US2421733A - Internal-combustion engine - Google Patents

Internal-combustion engine Download PDF

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US2421733A
US2421733A US575577A US57557731A US2421733A US 2421733 A US2421733 A US 2421733A US 575577 A US575577 A US 575577A US 57557731 A US57557731 A US 57557731A US 2421733 A US2421733 A US 2421733A
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suction
choke valve
valve
choke
carburetor
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US575577A
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Henning Otto
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Carter Carburetor Corp
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Carter Carburetor Corp
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M7/00Carburettors with means for influencing, e.g. enriching or keeping constant, fuel/air ratio of charge under varying conditions
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M1/00Carburettors with means for facilitating engine's starting or its idling below operational temperatures
    • F02M1/08Carburettors with means for facilitating engine's starting or its idling below operational temperatures the means to facilitate starting or idling becoming operative or inoperative automatically
    • F02M1/10Carburettors with means for facilitating engine's starting or its idling below operational temperatures the means to facilitate starting or idling becoming operative or inoperative automatically dependent on engine temperature, e.g. having thermostat

Description

June 3, 1947. o. HENNING 2,421,733
I INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINE Filed Nov. 1'?, 1931 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVNTOR OTTO HENNING ATTORNEY June 3, 1947 o. HENNING 2,421,733
` INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINE l 1 Filed Nov. 17,1931 l 5 sheets-sheet 2 'FIG/a.
0770 Hlm/m6 u 1N VENTOR A TTORNE Y G m N N E H o.
NTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINE 1951 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Nov. l7
INVENTOR ATTORNEY Bmw N470 o. HENNHN@ WWU/33 INTERNAL- COMBUSTION ENGINE Filed Nov. 17, 1931 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 oT'ro Himmmci` mamon ATTORNEY June 3, 1947. o. l-IENNlNc-.`
INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINE Filed Nov. 17, 1931 5. Sheets-Snes?.v 5
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mvsmon ATToRNi-:Y
Patented June 3,
UNITED STATE s PATENT oFFlcE INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINE Otto Henning, St. Louls,vMo., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Carter Carburetor Corporation, v St. Louis, Mo., a corporation of Delaware Application November 17, 1931, Serial N0. 575,577v
of constant size regardless of suction during normal operation of the carburetor, at normal operating temperatures.
, It is an object of this invention to provide a carburetor having new and improved means for automatically changing the operation thereof as vthe engine warms up or cools off, so that during the low temperature operation of the carburetor, such operation will embody at least some of the principles of the air valve carburetor, while at normal and high temperatures the carburetor will be operated strictly on the plain tube principle.
It is a further object of this invention to provide a carburetor in which fuel mixture ratio is automatically controlled both by temperature and suction, so that the mixture will be leaned out at high temperature and also at high suction.
It is a further object oi this invention to provide a carburetor with-means for automatically enriching the mixture when 'the engine stops and for automatically leaning out the mixture when the engine begins to operate under its own power.
It is a further object of this invention. to provide a carburetor having a choke valve and to provide meansfor varying the position of said choke valve in accordance with the suction in the intake manifold of said engine.
t drawings, referring to which:
Figure la is a, diagram of the carburetor according to my invention.
Figure l is a somewhat diagrammatic view showing an .elevation of the carburetor with p'arts in section, and showing a section of the exhaust pipe with the controlling thermostat attached thereto. I
Figure 2 is a sectional view of the carburetor shown in Figure l, showing choke valve when same is in closed position. Figure 3 is a sectional view corresponding to Figure 2, exceptthat the choke valve is in slightly open position.
Figure 4 is a side elevation of the carburetor 2s claims. n (ol. 12s-119) Figure 5 is a sectional view of the carburetor shown in Figure l, the section being taken through the iioat bowl and accelerating pump.
Figure 6 is ,a plan view of the carburetor shown inFigures1to5. p
Figure -7 is a detail view showing a slightly modified form of the device.
The reference numeral I indicates the lower half, or'main body member of the carburetor. This lower half is provided with a ange 2 by means o! which it may be attached to the intake shown in Figure 1, with parts broken away and others shown in section.
manifold of an internal combustion engine. The upper half of the carburetor 3 is formed in a separate casting and superposed on the lower half. The` two halves of the carburetor have a downdraft mixing conduit extending therethrough, which mixing conduit comprises air inlet 5, air chamber 6, mixing chamber 1, and discharge outlet 8.
The admission of air to the carburetor .is com trolled by a choke valve, which is generally indicated at 9, and which is carried by the shaft I0. The choke valve is made up of two sections, one section being rigidly attached to the choke valve shaft, as indicated at I I, and the other section I2 being pivotally attached to the choke valve shaft and operablelby suction. A spring` I3 yieldably attached to the two sections of the choke valve normally holds the section I2 in line with the section II. .Section I2 has a projection I4 thereon, for limiting its closing movement so that the action of the spring I3 will be stopped when section I2 has been brought into line with lsection II. A latch I5 is pivotally-mounted on the solid section II and has a latch contact member I6. thereon for contacting wlth'the wallof the air inlet, and projection Il at the other end thereof for contacting with the projection I4 to limit thethe carburetor is controlled by throttle valve 23,
which is pivotallycarried on shaft 24, and the shaft is arranged` for manual operation in any convenient manner. t Y
. Fuel for low speed operationis supplied to the rmixing conduit through port or nozzle 25. This l member 48.
. 3 discharge outlet is shown in Figure 1 as a single port extending to both sides of the throttle when same is in closed position, but it will be understood that any other port construction or arrangement may be used if desired.
Fuel is supplied to the nozzle 25 by means of idle tube 26, connecting passageways 21-28, calibrated passageways 29, passage 30, and metering jet 3|. Fuel for the main nozzle |9 is also supplied from jet 3|, passage 30, and the chamber 32 which surrounds tube 28. Thus, it will be seen that the main nozzle I9 and idling nozzle 25 are connected by restricted passageway 29 and both nozzles vreceive their fuel in common from the jet 3|, which is controlled in accordance with the position of the throttle by means of lmetering rod 33. The jet 3| takes its fuel from the chamber 34 in which the fuel is maintained at a constant level A-A by fioat 35 and needle valve 36. It may be noted at this point that either the float valve 36 or the lip 35A, which operates the fioat valve, may be chromium plated to prevent wear.v Fuel is supplied in a conventional manner to needle valve 36 through connection 31 by the usual fuel pump or gravity tank.
The accelerating pump piston 38 is operated by means o-f a rocker arm 38a connected to the throttle through link 39 and operating arm 40. A suitable vent 4| is formed in the upper part of the float chamber above fuel level for connecting said float chamber to the inside of the mixing conduit. y
Additional venting means for the float chamber, comprising an orifice 42, is also provided. Preferably, the orice 42 is ofsmaller capacity than the orifice 4|, whereby a draft will be created through the fioat chamber for cooling the fuel therein, but the fuel in the float chamber will also be subjected to a suction corresponding to the speed of air flowing through the carburetor.
The choke valve 9 is primarily controlled by thermostat 43, which is mounted on the exhaust .pipe 44 of the engine. 'I'he thermostat is of the usual bimetallic type and is wound in such a manner that the free end 45 will turn in a clockwise direction with reference to Figure 1, when the temperature is raised. 'I'he connection of the thermostat to the choke valve includes a link 46 which is plvoted to the free end of the thermostat and also to the arm 41 at pivot 48. The link 46 is provided with a shoulder 49, and va spring 50 is mounted around the link 46 above the shoulder, so that one end of the spring will contact with the shoulder and the other with the pivot It will be understood that the rod 46 is freely slidable in pivot 48 and its motion in one direction is limited by the spring, and :motion in the other direction is limited by nut which is fixed tothe end of link 46.
Arm 41 in this modification is attached to the choke shaft I0. With the thermostat in the position shown in Figure 1, the choke valve will be in closed position; as the thermostat heats up, the choke valve moves to the position indicated by dotted lines in Figure l. The closed position of the choke valve will correspond to a thermostat temperature of approximately 50' to 70 degrees Fahrenheit, if the thermostat is :mounted on the exhaust pipe as shown, and the :full open position of the choke valve will be :reached when the temperature of the thermostat :.s approximately 130 to 150 degrees Fahrenheit.
For providing an initial movement of the choke as soon as the engine starts to run under its own 4 power, a cylinder 52 having a piston53 slidably mounted therein is provided. The piston is connected by means of a hollow piston rod 54, ball and socket joint 55, and link 56 to an arm 51 which is mounted on the choke shaft. 'I'he arm i-s mounted to freely rotate on the choke shaft,
` but a -stop 58 is provided to contact with anv extension 59 on the arm t1, so that movement of the arm 51 in a clockwise direction with reference to Figure 1 will cause an opening movement of the choke vlalve.
A spring 60 is mounted in the cylinder 52 for normally holding the piston 53 in its raised position, so that the normal closing of the choke valve under the inuence of the thermostat 42 will not be interfered with. A suction passage 6| is formed in the lower casting to connect the discharge outlet of the carburetor with the lower end o-f the cylinder through a restrictedl orifice 62. The restriction of the orifice 62 is calibrated to provide a delayed action in the opening of the choke valve under the influence of the suction, otherwise, the mixture would be leaned out too quickly when the engine starts to run under its own power. A valve 63 slidably mounted in the hollow 'piston rod 54 and normally held in wnward position by spring 64 is provided for closing off the orifice 62 after a predetermined mover rent of the piston.
A modified form of the invention may be constructed as shown in Figure 7. The arm 41 is loosely mounted on the shaft I0. 'I'he arm 51 is tightly mounted on the shaft I0 and the valve 63 is omitted, the piston 53 being relied on to give a full opening movement of the choke valve under suction. It will be noted that the stop 58 is formed in two portions at an angle to each other, the lower portion of thisV member contacts with the projection 59 on one end of arm 41, and
the upper portion contacts with the opposite endl of .the arm 41,' permitting a lost motion of approximately 30 degrees between contact or the l member 58 withthe arm 41 and extension 59.
When this construction is used, there will be less danger of straining 'the thermostat 43 at high temperatures, because the lost motion between arm 41 and stop 58 will permit a. substantially free movement of the thermostat after the normal operating temperature of approximately degrees has been reached. It will be understood, of course, that extremely high temperatures on the exhaust pipe 44 are reached during operation of the car. These temperatures may reach 475 or 500 degrees Fahrenheit, and inasmuch as it is desired to have the choke valve fully opened by the thermostat at a temperature of approximately 150 degrees or less, .the thermostat would be placed under a considerable strain after the full open position was reached, if some means were not provided for permitting free movement of the thermostat. The spring 50 is normally made weak enough to permit a substantially free movement of the thermostat, but when additional lost motion and free movement after the choke valve is opened is provided for, the danger of straining the mem-ber 43 at high temperatures is substantially eliminated.
The operation of the device is as follows:
Fuel is supplied from a conventional gravityI ing the suction developed by the engine on the fuel nozzles 20 and 25 (Figure 1), and drawing a very rich mixture into the engine for starting.
It will be understood that the normalrcranking speeds of an engine are 100 R. P. M. or less,
while the normal operating" speeds are 200- R. P. M. or more. As soon as the engine begins to operate under its own power, the suction is very substantially increased. The suction at cranking speeds is approximately one-hall pound per square inch, while at operating speeds,` `the suction with the choke valve in closed position will be six or seven pounds' per square inch.l
As soon as the engine starts to run-under its own power, the increased suction will slightly open valve portion i2 against the resistance of the spring i3 until the movement of the member I2 is stopped by contact of the projection i4 with the latch il and admit some additional air to the engine to slightly lean out the mixture.
At the same time that the engine starts to run under its own power, the suction will be supplied to cylinder 52 by means of connection 6i, and will begin to draw the piston 53 downwardly, and open the choke valve. As soon as the solid portion of the choke valve reaches the position shown in Figure 3, the projection' il on the latch i5 will pass out of contact with projection it on the yieldable portion of the valve permitting portion i2 of the choke valve to open further independently of portion ii under the infiuenceof the intake suction, and the carburetor may then operate as an air valve carburetor until thethermostat rli has warmed up suiliciently to continue the opening movement of the choke valve. It will be noted that there is a pause in the opening movement of said valve after the operation of the suction cylinder is completed. During this pause, the' thermostat 43 is being warmed up, and the piston chambers of the motor are also warming up. During this pause, the portion i2 of the choke valve, which is directly operated by suction, takes care of the requirements of the carburetor and opens or closes in accordance with the suction which may be applied. Preferably, the valve. closing movement of the suction operated piston is just suiiicient to insure the unlatching of the latch i5 so that the suction operated member l2 may rotate further independently of valve portion il.
Withinless than a minute after the engine begine to operate (assumingthat the initial starting temperature is approximately zero Fahrenheit), the thermostat will continue the opening movement of the choke valve, and whenI the exhaust pipe M has reached a temperature of approximately 150 degrees, the choke valve will be in full open position, or nearly so. After the full open position of the choke is reached. further movement thereof is prevented by stop means 99; as shown in broken lines in Figure '7, and further heating `of the thermostat will cause compression of the spring 50. The strength oi.' this spring is insuiiicient to cause permanent deformation of the thermostat at high temperatures.
In the second modication, as shown in Figure 7, the arm 41 is loose on the choke shaft and may rotate approximately 30 degrees clockwise relasaid carburetor will` be simultaneously concendrops.
tive to'shaft i0 and arm l1 rigid therewith bei i fore the spring 50 is compressed. In this modlilcation, sumcient movement of the piston I3 is permitted prior to the closing oi.' the valve III to permit the suctiony to fully open the choke valve.
With the latter construction, closing move- Vments oi' the choke valve will occur whenever the i suction inthe intake manifold is lowered, unless the temperature is so high that the lost motion between the arm 41 Vand the stop 58 has already been taken up. This is very desirable for accelof the thermostat is degrees with the choke valve fully open, the 30` degrees of closing movement would still be permitted when the suction If the temperature rises another 25 or 30 degrees, the arm 41 will be given approximately 10 degrees of angular movement in a clockwise direction with reference to Figure 1. If the suction now falls, the choke valve can only have 20 degrees of closing movement before contact of the stop 58 with the arm 41, and if the temperature is still further raised by 40 or 50 degrees, the choke valve will not close at all when the suction drops. Inasmuch as the normal operating temperature of the thermostat is approximately 250 or 300'degr`ees, it will be seen that the choke valve will be kept in full open position i'or normal operation, but under low temperatures and before the engine is fully warmed up, there will be a slight closing movement of the choke valve to assist acceleration.
I claim:
1. In a carburetor for internal combustion engines, a, downdraft air passage., a throttle valve at the lower end thereof, a choke valve at the upper end thereof, said choke valve comprising a, suction operated portion and a solidf portion, a shaft rigidly fixed to said solid portion, a. piston connecting with said shaft, a cylinder for said piston, a connection for conveying suction to saidcylinder from a point in said air passage below said throttle, and a heat responsive device constructed and arranged to act in opposition to the opening of the choke valve when the temperature is low.
2. In a carburetor, means forming a ldowndraft air passageway, achoke valve at the upper end of said passage, a throttle valve at the lower end of said passage, a pair of fuel nozzles discharging by suction into said air passageway, one of said nozzles discharging at a comparatively low level adjacent said throttle, and the other discharging ai; a comparatively high level between said throttle and said choke valve, a suction operated piston for operating said choke valve, spring means normally tending to hold said choke valve in closed position, whereby the suction in trated on both' of said nozzles, a suctionfpassage connected at a point below said throttle to convey suction to operate said piston, and a valve carried by said piston for controlling said suction passage.
3. In acarburetor, means forming an air passageway, a choke valve at the inlet end of said passage, a throttle valve at the outlet end of said discharging adjacent said throttle, and the other discharging between said throttle and said choke valve, a suction operated piston for operating said choke valve, heat responsive means yieldably tending to hold. said choke valve in closed position when the temperature is low, whereby the suction lin said carburetor will be simultaneously concentrated on both of said nozzles, a suction passage connected to a point below said throttle to convey suction to operate said piston, and a valve carried by said piston for controlling said suction passage.
4. In a carburetor, means forming a mixing conduit, a plurality of venturis in said mixing conduit, a main fuel nozzle discharging into one of said venturis, a throttle controlling the discharge of mixture from said carburetor, a second fuel nozzle discharging into said mixing conduit adjacent said throttle valve, a choke valve for controlling the admission of air to said conduit, said choke valve including a part which is movable toward open position by direct action of suction, a suction operated piston connected to said choke in such a manner as to tend to open the choke upon increases of suction, and e, thermostat connected to said choke. 5. In a plain tube carburetor, means forming a mixing conduit, means forming a venturi in said mixing conduit, a main fuel nozzle discharging into said venturi, a throttle controlling the discharge of mixture from said carburetor, a second fuel nozzle discharging into said mixing conduit adjacent said throttle valve, a choke valve for controlling the admission of air to said conduit, said choke valve including a, part which is movable toward open position b'y direct action of suction, a suction operated piston connected to said choke in such a manner as to tend to open the choke upon increases of suction, and a thermostat connected to said choke.
6. In a carburetor, means forming a mixing conduit, a plurality of-venturis in said mixing conduit, a, main fuel nozzle discharging into one-of said venturis, a throttle controlling the discharge of mixture from said carburetor, a second fuel nozzle discharging into said mixing conduit adjacent said throttle valve, a choke valve for controlling the admission of air to said conduit, said choke valve including a part which is movable toward open position by direct action of suction, a suction operated piston connected to said choke in such a manner as to tend to open said choke upon increases in suction, a thermostat connected to said choke, said thermostat being connected to said choke through a yieldable connection, whereby said thermostat may continue to move after any stoppage of the movement of said choke valve.
7. In a plain tube carburetor, means forming a, mixing conduit, means forming a venturi in said mixing conduit, a main fuel nozzle discharging into said venturi, a throttle controlling the discharge of mixture from said carburetor, a second fuel nozzle discharging into said mixing consion of air to said conduit, said choke valve comduit adjacent said throttle valve, a choke valve for controlling the admission of air to said conduit, said choke valve including a part which is movable toward open position by .direct action of suction, a suction operated piston connected to said choke in such a manner as to tend to open said choke upon increases in suction, a thermostat connected to said choke, saidlthermostat being connected to said choke through a yieldable connection, whereby said thermostat may con- 1 tinue to move after any stoppage of the movement of said choke. o
8, In a carburetor, means forming a mixing prising a stem, a portion rigid with said stem and a portion movable with respect to said rigid portion and adapted to be directly operated by suction, and additional means operated by the suction existing in the outlet end oi the mixing conduit for controlling the rigid portion of said choke valve.
10. In a carburetor, means forming a mixing conduit, a choke valve for operating the admission of air to said conduit, said choke valve comprising a stem, a portion rigid with said stem, and a portion movable with respect to said rigid portion and adapted to be directly operated by suction, additional means operated by the suction existing in the outlet end of the mixing conduit-for controlling the rigid portion of said choke valve, and means including a heat responsive device for controlling the mixture delivered by said carburetor.
11. In a carburetor, means forming a mixing conduit, a choke valve for controlling the admission of air to said conduit, said choke valve comprising a stem, a portion rigid with said stem and a portion movable with respect to said rigid portion and adapted to be directly operated by suction, additional suction. operated means for controlling the rigid portion of said choke valve,
12. In a carburetor, means forming a mixing v conduit, a choke valve for operating the admission of air to said conduit, said choke valve comprising a stem, a portion rigid with said stem, and a. portion movable with respect to said rigid portion and adapted to be directly operated by suction, additional suction operated means for controlling the rigid portion of said choke valve, latch means controlled in accordance with the position of the solid portion of said choke valve for limiting the movements of that portion o1' the choke valve which is directly operated by suction, and means including a heat responsive device for controlling the mixture delivered by said carburetor.
13. In a, carburetor, means forming a mixing conduit, a choke valve for controlling the admission of air to said conduit, said choke valve comprising a stem, a portion rigid with said stem and a portion movable with respect to said rigid portion and adapted to 'be directly operated by suction, additional suction operated means for controlling the rigid portion of said choke valve, and a heat responsive element for operating said choke valve in conjunction withsaidsuction operated means.
14. In a. carburetor, means forming a mixing conduit, a choke valve for controlling the admission of air to said conduit, a plurality of interconnected nozzles discharging fuel into said conduit at spaced points, both posterior to said choke valve, a throttle valve controlling the discharge of mixture from said conduit, a heat responsive element for controlling the position of said choke valve. suction operated means carried by said choke valve foradmitting air by suction `when said choke valve is completely closed, and means in addition to said suction operated means for automatically opening said choke valve a predetermined degree whenever said engine is running under its own power.
15. In a plain tube carburetor, means forming a mixing conduit, a throttle at the outlet oi said conduit, a choke valve for controlling the admission of air to said conduit, a heat responsive device connected to the operating shaft of said choke valve, a suction responsive device connected to the operating shaft of said choke valve and operated by the suction existing in the outlet of said mixing conduit, one of said devices 'being free to move in one direction only with respect to said shaft, and the other of` said devices being rigidly connected to said shaft, said mixing conduit anterior to said throttle being open and of constant size regardless of suction when the norf force of the temperature responsive means, said mal operating temperature is maintained or exceeded.
16. In a' device of the class described, a choke I valve, a shaft for said choke valve, said choke valve comprising a portion solidly xed to said shaft and a suction operated portion, means controlled by the position of said shaft for limiting the movement of said suction operated portion, means comprising a suction responsive element and a heat; responsive element for controlling the position of said shaft, said suction responsive element being adapted `to initiate an opening movement of said choke valve, and said heat responsive element being constructed and arranged to complete the opening movement of said choke valve.
17. In an internal combustion engine, means forming a mixing conduit, a throttle for controlling the mixture discharged from said conduit, a choke for controlling the admission of air to said conduit, means for partially closing said choke in response to an opening movement of said throttle when the temperature is low, thereby giving a richer mixture for acceleration, and heat responsive means for preventing such partial closing of the choke when the temperature is high.
18. In a carburetor for internal combustion engines, an air passage, a throttle valve and a choke valve in said passage, said choke valve comprising a plurality of portions, one of said portions being suction operated, a shaft rigidly fixed to another of` said portions, a. piston connected to said shaft, a cylinder for said piston communieating with said air passage posterior to said throttle, and a heat responsive device constructed and arranged to act in opposition to the opening of the choke valve .when the temperature is low.
v1,9. In a carburetor for internal vcombustion engines, an' air passage, a throttle valve and a choke valve in said passage, said choke valve comprising a plurality lof portions, one ofv said portions being suction operated, a shaft rigidly fixed to another of said portions, a, piston .connected to said shaft, a cylinder for said piston communicating with said air passage posterior to said throttle, and a heat responsive device constructed and arranged to act in opposition to the opening of the choke valve when the temperature is low, said mixing conduit anterior to said mixing conduit between said choke and said throttle being open and of iixed size regardless of suction, said choke valve being moved to fully open position when the normal operating temperature is reached or exceeded and remaining in such fully open position as long as said normal operating temperature is maintained or exceeded regardless of suction.
21. In a carburetor for internal combustion engines, an air passage, a throttle valve :adjacent the posterior end thereof, a; choke valve adjacent the anterior end thereof, said choke valve comprising a suction operated portion and a solid portion, a shaft rigidly fixed to said solid portion, a piston connecting with` said shaft, a cylinder for said piston, a connection for conveying suction to said cylinder from a point in said air passage posterior to said throttle, and a heat responsive device constructed and arranged to urge the choke valve toward fully open position when the temperature is high.
22. In a `carburetor for internal combustion engines, an air passage, a throttlemvalve adjacent the posterior end thereof, a choke valve adjacent the anterior end thereof, said choke valve comprising a suction operated portion and a solid portion, a shaft rigidly xed to said solid portion,
a piston connecting with said shaft, a cylinder.
23. In combination 'with an internal combus-` tion engine, a carburetor having a throttle and a choke valve, temperature responsive means influencing the movements of said valve and operative to move said valve toward open position when hot, and suction operated means capable of moving the valve to at least a partially opened position, said suction operated means comprising a chamber connected-to a point posterior to the throttle and having a movable spring pressed wall subject tothe suction at said point, said choke valve being moved to fully open position when the normal operating temperature is reached or exceeded and remaining in such fully open position as long as said normal operating temperature is maintained or exceeded regardless of suction.
24. In a carburetor, an induction passage having an air inlet, a choke valve controlling the air inlet, a, throttle controlling the induction passage, a bimetallic spring thermostat having a resilient connection with the choke valve and adapted to close the choke valve when c old and to completely open it when hot, a suction chamber connected to the inductionV passage posterior to the throttle and having a, movable wall responsive to suction therein, yielding means urging said 4wall in a direction opposite tothe force exerted on it by of the temperature responsive means, said choke'v valve being moved to fully open position when the normal operating temperature is reached or l exceeded and remaining in such fully open position as long as said normal operating temperature is maintained or exceeded, regardless of suction.
' 26. In combination with an internal combustion engine, a plain tube carburetor having a choke valve, temperature responsive means yieldingly urging the choke valve toward closed position when the temperature is low, and suction operated means capable of moving the valve to a partially opened position against the force .of the temperature responsive means, the admission of air to said carburetor being open and unrestricted except by said choke valve, said choke valve being moved to fully open position when the normal operating temperature is reached or exceeded and remaining in such fully open position as long as said normal operating temperature is maintained or exceeded,-.regardless of suction.
27. The combination with an internal combustion engine, a carburetor having a. choke, temperature responsive means yieldingly urging the valve-toward closed position, and suction operated means capable of moving the valve to at least a partially opened position when 'the temperature responsive means tends to holdthe choke valve in closed position, said choke valve being moved to fully open position when the normal operating y temperature is reached or exceeded and remaining in such fully open position as long as said normal operating temperature is maintained or exceeded regardless of suction.
28. In combination with an internal combustion engine, a 'carburetor having a choke valve, temperature responsive means yieldingly urging the choke valve toward closed position, and suction operated means capable of moving the valve to a partially opened position while said temperature responsive means urges the choke valve to- '.ward closed position, said choke valve being moved to fully open position when the normal operating temperature is reached or exceeded and remaining in such fullyopen position as long as said normal operating temperature is maintained or exceeded, regardless ofsuction.
OTTO HENNING.
` annnnaneas errno .The following :references are of record in the le of thispatent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS Number l' Name Date 1,285,609 Bubb Nov. 26, y1918 1,343,311 Cory June 15, 1920 1,413,371 Adler et al. Apr. 18, 1922 1,843,186 Wolfard Feb. 2, 1932 1,799,486 Stokes Apr. 7, 1931 1,842,690 .Stokes Jan. 26, 1932 v1,562,651 Mock Nov. 24, 1925 1,304,808 Royce May 27, 1919 v1,841,687 Stokes Jan. 19, 1932 1,723,936 Hifner 1 Aug. 6, 1929 1,493,975 Folberth May 13, 1924 v 1,821,014 Heitger Sept. 1, 1931 1,841,749 Martin Jan. 19, 1932 1,351,477 Hodges Aug. 31, 1920 11,854,236 Stokes Apr. 19, 1932 1,413,985 Hodges Apr. 25, 1922 .1,945,191 Hunt ...v Jan. 30, 1934 2,085,351
Colley June' 29, 1937 Disclaimer 2,421,733.-0tt0 Henning, St. Louis, Mo. INTERNALCOMBUSTION ENGINE. Patent dated June 3, 1947. Disclaimer filed Nov. 8, 1950, by the assignee, Garter Oabwetor Oopomtz'on. Hereby enters this disclaimer to claims 17, 23, 27 and 28 of said patent.
[Oficial Gazette Deeembe?a 5, 1950.]
US575577A 1931-11-17 1931-11-17 Internal-combustion engine Expired - Lifetime US2421733A (en)

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2603198A (en) * 1952-07-15 Automatic choke valve
US2705484A (en) * 1932-01-08 1955-04-05 Gen Motors Corp Mechanism for controlling the starting and operation of internal combustion engines
US2774343A (en) * 1952-04-09 1956-12-18 Bendix Aviat Corp Choke control device
US2837071A (en) * 1956-08-22 1958-06-03 Gen Motors Corp Carburetor
US2956558A (en) * 1957-11-14 1960-10-18 Holley Carburetor Co Means for starting and operating internal combustion engines
US2979047A (en) * 1957-07-08 1961-04-11 Acf Ind Inc Automatic choke for small carburetors
US3284061A (en) * 1964-03-02 1966-11-08 Acf Ind Inc Carburetor
US3328011A (en) * 1965-11-03 1967-06-27 Bendix Corp Carburetor choking device
US6186482B1 (en) * 1997-09-25 2001-02-13 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Carburetor choke valve

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US1285609A (en) * 1917-11-21 1918-11-26 Oscar W Epperson Air-inlet valve for carbureters.
US1304808A (en) * 1919-05-27 Boyce limited
US1343311A (en) * 1916-08-01 1920-06-15 Eugene F Kline Air-control device for the air-inlets of carbureters
US1351477A (en) * 1919-03-15 1920-08-31 Edward G Hodges Air-control and heat-regulating device for internal-combustion engines
US1413371A (en) * 1921-07-30 1922-04-18 John B Adler Automatic air-supply control for internal-combustion engines
US1413985A (en) * 1919-01-13 1922-04-25 Edward G Hodges Carburetor air-control device
US1493975A (en) * 1923-01-18 1924-05-13 Folberth Auto Specialty Compan Attachment for motor vehicles
US1562651A (en) * 1918-01-02 1925-11-24 Stromberg Motor Devices Co Carburetor
US1723936A (en) * 1928-02-13 1929-08-06 Ernest J Hifner Automatic choke actuator
US1799486A (en) * 1923-11-24 1931-04-07 Curtis B Camp Carburetor
US1821014A (en) * 1927-07-21 1931-09-01 Frank H Heitger Carburetor
US1841687A (en) * 1927-09-01 1932-01-19 Curtis B Camp Automatic fuel regulator
US1841749A (en) * 1927-05-10 1932-01-19 Martin Carl August Thermostatic control device for carburetors
US1842690A (en) * 1926-12-30 1932-01-26 Curtis B Camp Automatic fuel regulator
US1843186A (en) * 1929-12-16 1932-02-02 Hopewell Brothers Carburetor
US1854236A (en) * 1927-11-10 1932-04-19 Curtis B Camp Automatic fuel regulator
US1945191A (en) * 1931-05-04 1934-01-30 Bendix Stromberg Carburetor Co Carburetor
US2085351A (en) * 1933-07-06 1937-06-29 Carter Carburetor Corp Carburetor

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1304808A (en) * 1919-05-27 Boyce limited
US1343311A (en) * 1916-08-01 1920-06-15 Eugene F Kline Air-control device for the air-inlets of carbureters
US1285609A (en) * 1917-11-21 1918-11-26 Oscar W Epperson Air-inlet valve for carbureters.
US1562651A (en) * 1918-01-02 1925-11-24 Stromberg Motor Devices Co Carburetor
US1413985A (en) * 1919-01-13 1922-04-25 Edward G Hodges Carburetor air-control device
US1351477A (en) * 1919-03-15 1920-08-31 Edward G Hodges Air-control and heat-regulating device for internal-combustion engines
US1413371A (en) * 1921-07-30 1922-04-18 John B Adler Automatic air-supply control for internal-combustion engines
US1493975A (en) * 1923-01-18 1924-05-13 Folberth Auto Specialty Compan Attachment for motor vehicles
US1799486A (en) * 1923-11-24 1931-04-07 Curtis B Camp Carburetor
US1842690A (en) * 1926-12-30 1932-01-26 Curtis B Camp Automatic fuel regulator
US1841749A (en) * 1927-05-10 1932-01-19 Martin Carl August Thermostatic control device for carburetors
US1821014A (en) * 1927-07-21 1931-09-01 Frank H Heitger Carburetor
US1841687A (en) * 1927-09-01 1932-01-19 Curtis B Camp Automatic fuel regulator
US1854236A (en) * 1927-11-10 1932-04-19 Curtis B Camp Automatic fuel regulator
US1723936A (en) * 1928-02-13 1929-08-06 Ernest J Hifner Automatic choke actuator
US1843186A (en) * 1929-12-16 1932-02-02 Hopewell Brothers Carburetor
US1945191A (en) * 1931-05-04 1934-01-30 Bendix Stromberg Carburetor Co Carburetor
US2085351A (en) * 1933-07-06 1937-06-29 Carter Carburetor Corp Carburetor

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2603198A (en) * 1952-07-15 Automatic choke valve
US2705484A (en) * 1932-01-08 1955-04-05 Gen Motors Corp Mechanism for controlling the starting and operation of internal combustion engines
US2774343A (en) * 1952-04-09 1956-12-18 Bendix Aviat Corp Choke control device
US2837071A (en) * 1956-08-22 1958-06-03 Gen Motors Corp Carburetor
US2979047A (en) * 1957-07-08 1961-04-11 Acf Ind Inc Automatic choke for small carburetors
US2956558A (en) * 1957-11-14 1960-10-18 Holley Carburetor Co Means for starting and operating internal combustion engines
US3284061A (en) * 1964-03-02 1966-11-08 Acf Ind Inc Carburetor
US3328011A (en) * 1965-11-03 1967-06-27 Bendix Corp Carburetor choking device
US6186482B1 (en) * 1997-09-25 2001-02-13 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Carburetor choke valve

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