US2421085A - Target seeking aerial bomb - Google Patents

Target seeking aerial bomb Download PDF

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US2421085A
US2421085A US494377A US49437743A US2421085A US 2421085 A US2421085 A US 2421085A US 494377 A US494377 A US 494377A US 49437743 A US49437743 A US 49437743A US 2421085 A US2421085 A US 2421085A
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bomb
target
receiver
casing
missile
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US494377A
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Gregory V Rylsky
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Bendix Aviation Corp
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Bendix Aviation Corp
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41GWEAPON SIGHTS; AIMING
    • F41G7/00Direction control systems for self-propelled missiles
    • F41G7/20Direction control systems for self-propelled missiles based on continuous observation of target position
    • F41G7/22Homing guidance systems
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41GWEAPON SIGHTS; AIMING
    • F41G7/00Direction control systems for self-propelled missiles
    • F41G7/20Direction control systems for self-propelled missiles based on continuous observation of target position
    • F41G7/22Homing guidance systems
    • F41G7/222Homing guidance systems for spin-stabilized missiles
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41GWEAPON SIGHTS; AIMING
    • F41G7/00Direction control systems for self-propelled missiles
    • F41G7/20Direction control systems for self-propelled missiles based on continuous observation of target position
    • F41G7/22Homing guidance systems
    • F41G7/2253Passive homing systems, i.e. comprising a receiver and do not requiring an active illumination of the target
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41GWEAPON SIGHTS; AIMING
    • F41G7/00Direction control systems for self-propelled missiles
    • F41G7/20Direction control systems for self-propelled missiles based on continuous observation of target position
    • F41G7/22Homing guidance systems
    • F41G7/2273Homing guidance systems characterised by the type of waves
    • F41G7/2293Homing guidance systems characterised by the type of waves using electromagnetic waves other than radio waves
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01RMEASURING ELECTRIC VARIABLES; MEASURING MAGNETIC VARIABLES
    • G01R31/00Arrangements for testing electric properties; Arrangements for locating electric faults; Arrangements for electrical testing characterised by what is being tested not provided for elsewhere
    • G01R31/26Testing of individual semiconductor devices

Description

a. v. RYLSKY TARGET SEEKING AERIAL BOMB 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed July 12, 1,943

May 2?, 1947. v, s 2,421,085

TARGET SEEKING AERIAL BOMB Filed July 12. 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 I N V EN TOR. Gregozy R Lsky. Y B Y Afforney v ?atented May 27, 1947 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE TARGET SEEKING AERIAL BOMB Gregory V. Rylsky, Ridgcfield Park,, N. J assignor to Bendix Aviation Corporation, Teterboro, N. J a corporation of Delaware Application July 12, 1943, Serial No. 494,377

Claims. 1

The present invention relates to projectiles and more particularly to a novel projectile adapted for use as an aerial bomb to be dropped from an aircraft, whereby bombing of a target may be accomplished with much greater accuracy than was possible heretofore.

It is known that accuracy in bombing a target from an aircraft is frequently impaired by unavoidable errors in the calculation of dropping angles, and by poor visibility caused by haze, fog or smoke, even when an accurate bombsight is employed. If, therefore, a bomb can be automatically controlled by some suitable means to be guided toward or to seek the target without the necessity of making any calculations or having to see the target, near misses can be substantially eliminated or at least reduced to a great extent and bombing of the target carried out very accurately even under extremely unfavorable visibility conditions.

Accordingly, one of the objects of the present invention is to provide a novel projectile adapted for use as an aerial bomb, including novel means automatically controlling said projectile to guide it toward the target, whereby near misses are substantially eliminated or reduced and the accuracy of bombing effectively increased.

Another object is to provide a novel targetseeking aerial bomb adapted to be dropped or ejected from an aircraft, including novel means responsive to radiant energy emanating from the target by reflection or direct radiation or otherwise, for automatically controlling said bomb along a path guiding it toward the target, whereby said bomb will hit the target without any further control by the bombardier regardless of the angle at which it may have been dropped or ejected from the bomb rack and/or bomb bay of the aircraft up to 45 or otherwise, as long as it is within the area scanned by the sensitive element of the steering mechanism, or scans the target and reflects the image thereof or the objective lens receives the impact of the radiant energy or light rays.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel target-guided aerial bomb adapted to be dropped from an aircraft into the air, including novel means responsive to radiant spectral energy emanating from the target by reflection, or direct radiation, or otherwise, in the form of invisible heat rays in the infra-red portion of the spectrum, or light rays in the visible portion of the spectrum, whereby the bomb is automatically steered toward the target from the release point by contrast with the value of the heat or light radiation from the target compared with the area surrounding the target.

A further object is to provide a novel bomb including a visible light ray or radiant energy responsive receiving device such as a photo-electric or light sensitive cell or an infra-red ray responsive cell, whereby the received radiant energy may be converted into electrical energy, then amplified and converted into kinetic energy to mechanically and automatically steer the bomb toward an energy radiating target within the range of the receiver.

Another object is to provide a novel image guided bomb including a novel axially positioned image forming and projecting means or quartz lens adapted to intensify the heat or light rays and an image receiving surface that rotates with the bomb on a predetermined frequency cycle in cooperation with a photocell positioned off center or eccentrically of the longitudinal axis of rotation of the bomb at said surface and having a frequency response within said frequency of rotation of the bomb and image receiving surface with or relative to the lens and axis of the bomb so as to periodically or intermittently impinge upon or strike the light or heat sensitive cell, whereby to continuously direct the bomb toward the target under the action of radiant energy or light rays projected to a photo-electric or light sensitive cell, radiant energy receiver or responsive device by the image thereof projected or reflected on the image receiving surface with each rotation of the bomb and a bomb steering device actuated thereby to keep the bomb on a course toward the target.

Another object is to provide a novel bomb adapted to rotate an image receiving surface at a suitable frequency so the locus of the image is concentrically circular with respect to the bomb axis, whereby once in each rotation of the bomb and image receiving surface, the target image, heat or light rays cross the receiving field or mask opening of an eccentrically positioned radiant-energy receiver, photo-electric or light sensitive cell in some part of the said concentric circular image field, in accordance with the frequency response of the photocell or radiant energy receiver, to generate an electric current and energize a steering means.

Another object of the invention is to provide in combination with a novel bomb device a novel means mounted on a photocell or spectral energy receiver responsive to a portion of the infra-red spectrum so shaped that the target image remains on the photocell or spectral energy receiver longer the greater the angle of deflection from the target or the farther the target is from alignment with the longitudinal vertical axis of rotation of the bomb, whereby the bomb steering means is actuated in greater degrees of rotation, deflection or course changing and correcting position toward the bomb axisthe farther the bomb is from axial alignment with the target.

The above and other objects and advantages of the present invention will appear more fully hereinafter from a consideration of the detailed description which follows, taken together with the accompanying drawings wherein two embodiments of the invention are illustrated. It is to be expressely understood, however, that the drawings are for the purpose of illustration only and are not designed as a definition of the limits of the invention; and that when reference is made to a spectral energy receiver, such terminology is intended to include photocells of any type suitable for radiant energy reception, it being the purpose herein to include cells which are responsive to either the light or heat rays and visible or invisible portions of the spectrum.

In the drawings, wherein like reference characters refer to like parts throughout the several views:

Figure 1 is a longitudinal cross section view of part of the bomb casing taken so as to expose the relative positions of the elements housed within the nose thereof.

Figure 2 is a plan view of the bomb with the tail portion thereof broken away to show the electro-mechanical rudder operating means.

Figure 3 is a side elevational view of the bomb.

Figure 4 is an elevation view of the nose portion of the bomb, as it appears from the target.

Figure 5 is a transverse section along the line 5-5 of Figure 1.

Figure 6 is a diagrammatic view of the operating circuit.

Figure 7 is a perspective view of a modified form of the invention partly broken away.

Figure 8 is a transverse section taken through line 8-8 of Figure '7 of the bomb casing to illustrate an elevational plan view of a modified form of wing and brake.

Referring to the several figures in detail, numeral [0' designates a regular streamlined bomb casing within the nose or head end 9 of which are mounted the following elements:

A spectral energy receiver II, which may be any type of photocell photo-electric or light sensitive cell, or a cell such as a type responsive to the invisible infra-red ray portion of the spectrum of certain wave lengths or range thereof and containing voltage generating crystals responsive to a gas occluding substance, not shown, hermetically sealed therein; and amplifier 20 of any suitable type; agriamhbjfifiiliilfillififikh m:gjgepf quartz or rggk alt positioned in an axial opening in the nose or head end of the bomb and communicating with a rearwardly flaring off-center or eccentrical passage 22a angularly through the nose or head portion of the bomb in front of the cell. The objective field of lens 22 is approximately 45 as indicated in Figure 1; other lenses with larger or smaller objectives could be used. For example, an infra-red ray cell may be used such as is illustrated in Patent 2,115,578, issued April 26, 1938, to William M. Hall.

The spectral energy receiver I l is eccentrically mounted with respect to the longitudinal axis of casing [0, within the nose 9. The face or window of the receiver l I is coincident with the focal plane of the objective lens 22, designated generally as at l2. Fixed over the face of the receiver II in a suitable manner is a mask [5 formed with a triangular shaped aperture I5a, the apex of which extends toward, but falls short of, the longitudinal axis of the casing Ill. The sides of aperture I5a are radial with respect to the axis of casing I0, and if extended, would intersect at the axis.

Radiant energy as from a Searchlight, or infra red or heat rays emitted from a, warm body or reflected therefrom, will be focused by the objective lens 22 onto the focal plane l2. When the radiant energy rays are coincident with the extended line of the longitudinal axis of casing Ill, the lens 22 will focus the ray along the longitudinal axis onto the mask [5. The receiver II will thus remain inoperative.

When the radiant energy emitting body is not coincident with the extended axis of casing III, the lens 22 will focus the beam onto the window of the receiver H through the aperture I5a in the mask l5. The radial distance from the apex of aperture [Sat at which the energy beam is focused by the lens 22 will be determined by the distance the energy radiating body is from the extended axis of the casing I0.

As will hereinafter be described, the casing Ill will be rotated during its free fall. The beam images focused onto the receiver 1 I will thus sweep across the face thereof and over mask I5 in circular or spiral lines. The time interval during which receiver l l is activated will be the same in each case regardless of the radial distance from the aperture apex. In Figure 5, the spiral dashed line l6 indicates the locus of the path of a focused energy beam; the outer loops indicating the target emitting the radiant energy beam was just within the range of the missile, that is, within the objective field of the lens 22, while the inner loops show the radiant energy beam coming into coincidence with the extended axis of the casing, indicating that the missile had directed itself toward the target.

Mounted in the tail portion of casing 10 in circuit with cables [8 and 19 leading from amplifier 20 are the steering or rudder operating elements, which include a solenoid 23 and a rudder 25 or forwardly extending arm thereof forming an armature adapted to be shifted to and from an outer stop 24, by said solenoid 23 in response to the amplified signals generated from the infra-red radiant energy or photocell or by a, suitable photocell or the voltage generating means above referred to of spectral energy receiver II.

The rudder 25 is pivotally mounted in the tail of the bomb casing 10 on a pivot member 26,

in such a way that deflection about the pivot 26 takes place from the neutral position to one side only.

The axis of rotation of the rudder 25 is fixed approximately ninety degrees to the line of symmetry of the opening l5a in mask IS on spectral energy receiver ll, shown in Figures 1 and 5; so that the steering impulse given to the rudder will always deflect the bomb, so as to displace the focused target image closer to the longitudinal axis of the bomb casing Ill. Slight deviation from the 90 angle between rudder 25 and the line of symmetry of the cell Il may be provided as needed to compensate for lag in rudder movements and lag in aerodynamic response of the bomb.

When the target image has shifted to and is in line with the longitudinal axis of the bomb as indicated at X, no exposure is made through mask l5, no activation of the spectral energy receiver I l occurs and rudder 25 stays in neutral position. This means that the bomb is in line with the target. When the bomb gets out of line with the target, the above process is repeated until it is again restored to the correct position.

The bomb casing I is provided with wings 21. The wings are pitched and extend outwardly from said casing in different planes, approximately at right angles to the plane of the rudder 25. The bomb will be rotated about its longitudinal axis by the eccentric wings during its free fall. The rate of rotation of the missile will be determined by the pitch of the wing surfaces. The rotational velocity of the bomb must be equal to or less than the response frequency of the energy receiver ll.

During its free fall, the bomb casing I0 will rotate with it the lens 22, the mask 15, and the receiver II. The energy beam picked up by the lens 22 will be focused on the mask l and the receiver II in the spiral pattern shown by the line l6 in Figure 5. When the rate of rotation of the missile is equal to or less than the response frequency of the receiver, the solenoid 23 will be energized once during each revolution of the missile. When the rate of rotation is greater than the receiver response frequency, the impact of the energy beam on the receiver may occur when the receiver has only partially recovered from a previous activation. The solenoid 23 will thus be energized at irregular intervals, causing an erratic and unpredictable course of the bomb.

Due to the time lag between the instant the receiver II is activated by an energy beam, the operation of the solenoid, and the change in course due to rudder operation, the nose 9 of the missile is rotatable with respect to the casing Ill. The mask I 5 and the receiver I I may thus be rotated with respect to the plane of the rudder to compensate for this time lag. The degree of compensation may be set with respect to a scale 29 on casing I0.

In operation, the bomb in falling will rotate about its longitudinal axis due to the wing construction hereinbefore described. The lens 22 will focus onto the plane [2 any radiant energy beams within the 45 angle objective field as indicated in Figure 1. As the focused beam sweeps across the aperture in the mask 15, the receiver I I will be activated. The signal is amplified by the amplifier and then energizes the solenoid 23. The rudder 25 will then be moved counterclockwise (Figure 2) to steer the bomb.

Since the axis of th rudder 25 is approximately at right angles to the line of symmetry of the aperture I511, the movement of the rudder will direct the missile toward the target when the focused beam activates the receiver ll. (See Figures 2 and 5.)

Figures 7 and 8 illustrate a modified form of the present invention insofar as the means for rotation and means for regulation of the velocity of rotation are concerned.

Numeral 3D designates an annular wing or propeller construction comprising a plurality of suitably pitched propeller blades 3l. The annular wing is positioned about the bomb casing II) at a point most likely to ofiset yawing of the bomb in flight and each blade 3| is pitched to impart limited mean velocity rotation, such velocity of rotation being substantially limited to a frequency cycle within the frequency receiving or responsive cycle of any suitable photocell or spectral energy receiver used.

Swiveled or pivoted between annular rings feathering spoilers or centrifugal retarder members, such as feathering brakes 35 and 36. Brakes 35 and 36 are normally in a retracted non-braking idle position within the wing 30, until the velocity of rotation of bomb casing Ill and its related parts exceeds or approaches the limit of the frequency response cycle of the suitable type photocell or spectral energy receiver being used.

When the velocity becomes too high, brakes 35 and 36 swing out against the action of retainer or biasing springs 3;! and 38, tethered to partitions 39 and 40, by pins 4| and 42 and serve to retard rotation of the missile.

As the operation and construction of the modified form illustrated in Figures 7 and 8 are otherwise the same as the form illustrated in Figures 1 through 6, no further reference to the modification is necessary.

There is thus provided a novel target seeking bomb that may be used for any type target and one that is efiective to eliminate near misses and particularly against sea craft, such as warships, which represent considerable contrast in the value of heat radiation compared with the surrounding water and/or any other large targets on land or sea. Also, as pointed out in the specification and claims, in addition to operation from comparative heat wave radiations, radiant energy or light rays, the illumination of the target by a search light and utilization of the reflected visible light may be similarly converted into electromotive force to guide the bomb, when any suitable type light sensitive cell may be used which is responsive to such visible energy waves.

While only two embodiments of the invention have been illustrated and described, various changes and modifications, which will now appear to those skilled in the art, may be made without departing from the scope of the invention. Reference is therefore to be had to the appended claims for a definition of the limits of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A target seeking missile comprising, a casing having a nose portion and a tail portion;- an objective lens in said nose portion concentric with the longitudinal axis of said casing, a spectral energy receiver in said nose portion in the focal plane of said lens and disposed eccentrically with respect to the axis of said casing for receiving the spectral rays focused by said lens radiated from a target toward which the missile is launched; means for rotating said missile about its longitudinal axis in its flight toward the target, whereby the focused spectral rays periodically traverse said receiver to activate the same; and guide means at the tail portion of said mis- 'sile operative upon'activation of said receiver to direct said missile at the target radiating spectral energy rays.

2. A target seeking missile comprising, a casing having a nose portion and a steering rudder on the tail portion; an objective lens in said nose portion concentric with the longitudinal axis of said casing, a spectral energy receiver in said nose portion in the focal plane of said lens and disposed eccentrically with respect to the axis of said casing for receiving the spectral rays focused by said lens radiated from a target toward which the missile is launched, a, mask for said receiver having a triangular aperture therein, the line of symmetry of said aperture being substantially at right angles to the plane of said steering rudder, means for rotating said missile about its longitudinal axis in its flight toward the target whereby the focused spectral rays periodically traverse the aperture in said mask to activate said receiver, and means operative upon activation of said receiver to operate said rudder to direct said missile at the target radiating spectral energy rays.

3. A target seeking missile comprising, a casing having a nose portion and a steering rudder on the tail portion thereof; an objective lens in said nose portion concentric with the longitudinal axis of said casing, a spectral energy receiver in said nose portion in the focal plane of said lens and disposed eccentrically with respect to the axis of said casing for receiving the spectral rays focused by said lens radiated from a target to- V ward which the missile is launched, a mask for said receiver having a triangular aperture therein, the apex of said aperture extending toward, but falling short of the longitudinal axis of said casing; the line of symmetry of said aperture being substantially at right angles to the plane of said steering rudder, wing members secured to said casing for restrictively rotating said missile in its flight about its longitudinal axis, the rotational velocity of said missile being within the limits of response frequency of said receiver, whereby the focused spectral rays periodically traverse the aperture in said mask to activate said receiver, and means operative upon the activation of said' receiver to operate said rudder to direct said missile at the target radiating spectral energy rays.

4. A target seeking missile comprising, a casing having a nose portion and a tail portion; an objective lens in said nose portion concentric with the longitudinal axis of said casing, a spectral energy receiver in said nose portion in the focal plane of said lens and disposed eccentically with respect to the axis of said casing for receiving the spectral rays focused by said lens radiated from a target toward which the missile is launched; means for rotating said missile about its longitudinal axis in its flight toward the target, whereby the focused spectral rays periodically traverse said receiver to activate the same; centrifugally operated spoilers fixed to said casing to limit the rotational velocity of the missile in its flight within the limits of response frequency of said receiver, and guide means at the tail portion of said missile operative upon activation of said receiver to direct said missile at the target radiating spectral energy rays.

5. A target seeking missile comprising, a casing having a nose portion and a steering rudder on the tail portion thereof; an objective lens in said nose portion concentric with the longitudinal axis of said casing, a spectral energy receiver in said nose portion in the focal plane of said lens and disposed eccentrically with respect to the axis of said casing for receiving the spectral rays focused by said lens radiated from a target toward which the missile is launched, a mask for said receiver having a triangular aperture therein, the apex of said aperture extending toward, but falling short of the longitudinal axis of said casing; the line of symmetry of said aperture being substantially at right angles to the plane of said steering rudder, wing members secured to said casing for rotating said missile in its flight about its longitudinal axis, centrifugally operated spoilers fixed to said casing to maintain the rotational velocity of said missile within the limits of response frequency of said receiver, whereby the focused spectral rays periodically traverse the aperture in said mask to activate said receiver, and means operative upon the activation of said receiver to operate said rudder to direct said missile at the target radiating spectral energy rays.

GREGORY V. RYLSKY.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Wildrick July 8, 1919 Centervall Aug. 30, 1921 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Number Great Britain June 22, 1931 France July 4, 1938 Italy Dec. 7, 1937 Italy Apr. 22, 1936 Italy Feb. 18, 1926 Great Britain July 16, 1942 France Feb. 24, 1936

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Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2554188A (en) * 1947-08-14 1951-05-22 Patelhold Patentverwertung Radio control of flying objects
US2599484A (en) * 1947-08-01 1952-06-03 William A Rhodes Steering control for model aircraft
US2769975A (en) * 1945-10-29 1956-11-06 Rines Robert Harvey Electromagnetic object-tracking-anddestroying method and system
US2882823A (en) * 1952-06-06 1959-04-21 Brinro Ltd Soc Improvements in proximity fuzes and similar apparatus
US2903204A (en) * 1946-11-08 1959-09-08 Nyman Alexander Heat seeker with proportional control
US2930894A (en) * 1954-07-13 1960-03-29 Republic Aviat Corp Optical sighting and tracking device
US2948813A (en) * 1950-08-21 1960-08-09 Aerojet General Co Tracking system
US2963973A (en) * 1953-03-26 1960-12-13 Roger S Estey Gyro optical system
US2977593A (en) * 1947-11-04 1961-03-28 Raytheon Co Dielectric nose cone antenna
US2998771A (en) * 1955-04-01 1961-09-05 Lloyd G Mosier Projectiles
US3000307A (en) * 1953-08-04 1961-09-19 Jr Herbert Trotter Device for correcting the course of a missile
US3010677A (en) * 1957-11-12 1961-11-28 Gen Dynamics Corp Missile control system
US3028119A (en) * 1956-04-24 1962-04-03 Collins Radio Co Missile guidance system
US3072365A (en) * 1957-09-16 1963-01-08 Missile Corp Pilotless craft guidance method and means
US3128061A (en) * 1945-08-11 1964-04-07 Thornton W Chew Automatic self-guidance system for movable objects
US3135484A (en) * 1959-11-18 1964-06-02 Lockheed Aircraft Corp Control system for annular wing aircraft
US3141411A (en) * 1957-06-19 1964-07-21 Eltro G M B H & Co Ges Fur Str Target finder for missiles
US3226057A (en) * 1951-05-21 1965-12-28 Robert G Wilson Automatic control system for navigating a vehicle toward an isolated reference point
US3245352A (en) * 1958-01-30 1966-04-12 Mcdonnell Aircraft Corp Aircraft
FR2087739A5 (en) * 1970-05-29 1971-12-31 Thomson Csf
US4142696A (en) * 1962-02-27 1979-03-06 Novatronics, Inc. Guidance devices
US4191346A (en) * 1953-02-19 1980-03-04 Walter G. Finch Target seeking gyro
US4566656A (en) * 1982-09-15 1986-01-28 General Dynamics Pomona Division Steering mechanism for an explosively fired projectile

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1309500A (en) * 1919-07-08 E wildrick
US1388932A (en) * 1916-07-27 1921-08-30 Centervall Hugo Aerial torpedo
GB352035A (en) * 1929-12-16 1931-06-22 Koloman Tihanyi Automatic sighting and directing devices for torpedoes, guns and other apparatus
FR797933A (en) * 1935-11-18 1936-05-06 Projectile
FR832427A (en) * 1937-05-04 1938-09-27 Shells for anti-aircraft fire
GB546488A (en) * 1939-08-16 1942-07-16 Thunell Karl Harry An object seeking and self-steering device

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1309500A (en) * 1919-07-08 E wildrick
US1388932A (en) * 1916-07-27 1921-08-30 Centervall Hugo Aerial torpedo
GB352035A (en) * 1929-12-16 1931-06-22 Koloman Tihanyi Automatic sighting and directing devices for torpedoes, guns and other apparatus
FR797933A (en) * 1935-11-18 1936-05-06 Projectile
FR832427A (en) * 1937-05-04 1938-09-27 Shells for anti-aircraft fire
GB546488A (en) * 1939-08-16 1942-07-16 Thunell Karl Harry An object seeking and self-steering device

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3128061A (en) * 1945-08-11 1964-04-07 Thornton W Chew Automatic self-guidance system for movable objects
US2769975A (en) * 1945-10-29 1956-11-06 Rines Robert Harvey Electromagnetic object-tracking-anddestroying method and system
US2903204A (en) * 1946-11-08 1959-09-08 Nyman Alexander Heat seeker with proportional control
US2599484A (en) * 1947-08-01 1952-06-03 William A Rhodes Steering control for model aircraft
US2554188A (en) * 1947-08-14 1951-05-22 Patelhold Patentverwertung Radio control of flying objects
US2977593A (en) * 1947-11-04 1961-03-28 Raytheon Co Dielectric nose cone antenna
US2948813A (en) * 1950-08-21 1960-08-09 Aerojet General Co Tracking system
US3226057A (en) * 1951-05-21 1965-12-28 Robert G Wilson Automatic control system for navigating a vehicle toward an isolated reference point
US2882823A (en) * 1952-06-06 1959-04-21 Brinro Ltd Soc Improvements in proximity fuzes and similar apparatus
US4191346A (en) * 1953-02-19 1980-03-04 Walter G. Finch Target seeking gyro
US2963973A (en) * 1953-03-26 1960-12-13 Roger S Estey Gyro optical system
US3000307A (en) * 1953-08-04 1961-09-19 Jr Herbert Trotter Device for correcting the course of a missile
US2930894A (en) * 1954-07-13 1960-03-29 Republic Aviat Corp Optical sighting and tracking device
US2998771A (en) * 1955-04-01 1961-09-05 Lloyd G Mosier Projectiles
US3028119A (en) * 1956-04-24 1962-04-03 Collins Radio Co Missile guidance system
US3141411A (en) * 1957-06-19 1964-07-21 Eltro G M B H & Co Ges Fur Str Target finder for missiles
US3072365A (en) * 1957-09-16 1963-01-08 Missile Corp Pilotless craft guidance method and means
US3010677A (en) * 1957-11-12 1961-11-28 Gen Dynamics Corp Missile control system
US3245352A (en) * 1958-01-30 1966-04-12 Mcdonnell Aircraft Corp Aircraft
US3135484A (en) * 1959-11-18 1964-06-02 Lockheed Aircraft Corp Control system for annular wing aircraft
US4142696A (en) * 1962-02-27 1979-03-06 Novatronics, Inc. Guidance devices
FR2087739A5 (en) * 1970-05-29 1971-12-31 Thomson Csf
US4566656A (en) * 1982-09-15 1986-01-28 General Dynamics Pomona Division Steering mechanism for an explosively fired projectile

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