US2404226A - High-frequency discharge device - Google Patents

High-frequency discharge device Download PDF

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US2404226A
US2404226A US457539A US45753942A US2404226A US 2404226 A US2404226 A US 2404226A US 457539 A US457539 A US 457539A US 45753942 A US45753942 A US 45753942A US 2404226 A US2404226 A US 2404226A
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grid
anode
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Anatole M Gurewitsch
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General Electric Co
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General Electric Co
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J19/00Details of vacuum tubes of the types covered by group H01J21/00
    • H01J19/78One or more circuit elements structurally associated with the tube
    • H01J19/80Structurally associated resonator having distributed inductance and capacitance

Description

ly 1946- A. M. GUREWITSCH 2,404,226
HIGH FREQUENCY DISCHARGE DEVICE Filed Sept. '7, 1942 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Inventor Anatole M. Gur'ewitsch,
torney. 4
y 5, 1946- A. M. GUREWITSCH 3 HIGH FREQUEXCY DISCHARGE DEVICE Filed Sept. '7, 1942 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Inventor; Anatole M. Gurewlosch,
y Hm'btorney Patented July 16, 1946 HIGH-FREQUENCY DISCHARGE DEVICE AnatoleM. Gurewitsch, Schenectady, N. Y., assignor to General Electric Company, a corporation of New York Application September '7, 1942, Serial No..457,53-9
19 Claims.
My invention relates to electronic discharge devices and more particularly to high frequency electric discharge devices of the space-resonant cavity type.
In the construction of electronic discharge devices for use in the high frequency field, it is, of course, desirable to have a particular electrode configuration which permits ready and suitable accessibility to the electrode of the device, and which is arranged to utilize these features without sacrificing efficiency of operation. In accordance with the teachings of my invention described hereinafter, I provide new and improved arrangements in the construction of high frequency electronic discharge devices which afford the advantages of the electrode construction and configuration, and in addition offer greater efficiencies than afforded by the prior art, arrangements.
It is an object of my invention to provide new and improved electronic discharge devices.
It is another object of my invention to provide new and improved high frequency electronic discharge devices of the space-resonant cavity type.
It is a further object of my invention to provide a new and improved electronic discharge device construction wherein the electrodes of the discharge device are spaced in substantial parallel relationship by means of insulating spacers, walls or cylinders, and wherein the resonant cavities are substantially enclosed by metal, thereby shielding the resonant cavities.
It is a still further object of my invention to provide new and improved electronic discharge devices which employ space-resonant cavities in conjunction with an electrode assembly which permits the operation of the devices Within the ultra-short wave length field such as several centimeters.
Briefly stated, in the illustrated embodiments of my invention I provide new and improved electric or electronic discharge devices of the space-resonant cavity type wherein the electrodes of the discharge device are supported by a plurality of substantially parallel conducting members or disks which are maintained in the desired space relationship by interposed insulating spacers, walls or cylinders sealed end-to-end with respect to the members. Shielding means such as walls or partitions, which may be integral with the outer membersor the intermediate member, and enclosed by the insulating cylinders establish with the members spaceresonant cavities which are substantially enclosed by metal, thereby shielding the space resonant cavities and preventing the radiation of electromagnetic energy through the dielectric material constituting theinsulating cylinders.
In accordance with another embodiment .of my invention, I provide in conjunction with the features above described, means readily adjustable for controlling or establishing the natural resonance frequency of the respective cavities of the device. One form of the meanswhich accomplishes the tuning may comprise ametallic collapsible type chamber which is sealed .to one of the cavities, and which is adjustable or cleformable in configuration to control the natural resonance frequency of either the anode-grid cavity or the grid-cathodecavity by communicat ing therewith through openings in one of the members, or through dielectric materials placed within the openings. The tuning means may, of course, be of rigid construction provided with adjustable metallic means to control the effective physical characteristics of the tuning chamber. For a better understanding of my invention, reference may be had to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, and its scope will be pointed out in the appended claims. Fig. 1 of the accompanying drawings diagrammatically illustrates an embodiment of my invention as applied to a high frequency amplifier, and Fig. 2 is a cross sectional view of the arrangement shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 3 diagrammatically illustrates an embodiment of my invention as applied to a high frequency oscillator; Fig. 4 diagrammatically illustratesan alternative arrangement for coupling the tuningchamber and one of the principal resonant cavities of the device; and Fig. 5 is a further modification which may be used as an amplifier. Fig. 6 is a further modification relating to an oscillator, and Fig. 7 represents a still further arrangement which may be applied to a frequency changer or mixer for energizing an intermediate-frequency stage of 'a high frequency system. Figs. 8 and 9 diagrammatically illustrate other modifications of my invention wherein the metallic walls which establish the'spaceresonant cavities may be. supported by or attached to the intermediate member. Fig. 9a1s0 shows an arrangement wherein the metallic walls 7 which shield the resonant cavities are provided with tuned sections to minimize the amount of energy which is radiated from the respective cavities.
Referring now to Fig. 1 of the accompanying drawings, I provide a high frequency electronic 7 3i discharge device of the space-resonant cavity type. Although the construction and arrangement of Fig. 1 may be employed for other purposes, in order to facilitate description of the invention the device will be explained with particular reference to operation as an amplifier. In carrying out my invention, I may employ electrode construction and terminal arrangements similar to those disclosed and claimed in a copending patent application Serial No. 436,633 of James E. Beggs, filed March 28, 1942, and which isassignedto the assignee of the present ap-' plication.
I provide a plurality of substantially parallel metallic walls or members I, 2 and 3 which are maintained in a substantially parallel relation- 7 ship and which are centrally located with respect to electrode. construction to be described presently. The members I, 2 and 3 are preferably disks constructed of copper or brass and afiord ready accessibility to the electrodeswhen used for ultra high frequency purposes. Members I, 2 and 3 are maintained in a spaced relationship by means of. insulating walls or cylinders 4 and 5 which are interposed between the members I and 2, and 2 and 3, and are sealed in end-to-end relationship to provide, at least in part, an
' evacuated enclosure for the device.. As will be ;obvious ,in view of the description appearing hereinafter, the regions or cavitie defined by prises a flanged cylinder I I terminated ina plate imity to a circular opening I3 in member 2. A conventional type heating element, such as a filament 14, may constitute a part of the cathode I0. Of course, the cathode construction may be sealed in a conventional way. An electrostatic control member, such as a grid I5, is conductively connected to member 2 and constitutes the third element of the electronic'discharge path. This control element is illustrated diagrammatically and, if desired, the grid may be positioned along the lower edge of plate 2 in order to obtain the desired inter-electrode capacity relationship.
In order to shield the space-resonant cavities, that is the anode-grid and the grid-cathode cavities, thereby providing regions which-are substantially-bounded by metal, I provide metallic walls or cylinders I 6 and I1 enclosed by the insu- 'lating cylinders 4 and 5 and which may be coaxial with the electrode construction described above. Cylinders I6 and I'I may be made integral with members I', and 3, or may be formed separately and attached thereto. It will be noted that cylinders I6 and I1 extend toward the intermediate member 2 and afford gaps I6 and- I1.
The principal effective capacitances of the respective cavities are,'of course, determined by the by gaps I6 and I1 may be considered as shunt or by-pass c'apacitances. V
In orderv to tune the device, that is in order to control the natural resonance frequency of one of the resonant cavities such as that associated with the anode 6 and the grid I5, I provide a tuning chamber I8 which may be defined by a metallic bellows-type member is. This member may be hermetically sealed'to member -I and may be readily attached thereto by a welding or soldering operation.
If desired, plate I may be provided with a cylindrical flange 2i? to which the member !9 is fastened. r
The tuning operation may be effected by controlling the dimensions of member I9. As a way of diagrammatically illustrating the adjustment of the dimensions of member I9, I have chosen to illustrate a thumbscrew assembly 2i, which is supported from memberl by an arm 2i, which raises and lowers the top thereof, thereby varying the dimensions-of the tuning cavity. Input electrode means, such as a concentric line 22, may be positioned as illustrated in the drawings and arranged to be in communication with the gridregion defined by members 2 and 3 and com- I2 'of emissive material positioned in close proX- cathode cavity. Of course, since it is desired to maintain the cavity at a low pressure, this line may be sealed by a conventional glass bead. I also provide output electrode means responsive to the electromagnetic waves of the anode-grid cavity. and in the particular embodiment illustrated the output electrode means which constitutes a concentric line 23 is shown supportedfby the member I9. Of course, since the tuning chamber is in communication with the anodegrid resonant cavity, the frequency of the electromagnetic waves of the anode-grid cavity are also present in the tuning cavity.
Reference may be had to 2 to. obtain a 7 more explicit concept of the manner in which the grid I5'is positioned relative to the electrode conproper operation, one of the cavities may be de-' signed so that its net reactance is slightly capacitive, and the other designed so that its reactance is slightly inductive for the desired operating frequency.
, anode-grid resonant cavity and the grid-cathode parallel or projected areas, between members I,
2 and 2,3, The effective capacitances provided cathode cavity by energization of the input eleci trode means 22, the potential of the grid I5 undergoes highfrequency cyclic variations thereby controllingthe magnitude of the electromagnetic waves within the anode-grid cavity due to the fact that the anode undergoes amplified cyclic 7 Voltage variations, The output electrode means 23 is thus energized and this output electrode In connection with the general principles of 5 means may be connected to any suitable utilization circuit.
i 'The eflective resonance frequency of the device may be controlled or adjusted by means of the thumbscrew assembly 21. the collapsible memher [9 is varied in height, the natural resonance frequency of the device isvaried'.
Fig; 3 diagrammatically illustrates another embodiment of my invention as applied to an electric discharge device embodying the principles of my invention, and which may be employed as an oscillator. In this arrangement, the elements hav been assigned reference numerals corresponding to similarly disposed elements of Fig. 1. Where it is desired to confine the evacuated enclosure to the region between members "I and 3, suitable dielectric sealing partitions or windows may be placed within the holes or openingst and. 9, thereby making it unnecessary to seal the tuning chamber. For example, glass insulating windows 24 and '25 may be positioned within the openings and these openings in themselves pro vide communication between the anode-grid cavity and the tuning cavity. However, in order to obtain more effective coupling, I may employ metallic conductors 26 and 2'! in the form of loops extending through and sealed to the windows 24 and 25 and fastened at their extremities to the metallic member l on opposit sides thereof.
The tuning chamber may comprise a rigid metallic cup 2-8 of cylindrical cross section and maybe tuned by an adjustable metallic member, such as a metallioscrew 29. Output electrode means, such as a concentric line 30, is connected to the tuning chamber or may be connected to the anode-gridresonant cavity.
Upon the application of a suitable unidirectional voltage to the anode 6 and cathode I through members I and 3', theelectronic device will oscillate at a frequency determined by its dimensions Of course, the magnitude of the frequency may be controlled by adjustment of screw 29.
In operation, it will be appreciatedthat the feed-back or coupling between the anode-grid cavity and the grid-cathode cavity is obtained by virtue of the inter-electrode capacity and by the design of the dimensions of the respective cavities. This feed-back voltage ma be "made to have the requisite magnitude and the desired phase to sustain the device in oscillation. In certain instances it may be desirable to provide an additional coupling between the anode-grid and the grid-cathode cavities. For example, openings or windows maybe placed between these cavities and, if desired, may be provided with conductive coupling means. Electromagnetic energy is interchanged between the anode-grid cavity and the tuning chamber through loops 26 and 21.
In Fig. a, an alternative arrangement of the coupling between the anode-grid cavity and the tuning chamber is illustrated. Instead of using a loop, it will be appreciated that a probe construction comprising a linear metallic conductor 3| may be employed. This conductor, of course, is sealed in the insulating window 25.
It will be readily appreciated that apparatus built in accordance with my invention may be applied with equal facility to devices employing other arrangements'oi the output electrode construction. For example, in Fig. 5 the output electrode means comprising a concentric trans mission line 32 is shown as extending into the anode-grid cavity through the shieldingv wall Hi.
In such an arrangement, it may be preferable to increase thediameter of the insultaing and spaci-ng cylinder-33 which maintains members I and Z in spaced relation. It, of course, will be appreciated that this. electrode construction is readily adaptableto high frequency electronlcrdis charge devices generally, which includes amplifiers, oscillators, frequency changers, etc.
In Fig. 6, I have there illustrated a still further embodiment of my invention wherein the anode, cathode and the grid structure of the discharge pathare maintained in the desired space relation by employing the shielding walls in conjunction with alined insulating means such as rings. More particularly, the anode assembly maybe supported bya metallic member of cylindrical cross section and constitutes an anode 35 which is supported bya spoke or arm construction similar to that shown in Fig. 2. The member 34 is also provided with a metallic tubular wall 36 which defines the anode-grid resonantlcavity. The anode-grid cavity may be coupled with a rigid metallic tuning chamber 3"! through dielec tric windows 38 and 39 which aresea-led to mom'- ber 34. A grid 40 is supported in spaced relation with respect to anode 3 5 and the cathode, to be described hereinafter, by means of a metallic plate or disk 41 and which is insulated from member 34 by means of an insulating or glass ring 42. Of course, member 34 and ring 42 are sealed to provide an evacuated space for-the electronic discharge path. A cathode 43 is supported by a metallic cup 44 of cylindrical cross section and is also maintained. in spaced relation with respect to the disk 4| by means of an insulating or glass rin 45. Rings 42 and 45 'areof small axial dimension relative to the axial length. of the device so that a relatively smallarea, 'definedfby a dielectric materiaLis associated with the anodegrid' andthe grid-cathode space-resonantcavities. In this particular embodiment of my invention, the space defined by members 34 and. 44 is main tamed at. a partial vacuum and the cathode 43 may be sealed in a proper manner to obtain best results. The natural resonance frequencyof the electronic discharge device maybe controlled by means of the tuning chamber defined by memher 3.1 and may be provided with an adjustable metallic member 46, th position of which within the tuning chamber may be established by any suitable mechanical expedient.
Output electrode means may be inserted into the anode-grid cavity and may comprise a cone centric line 4.! which is sealed to maintain the desired partial vacuum within the device.
Upon the application of a suitable unidirectional voltage to the anode and the cathode of the device illustrated in Fig. 6, the system will oscillate at its natural resonance, frequency which may be adjusted. by means of member 46 and the tuning chamber. As stated above, in this type of embodiment of my invention the coupling between the anode-grid and the grid-cathode cavities to produce the desired feed-back is accom plished by the interelectrode capacity of the elements constituting the electronic discharge path.
'Fig. 7 diagrammatically illustrates a still further embodiment of my invention. which may be employed as a frequency changer or mixer. 'A
plurality of conductive or metallic disks 48;;49
and'iiii are maintained in spaced relation bymeans of insulating cylinders" 5! and 52 which are sealed to members 48-49 and 49'- 50, respectively, and provide in part an enclosed evacuated region within which the elements of the electronic discharge path arepositioned. Metallic shielding walls -5-3 and 54. establish with disks 48-50 space-resonan cavities substantially bounded by metal to localize the fields within these cavities. These walls may be integral with disks 48 and 50 or'may be formed separately and attached thereto. An anode extends into the region defined between disks 48 and 49 and may be sealed'thereto. This anode may be constructed of solid metal; Grid 56 is supported by and conductively connected to disk 49. and constitutes the second electrode of the discharge path. A cathode 51 may be placed in close proximity to grid 56 and extends into the grid-cathode cavity space through an opening in disk 50.
In this modification of my invention, the tuning' chamber may be associated with the gridcathode resonant cavity by means of holes, or openings 58 and 59. The tuning cavity may comprise a sealed collapsible or bellows-type metallic member 60 comprising two cylindrical collapsible as for example in an arrangement for energizing I an intermediate frequency stage of a high frequency system, the anode 55 and grid 56 may be connected to an.output circuit 66 in the manner illustrated where the anode is connected to the circuitj'fifi and the grid, is also connected to the circuit through disk 49, and a cylindrical or tubular conductor Bl, thereby-affordingreadily acj cessibleelectrodes for high frequency purposes.
'.Upon. the application of suitable unidirectional voltage to the anodeand cathode and upon the impression of high frequency excitation'to the input electrode means 65, th device'of Fig. '7 will operate to transmit to circuit 66 high frequency oscillations which are of a beat frequency determined byrthe frequency of the input excitation V and the natural resonance frequency at which 4;
the discharge device operates. The natural resonance frequency at which the device operates is determined principally by the dimensions of the device, particularly theanode-grid and the gridcathode cavities.
natural resonance frequency and the frequency of the input excitation Adjustment of the tuning chamber controlsthe natural resonance frequency of the device and consequently permits The device, of course, operates in accordance with the difference between its,
grid'and the grid-cathode cavities may be defined by metallic walls which extend from the intermediate member to the end or outer members. For example, in Fig. 8 the disks, B9 and'lllare maintained in a spaced parallel relation by insulating cylinders II and'lZ. Disk 58 supports an anode 13 which maybe generally similar to the supporting arrangement shown in Fig. 2. A grid H is supported by disk 69 and the-cathode 15 is maintained in proximity to grid 14. A coupling between the anode-grid cavity and the tuning chamber (not shown) may be effected by means of probes 16 and H which may be sealed in Windows I8 and (9. r
The disk may be provided with cylindrical shaped metallic walls and 8| which extend to,-
tial impedance in order to prevent the loss of appreciable energy. In Fig. 9 walls 80 and 8| are provided with tuned transverse extensions such as rims or flanges 82 and 83 which may extend toward the axis of the device, or may extend away from the axis, and which are proportioned and designed to afford a maximum impedance or a tuned line effect to prevent the transmission of appreciable energy bymeans of the electromagnetic waves through the gaps. r
While I have shown and described my invention as applied to a particular system-and as embodyingvarious devices diagrammatically shown, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that changes and modifications may be made without adjustment of the frequency of the current supplied to circuit 66.
' r In view of the above disclosures, it will be appreciated that I provide improved high frequency.
electronic discharge devices which permit the use of desirable electrode arrangements suitable'for high frequency purposes, and which also obtain a high efficiency by localizing the electromagnetic fields of the space-resonant cavities associated with the electrodes of the discharge paths. In other words, the space-resonant cavities are shielded or enclosed by metaL'thereby reducing the amount of energy which would otherwise be lost by passage of the electromagnetic waves bodiment of my invention whereinthe anodedeparting from. my invention, and I therefore aim in the appended claims to cover all such changes and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of my invention.
What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is: 7
1. A high frequency electronic discharge device comprising electrodes including an anode, a cathode and a grid, a plurality of metallic members spaced in parallel relationship and each being conductively connected to a different one of said electrodes, the outer members each comprising a metallic wall extending toward but not engaging the intermediate member and providing cavity resonators substantially bounded by metal, and
l insulating walls supporting said metallic members andsealing said device to form an evacuated enclosure for said metallic walls and for said electrodes. I
2. A high frequency electronic discharge device comprising electrodes including an anode, a cathode and a grid, a plurality of metallic members spaced in parallel relationship and each being conductively connected to and supporting a dif- 3. A high frequency electronic discharge device 7 comprising electrodes including an anode, a cathode and a grid, a plurality of metallic members' "spaced in parallel relation, insulating walls spaced "9'; inend-to-end relation between said members providing an enclosure for said electrodes, metallic wall members enclosed by said insulating members' providing cavity resonators substantially bounded by metal and adjacent the anode-grid and grid-cathode electrodes of said device, and electrode means connected to one of said cavity resonators.
4. A high frequency electronic device comprising electrodes including an anode, a cathode and a grid, a plurality of metallic members spaced in parallel relation, a pair of insulating cylinders spaced in end-to-end relation between said meme bers providing an enclosure for said electrodes, metallic walls enclosed by said insulating cylinders providing cavity resonators substantially bounded by metal: and adjacent. the anode-grid and grid-cathode electrodes of said device,- and electrode means connected to the anode-gridcavity resonator.
5. A high frequency electronic device comprising electrodes including an anode, a cathode and a grid, three metallic members spaced in parallel relation and supporting said electrodes, a pair of insulating cylinders spaced in end-to-end relation between said members providing an enclosure for said electrodes and maintaining aid electrodes in spaced relation, metallic, walls enclosed by said insulating cylinders providing cavity resonators adjacent the anode-grid and grid-cathode electrodes of said device, and means connected to one of said resonators for controlling the natural frequency of one of said resonators.
6. A high frequency electronic device comprising electrodes including an anode, a cathode and a grid, three metallic members spaced in parallel relation and supporting said electrodes, a pair of insulating cylinders spaced in end-to-end relation between said members providing an enclosure for said electrodes and maintaining said electrodes in spaced relation, metallic walls enclosed by said insulating cylinders providing cavity resonators adjacent the anode-grid and grid-cathode electrodes of said device, and means comprising a tuning chamber connected to the anode-grid resonator for controlling the natural frequency of the anode-grid cavity resonator.
'7. A high frequency electronic device comprising electrodes including an anode, a cathode and a grid, three metallic members spaced in parallel relation and supporting said electrodes, a pair of insulating cylinders spaced in end-to-end relation between said members providing an enclosure for said electrodes and maintaining said electrodes in spaced relation, the outer members being provided with metallic walls enclosed by said insulating cylinders providin cavity resonators adjacent the anode-grid and grid-cathodev electrodes of said device, and means connected to one of said resonators for controlling the natural frequency of the grid-cathode cavity resonator.
8. A high frequency space resonant system including an electronic device comprising electrodes, a series of circular metallic members, said members being in parallel spaced relation, a plurality of insulating cylinders sealed in end-to-end relation between said members providing an enclosure for said electrodes, substantially cylindrical metallic partition spaced concentrically with respect to and enclosed by said insulating cylinders and coaxial with the electrodes of said device defining substantially metallic bounded cavity resonators, means forestablishing a difference of potential between two of the electrodes r l0 constituting an anodeand. a cathode, andout'put means coupled to one of said cavity resonators.
9. A high frequency electronic device comprising electrodes including an anode, acathode and a grid; three metallic members spaced in parallel relation, 3, pair of insulating cylindersv sealed in end-to-end relation between said members pro.- viding an enclosure for said, electrodes, metallic walls enclosed by said insulatin cylinders providing cavity resonators substantially boundedv by metal, means establishing a space of adjustable dimensions, in communication with the anode-grid cavity resonator to tune thelatter,
and output means connected to the last men-' tioned means.
10.. A high frequency space resonant system including an electronic device comprisingelectrodes including an anode, a cathode and a grid, three circular metallic disks, said disks being in parallel spaced relation, a pair of insulating cylinders sealed in end-to-end relation. between said disks providing an. enclosure for the electrodes, the outer disks being provided with metallic extensions concentric with the axial dimension of said device and enclosed by the insulating. cylinders providing .a pair of cavity resonators. ad-
J'acent the anode-grid and grid-cathode electrodes of said electronicdevicameans connected thereto for establishing a difference in potential between said anode andsaid cathode, and output means. connected to one of. said resonatorsresponsive to the electricaloscillations established in the anode-grid cavity resonator.
11, A high frequency electronic device comprising electrodes includingran anode, a cathode and a grid, three metallic members centrallylocated with respect to said electrodes. said members beng in parallel. spaced relation and constituting externally accessible terminals forsaid electrodes,
connected to the grid-cathode cavity resonator,
and output means connected to said housing.
12. A high frequency electronic device comprising electrodes including an anode, a cathode and grid, three metallic members centrally located with respect to said electrodes, said members being in parallel spaced relation and constituting externally accessible terminals for said electrodes, a pair of insulating cylinders sealed in end-to-end relation between and to said members providing a part of an evacuated enclosure for said electrodes, the outer members bein provided with metallic walls substantially perpendicular to the planes of said members and en.- closed by said insulating cylinders providing a pair of cavity resonators substantially bounded by metal, input means connected to the gridcathode cavity resonator, and output means in said anode-grid cavity resonator.
13. A high frequency electronic device comprising electrodes including an anode, a cathode and a grid, a plurality of metallic membersat least three in number, said members being in parallel spaced relation and having externally 11 t accessiblesurfaces providing symmetrical high frequency terminals fromsaid electrodes, said anode and saidcathode being connected respectively to the outer members and said grid being connected to the intermediate member, a pair of insulating cylinders sealed in end-to-end relation between said members providing a part of the enclosure for said electrodes, the said outer members bein provided with conductive walls en-V closed by said insulating cylinders forming anodeg'rid and grid-cathode cavity resonators which are substantially bounded by metal, means comprising an adjustable metallic bellows-type member' sealed to the member connected tosaid anode and communicating with said anode-grid cavity resonator through op eningsin said outer member; input'means connected to the grid-cathode cavity resonator, and output means extending into said bellows-type member. 14: An evacuated device comprising three substantially parallel conductive disks, one of the outer. disks and the intermediate disk constituting alcav'ity resonator and said intermediate disk and the other outer disk constituting a second cavity resonator, a pair .of insulating cylinders main- I taining said disks in spaced relation, electric disl5.' 'A high frequency electronic amplifier com.-' prising electrodes including an anodeQa cathode and a grid, a plurality of metallic members spaced in "parallel relation, a pair of insulating Walls spaced in end-tO-erldrelation between said members providing an enclosure for said electrodes, metallic walls enclosedby saidinsulating walls prbviding cavity resonators substantially bounded by 'metal and coupled with the anode-grid and grid-cathode electrodes of said device, input means connected to the grid-cathode resonator, and output means connected to the anode-grid cavity resonator for deriving energy from the anode-grid cavity resonator.
-"l6.' A high frequency electronic discharge device' comprising electrodes including an anode, a cathode and a grid, a plurality of metallic members spaced in parallel relation, insulating walls spaced in end-to-end relation between said members providing an enclosure for the electrodes, and-metallic wall members enclosed by said insulating walls providing cavity resonators substantially bounded by metal and adjacent the anodegrid and'the grid-cathode electrodes of said device, said metallic walls having a configuration which minimizes the transfer of energy from the cavity resonators to the region bounded by the insulating walls.
l7; 'A high frequency electronic discharge 'device comprising electrodes including an anode, a
cathode and a grid, a'plurality of metallic members spaced in parallel relation, insulating Walls in end-to-end relation between said members providing an enclosure for said electrodes, metallic wall members enclosed by said insulating walls and supported by the intermediate member and extending toward but not. engaging the outer members providing cavity resonators substantially bounded by metal and adjacent the anodegrid and the grid-cathode electrodes of said device, said metallic wall members being provided with tuned transverse extensions to minimize the transfer of electromagnetic energy from said cavity resonators to the region bounded by said insulating walls and saidfmetallic wall members.
18. A high frequency electronic'device compris- 7 ing threesubstantially parallel conductive members, one of the outer members and the intermediate member constituting a cavity resonator, a metallic member connected to said outer member external of said resonator and forming therewith a substantially" closed housing'coupledto said resonator for high frequency currents, adjustable means connected to said metallic member for controlling the natural resonance frequency of said resonator, said intermediate member and the other outer member constituting a second cavity resonator, electricdischarge means within'said device and, comprising electrodes including. an
anode connected to the first of said outer -mem-' electron emitting surface within the vicinity of said intermediate member, a grid supported by said intermediate member, an anode conductively connected to the other outer member and extend, ing into theregion defined between said other outer memberand said intermediatemember, an
adjustable metallic bellows-type member con-' 'nected to one of said parallel member s forming therewith a substantially closed housing, said housing constituting a part of said device for'controlling the natural resonance frequency, said one parallel member being provided with openings to permit transfer of energy to said housing by means of electrical oscillations, and output means within said housing for deriving energy therefrom. I v
r ANATOLE M. GUREWITSCH.
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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2428609A (en) * 1942-11-09 1947-10-07 Gen Electric High-frequency electric discharge device
US2473777A (en) * 1945-05-17 1949-06-21 Submarine Signal Co Variable cavity resonator
US2512156A (en) * 1946-03-01 1950-06-20 Us Sec War Delay means
US2525468A (en) * 1943-03-29 1950-10-10 Westinghouse Electric Corp Ultra high frequency tube
US2624864A (en) * 1945-12-10 1953-01-06 Melvin A Herlin Tunable multicavity type magnetron tube
US2642494A (en) * 1948-05-26 1953-06-16 Sperry Corp Mode suppressing coupling for cavity wavemeters
US2741746A (en) * 1951-10-24 1956-04-10 John C Rankin High frequency attenuating device
US2773996A (en) * 1946-09-13 1956-12-11 Slater John Clarke Transducer for producing sound at microwave frequencies
US3237049A (en) * 1962-11-21 1966-02-22 Gen Electric Tunable high frequency electric discharge device with internal resonator

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2428609A (en) * 1942-11-09 1947-10-07 Gen Electric High-frequency electric discharge device
US2525468A (en) * 1943-03-29 1950-10-10 Westinghouse Electric Corp Ultra high frequency tube
US2473777A (en) * 1945-05-17 1949-06-21 Submarine Signal Co Variable cavity resonator
US2624864A (en) * 1945-12-10 1953-01-06 Melvin A Herlin Tunable multicavity type magnetron tube
US2512156A (en) * 1946-03-01 1950-06-20 Us Sec War Delay means
US2773996A (en) * 1946-09-13 1956-12-11 Slater John Clarke Transducer for producing sound at microwave frequencies
US2642494A (en) * 1948-05-26 1953-06-16 Sperry Corp Mode suppressing coupling for cavity wavemeters
US2741746A (en) * 1951-10-24 1956-04-10 John C Rankin High frequency attenuating device
US3237049A (en) * 1962-11-21 1966-02-22 Gen Electric Tunable high frequency electric discharge device with internal resonator

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