US2432942A - Submerged combustion system - Google Patents

Submerged combustion system Download PDF

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US2432942A
US2432942A US481792A US48179243A US2432942A US 2432942 A US2432942 A US 2432942A US 481792 A US481792 A US 481792A US 48179243 A US48179243 A US 48179243A US 2432942 A US2432942 A US 2432942A
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means
timer
contacts
switch
pilot
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US481792A
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Theodore S See
Tegarden John Edward
Williams Arthur
Walter G See
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SUBMERGED COMB Co OF AMER
SUBMERGED COMBUSTION Co OF AMERICA Inc
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SUBMERGED COMB Co OF AMER
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23CMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR COMBUSTION USING FLUID FUEL OR SOLID FUEL SUSPENDED IN  A CARRIER GAS OR AIR 
    • F23C3/00Combustion apparatus characterised by the shape of the combustion chamber
    • F23C3/004Combustion apparatus characterised by the shape of the combustion chamber the chamber being arranged for submerged combustion

Description

Dec. 16, 1947. T 5, 555 ET AL 2,432,942

SUBMERGED COMBUSTION SYSTEM Filed April 5, 1943 3 Sheets-Sheet l Dec. 16, 1947. 'r. 5. SEE ET AL SUBMERGED COMBUSTION SYSTEM Filed April 5, 1943 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 m 5 dew M Hm d 6 1 Dec. 16, 1947. 5, SEE ET AL 2,432,942

SUBMERGED COMBUSTION SYSTEM Filed April 5, 1945 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 a2 T/A ram 27 72 T:

jg www ww p a-J w Patented Dec. 16, 1947 SUBMERGED COMBUSTION SYSTEM Theodore S. See, Hammond, Ind., John Edward Tegarden, Chicago, Ill., and Arthur Williams, Munster, and Walter G. See, Hammond, Ind., assignors to Submerged Combustion Company of America. Inc., Hammond, Ind., a corporation of Indiana Application April 5, 1943, Serial No. 481,792

8 Claims. (01. 158-28) 1 This invention relates to a. submerged combustion system and more particularly to a, system for the control of submerged combustion burners.

The expression submerged combustion is used herein to describe combustion beneath the surface of the liquid in direct contact with the liquid and is to be distinguished from the older methods of heating liquids which involve the transfer of the heat from the products of combustion through a metal wall, as, for example, in a steam boiler.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide a submerged combustion system, including a submerged combustion burner, means for supplying fuel thereto, ignition means for the fuel and motor actuated timer means controlled by the temperature of the liquid to be heated for automatically regulating the fuel supply means and the ignition means.

Another object of the invention is to provide a submerged combustion system including a submerged combustion burner, means for supplying pilot fuel thereto, means for supplying main fuel thereto and motor actuated timer means controlled by the temperature of the liquid which is being heated by the burner for automatically regulating the pilot fuel supply means, the main fuel supply means and the ignition means.

Another object of the invention is to provide a submerged combustion system of the type described including means to prevent the operation of the pilot fuel supply means upon failure of operation of the ignition means;

Still another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved submerged combustion system of the type described, including means to maintain the operation of the pilot fuel supply means for a period after ignition independently of the timer operation,

Still a further object of the invention is to provide a submergedcombustion system of the type described including means independent of the timer means to prevent the operation of the main fuel supply means, or both the main fuel supply means and the pilot fuel supply means when the'gas pressure is below a predetermined minimum.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a new and improved submerged combustion system of the type described including means to prevent the operation of the main fuel supply means upon failure of operation of the pilot fuel supply means.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent by reference to the following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 represents a general layout of one type of submerged combustion burner system which may be employed in the practice of the invention;

Figure 2 represents a simplified wiring diagram comprising various circuits utilized in the operation of the submerged burner system shown in Figure 1;

Figures 3 to 8, inclusive, represent diagrammatically the operation of the motor actuated timer means employed to control the submerged combustion burner system in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the invention.

Referring to Figure 1, the submerged combustion system shown therein comprises a submerged combustion burner, generally shown at 2, which is disposed in a suitable tank 4 containing a liquid 6. As shown, the outer casing 8 of the burner 2 preferably extends downwardly along the inside wall of the tank 4 and branches out at the bottom as an L-shaped member in which the base of the L is formed by the conduit I 0. The combustion gases are discharged directly into the liquid 6 through the holes 12, and the discharge of these gases serves to agitate the liquid. Other modifications of the L shape may be used, the principal ones, however, all involving some form of an L shape, such as for example, a U-shape, which is the equivalent of two Us, with the base of one opposite to the base of the other, or a T-shape which is equivalent.to two Us with the sides coinciding and the bases of the Us extending in opposite directions. The present invention is not concerned specifically with the form of the submerged burner itself. Various types of burners may be used, such as described, for example, in See et al., U. S. Patent 2,118,479.

The principal elements of the burner illustrated in Figure 1, in addition to those previously described, comprise an outer passageway l4 through which the main supply of fuel is introduced, an intermediate passageway l6 through which the main supply of air is introduced, and an inner passageway l8 where the pilot fuel and air are supplied and ignited by means of an igniter indicated at 20. The main fuel and air supplies pass through a burner plate 22 provided with suitable holes and are ignited by the pilot flame passing downwardly through the inner passageway l8, thereby causing the main combustion to take place at or beyond the burner plate 22 in direct contact with the liquid 6.

as will be understood, the air and fuel must be supplied atpressures great enough to overcome the head of the liquid. The air is supplied in the system shown in Figure lby means of a blower generally illustrated at 24. The air is taken into the blower through an air cleaner 28, from which it passes through conduit 28 into the blower and is then forced through conduit 80 and a conduit 36. From conduit 30 a minor proportion of the air is forced through conduit 30 and is referred to herein as the pilot air supply. Most of the air, however, continues through conduit 40 and is introduced into the passageway I of the burner 2.

The pilot air flows through pilot air control valve 42, a measuring orifice 40, and through the pilot air line into the burner head wherein it passes around the pilot tube 44 and thence into the pilot manifold I8. Shut off cocks 48 are provided on each side of measuring orifice 48 so that a manometer can be easily connected when desired in order to determine the pilot air flow.

A bypass governor 50 controls the gas supply so that its pressure is the same as that of the air supply and also permits the compressed gas to flow from the high pressure or exhaust side of the gascompressor 52 through the governor back to the low pressure or intake side via conduit 54 when the solution or liquid 6 is at the proper temperature and the gas control valves. hereinafter described, are in closed position so as to stop any gas flow to the burner. The equalization of pressure between the gas and air supply is maintained by pressure equalizing lines 56 and 58. In case the gas pressure is sufliciently high so that a gas compressor is not required, it will be understood that a different type of governor may be used and that the bypass arrangement 54 will not be necessary. A gas strainer 60 is provided and should be periodically washed and cleaned. If gas is available at a pressure sufficiently high to overcome the resistance due to the head of solution in the tank 4, the gasmain is connected directly to the governor 50.

From the governor 50 the gas is passed through a gas supply pipe 62 and one part, the pilot gas, passes through a conduit 64 controlled by a solenoid actuated valve 66, the other part, which forms the main gas supply, passing through conduit 68 controlled by a solenoid actuated valve 10. Conduit 68 is provided with a measuring orifice 12 to control the flow of gas and may be provided on either side of said orifice with suitable cocks, not shown, similar to cocks 48 to which a manometer may be attached to determine the gas pressure. A manually controlled valve 14 is also provided to control the main gas flow. The main gas supply flows through conduit 6B and enters the passageway I4, from which it passes through the burner plate 22 for combustion with the ma n air supply flowing through the annular passageway IS.

The pilot fuel supply flows through conduit 64, manually controlled pilot gas control valve IS, measuring orifice 18, and is conducted to the igniter 20 through pilot gas tube 44. It will be understood that the igniter may be above the liquid level, as shown, at the liquid level, or below it. A sight port is provided at 80 to view the flames if desired. A pair of cocks 82 are provided for a manometer which can be used if necessary to determine the gas flow through the conduit 64.

The igniter 20 consists of a wire which becomes red hot when heated by a source of electrical energy supplied through a conductor 84. The conductor 84 is preferably run through the 4 inside of the pilot air supply conduit 00 which it enters at point 00, through a suitable packing box or connection chamber 00, the latter being connected to a cable 92 carrying the conductor 84. The cable 92 in turn is connected to a suitable step-down transformer generally indicated at 94. The step-down transformer 04 receives its current from a high voltage line, as described in Figure 2. Also shown in Figure l is a constant current transformer 06, which preferably consists of a 3-pillar laminated iron core with a stationary low voltage secondary coil below, and a fioating 110 volt primary coil above, both of which are mounted around the central pillar. Any variations in line voltage within above or below normal change the position of the primary coil but will not change the secondary ignition current. An additional step-down transformer 32.is supplied for the timer control circuit. A control box 98 houses transformer 32 and most of the control elements which will be described more fully hereinafter with reference to Figure 2.

- The operation of the system is also controlled in response to the temperature of the liquid 0 by means of a thermostatic element I00 connected through a line I02 and capable of actuating a switch I04, which in turn closes a circuit to initiate a cycle of operations in the manner hereinafter described. The controlling push buttons are generally indicated at I06, I06 the adjustment for the thermostatic control at I08, the high voltage line carrying the source of electrical energy at I I0, and the line carrying the source of eleritirgcal energy to the compressors 24 and 52 at The burner system previously described is controlled electrically in a manner which may be best understood by reference to Figure 2. As shown in Figure 2, a source of electrical energy (of any type which is required to drive the motor H4) is passed through the lines or conductors L L and L to a motor I I4 which serves to drive the blower 24, or both the blower 24 and the gas compressor 52 if a compressor is necessary. The motor is started by pressing the start button indicated at I06 which serves to energize a solenoid M, of a relay switch III, thus closing and holding closed the contacts M M M and M of said relay switch. An overload relay 0L is provided to protect the motor from overloading and to break the circuit through the solenoid M by breaking the contacts 0L1 when an overload occurs, otherwise the contacts 0L1 are normally closed as illustrated. The motor control circuit thus extends from one side of the secondary winding of the transformer 32 through a fuse F5, the normally closed stop switch I06, the start switch I00, the solenoid M of relay switch I I I, the overload switch 0L1, and thence back to the other side of the secondary winding of the transformer 32, through a return conductor C2 which is preferably grounded. Thus, it will be seen that when the starter button at I 06 is pressed the motor I I4 runs continuously, thereby driving the air compressor and the gas compressor and causing a constant volume of air to pass through the burner thereby continuously agitating the liquid Ii regardless of whether the fuel has been ignited or the liquid is being heated.

As shown in Figure 2, the lines L and L have takeofis to the transformer 32 which transforms the current from a voltage of 500 volts to volts. The 110 volt circuits are grounded at G and one side of the line passes through the starter button at I06, and the holding switch contacts M, which remains closed to maintain the circuit through coil M even after the start button opens when released after being pressed down to start the system in operation. The timer circuit also passes through the manually operable off and on switch II8, which is normally closed, and the thermostat switch I04, which is closed if the temperature of the liquid 6 is below the thermostatic setting. Fromthe thermostat I04 the current passes through a, conductor c1 to a motor actuated timer generally indicated at I20 in Figure 2. The invention is not limited to the use of any particular motor actuated timer but may be illustrated by reference to a timer of the type described in U. S. Patent 2,175,864. The principal elements of this type of timer are shown diagrammatically in Figures 3 to 8. These Figures 3 to 8 also show the various positions of the various elements of the timer at different stages of the submerged combustion control operation, and these various positions of said elements, together with the operation thereof, will be described hereinafter.

The current flowing through conductor 01 energizes the timer motor I22 in a manner which will be hereinafter described and the other side of the line returns to the transformer 32 through v lay 20R, and thence through the grounded conductor C2 to complete the circuits.

Also, as shown in Figure 2 a return circuit may be traced from thermostat switch I 04 through conductor as, contacts 2CR1 of control relay 2GB, conductor 05 and thence either through conductor Cs and the coil of control relay 20R directly to the return side of the circuit, or through conductor c7 and the coil of solenoid actuated pilot gas valve 66 to the return side of the circuit comprising the conductor 02.

Another circuit may be traced from thermostat switch I04 through conductor c3, timer contacts T contacts 2CR2 of control relay 20R, contacts P and P of gas pressure safety switches, which would be normally placed ahead of drainage trap 60, of Figure 1, in the gas supply line 34, conductor ca, and the coil of solenoid actuated main gas valve 10 to the conductor 62 comprising the return side of the circuit.

Another circuit may be traced from the thermostat switch I04 through conductor 0:, timer contacts T conductor 09, and the coil of a, control relay ICE to the return conductor 02.

Fuses are, provided at various places in the various circuits at F F F F and F for safety purposes, as will be readily understood. Certain other devices and safety precautions may be provided without departing from the invention. For example, pressure switches like the switches P and P may also be placed in the conductor 01 ahead of the pilot gas valve 66 thereby to break the flow of gas to the pilot valve in the event that the gas pressure is too low.

As will be observed from Figure 2, the gas pressure safety switches P and l? are normally closed and the same is true with respect to the contact 0L1 of the overload relay 0L. If the gas pressure is too low, contacts P and P will open, breaking the circuit through the main gas valve I0 and causing the latter to close. If the motor II4 burns out, the overload will cause contacts 0L1 to open, breaking the circuit through the coil M and shutting down the entire apparatus. All of the other contacts are shownin a, normally open position, which is the position they occupy when the apparatus is entirely out of operation. However, it will be understood that after the push button I06 has been pressed to start the system in operation the contacts M M, M and M will be closed by the coil M and will remain closed until the stop" button at I06 is pressed or until the circuit is broken through the coil M in some other manner, as by operation of the overload relay 0L, as previously explained.

The thermostat switch I04 is shown with the contacts normally closed which assumes that the liquid to be heated is below the temperature desired at the time the start button I06 is pressed. The timer contacts T and T are shown as normally open, but it should be understood, as will be hereinafter explained, that just as soon as coil G is energized, as shown in Fig. 4, the timer mechanism is released and contacts T and T assume a closed position, thereby causing the timer motor I22 to be energized and at the same time Y energizing the coil of the control relay ICR. The

coil G isenergized from the secondary winding of the transformer 32, upon closure of the start switch I06, provided that the thermal switch I04 and the main switch II8 are in closed position. After being thus initially energized by the closure of the start switch I06, the coil G will be main tained in energized condition through the closure of switch contacts M, until said contacts open as a result of the operation of the stop switch I062 When the coil of the control relay ICE is energized it closes the contacts ICRi and ICRz, thereby causing the transformers 94 and 96 to be energized, which in turn causes a flow of electrical energy to the hot wire igniter 20. Thus, the ignition transformer circuit can not be energized prior to the energization of the timer motor I22, and hence the opening of the gas valves 66 and I0 will be prevented until the igniter is operating.

As will be observed, the energization of the ignition transformer circuit also causes the coil of series relay iSR to be energized, thereby closing contacts ISRi. At such time the timer motor I22 is in operation, and after a predetermined interval will close contacts T, as shown in Fig. 5. If the ignition transformer circuit, for any reason, has not previously been energized, relay contacts ISRi will be open and nothing can happen in the circuit controlled by the contacts T Thus, the series relay ISR provides means to prevent the operation of the pilot fuel supply means and subsequent operation of the main fuel supply means if there has been a failure in the electrical system of the igniter. If the igniter is operating satisfactorily, however, the contacts lSRi will be closed and the circuit through the coil of control relay 2CR will be energized upon the closing of the timer contacts T by the timer motor. At the same time the circuit through the conductors cs, 01, and the solenoid of pilot gas valve 66 will be energized, opening the pilot gas valve and permitting a flow of pilot gas past the igniter 20,

which will thereupon ignite the gas. It will be understood that the timer motor is set to allow a predetermined time interval between the energization of the igniter circuit and the closing of the timer contacts T to energize the pilot gas valve circuit. a

As soon as control relay 2GB. is energized it will close the contacts 2CR1 in the pilot gas valve circuit and thereby provide means to maintain the operation of the pilot fuel supply for a period after ignition independently of the timer. Closure of the contacts 2CR1 also serves to energize the relay 20R through the conductor ca. Thus, the subsequent opening or closing of the timer contacts T no longer afiects the operation of the pilot gas valve 68. e

The control relay 2CR when energized also closes relay contacts 2CR2 in the main gas valve circuit and after a predetermined interval, when timer contacts 'I are closed by further operation of the timer motor I22, as shown in Fig. 6, the solenoid of the main gas valve III will be energized, thereby permitting free iiow of the main gas supply to the burner, as previously described. The pilot gas valve also continues to remain open and both gas valves will remain open until the circuit is broken through their respective solenoids, which may be accomplished either by opening the thermostat switch contacts I N, or the manual switch H8, or the stop switch at I06, or by opening the timer contacts T, or by opening the gas pressure safety switches 13 and P. Since it is essential that the system should remain in operation until the liquid reaches a desired temperture and, to this end, that the main gas valve shall remain open, contacts T should remain closed even though the timer motor contacts T be opened by the timer motor to disable the same. 1

Before the timer motor is stopped, however, the timer contacts T are opened, as shown in Fig. 7, so that the coil of control relay ICE is de-energized, and the ignition system is thereby deenergized by the opening of relay contacts ICRi and ICRz. The relay ISR also becomes de-energized, thus opening relay contacts ISR1 and restoring a Dart of the circuit through the pilot gas valve to its initial position. The opening of the contacts T to de-energize the ignition circuit may be accomplished either prior to or simultaneously with the opening of the motor contacts T. However, after the timer motor I22 is stopped, with the timer contacts T closed, the apparatus will continue to supply gas to the burner for combustion beneath the surface of the liquid so long as the thermostat calls for heat.

When the thermostat switch I04 opens, the fuel supply system will automatically shut down because the solenoid valves 66 and I0, respectively, of the pilot fuel supply means and the main fuel supply means, will both be de-energized. The clutch coil G of the timer motor is also deenergized and the timer mechanism is reset to its initial position by a suitable spring in which energy has been stored by the operation of the timer motor, as hereinafter explained. As a result, all of the timer contacts T, T '1 and T will be restored to their original open positions when the switch I04 opens. When the thermostat switch is again closed, due to a falling temperature in the liquid, the operation will be repeated. If it is desired merely to run the blower motor I I4 and to disconnect the burner, this may be accomplished by opening switch II8. Normally, however, the entire system will remain energized and the burner operation will be subject to the opening and closing of the thermostat switch I04. 7

The timer mechanism employed in combination with the other elements, as previously described, does not 'per se form a part of this invention and it will be understood that various types of timer mechanisms may be employed in the practice of the invention. As an example of a timer mechanism which may be used, reference is made to U. 8. Patent 2,175,864 which discloses such a mechanism although not in a combination of this type. For the sake of clarity. the details of said mechanism will not be given here except so far as is necessary to understand the application of this mechanism to the present invention. The operation of the timer mechanism is illustrated herein in Figures 3 to 8, inclusive, and may be described as follows.

Preferably the elements of the timer mechanism include a timer motor I22, a latching device LA, a spring 8 connected to the latching device, a clutch CL, a clutch spring S the clutch coil G previously referred to, a third spring 8, four sets of contacts T, T T and '1', also previously referred to, and means to open and close said contacts represented by the cam elements C, C, C C C C, C, and C against which the contacts are biased by means of a suitable spring, not shown. A stop ST is also provided to limit the movement of the latch mechanism LA. The cam members C to C" have been represented as being carried by a shaft SH, which is driven by the timer motor I22 through the clutch CL.

In Figure 3 the timer mechanism is shown with the timer motor de-energized. In this position the spring S holds the latch bar LA against the I stop ST andthe stops 1: hold the contacts T,

T, T, and T away from each other irrespective of the positions of the cams C to C". In this position, as previously explained, the clutch coil (3 is also de-energized, and as shown the clutch is held open by spring S The spring 3 is in its normal uncoiled position with respect to the drum or pulley D. When the clutch coil G is energized in the manner previously explained with respect to Figure 2 it moves the bar B against the pressure of spring S to cause the clutch CL to engage and simultaneously unlatches the latch bar LA, moving it against the pressure of the spring 8 and causing the stops 1!. to disengage and permit the contacts T, P, T, and T to assume their normally biased positions against the cams C to C", as illustrated in Figure 4. Since the cams C to C are so positioned that the contacts T and T are then closed, the timer motor will start immediately upon the closing of contacts T and will begin to drive the shaft SH through the clutch CL and store energy in the spring 8 by winding it around the drum D, as shown, or in any other suitable manner. The driving of the shaft SH will cause a rotation or other movement of the cam surfaces C to C and as these cams move to various positions the contacts will be opened or closed in the manner previously explained with reference to Figure 2.

As shown in Figure 5, the neat operation of the timer is the closing of contacts T which causes the opening of the pilot gas solenoid valve 68 in the manner previously explained. At this point.-

contacts T, T, and T are all closed but contacts 'I' which control the main gas supply are still open, thus giving an opportunity for the pilot gas to ignite ahead of the main gas.

The next step is the closing of contacts T, which is illustrated in Figure 6 wherein all of the contacts are closed. The closing 01' contacts '1" opens the main gas valve III and places the burner in full operation until the thermostat switch I04 opens (Figure 2) and breaks the motor circuit through conductors c1 and 02.

While the burner is in full operation the ignition system is no longer necessary, so that the contacts T controlling the ignition system may be opened as shown in Figure 7. Finally, after the burner has been placed in full operation, it is also necessary to stop the operation of the timer motor in order to keep the contacts T and T closed, and this is accomplished by opening the motor contacts T, so that when the burner is in full operation the various elements of the timer will assume the positions shown in Figure 8. In the positions shown in Figure 8 the clutch coil G is still energized but the timer motor I22 isno longer running. The clutch is strong enough to hold the shaft SH against the tendency of the spring S to restore to its initial position. The latch bar LA is still held in unlatched position due to the fact that the coil G is still energized. As soon as the coil G is de-energized by the opening of the thermostat switch I04 (Figure 2) the clutch CL will disengage due to the spring S and the latch bar LA will simultaneously move to the left, locking the contacts T, T Tl, and T away from the cams C to C and thereby permitting the spring S to restore to its initial position and at the same time move the shaft SH to cause the cams C to C to restore to their initial positions, all as shown in Figure l. As soon as the thermostat calls for heat, the cycle is repeated in the manner alrealy described.

It will be understood that the description of the timer mechanism is merely for the purpose of illustration and that the elements thereof do not necessarily haye the appearance of the illustrative elements used in Figures 3 to 8. Thus, the cams C to C are not in fact cam wheels in the specific apparatus described in U. S. Patent No. 2,175,864, but instead perform the function of the plate (82). Nevertheless, the cams could replace the plate and have been used in order to clarify the description.

It will be understood that the positions of the cams C to (3 shown in Figures 3 to 8 are approximate for the purpose of illustration only and may be varied to suit the particular desired timing relationship. Thus, the cams may be varied not only as to the cam surface but as to the size of the cams.

The invention is of importance because it provides a new and improved submerged combustion system in which the operating parts are relatively simple and in which the operation is safe and satisfactory. Systems of this type may be used for many purposes, for example, in heating pickling baths for steel pickling operations, for evaporation, water softening, and for other purposes to which submerged combustion is applicable.

Having thus described the invention, what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

l. A submerged combustion system comprising a liquid submerged combustion burner; fuel supply means for delivering fuel to the burner, including fuel supply conduit means and electrically operated fuel flow control means; ignition means for igniting the fuel; electrical control means adapted for connection with a suitable source of energizing power, for operating said flow control means and said ignition means in a predetermined time delayed sequence; said electrical control means comprising an operating circuit for said flow control means including a control switch for controlling the operation of said flow control means, a control circuit including an igniter timing switch for operating said ignition means, timer means operable initially to close said igniter timing switch, relay means operable by said timer means following closure of said igniter timing switch to thereafter close said control switch,- and thermally responsive switch means responsive to the temperature of the liquid to be heated for selectively rendering said electrical control means operative or inoperative.

2. A submerged combustion system as set forth in claim 1 wherein said electrical control means includes an additional timing switch operable by said timer means to energize said operating circuit after a predetermined time-delay interval following closure of said igniter timer switch.

3. A submerged combustion system as set forth in claim 1 wherein said electrical control means includes an additional timing switch operable by said timer means to energize said operating circuit after a predetermined time-delay interval following closure of said igniter timing switch, said timer means being operable thereafter to open said igniter timing switch to disable said ignition means, and means to maintain said valve operating circuit after the igniter switch has opened.

4. A submerged combustion system as set forth in claim 1 wherein said electrical control means includes an additional timing switch operable by said timer means to energize said operating circuit after a predetermined time-delay interval following closure of said igniter timing switch, a driving motor selectively clutchable with said timing means to drive the same, said timing means being operable to stop said motor, after said operating circuit has been energized, with the timing means in cocked position maintaining said operating circuit, and means operable to release said timer means for return from cooked to standby position upon disconnection of the electrical control means from the energizing power source.

5. A submerged combustion system as set forth in claim 1 wherein said electrical control means includes an additional timing switch operable by said timer means to energize said operating circuit after a predetermined time-delay interval following closure of said igniter timing switch, a driving motor selectively clutchable with said timing means to drive the same, said timing means being operable to stop said motor after said operating circuit has been energized, with the timing means in cocked position maintaining said operating circuit, and means operable to release said timer means for return from cocked to standby position upon failure of the ruel supply.

6. A submerged combustion system as set forth in claim 1 wherein said electrical control means includes an additional timing switch operable by said timer means to energize said operating circuit after a predetermined time-delay interval following closure of said igniter timing switch, a driving motor selectively clutchable with said timing means to drive the same, said timing means being operable to stop said motor after said operating circuit has been energized, with the timing means in cocked position maintaining said operating circuit, and means operable to release said timer means for return from cocked to standby position upon failure of the fuel supply, said means comprising normally closed low pressure switch means in said operating circuit and 11 adapted to open when pressure of the fuel supply falls below a predetermined value.

'7. A submerged combustion system, as set fort in claim 1, including safety switch means in said operating circuit and actuated in response to the operation of said ignition means to prevent operation of said relay means in the event of failure of the ignition means to function.

8. A submerged combustion system comprising a liquid submerged combustion burner, pilot fuel supply means and main fuel supply means for delivering pilot fuel and main fuel to the burner, including pilot fuel and main fuel supply conduit means, and electrically operated pilot and main fuel flow control means operatively associated, respectively, with said pilot and main fuel supply conduit means; ignition means for igniting the fuel supplied at said burner; electrical control means for operating said pilot and main fuel flow control means and said ignition means in a. predetermined time delayed sequence, said electrical control means comprising an operating circuit for said pilot fuel flow control means, said operating circuit including a control switch for controlling the operation of said pilot fuel flow control means, an operating circuit for said main fuel flow control means, said last named operating circuit including a control switch for controlling the operation of said main fuel flow control means, timer means operable to close a plurality of timing switches, respectively, in a predetermined sequential order, control circuit means including a first of said timing switches for operating said ignition means, circuit control means for controlling the pilot flow control means 12 and including a second of said timing switches. circuit control means for controlling the main fuel control means and including a third of saidtiming switches, and means responsive to energization of said ignition means for preparing the pilot circuit control means, said first, second,

and third switches being actuated in sequence.

whereby upon operation of the timer means the ignition means, pilot fuel supply means and main fuel supply means are sequentially operated. THEODORE 8. SEE. JOHN EDWARD 'I'EGARDEN. ARTHUR WILLIAMS. WALTER G. BEE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,174,533 See et al. Oct. 3, 1939 2,118,479 See et al May 24, 1938 2,032,046 Branche Feb. 25, 1938 1,807,376 Braden May 26, 1931 2,174,275 Raney Sept. 26, 1939 2,345,399 Jones Mar. 28, 1944 2,175,864 Anderson Oct. 10, 1939 2,286,156 Petersen June 9, 1942 2,203,907 Hines June 11, 1940 2,117,323 Hines May 17, 1938 2,244,401 Pelikan June 3, 1941 2,265,259 Wynn Dec. 9, 1941 2,119,064 Watanabe May 31, 1938

US481792A 1943-04-05 1943-04-05 Submerged combustion system Expired - Lifetime US2432942A (en)

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Cited By (43)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2596729A (en) * 1947-11-05 1952-05-13 See Walter George Fuel ignition system
US3241548A (en) * 1962-05-07 1966-03-22 Selas Corp Of America Submerged combustion apparatus embodying a shallow, closed, rectilinear tank and upstanding liquid separation chamber at one end thereof
US3267993A (en) * 1964-01-08 1966-08-23 Fennell Corp Heat transfer system for a liquid bath
DE1233083B (en) * 1953-03-04 1967-01-26 Selas Corp Of America gas burner
US3620571A (en) * 1969-06-16 1971-11-16 Calvin H Billings Single-well heated gas mining method and apparatus
US3913560A (en) * 1972-08-04 1975-10-21 Aquitaine Petrole Submerged combustion installation
US4059386A (en) * 1976-01-21 1977-11-22 A. O. Smith Corporation Combustion heating apparatus to improve operation of gas pilot burners
US4376626A (en) * 1979-10-09 1983-03-15 Etablissements Eugene Scholtes Device for the control of a sequential burner of a cooking apparatus
US8707740B2 (en) 2011-10-07 2014-04-29 Johns Manville Submerged combustion glass manufacturing systems and methods
US8875544B2 (en) 2011-10-07 2014-11-04 Johns Manville Burner apparatus, submerged combustion melters including the burner, and methods of use
US8973405B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2015-03-10 Johns Manville Apparatus, systems and methods for reducing foaming downstream of a submerged combustion melter producing molten glass
US8973400B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2015-03-10 Johns Manville Methods of using a submerged combustion melter to produce glass products
US8991215B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2015-03-31 Johns Manville Methods and systems for controlling bubble size and bubble decay rate in foamed glass produced by a submerged combustion melter
US8997525B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2015-04-07 Johns Manville Systems and methods for making foamed glass using submerged combustion
US9021838B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2015-05-05 Johns Manville Systems and methods for glass manufacturing
US9032760B2 (en) 2012-07-03 2015-05-19 Johns Manville Process of using a submerged combustion melter to produce hollow glass fiber or solid glass fiber having entrained bubbles, and burners and systems to make such fibers
US9096453B2 (en) 2012-06-11 2015-08-04 Johns Manville Submerged combustion melting processes for producing glass and similar materials, and systems for carrying out such processes
US9096452B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2015-08-04 Johns Manville Methods and systems for destabilizing foam in equipment downstream of a submerged combustion melter
US9115017B2 (en) 2013-01-29 2015-08-25 Johns Manville Methods and systems for monitoring glass and/or foam density as a function of vertical position within a vessel
US9227865B2 (en) 2012-11-29 2016-01-05 Johns Manville Methods and systems for making well-fined glass using submerged combustion
US9492831B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2016-11-15 Johns Manville Methods and systems for destabilizing foam in equipment downstream of a submerged combustion melter
US9533905B2 (en) 2012-10-03 2017-01-03 Johns Manville Submerged combustion melters having an extended treatment zone and methods of producing molten glass
US9643869B2 (en) 2012-07-03 2017-05-09 Johns Manville System for producing molten glasses from glass batches using turbulent submerged combustion melting
USRE46462E1 (en) 2011-10-07 2017-07-04 Johns Manville Apparatus, systems and methods for conditioning molten glass
US9731990B2 (en) 2013-05-30 2017-08-15 Johns Manville Submerged combustion glass melting systems and methods of use
US9751792B2 (en) 2015-08-12 2017-09-05 Johns Manville Post-manufacturing processes for submerged combustion burner
US9777922B2 (en) 2013-05-22 2017-10-03 Johns Mansville Submerged combustion burners and melters, and methods of use
US9776903B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2017-10-03 Johns Manville Apparatus, systems and methods for processing molten glass
US9815726B2 (en) 2015-09-03 2017-11-14 Johns Manville Apparatus, systems, and methods for pre-heating feedstock to a melter using melter exhaust
US9982884B2 (en) 2015-09-15 2018-05-29 Johns Manville Methods of melting feedstock using a submerged combustion melter
USRE46896E1 (en) 2010-09-23 2018-06-19 Johns Manville Methods and apparatus for recycling glass products using submerged combustion
US10041666B2 (en) 2015-08-27 2018-08-07 Johns Manville Burner panels including dry-tip burners, submerged combustion melters, and methods
US10081563B2 (en) 2015-09-23 2018-09-25 Johns Manville Systems and methods for mechanically binding loose scrap
US10131563B2 (en) 2013-05-22 2018-11-20 Johns Manville Submerged combustion burners
US10138151B2 (en) 2013-05-22 2018-11-27 Johns Manville Submerged combustion burners and melters, and methods of use
US10144666B2 (en) 2015-10-20 2018-12-04 Johns Manville Processing organics and inorganics in a submerged combustion melter
US10183884B2 (en) 2013-05-30 2019-01-22 Johns Manville Submerged combustion burners, submerged combustion glass melters including the burners, and methods of use
US10196294B2 (en) 2016-09-07 2019-02-05 Johns Manville Submerged combustion melters, wall structures or panels of same, and methods of using same
US10233105B2 (en) 2016-10-14 2019-03-19 Johns Manville Submerged combustion melters and methods of feeding particulate material into such melters
US10246362B2 (en) 2016-06-22 2019-04-02 Johns Manville Effective discharge of exhaust from submerged combustion melters and methods
US10301208B2 (en) 2016-08-25 2019-05-28 Johns Manville Continuous flow submerged combustion melter cooling wall panels, submerged combustion melters, and methods of using same
US10322960B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2019-06-18 Johns Manville Controlling foam in apparatus downstream of a melter by adjustment of alkali oxide content in the melter
US10337732B2 (en) 2016-08-25 2019-07-02 Johns Manville Consumable tip burners, submerged combustion melters including same, and methods

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US1807376A (en) * 1925-03-09 1931-05-26 Nu Way Corp Liquid fuel burning system
US2119064A (en) * 1934-03-12 1938-05-31 Watanabe Yoshito Automatic telegraph receiving machine
US2175864A (en) * 1935-06-01 1939-10-10 Eagle Signal Corp Multicircuit timing switch
US2117323A (en) * 1935-11-06 1938-05-17 Union Switch & Signal Co Railway switch controlling apparatus
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US2118479A (en) * 1938-03-24 1938-05-24 Submerged Comb Company Of Amer Submerged combustion burner
US2265259A (en) * 1938-11-05 1941-12-09 Gen Railway Signal Co Switch and signal control system for railroads
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Cited By (63)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2596729A (en) * 1947-11-05 1952-05-13 See Walter George Fuel ignition system
DE1233083B (en) * 1953-03-04 1967-01-26 Selas Corp Of America gas burner
US3241548A (en) * 1962-05-07 1966-03-22 Selas Corp Of America Submerged combustion apparatus embodying a shallow, closed, rectilinear tank and upstanding liquid separation chamber at one end thereof
US3267993A (en) * 1964-01-08 1966-08-23 Fennell Corp Heat transfer system for a liquid bath
US3620571A (en) * 1969-06-16 1971-11-16 Calvin H Billings Single-well heated gas mining method and apparatus
US3913560A (en) * 1972-08-04 1975-10-21 Aquitaine Petrole Submerged combustion installation
US4059386A (en) * 1976-01-21 1977-11-22 A. O. Smith Corporation Combustion heating apparatus to improve operation of gas pilot burners
US4376626A (en) * 1979-10-09 1983-03-15 Etablissements Eugene Scholtes Device for the control of a sequential burner of a cooking apparatus
US9533906B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2017-01-03 Johns Manville Burner apparatus, submerged combustion melters including the burner, and methods of use
US10081565B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2018-09-25 Johns Manville Systems and methods for making foamed glass using submerged combustion
US9776903B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2017-10-03 Johns Manville Apparatus, systems and methods for processing molten glass
US8973400B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2015-03-10 Johns Manville Methods of using a submerged combustion melter to produce glass products
US8991215B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2015-03-31 Johns Manville Methods and systems for controlling bubble size and bubble decay rate in foamed glass produced by a submerged combustion melter
US8997525B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2015-04-07 Johns Manville Systems and methods for making foamed glass using submerged combustion
US9021838B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2015-05-05 Johns Manville Systems and methods for glass manufacturing
US9840430B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2017-12-12 Johns Manville Methods and systems for controlling bubble size and bubble decay rate in foamed glass produced by a submerged combustion melter
US9481592B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2016-11-01 Johns Manville Submerged combustion glass manufacturing system and method
US9096452B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2015-08-04 Johns Manville Methods and systems for destabilizing foam in equipment downstream of a submerged combustion melter
US10472268B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2019-11-12 Johns Manville Systems and methods for glass manufacturing
US10322960B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2019-06-18 Johns Manville Controlling foam in apparatus downstream of a melter by adjustment of alkali oxide content in the melter
US9481593B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2016-11-01 Johns Manville Methods of using a submerged combustion melter to produce glass products
US9573831B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2017-02-21 Johns Manville Systems and methods for glass manufacturing
US9492831B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2016-11-15 Johns Manville Methods and systems for destabilizing foam in equipment downstream of a submerged combustion melter
US9676652B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2017-06-13 Johns Manville Systems and methods for making foamed glass using submerged combustion
US8973405B2 (en) 2010-06-17 2015-03-10 Johns Manville Apparatus, systems and methods for reducing foaming downstream of a submerged combustion melter producing molten glass
USRE46896E1 (en) 2010-09-23 2018-06-19 Johns Manville Methods and apparatus for recycling glass products using submerged combustion
USRE46462E1 (en) 2011-10-07 2017-07-04 Johns Manville Apparatus, systems and methods for conditioning molten glass
US9580344B2 (en) 2011-10-07 2017-02-28 Johns Manville Burner apparatus, submerged combustion melters including the burner, and methods of use
US9776901B2 (en) 2011-10-07 2017-10-03 Johns Manville Submerged combustion glass manufacturing system and method
US9957184B2 (en) 2011-10-07 2018-05-01 Johns Manville Submerged combustion glass manufacturing system and method
US8707740B2 (en) 2011-10-07 2014-04-29 Johns Manville Submerged combustion glass manufacturing systems and methods
US8875544B2 (en) 2011-10-07 2014-11-04 Johns Manville Burner apparatus, submerged combustion melters including the burner, and methods of use
US9650277B2 (en) 2012-04-27 2017-05-16 Johns Manville Methods and systems for destabilizing foam in equipment downstream of a submerged combustion melter
US10087097B2 (en) 2012-06-11 2018-10-02 Johns Manville Submerged combustion melting processes for producing glass and similar materials, and systems for carrying out such processes
US9096453B2 (en) 2012-06-11 2015-08-04 Johns Manville Submerged combustion melting processes for producing glass and similar materials, and systems for carrying out such processes
US9926219B2 (en) 2012-07-03 2018-03-27 Johns Manville Process of using a submerged combustion melter to produce hollow glass fiber or solid glass fiber having entrained bubbles, and burners and systems to make such fibers
US9643869B2 (en) 2012-07-03 2017-05-09 Johns Manville System for producing molten glasses from glass batches using turbulent submerged combustion melting
US9032760B2 (en) 2012-07-03 2015-05-19 Johns Manville Process of using a submerged combustion melter to produce hollow glass fiber or solid glass fiber having entrained bubbles, and burners and systems to make such fibers
US9493375B2 (en) 2012-07-03 2016-11-15 Johns Manville Process of using a submerged combustion melter to produce hollow glass fiber or solid glass fiber having entrained bubbles, and burners and systems to make such fibers
US9533905B2 (en) 2012-10-03 2017-01-03 Johns Manville Submerged combustion melters having an extended treatment zone and methods of producing molten glass
US10392285B2 (en) 2012-10-03 2019-08-27 Johns Manville Submerged combustion melters having an extended treatment zone and methods of producing molten glass
US9227865B2 (en) 2012-11-29 2016-01-05 Johns Manville Methods and systems for making well-fined glass using submerged combustion
US9676644B2 (en) 2012-11-29 2017-06-13 Johns Manville Methods and systems for making well-fined glass using submerged combustion
US10125042B2 (en) 2013-01-29 2018-11-13 Johns Manville Systems for monitoring glass and/or glass foam density as a function of vertical position within a vessel
US9115017B2 (en) 2013-01-29 2015-08-25 Johns Manville Methods and systems for monitoring glass and/or foam density as a function of vertical position within a vessel
US10131563B2 (en) 2013-05-22 2018-11-20 Johns Manville Submerged combustion burners
US10138151B2 (en) 2013-05-22 2018-11-27 Johns Manville Submerged combustion burners and melters, and methods of use
US9777922B2 (en) 2013-05-22 2017-10-03 Johns Mansville Submerged combustion burners and melters, and methods of use
US9731990B2 (en) 2013-05-30 2017-08-15 Johns Manville Submerged combustion glass melting systems and methods of use
US10183884B2 (en) 2013-05-30 2019-01-22 Johns Manville Submerged combustion burners, submerged combustion glass melters including the burners, and methods of use
US9751792B2 (en) 2015-08-12 2017-09-05 Johns Manville Post-manufacturing processes for submerged combustion burner
US10442717B2 (en) 2015-08-12 2019-10-15 Johns Manville Post-manufacturing processes for submerged combustion burner
US10041666B2 (en) 2015-08-27 2018-08-07 Johns Manville Burner panels including dry-tip burners, submerged combustion melters, and methods
US9815726B2 (en) 2015-09-03 2017-11-14 Johns Manville Apparatus, systems, and methods for pre-heating feedstock to a melter using melter exhaust
US9982884B2 (en) 2015-09-15 2018-05-29 Johns Manville Methods of melting feedstock using a submerged combustion melter
US10081563B2 (en) 2015-09-23 2018-09-25 Johns Manville Systems and methods for mechanically binding loose scrap
US10435320B2 (en) 2015-09-23 2019-10-08 Johns Manville Systems and methods for mechanically binding loose scrap
US10144666B2 (en) 2015-10-20 2018-12-04 Johns Manville Processing organics and inorganics in a submerged combustion melter
US10246362B2 (en) 2016-06-22 2019-04-02 Johns Manville Effective discharge of exhaust from submerged combustion melters and methods
US10301208B2 (en) 2016-08-25 2019-05-28 Johns Manville Continuous flow submerged combustion melter cooling wall panels, submerged combustion melters, and methods of using same
US10337732B2 (en) 2016-08-25 2019-07-02 Johns Manville Consumable tip burners, submerged combustion melters including same, and methods
US10196294B2 (en) 2016-09-07 2019-02-05 Johns Manville Submerged combustion melters, wall structures or panels of same, and methods of using same
US10233105B2 (en) 2016-10-14 2019-03-19 Johns Manville Submerged combustion melters and methods of feeding particulate material into such melters

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