US2402143A - Parachute pack - Google Patents

Parachute pack Download PDF

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Publication number
US2402143A
US2402143A US539173A US53917344A US2402143A US 2402143 A US2402143 A US 2402143A US 539173 A US539173 A US 539173A US 53917344 A US53917344 A US 53917344A US 2402143 A US2402143 A US 2402143A
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Prior art keywords
parachute
cylinders
load
cylinder
cord
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Expired - Lifetime
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US539173A
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Gilbert H Arenstein
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National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
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National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01QANTENNAS, i.e. RADIO AERIALS
    • H01Q1/00Details of, or arrangements associated with, antennas
    • H01Q1/27Adaptation for use in or on movable bodies
    • H01Q1/34Adaptation for use in or on ships, submarines, buoys or torpedoes

Description

J1me 1- G. H. ARENS-TEIN 2,402,143

PARACHUTE PACK Filed June 7, 1944 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG! INVENTOR. GILBERT H. ARE NSTEIN Je 18, 1946. G. H. ARENSTEIN 2,402,143

PARACHUTE PACK Filed June 7, 1944 2 Sheeis-Sheet 2 FIG.6

INVENTOR. GILBERT H. ARENSTElN mes Gilbert K. Arenstein, Dayton,

the United States of America, by the Secretary of War 4 estates iii I E PACK Ghio, assicnor to as repmemted Application June 7, 1944, Serial No. scams 7 Claims. (crest -1st (Granted unselthe act of mm s, sees, as

amended April 30, 1923; 37} Q. G.

The invention described herein may be manuiactured and used by or for the Government for governmental purposes, without the payment to me of any royalty thereon.

The invention to be hereinafter described relates to floatable or buoyant radio transmitting sets.

In emergencies at see. such as ship wrecksior instance, signaling devices giving the location are invaluable aids to rescue. Many other valuable uses may be made of such devices. Spotting of life costs, or the like launched or, released from wrecked ships or lanes in war operations or similar spotting of enemy submarines are among planes and to cooperate with planes. For such I uses the device must, usually, be dropped from a considercble'helght by a plane going at cousld ereole speed. Almost without exception, it will be dropped into a body of water. dificultles of buoyancy, even heel or upright floating position, antenna erection and maintenance erections, and many other minor difficulties.

The invention adequately overcomes the above difficulties and provides a buoyant radio transmitter sigoaliog set which may be readily is: shed from a plane and will automatically ght on landing, erect an entemia, start a code signal of known approximate range and continue that for an approximate given period. construction is simple, compact,

Thet involves crence characters designate the same parts in the different views.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is an enlargedslde elevation, assembled, showing only the upper end of the cylinders;

Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic view showing the first operation after launchin Fig. 3 is a side elevation tended;

Fig. 4 is a side elevation of the telescopic anterma extended;

Fig. 5 is a side elevation of the sister hook in operative or holding position, with load on;

Fig. 6 is alike view, in inoperative position, with load released; and

Fig. '7 is a cross section on line l-=-l of Fig. 6.

Because of the scale of the drawings, Fig. 2 does not show any of the parts shown on the top of cylinder 8 and Figs. 3 and 4 indicate, only, the location of the soluble plug which is not visible in Fig. l.

Referring to the drawings in detail l indicates a cylindrical container in. which see housed the transmitter, the extensible antenna. end the mechanism for operating one andactuatlhg the other.

The cylinder 5 with its contents is sufrlciently buoyant to maintain afloat the assembly, including the outer cylinder 2 which, as will later appear performs a double function. For this pur pose, each cylinder is provided with o stop 3 in the form oi a rib, plate or the like so positioned or disposed thet the one on cylinder 2 engages that on cylinder 1 as cylinder 2 approaches the end of cylinder 5, as will more clearly appear hereinalter. In order to assist in this telescopic action of the cylinders exoi the cylinders, cylinder 2 is provided with a.

durable and efilcieht. Particularly has the whole device been reduced to the least practicable dimensions while at the some time retaining greatest practicable strength in the cylinder walls and other ports subject to shock or sudden pressure or strain and, especially, providing complete water prooi protection for all operative parts subject to damage by water.

In order to more clearly disclose the construction, operation and use of the invention, reference should be had to the accompanying drewings forming part of this application. Throughout the several figures of the drawings, like refplurality of perforations l in its lowerend for water inlet and it has a lead weight 5 in its extreme lower end.

Within cylinder i is a suitable radio transmlt= ting set oi predetermined range and provided with means to set it to transmit a lmown selected code signal Likewise its operative life, while limited, is known and definite so that, when the buoy containing it has been placed and the trans= mitter started, as will be later disclosed, it will be known how long such signal may he expected to be transmitted. Likewise the time of! start log may be predetermined and prearranged.

To the upper end of cylinder l is clamped o. parachute container 8. The parachute container is cylindrical and of substantially the same diamstar as cylinder (1. It is provided with a resilient split extension l adapted to fit about and receive the upper end of cylinder I.

tension tight. to clamping position, it is provided To draw this exwith a band or ring 8 with spaced end ears 8 to receive a suitable tightening bolt and nut. The container 6 is cemented or similarly secured to the extension I and may be ripped therefrom by the same operation that rips open the container and releases the parachute, as will hereinafter be more fully set forth. In efiect, the flexible clamping extension and parachute container are one element, though not, actually, integral. Within this container is disposed the parachute, the load cord from the parachute, and a static cord by which the parachute is released from its container.

The present invention is not concerned, either with the transmitter itself, the antenna or antenna erecting means as individual units or the unit or units comprising the timing mechanism determining the starting of the signals or the duration of operation. Accordingly, those features and units will not be further illustrated or described in this application.

The timing mechanism by which the beginning of operations of the transmitter and the time of erections of the antenna are controlled, may be set from the outside in well known manner. Its starting is initiated bya suitable pull switch with connections to'the parachute, so that as the cylinders constituting the signal buoy descend the switch will be pulled to on and these mechanisms started or their starting initiated or prepared.

Within the parachute container 6 is arranged the parachute by which the buoy is delivered to position. Static cord II is provided with a suitable loop for connection to a frame member of the plane. A portion extending from that loop is free, and a following portion is embedded" as a rip cord in the side wall of the container, 8 extending completely from top to bottom. Or one or more branch cords may be run 0!! from the static cord and embedded as rip cords in the I wall of the container Ii. As this rip cord portion is pulled, the cylinder 6 will be split lengthwise so that the parachute is freed. The static cord end is connected to the parachute top and as the buoy,

and parachute container assembly, launched from the plane, descends, the static cord, after opening container 8, pulls the parachute which opens to carry the buoy, to position. At about the point where the parachute opens, a weaker inserted section of the static cord breaks and the chuteis then cut loose or freed. The assembled buoy cylinders are now suspended by the load cord The connections between load cord and buoy are soarranged and of such nature as to insure final delivery of the buoy in most effective position and with the starting mechanism properly timed and set. To that end, the load cord I2, itself capable of sustaining the entire load of the assembled buoy cylinders, is provided with connections to the cylinders or to mechanism within them operable by those connections to the point of their respective ruptures which occur at predetermined strain points, less than that of the load cord. Thus, assuming the parachute has opened and the cylinders are suspended by the load cord; a pull-switch cord I3 leading from the load cord and connected to a loop I4 which leads through the end of cylinder to a switch in the cylinder, first receives the full load. The loop I4 is designed to sustain a predetermined strain,

to operate as the load strain sustain the weight of the buoy. So, as it'ls pulled to its breaking point, the transmitter operating mechanism and the trigger mechanism for exploding the antenna raising charge will be initiated. As the strain resistance is exceeded loop I4 breaks. As the buoy continues down, the load will next be imposed on a second cord I5 branched from the load cord and connected to a loop- I6. The loop I6 passes through eyes I1 and I 8 or the like on cylinders 2 and I, respectively. This loop, like loop I4, is of predetermined strength or resistance, less than that of the load cord. Loop I6 is of sumcient strength to couple the two cylinders or suspend cylinder 2 from I, but not of suflicient strength to sustain the weight of both cylinders, assembled. As the strain falls on I6 1t breaks, allowing the whole load to be taken through load line I2, hook I9 and handle 20 on cylinder 2. There are no other branch cords from the load cord to the buoy. Instead, the lower end of the load cord is connected direct to the outer cylinderby any suitable means'such as a snap hook IS on lower end of'the load cord I2 and strap, loop or handle 20'on the upper end oi. outer cylinder 2. As the buoy continues down, it first submerges and then quickly resurfaces. The outer cylinder 2 receives the first full impact as it lands and so protects the inner cylinder I. The strengthening corrugations .stiflen shell 2 and protect cylinder I against the shock of landing.

From the time that the parachute opens, the

load cord is understrain of the full load or weight -tenna, and consequent complete inoperativeness of the buoy. To that end, a special automatic re- .leasin'g device or sister hook assembly construction is interposed in the load cord, constructed is decreased-see Figures 5, 6 and 7.

This hook assembly isinserted in the load line or cord by connecting theparachute end to an eye 2| on one end of a tubular housing 22- within which is reciprocably mounted a block 23 WhlCh'iS guided by pin and slot connectionsv 24 and 25 on the tube and in the block, respectively. The block is held normally retracted within tube 22 by coil tension springs 26. When so retracted, the tails 21 of a pair of cooperating sister hooks 28 are held closed by the tube. The operative hook ends are similarly closed or in operative position. Due to the shape or design of the operative or outer hook end, that closed position will be equally maintained by any rod, rope or like connection seated in the closed hooks provided there is appreciable weight or tension on that connection. The buoy end of the load line or cord is connected to the closed sister hook by a loop, ring or like means seated in the assembled or closed hook ends. That weight, in turn, extends springs 28 and withdraws block 23 to the point where tails 21 are beyond the end of housing 22. As the buoy lands, the load on hooks 18 5 denly relieved. At that instant, a coil spring 2! in the end of block 23, carried by a pin or post to the rear of tails 21, comes into play. It bears against the two tails and instantly swings them on their pivot to open position. That, of course,

accepts That, in turn, releases the parachute which will drift to one side or'the other and all probability of fouling will be avoided. Since spring 29 comes into operation instantly on the sudden decrease of load on hooks 28, those hooks will be swun open and tails 21 spread before the tension of springs 2% can appreciably retractblock 23. Consequently, there is no danger of hooks 2b reclosing before the buoy is released, because the tails will be engaged by the end of tube or'housing 22 by the withdrawing action of spring 26.

As the outer cylinder 2 drops to fully extended position, as in Fig. 3, due to its weighted lower end, it will act as a keel and thoroughly stabilize the buoy, maintaining it in an erect and eillcient operative position, the cooperating ribs, or steps preventing the outer cylinder passing entirely beyond the inner one. The mechanism is so a timed that by the time the buoy resurfaces or very shortly thereafter, the antenna will be erected. This antenna is telescopic and is so constructed as to automatically maintain its extended, or projected conditio practically permanently. The details of the construction of that antenna are no part of the present invention and,

' accordingly, will neither be illustrated nor described in the present application.

The inner cylinder is made absolutely tight or water proof against all leakage even of moisture, such as might prevent or seriously affect operation of any or the contained mechanism.

As a matter of protection to the public, especially navigation, whether in times ofpeace or war, and as a matter of secrecy and avoiding disclosure of information in wartime emergencies, it is desirable-to destroy or remove any such buoy after a period of time predetermined as probably suficient to accomplish its designed purpose. To that end, the inner cylinder is provided with a plug of soluble material 3%. as shown in the drawings, this plug is in the top of cylinder i. That, of course. enables inflow of.-

water at the top as soon asthe plug dissolves. Any other suitable location enabling inflow at or near the top should accomplish the same result. Normally, both cylinders, floats with only a few inches of cylinder i above water. Consequently, comparatively little inflow will be required to sink and destroy any of these buoys. On the other hand, the buoy must remain afloat for at least the full period oi its life to assure its maximum utility or useful life. Accordingly, the plug material is selected to dissolve in water of known approximate temperature and given character (salt or fresh, for instance) only after expiration of the known operative or effective life of the transmitter of the respective buoy. Thus, if the particular transmitter will operate for 24 hours, the plug 3d should be of such material as will not dissolve in less than 24 hours and preferably would require considerably longer than so hours to dissolve. Briefly, the operation is as follows:

The chosen code signal will be set in the transmitting mechanism, the timer for exploding the charge of the ballistic antenna will be set,'and the loop or the static cord will be connected to the strut orother frame member of the plane. Then, as the buoy is launched, the static cord begins to pull out.' As it does so it first rips open the container 6 and then it pulls out the parachute. As it pulls out the parachute it approaches the limit of its extension. Continued drop breaks the weakened section of the static after resurfacing, the buoy, including cord so that the parachute is now completely clear of the plane and carrying the buoy, alone. The buoy, in its descent, connected to the load line, next, strains the connection between the load I2, hook l9 and maintaining them line and the loop l3, pulling the switch which starts the preset transmitting mechanism and the antenna raising mechanism. Continuing descent puts the strain on loop it which is severed, allowing the whole load to be taken through load line handle it on cylinder 2. Now the load cord or line takes the whole load direct. The load on the load line either direct or indirect retains the sister hook extended and operative. As the relieved and disconnects side and eliminates possibility of fouling,

It is thought that the construction, operation and use of the several parts of the invention, and the order of the steps in the operation willbe clear from its preceding detailed description.

Many changes may be made in the construction, arrangement and disposition of the several parts of the invention within the scope of the apthe sister hook instantly opens and pended claims, without in any way departing invention and it is meant this application wheredisclosed by way of illustration and with no intent to in any degree.

limit the invention thereby.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim and. desire to protect by letters Patent is:

1. In combination in a buoyant signal transmitting device adapted to be launched from a plane at considerable height, into a body of water below, two cylinders telescopically disposed one within the other, means preventing complete separatlon of said cylinders, preset transmitting mechanism and cooperating locked starting mechanism disposed within the inner cylinder, seyerable connections between said cylinders telescoped, a parachute contamer connected to said inner cylinder, a parachute in said container, load cord connection between sald parachute and said outer cylinder,

' connections between said loadcord and the lock of said locked starting means automatically unlocmng said starting mechanism at a predetermined point in the descent of the cylinders, connections between said load cord and the aforesaid severable connections automatically severing the same at a predetermined point in the descent of the cylinders, and means automatically disconnecting said parachute from said outer cylinder as said cylinders land.

2. In combination in a buoyant signal transmitting device adapted. to be launched from a plane at considerable height, into a body of water below, two cylinders telescopically disposed one within the other, means preventing complete soporation of said cylinders, preset transmitting mechanism and antenna raising and cooperatin locked starting mechanism disposed within the inner cylinder, said outer cylinder being provided with a. perforated and weighed lower end whereby, in extended position, it constitutes a. keel for the two cylinders, severable connections between said cylinders maintaining them telescoped, a parachute container connected to said inner cylindex, a parachute in said container, load cord connection between said parachute and said outer cylinder, connection between said load cord and the lock of said locked starting means automatically unlocking said starting mechanism at a predeterminfl point in the descent or the cylinders,

load lands, the strain is suddenly the parachute which floats to one c ooses said outer cylinder as said cylinders land.

3. In combination in a buoyant signal transmitting device adapted to be launched from a plane at considerable height, into a body of water below, two cylinders telescopically disposed one within the other and provided with cooperating stops whereby complete separation is prevented, said outer cylinder being provided with a perforated and weighted lowerend and adapted, in extended position, to act as a, keel, preset transmitting and antenna raising mechanism and cooperating locked starting mechanism disposed within said inner cylinder, a telescopic antenna in said inner cylinder, a plug of predetermined solubility in the wall of said inner cylinder adapted to open said cylinder at a predetermined time for inflow of water and sinking of the device, a parachute container connected to said inner cylinder, a parachute therein, a static cord connect ed to said parachute and having rip-cord connection with said container and adapted to be connected to the launching plane, severable connection between said cylinders, connection between the other cylinder and the parachuteload line, connection between said load line and the aforesaid locking mechanism for unlocking the same at a predetermined point in the descent,

connection between said load line and the aforesaid severable connection between the cylinders for severing the same at a predeterminedpoint automatically disconnecting said parachute from the other, the outer one in extended relation constituting a stabilizing keel for the two, means carried by each cylinder adapted to engage cooperating means carried by the other and limit- ".ing separating movement between said cylinders,

sever-able connections between said cylinders maintaining them telescoped, a separable parachute container connected to said inner cylinder,

a parachute in said container, a rip cord connected to said container and to said parachute and provided with means for connecting to a plane, load cord connections between said parachute and said outer cylinder and connections between said load cord and the aforesaid severable connections automatically severing the same at a predetermined point in the descent of the cylinders.

6. In combination in a buoyant signal transmittlng device adapted to be launched from a below, two cylinders telescopically disposed one within the other, the outer one in extended relation constituting a stabilizing keel for-the two,

i means carried by each cylinder adapted to engage cooperating means carried by the other and lim iting separating movement between said cylinders, severable connections between said cylinders maintaining them' telescoped, a parachute container connected to said inner cylinder, 8. parachute in said container, means for releasing said parachute, load cord connections between said parachute and said outer cylinder, and connections between said load cord and the aforesaid severable connections automatically severing the same at a, predetermined point in the descent of the cylinders. I

'5. In combination in a buoyant signal transmitting device adapted to be launched from a plane at considerable height, into a body of water below,

two cylinders telescopically disposed one within plane at considerable height, into a body of water below, two cylinders telescopically disposed one within the other, the outer one in extended relation constituting a stabilizing-keel for the two, means carried by one of said cylinders enabling sinking of both said cylinders at a predetermined time, means carried by each cylinder adapted to engage cooperating means carried by the other and limiting separating movement between said cylinders, severable connections between said cylseverable connections automatically severing the same at a predetermined point in the descent of the cylinders.

'7. In. combination in a buoyant signal transmitting device adapted to be launched from a plane at considerable height, into a body of water below, two cylinders telescopically disposed one within the other, the outer one in extended relation constituting a stabilizing keel for the two, a plug of predetermined solubility in the wall of the inner cylinder adapted to open said cylinder at a predetermined time for inflow of water and sinking of the device, means carried by each cylinder adapted to engage cooperating means carried by the other and limiting separating movement between said cylinders, severable connections between said cylinders maintaining them telescoped, a parachute" container connected to said inner cylinder, a parachute, in said container,

means for releasing said parachute, load cord GILBERT H. AREN STEIN.

US539173A 1944-06-07 1944-06-07 Parachute pack Expired - Lifetime US2402143A (en)

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Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2473050A (en) * 1947-01-13 1949-06-14 Charles J Camp Emergency radio signal for airplanes
US2519553A (en) * 1946-11-27 1950-08-22 Faulkner Arundell Wallis Radio apparatus for aircraft
US2555867A (en) * 1945-08-28 1951-06-05 Robert P Bennett Air launched radio station
US2555352A (en) * 1945-06-20 1951-06-05 Percival D Lowell Air launched radio station
US2582113A (en) * 1947-11-13 1952-01-08 Reconstruction Finance Corp Delay opening parachute pack and releasing assembly therefor
US2586828A (en) * 1950-01-19 1952-02-26 Royal V Keeran Radio buoy
US2593432A (en) * 1948-06-18 1952-04-22 Raymond L Freas Automatically operated radio buoy
US2628307A (en) * 1950-06-01 1953-02-10 Eura Wilson Emergency signaling apparatus
US2636121A (en) * 1949-02-14 1953-04-21 Raymond L Freas Automatically operated signaling apparatus
US2642693A (en) * 1947-07-22 1953-06-23 Francis V Broady Apparatus for retrieving fishing tackle or the like
US2675776A (en) * 1954-04-20 Sea marker
US2803838A (en) * 1954-08-26 1957-08-27 Jr Nathaniel B Wales Aircraft crash marking device
US2877735A (en) * 1954-10-11 1959-03-17 Johan Jacob Van Oosten Alarm systems
US2913073A (en) * 1958-05-01 1959-11-17 Magnavox Co Extensible antenna
US2966674A (en) * 1956-12-17 1960-12-27 Maurice W Clark Automatic signaling device
US2978716A (en) * 1944-10-24 1961-04-11 Leonard D Jackson Smoke float
US3032302A (en) * 1959-09-17 1962-05-01 Blackburn Aircraft Ltd Container for supplies for dropping from aircraft
US3093107A (en) * 1945-01-25 1963-06-11 Joseph A Grand Expendable ammonia noisemaker
US3116691A (en) * 1944-11-01 1964-01-07 Howard E Tatel Proximity fuze
US3166977A (en) * 1960-12-30 1965-01-26 Pickett Robert Byron Stabilized water-launched rocket vehicle
US4464131A (en) * 1982-03-16 1984-08-07 Her Majesty The Queen In Right Of Canada, As Represented By The Minister Of National Defence Water ballast compartment for buoyant marine devices

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2675776A (en) * 1954-04-20 Sea marker
US2978716A (en) * 1944-10-24 1961-04-11 Leonard D Jackson Smoke float
US3116691A (en) * 1944-11-01 1964-01-07 Howard E Tatel Proximity fuze
US3093107A (en) * 1945-01-25 1963-06-11 Joseph A Grand Expendable ammonia noisemaker
US2555352A (en) * 1945-06-20 1951-06-05 Percival D Lowell Air launched radio station
US2555867A (en) * 1945-08-28 1951-06-05 Robert P Bennett Air launched radio station
US2519553A (en) * 1946-11-27 1950-08-22 Faulkner Arundell Wallis Radio apparatus for aircraft
US2473050A (en) * 1947-01-13 1949-06-14 Charles J Camp Emergency radio signal for airplanes
US2642693A (en) * 1947-07-22 1953-06-23 Francis V Broady Apparatus for retrieving fishing tackle or the like
US2582113A (en) * 1947-11-13 1952-01-08 Reconstruction Finance Corp Delay opening parachute pack and releasing assembly therefor
US2593432A (en) * 1948-06-18 1952-04-22 Raymond L Freas Automatically operated radio buoy
US2636121A (en) * 1949-02-14 1953-04-21 Raymond L Freas Automatically operated signaling apparatus
US2586828A (en) * 1950-01-19 1952-02-26 Royal V Keeran Radio buoy
US2628307A (en) * 1950-06-01 1953-02-10 Eura Wilson Emergency signaling apparatus
US2803838A (en) * 1954-08-26 1957-08-27 Jr Nathaniel B Wales Aircraft crash marking device
US2877735A (en) * 1954-10-11 1959-03-17 Johan Jacob Van Oosten Alarm systems
US2966674A (en) * 1956-12-17 1960-12-27 Maurice W Clark Automatic signaling device
US2913073A (en) * 1958-05-01 1959-11-17 Magnavox Co Extensible antenna
US3032302A (en) * 1959-09-17 1962-05-01 Blackburn Aircraft Ltd Container for supplies for dropping from aircraft
US3166977A (en) * 1960-12-30 1965-01-26 Pickett Robert Byron Stabilized water-launched rocket vehicle
US4464131A (en) * 1982-03-16 1984-08-07 Her Majesty The Queen In Right Of Canada, As Represented By The Minister Of National Defence Water ballast compartment for buoyant marine devices

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