders, and for balanced operation of the system, the combination of a pressure liquid make-up supply conduit for each of the conduits near one end thereof, said make-up conduits having no direct communication with each other, a single make-up reservoir, dual pump means connected to the reservoir and to each of the make-up conduits, said power transmitting rod and connected piston having timed relation operation with said pump means for synchronizing pressure applied to the liquid in the two first mentioned conduits, said dual pump means and power transmitting rod and piston simul taneously applying pressure to one of the two first mentioned conduits at a time, interdependent adjustable pressure relief valves controlling discharges from the make-up conduits to said reservoir, said means for the synchronized application of pressure by the pressure supplying piston and the dual pump means combined with both adjustable pressure relief valves and their mutual interdependence comprising the means for maintaining the synchronous movement of said first mentioned pistons.

4. In a hydraulically operable system having a working unit including a pressure operable piston and a cylinder therefor, said pressure operable piston being of floating type, and a power supplying pressure unit including a cylinder and a piston therein, both pistons being double acting, a power operable rod for actuating the last mentioned piston, a power transmitting rod connected to the first piston, a conduit connecting the rod end of the second cylinder to the rod end of the first cylinder, and another conduit independent of the first conduit and connecting the opposite rodless end of the second cylinder to the opposite rodless end of the first cylinder, each rod being slidably supported by the first mentioned rod ends of the cylinders, and for balanced operation of the system, the combination of a pressure liquid make-up supply conduit for each of the conduits near one end thereof, said make-up conduits having no direct communication with each other, a single make-up reservoir, dual pump means connected to the reservoir, each half of the pump means connecting independently to a make-up conduit, and interdependent adjustable pressure relief valves, each controlling a discharge to said reservoir for venting excess make-up liquid thereto, and means actuating said dual pump means in timed relation with said second piston for make-up supply to and in communication with associated independent conduit connecting the cylinders only when subject to second piston pressure.

5. In a pumping system having a pressure liquid supplying unit including a cylinder and a piston therein, a working unit including a cylinder and a piston therein, said pressure operable piston being of floating type, a power transmitting rod connected to the last mentioned piston, means for normallymaintaining the synchronous movement of said pistons, and normally independent conduit means connecting corresponding ends of said cylinders, and means for restoring the synchronism of the aforesaid pistons, the combination of a bypass means for each independent conduit means, said conduit means having intercommunication only when either of said bypass means is operating, a liquid reservoir positioned above the first cylinder, a piston rod extending from the first cylinder and through the reservoir, power means above the reservoir for reciprocating the piston rod therein, said reservoir included piston rod alternately applying pressure to the working liquid in the independent conduit means, dual make-up pump means operable synchronously with the power means and arranged to withdraw liquid from the reservoir and independently and in timed relationship with the reservoir included piston rod to discharge the reservoir withdrawn makeup liquid to said independent conduit means, the reservoir included piston rod and the corresponding part of the dual pump means applying pressure simultaneously to the liquid in one of the independent conduit means at a time, and interdependent adjustable pressure relief valves controlling the venting of surplus make-up liquid from the independent conduit means, said means, for the synchronized application of pressure by the first mentioned piston and the dual pump means being combined with both adjustable pressure relief valves and including their mutual interdependence operating in conjunction with said by-pass means, comprising the means for maintaining the synchronous movement of said first mentioned pistons and for restoring their synchronism when necessary.

6. In a pumping system having a pressure liquid supplying unit including a cylinder and a piston therein, a rod for the pressure supplying piston, power means for operating said piston and pivotally connected to the remote end of that rod, a working unit including a cylinder and a piston therein, said pressure operable piston being of floating type, a power transmitting rod connected to the last mentioned piston, means for normally maintaining the synchronous movement of the said pistons, and normally independent conduits connecting corresponding rod ends and rodless ends of said cylinders, the combination of a bypass system for restoring the synchronism of said pistons, said conduits having intercommunication only when said bypass system is operating, said pressure supplying system alternating applying pressure to the liquid in the conduits, a reservoir for makeup liquid, dual make-up pump means connected to the reservoir and operable synchronously with the power means for reservoir liquid withdrawal and independently and in timed relationship with the power operable piston to discharge the withdrawn liquid to the independent conduits, the power operable piston and the corresponding part of the dual pump means applying pressure simultaneously to the liquid in one of the conduits at the same time, and interdependent adjustable pressure relief valves to control the independent venting of surplus makeup liquid from the independent conduits, said bypass system combined with means for the synchronized application of pressure by the power transmitting piston and the dual pump means operating in conjunction with both adjustable pressure relief valves and including their mutual interdependence comprising the means for maintaining the synchronous movement of the first mentioned pistons and for restoring their synchronism when necessary.

LEIGH E. HUGHES.

REFERENCES CITED Number UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Henrich July 16, 1878 Bain Nov. 16, 1897 Fulton Mar. 26, 1901 Steiner June 16, 1903 Spink Apr. 3, 1906 Staggs May 28, 1929 Shimer Aug. 15, 1933 Richards June 20, 1939 Reichert Nov. 21, 1939 White Nov. 28, 1939

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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2548807A (en) * 1947-06-21 1951-04-10 Worcester Found Ex Biology Pneumatic type pulsator
US2564164A (en) * 1948-08-09 1951-08-14 Deere & Co Hydraulic transmitter-motor unit
US2676464A (en) * 1946-04-12 1954-04-27 Charles F Warren Jr Hydraulic impact pulsator transmission system
US2882685A (en) * 1956-07-02 1959-04-21 Gleason Works Hydraulic motion transmitting system
US2923131A (en) * 1954-12-31 1960-02-02 Ibm Hydraulic control apparatus
US2975599A (en) * 1957-11-27 1961-03-21 Milton Roy Co Pump with fluid transmission
US3034300A (en) * 1955-10-15 1962-05-15 Alfred H Schutte Supervising device for hydraulic adjusting apparatus in automatic lathes
US3101058A (en) * 1961-06-16 1963-08-20 Jr William H Carr Diaphragm pumping system
US3146596A (en) * 1960-10-19 1964-09-01 Thompson Company Non-complementary cams for double acting fluid motor
US3266217A (en) * 1963-07-19 1966-08-16 Hamac Hansella Ag Apparatus for hydraulic control of the transverse sealing jaws of a packaging machine
US3433018A (en) * 1965-10-23 1969-03-18 Central Brass & Aluminum Found Self-compensating servo system control unit
US3513656A (en) * 1969-03-17 1970-05-26 Gen Signal Corp Pressure translators

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US206018A (en) * 1878-07-16 Improvement in apparatus for transmitting power and motion
US593871A (en) * 1897-11-16 Hydraulic steering mechanism
US670447A (en) * 1900-04-19 1901-03-26 Joseph Newton Fulton Apparatus for transmitting power.
US731241A (en) * 1902-06-07 1903-06-16 John G Steiner Pumping system.
US817014A (en) * 1905-10-20 1906-04-03 Arthur M Spink Fluid-pressure door opener and closer.
US1714528A (en) * 1926-07-23 1929-05-28 Horace M Staggs Hydraulic long-stroke pump mechanism
US1922264A (en) * 1931-10-15 1933-08-15 Oil Well Supply Co Rodless pump
US2162748A (en) * 1937-11-01 1939-06-20 David W Richards Hydraulic water and oil pump
US2180366A (en) * 1938-02-14 1939-11-21 Petty Lab Inc Pumping apparatus
US2181754A (en) * 1937-01-22 1939-11-28 Bendix Prod Corp Hydraulic transmission

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US206018A (en) * 1878-07-16 Improvement in apparatus for transmitting power and motion
US593871A (en) * 1897-11-16 Hydraulic steering mechanism
US670447A (en) * 1900-04-19 1901-03-26 Joseph Newton Fulton Apparatus for transmitting power.
US731241A (en) * 1902-06-07 1903-06-16 John G Steiner Pumping system.
US817014A (en) * 1905-10-20 1906-04-03 Arthur M Spink Fluid-pressure door opener and closer.
US1714528A (en) * 1926-07-23 1929-05-28 Horace M Staggs Hydraulic long-stroke pump mechanism
US1922264A (en) * 1931-10-15 1933-08-15 Oil Well Supply Co Rodless pump
US2181754A (en) * 1937-01-22 1939-11-28 Bendix Prod Corp Hydraulic transmission
US2162748A (en) * 1937-11-01 1939-06-20 David W Richards Hydraulic water and oil pump
US2180366A (en) * 1938-02-14 1939-11-21 Petty Lab Inc Pumping apparatus

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2676464A (en) * 1946-04-12 1954-04-27 Charles F Warren Jr Hydraulic impact pulsator transmission system
US2548807A (en) * 1947-06-21 1951-04-10 Worcester Found Ex Biology Pneumatic type pulsator
US2564164A (en) * 1948-08-09 1951-08-14 Deere & Co Hydraulic transmitter-motor unit
US2923131A (en) * 1954-12-31 1960-02-02 Ibm Hydraulic control apparatus
US3034300A (en) * 1955-10-15 1962-05-15 Alfred H Schutte Supervising device for hydraulic adjusting apparatus in automatic lathes
US2882685A (en) * 1956-07-02 1959-04-21 Gleason Works Hydraulic motion transmitting system
US2975599A (en) * 1957-11-27 1961-03-21 Milton Roy Co Pump with fluid transmission
US3146596A (en) * 1960-10-19 1964-09-01 Thompson Company Non-complementary cams for double acting fluid motor
US3101058A (en) * 1961-06-16 1963-08-20 Jr William H Carr Diaphragm pumping system
US3266217A (en) * 1963-07-19 1966-08-16 Hamac Hansella Ag Apparatus for hydraulic control of the transverse sealing jaws of a packaging machine
US3433018A (en) * 1965-10-23 1969-03-18 Central Brass & Aluminum Found Self-compensating servo system control unit
US3513656A (en) * 1969-03-17 1970-05-26 Gen Signal Corp Pressure translators

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