US2377887A - Lasting machine - Google Patents

Lasting machine Download PDF

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US2377887A
US2377887A US484327A US48432743A US2377887A US 2377887 A US2377887 A US 2377887A US 484327 A US484327 A US 484327A US 48432743 A US48432743 A US 48432743A US 2377887 A US2377887 A US 2377887A
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upper
fluid
toe
pressure
means
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US484327A
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Jorgensen Bernhard
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United Shoe Machinery Corp
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United Shoe Machinery Corp
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D21/00Lasting machines
    • A43D21/16Lasting machines with lasting pincers and toe- or heel-embracing wipers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D21/00Lasting machines
    • A43D21/12Lasting machines with lasting clamps, shoe-shaped clamps, pincers, wipers, stretching straps or the like for forming the toe or heel parts of the last
    • A43D21/125Lasting machines with lasting clamps, shoe-shaped clamps, pincers, wipers, stretching straps or the like for forming the toe or heel parts of the last with a plurality of pincers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D21/00Lasting machines
    • A43D21/18Lasting machines with lasting pincers and straight-acting wipers, also for forming the shank portions of shoes

Description

June 12, 1945. B. JORGENSEN 2,377,887

LASTING MACHINE Filed April 24, 1943 8 SheetS -Sheet 1 June 12, 1945. a; JORGENSEN LASTING MACHINE Filed April 24, 1943 B-Sheets-Sheet .2

June 12, 1945. a. JQRGENSEN LASTING MACHINE s Sheets-Sheet :5

Filed April 24, 1943 June 12, 1945. B. JORGENSEN 2,377,387

LASTING MACHINE Filed April'24, 1943 s Sheets-Sheet 4 June 12, 1945. JORGENSEN 2,377,887

LASTING MACHINE g 1 Filed April 24, 1943 8 Sheet-Sheet 5 June 12, 1945. B O ENSEN 2,377,887

LASTING MACHINE Filed April 24, 1945 8 Sheets-Sheet s June 12, 1945. JOR'GENSEN 2,377,887

LASTING MACHINE Filed April 24, 1943 8 Sheets-Sheet? June 12, 1945. B. JORGENSEN LASTING MACHINE Filed April 24, 1943 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 Avg/70;?

uxamnwm LNEAQ NNN over the insole.

materials.

Patented June 12, 1945 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE LAS'II'NG Bernhardt Jorgensen, Marblehead, Mass" assignor to United Shoe Machinery Corporation,

Flemington, N. J., a corporation OFN'GW'JBIQSEY Application April 24, 1943,, Serial No. 484,327

(01.. 1 2-.1&)

'79 Glaims.

onDecember 28, 1943, on another application of mine, and in other Letters Patent hereinafter referred to. It is to be understood, however, that the invention in various novel aspects is not limited to machine organizations of that particular character, but is susceptible of various embodi- ,mBIltS.

The machine, shown in the above-mentioned Letters Patent No. 2,324,509, when, modified as disclosed in Letters Patent No. 2,337,558, is D1:Q'

vided with a toe former for conforming the, toeendportion of amulti-ply upper to the contour of a last by wiping it heightwise of the last, with means for trimming the margin of one or more inner layers-of the upper thus conformed. to the contour of the last while leaving a margin of the outer layer to be lasted over an insole on the last next to the insole, and with wipers for thereafter wiping the margin of the outer layer inwardly The machine is also provided withgrippers which grip the margin of the sevsuchhthat the amount of force with which the eral layers of the upper at the end and the sides of the toe respectively, the end gripper being moved lengthwise of the last and the side grippers widthwise of the last to pull the upper in outward directions prior to the action of the toe former thereon and holding the upper under tension as the toe former is operated to wipe the upper heightwise of the last. The grippers then hold the margin of the upper spread out,- wardly over the wipers preparatory to the uppertrimming operation which is performed by a plurality of trimming knives movable outwardly from positions opposite the bottom of the last, the grippers releasing the upper prior to the completion of the upper-trimming operation and being retracted to avoid interference with the trimming knives. Thereafter the upper is released also by the toe former and the operations of pulling it and of wiping it heightwise of the last are repeated, the grippers at this time, howa retarder being provided over the toe end of the insole for the margin of the outer layer against. the wipers. to render them more effective to wipe it smoothly and tightly over the insole. The machine is anautomatic machine in which the. various instrumentalities are operated at the prop r times by flu dspressure means to whichmitted. toslip on. the upper in response toits resistanceto-thexforce of the pull, and is further upper is, gripped by the jaws of the grippers is definitely predetermined regardless of the thicknessof the upper materials. For the latter purpose, and. inorder that the force with which the upper is gripped may be varied as required for the best results in operating on different upper materiala. fluid is supplied to the fluid-pressure means whereby the jaws are caused to grip the upper through apressure-reducing valve which is, adjustably controlled to; vary the pressure of thefluidithussupplied independently of the pressure oft the fluidat the source of supply. Since the pressure at the source may fluctuate somewhat.- by reason of the admission of a fluid to other fluid-operated means with which the machine is provided, the. fluid for maintaining the grip of the lawsion the upper is automatically trapped to prevent it from being affected byany such fluctuation. of. pressure atthesource. In the construction shown, moreover,'the trapped fluid is controlled by an accumulator as further insurance. that its: pressure will remain substantially constant'unden conditions hereinafter described. With theforceflof the grip thus accurately predetermined; regardless of the thickness of the ever, acting only on the outer layer of the upper Cement is then applied to the shoe and the wipers are operated to wipe the margin of the outer layer inwardly over theinsole into position to be secured to the insole by the cement, M

upper materialaand withprovision for the slippingv of the; jaws. on. the upper, substantial insurance: is afforded of uniform results in operating ongsucoessivewshoes. Since the action of the toe formenmwiping-zthe upperheightwise of the last tends-to increaseithe: force of the outward pull of.thegrippersaonxthexuppersby drawing its marginzinwardly 'tcwardrtheedge of the last bottom,-

t-hmpressure otithe" jaws ontheupper is prefertion, in one aspect, also provides means formoving them all as a unit in a direction length ingly to occupy different positions heightwise of the last when they grip the upper the second time than when they grip it the first time, the gripper support being prevented by a detent from receiving its full retractive movement heightwise of the last after the first pull of the grippers on the upper. This affords better in- V surance that the grippers will properly grip the wise of the last further to pull the upperin that direction. This affords better insurance against the formation of any wrinkles in the upper at the sides of the toe between the side grippers and portions of the upper already lasted in locations immediately beyond the toe. For the purpose in view, in the construction shown, a support common to all the grippers is moved lengthwise of the last by the operative movement of the means for wipin the upperheightwise of the last. To increase the effectiveness of the end gripper in pulling the upper "lengthwise of the last, provision is afforded for operating it positively by that movement 'of'the gripper support through a device which controls it after it has been operated yieldingly through the spring associated therewith. The end gripper is, therefore, operated first yieldingly and then positively, its jaws being permitted to slip on the upper when it is thus operated positively, at which time the toe former, as'above suggested, receives its wiping movement'heightwise of the last. A further function of the above-mentioned gripper-controlling device, which in the construction shown is rendered operative by relative closing movement of the end' gripper jaws, is to prevent the end gripper'from being drawn reversely inward toward theedge of the last bottom by the pull of the margin of the upper thereon as the upper is wiped heightwise of the last, thus affording better insurance against any wrinkling of the upper at the corners of the toe beyond the end gripper jaws. This .is an advantage not only when the second pull is applied to the upper, with the gripper acting on the outer layer only of the upper materials, but also when the first pull is applied to the several layers, at which time any wrinkling of the lining, for example, might detract from the best results in the upper-trimming operation and might be diflicult to correct later in the lasting operation.

In the course of the upper-pulling operation the grippers are also preferably moved, as heretofore, a short distance heightwise of the last further to pull the upper in that direction by movement of the gripper support. 7 Among other advantages, this permits them to occupy positions heightwise of the last most convenient for the reception of the margin of the upper when the shoe is initially presented to the machine, and yet results inpreventing interference thereafter between them and the wipers. After the upper has been conformed the first time to the contour of the last by the toe former it tends margin of the upper the second time.

When the margin of the upper is trimmed by I the outward movements of the trimming knives,

the knives have a tendency to increase the strain on the upper materials, and there is also an increased strain on the upper when the wipers thereafter wipe the margin of the outer layer, controlled by the retarder, inwardly over the insole. As an additional safeguard against distortion of the upper by such extra strain thereon, especially in a direction lengthwise of the last, provision is further afforded by this invention for an increase of pressure of the toe former on the upper in the upper-trimming operation and when its margin is wiped inwardly over the insole.

The above-mentioned retarder is so formed that the margin of the upper is pressed against it by the edges of the wipers at the end and the sides of the toe, as a result of which pressure the retarder is forced heightwise of the last away from the insole to permit the wipers to move inwardly between it and the insole. In the construction herein shown provision is also afforded for a short inward movement of the retarder in a heelward direction against the resistance of springs in response to the pressure of the margin of the upper against it at the end of the toe. This tends further to prevent undue strain on the upper at the end of the toe, especially at the beginning of the inward movements of the wipers. When the retarder has been moved far enough heightwise of the last to clear the wipers, the above-mentioned springs cause itto bend the margin of the upper at the end of the toe quickly outward over the wipers. These springs are of such strength that if, under any conditions, the margin of the upper should be pressed against the retarder by the wipers at the end of the toe earlier than at the sides of the toe, the retarder will be moved heelwardly before it is moved heightwise of the last away from the insole, thus insuring that it will be properly effective to control the upper at the sides of the toe.

When the toe former is moved heightwise of the last the wipers are moved with it, both the toe former and the wipers being carried by a common support. In order to prevent undesirable interference with any shoe of a style having a bulging toe, the machine herein shown is further provided with means for holding both the toe former and the wipers retracted lengthwise of the last until they are opposite the end of the toe and -for then releasing them and moving them lengthwise of the last toward the toe to render the toe former properly effective thereafter to wipe the upper heightwise of the last.

The above and other features of the invention,

including various novel details of construction and combinations of parts, will now be more particularly described with reference to the accompanying drawings and thereafter pointed out in the claims.

In the drawings,

Fig. 1 is a View partly in left-hand side elevationiand: partly in. section or: a portionpi the: ma;- chine to whichthe-invention; is herein shown as ppliedr Fig. 2 is a: plan view, with. partsin section, showing: the" grippers andportions. of their operatingand.controllingmechanisms; i I

Fig. 3 shows the upper portionof themaohine in'front elevation; i Fig; 4- is a view' similar. to aportion of Fig. 1-, butrshowing the parts differently positioned than in Fig. 1.;

Fig. 5-is a viewin elevation,. on an enlarged scale, of one ofthe: side grippers;

Fig. 6 is a View partly inplan andpartlyin section, showing; the toe wipers, the toeformer and parts. associated therewith;

Fig. 7 l is. a viewmainlyin right-handside:eleva -v tion,. showing; the retarder and. parts associated therewith; I l

Fig. his a view partly inplan. and partly in section ontthe line VIII-VIII of Fig. '7;

Fig; 9 is a view partlyin plan and partly in section ontheline IX-IXof. Fig. 7.;

Fig. 10 .isa-diagrammatic View illustratingthe character of: the means provided. for controlling the pressure of the fluid whereby the grippers areclosed onthe upper; i y

Figs. 1.1 to-20. inclusive, are mainly vertical sectionalv views illustrating the relation to the shoe of. parts which operate thereon as they. appear at difierent times-in the course of the operation otthe machine;

Fig.21'. is mainly a. plan view. showing th shoe and certain parts in the positions which. they occupy: Substantially at the/beginning of the upper-trimming operation; and.

Fig; 22 is: a chart. illustrating" the timing ofthe various operations performed: in the .cycle ofv op erations of the' machine.

i In. view of. the. disclosures inthe previously; mentioned Letters Patent,.only such portions of themachine as it is. necessary to refer to for an understanding of thepresent invention will be herein described in detail. The shoe is. positioned bottom upward for the operation of. the machine thereon with the forepart of. the. insolein engagement. with a -vertically. adjustablev plate 2 (Figs. 2, .3, and 110,1; associated with which are aplurality of pins 4- arranged to extend through holesinthe insole into holes the bottom: of the last. i It will be understood, however, that the invention is not dependentupon the use or means of that particular character for determining the location of the shoe. Substantially at the beginning of the cycle of power operations-of the machine theshoeis clamped against the plate 2 by a'toerest 6 and an instep support Ewhich are moved. upward into supporting relation to the shoe and last, as illustrated. in Fig. l2, by fluidoperated means. not herein shown. By other fluid-operated means also a heel rest '0 is moved into supportin relation to the heel-end face of the shoe.

When. the shoe ispresented bythe operator in the position determined by theplate 2 and the pins 4 the outturned or outwardly flaring margin of the toe-end portion of the upper materials.

is inserted. between the open jaws of three grippers comprising a toe-end gripper l2 (Fig. 2) constructed and arranged. to engage the upper around the end and the cornersor the toe and two side grippers 14 arranged toengageit at the sides of the toe immediately beyond the jaws of the end gripper. In the construction herein shownthere are no substantial intervals initially between" the: endif gripper and: theiside. grippers. andraccordinglyhwhenv they first gripzthe marginroi the upper they engage it in a substantially continuous manner around, thetoe. The three grippersare mounted" on asubstantially horizon tal gripper support1i6:'(Figs. v1 and 2 which by means of; studs l8.-. is pivotally. mounted. at its rear "end; ontherframe of the. machine. for'swinging; movements heightwise or the-shoe. At its front end the gripper support l6.is-normally supported on a.lug 20 formed ona slide 22- which is vertically adjustable on; the frame asmore particularly hereinafter-described:

The toe-endgripper l2 comprises a: pair of jaws-24-and2fi. the lower jaw. being fast on a slide zflx movable in:directionsrlengthwise of the shoe-along. guidew-ays -on-:the;support 6. The upper. jawyzd-is; m'ounted'om a-pin- 300p the lower jaw iorswingingmovements-.heightwise of the shoe into and out. ofupper-gripping position, andis. connected byt'a link.32 toa piston 34 movable in a-cylinderiifi fast on the slide 28. The jaw 26. isheldinitially inopenposition, with the piston 3.4. near the inner end: ofthe. cylinder 36, by two springs.- 38 connected. to'apin 46 in the jaw; Thepiston-is operated to. cause the jaws to grip theupper by fluidadmitted to the; cylinder 3-6:. fr'o1napipe. 42.connected by:a flexible tube M to acrosspipe 4 5 at the rear of the gripper sup- .port l-t. This crosspipereceives operating fluid from. a pipe 48 to which fluidis suppliedas hereinafter described; I I

Eachof the. side grippersllcomprises a lower jaw- 5D. (Fig, 5) and an upper jaw 52 mounted on a pin 54 onthe lower jawtoswing toward and from the latter: heightwisep of the shoe. The lowerjaw of each side gripper is-secured to a slide 55. (Fig. 2)' movableon the support I 6 along guideways. arrangedsubstantially at right angles to theguidewaysforthetoefend gripper l2. The

upper jaw 52. of. each .side gripper isconnected by alink. 58 to a piston operating in. a cylinder 62 fast on. the. slide and is.held normally in open position. by springs 64. The closing of each side. gripper on: the upper results from the ad mission. of. fluid.- to, the cylinder 62 through a flexible tube 66.- connected. tothe cross pipe: 46. Accordingly, fluid fromthe pipe 48 acts to close all. three grippers; simultaneously on the upper. To facilitate the proper gripping of the. margin of. theupper'bythejaws of the-side grippers in locations comparatively near portions of the upper. which. havetalready been lasted over the insole at. the sides ofi the shoe immediately beyondthe toe,. the upper-engaging faces of the jawsoi eachv of. these. grippers, in.,the. construction herein. shown,.. are inclined heightwise and lengthwise of the: shoe as illustrated. in Fig. 5, so that the portionsoffthesefaces which engage the. upper comparatively. near the previously lasted portionsv of theupper are located somewhat higher thanthe portions which. engage'the upper. nearer. the. end of. the toe...

The. pulling of. the upper byuthe several grippersis efiected bymovingthe slides '28 and 56 outwardly along their guideways on the support l6. For imparting. such upper-pulling. movementto the tQe-endg ripper l2 alever 68 is pivot'ally mounted on a. stud l0 on the support 16 and,..in. the. constructionherein .shown is connected. directly through a spring 12 to the slide 2% which. carries. the toe-end gripper. The'operative. movement of the lever .68- is effected by bodily moyement. ofa cylinder 14 which is pivotally connected .at 1;6.-to the lever. and into which fluid is delivered from a flexible tube I8 leading from a supply pipe 80. The return movement of the toe-end gripper is efiected, when permitted, by a spring 82 connected to the lever 68 and to a screw 84 on the support I6, the lever acting on the slide 28 through the fully contracted spring 12. Such return movement of the gripper is limited by engagement of a rod 86 with a lug 88 on the cylinder 14, this rod being fast in a lug 90 on the supportI6.

The fluid admitted to the cylinder 74 serves also to impart upper-pulling movement to the left-hand side gripper I4. For this purpose there is movably mounted in the cylinder I4 a piston 92 connected to one arm of a lever 94 mounted to swing about a stud 96 on the support I6. Also mounted to swing about this stud is one arm of a three-armed lever 98 which has a forwardly extending arm connected to the slide 56 carrying the left-hand side gripper. A spring I connected to this arm and to the left-hand arm of the lever 94 serves to hold this lever normally in engagement with a lug I02 on the three-armed lever. Accordingly, outward movement of the piston 92 in the cylinder I4 swings the lever 94 and the three-armed lever 98 as a unit about the stud 96 to impart upper-pulling movement to the left-hand side gripper, the spring I00 being yield able to permit the lever 94 to move relatively to the lever 98 in response to resistance of the upper to the force of the Dull applied thereto. Movement of the piston 92 is limited by a stop I04 on the support I6. The left-hand side gripper is returned to its starting position, when permitted, by a spring I06 connected to the lever 94, this position of the gripper being determined by engagement of an adjustable rod I08 with the third arm of the three-armed lever 98.

The mechanism for imparting upper-pulling movement to the right-hand side gripper I4 is of substantially the same construction as that for operating the left-hand gripper, and corresponding parts are identified by the same reference characters. The lever '94 through which the right-hand gripper is operated is pivotally connected to a piston IIO movably mounted in a cylinder I I2 which is pivoted on a stud II4 on the support I6, movement of the piston being limited by a stop II6. Fluid is admitted to this cylinder through a pipe II8 communicating with the supply pipe 80. Accordingly, by fluid received from this supply pipe all the grippers are operated simultaneously to pull the upper.

To assist in accomplishing the objectsof the present invention, there is associated with the toe-end gripper I2 a device which prevents that gripper from moving reversely toward the toe end of the last relatively to the gripper support I6 after it has been operated yieldingly through the spring 12. This device comprises a pair of pawls I (Fig. 1) which are slightly staggered and are pivotally mounted on a pin I22 supported on one of two gibs I24 which assist in guiding the end gripper in its upper-pulling movement, the pawls being arranged to engage teeth I26 formed on the same gib to prevent the above-mentioned reverse movement of the gripper. The pawls are controlled by a plate I28 resting on a lug I30 formed on the cylinder 36 and pivotally connected at one end to the previously mentioned pin in the gripper jaw 26. The plate I28 is further guided by a pin I32 extending upwardly from the lug I30 through a slot I34 (Fig.2) in the plate. Initially the pawls I20 are held out'of engagementwith the teeth I26 by engagement of the rear end of the plate I 28' with upwardly extending tails I36 of the pawls, as illustrated, and in response to the upper-gripping movement of the jaw 26 the plate is withdrawn from the tails I36 to cause the pawls to be moved by gravity into engagement with the teeth I26. It will be understood that when the upper-pulling movement is imparted to the end gripper through the spring 12 the pawls ride over the teeth and thereafter prevent any reverse movement of the gripper. The purpose' and function of this gripper-controlling means will be more fully hereinafter explained.

For purposes also of this invention the several grippers are so constructed that the upper-gripping faces of their jaws are smooth and are permitted to slip on the upper in the course of the operation of the machine when the resistance of the upper to the force of the pull thereon becomes great enough, and the machine is further provided with means whereby the force with which the upper i gripped by the jaws may be definitely predetermined and may be varied as required for the best results in operating on different upper materials. For closing the jaws on the upper, for operating the grippers to pull the upper, and for impartingoperative movements also to the various other fluid-operated mechanisms with which the machine is provided, the machine has, as heretofore, a chamber or manifold I38 (Fig. 1) which serves as a source of supply of fluid under pressure, the fluid, which is preferably light oil, being delivered to this chamber by a continuously operating pump (not herein shown) and the pressure of the fluid in the chamber being determined by a relief valve (also not shown), as fully disclosed in Letters Patent No. 2,324,509. Admission of fluid to the gripper-closing cylinders 36 and and exhaust of the fluid therefrom are controlled by a sleeve valve I40 which corresponds to the valve I shown in said Letters Patent. The valve I40 con- .trols communication between the chamber I38 and the previously mentioned pipe 48 leading to the gripper-closing cylinders. Associated with the valve is valve-operating mechanism I42 to which movement is imparted in the first instance by a treadle-operated rod I44 to admit the fluid to the gripper-closing cylinders, after which this mechanism is controlled automatically in the course of the operation of the machine, as also fully disclosed in the last-mentioned Letters Patent. I I

Interposed between the valve I40 and the supply pipe 48, in the construction herein shown, is a pressure-controlling valve I46 which serves to reduce the pressure of the fluid supplied to the gripper closing cylinders below the pressure of the fluid in the chamber I38 and through which the pressure of the fluid supplied to the cylinders may be adjustably varied. The pressure-controlling valve I46 comprises a cylinder I48 supported on a casting I50 on which the valve-operating mechanism I42 is mounted, and a piston I52 (Figs. 2 and 10) movable in the cylinder. The piston is held initially in engagement with a plug I54 at one end of the cylinder by a spring I56,

and fluid is conducted into that end of the cylinder from the valve I40 through a pipe I 58. Fluid thus admitted to the cylinder I48 passes through a bore I 60 in the piston I52 and through ports I62 to an annular chamber I64 formed in the piston, and from this chamber it passes through a port I66 t0 the pipe 48 leading to the gripperclosing cylinders. It will be understood that the fluid in these cylindersfirst-moves the pistons 34 and 60 to swing 1 the I gripper jaws'2li' and :52 into positions to grip the upper against the cooperating gripper jaws and then serves'toincreasethef pressure of the jaws on the upper. Atcthe-same time the fluid in the valve cylinderi l48 tendsby its pressure-on'the valve piston 152 tomo've this piston along "the cylinder against the resistance ofthe spring I56. Such movement of the piston I52, however, does 'not take place until thepressure ofthe fluid in the gripper-closing cylinders andin the valvecylinder I48 has been'builtlup to a predetermined maximum. This maximum pressure is determined not only by the spring I58, which is a comparatively light spring, but i also: by additional means arranged to control themovement of the piston I52. For the 'purpose -of such additional control that portion ofthe cylinder I48 in which-the spring 156 is mounted i filled with fluid, i. e.', with oil; and is in communication through a; pipe I68 I with a I relief valve I I mounted at-the front'of the machine (Fig. 2) within convenient reach of the operator. This relief valve comprises a ball-shaped 'valve -membe1 I 12 (Fig. 10) normally held on itsseat to prevent escape of fluid from'the pipe -I68by aspring I I4 which is variably compressible by a hand wheel I16. Nomovement of the valve piston =I52, therefore, occurs'untilthe pressure of thefiuidtacting on the gripper jaws is sufficient to overcome the combined resistances of the springs I56 and IM. As soon as the valve member I 12 is forcedfrom itsseatby the'pressureof thefluid the piston IE2 ismoved quickly along the valve cylinder 1214 8 against the resistance of the spring I56 to .close thep0rt j I wand thus not only to prevent'furth-er increase of pressure in the gripper-closing cylindera'but also to'trapthe 'fluid in those cylinders. By the pressure of the fluid from the supply chamber I38 the piston I52 isthu moved until it is stoppedby a plug II8-in one enduof the valve cylinder M8, at which time the annular chamber*l64 =in=the piston is located a substantial I distance beyond the port 466 (Fig. 10) Accordingly, any such drop in the pressure of the' fluid inthesupply chamber I 38 asmay occur momentarily'by reason of admission of fiuid to some one'ofthe operating mechanisms of the machine while the grippers are closed ontheuppe'r will-not result in such return movement of the-valve-piston I52, under the influence oi the spring 1256, as'to'bringthe annular chamber 164 again into registration with the port I66. The pressure with which the grippers are held I closed 1 on the upper will, therefore, not be affectedby any suohfluctuation of pressure at the source of fluid supply.

The fluid which escapes past the relief valve ITII is conducted by-a pipe I80toa ;reservoir.or sump I82 from whichfluid is pumped to the sup ply chamber I38. Whenthe valve-I-40 is moved to exhaust positionthe pipe I58 is opened by the uncovering of ports I84; one of whichis shown in Fig.1, thus reducing the pressure in this pipe to zero, and as a result the valve piston l52 is quickly returned to its initial position by the spring I 55; thus bringingits annular chamber I'64 into registration witlr the port I and openingthe gripper closing cylinders also to exhaust to causethe release of'the upper by the grippers. It will be understood thatinitsreturn flow the fluid passes through the ports I84 to -'the sump [82. '-When thevalve piston L [52 is thus returned by the spring I56 fluid i permitted to flow freely 'from the sump into that end of:thecylinder -.where the--spring :is

located througha check valve I86 located-inn by p'ass pipe 488 leading :from the pipe I80 .to the pipe I68. It will further beunderstoodthat by adjusting the valve spring .l 14 1. by .means of the hand wheel: lilli-theoperator mayvary as desired the force with which theupper is :gripped by the .jawszof the grippers. The amount of such force-is shown byan indicator .190 mounted on the front of theumachine and connected through a-pipell92lwith thepipe 48.

i .It will be.evidentithatthe.amountof forcewith which'the margin; ofitheupper isgripped by the jaws. of thegrippersis the same whether thejaws grip theseverlal .layers of the .upperrmaterials, as when .the .pullris :applied the .first time to ,the upper, aor'awhetheratheygrip .onlysthe outer layer in. applying. the second'pp'ull: after the trimming of the margin ofathe upper. It I may occasionally happen, however, :that inipulling the upper-the first time some one of the grippers will slip oil one :ofthe inner layers 'ofthe upper .materials whilestilltgripping the otherlayers- Inorder to preventsthe possibility .of -.an undesirable reduction Ofjthe pressure of the jaws of .thenseveral grippers: on theupperunder those conditionsthe machine is lprovided .withan accumulator I.94 jas furtherzinsurance that the. gripping pressure will bemaintainedsubstantially constant. This accumulator comprises a cylinder -I 96 in communie cationzat oneend with thepipe iIiand having therein. a piston I 98 movable against 1 the gresistanceotaspring ZIlO whichis-seated on a-plug 202 threaded in the other end of the cylinder. It will be understood that bythe pressure of the fiuidin the sunply line leading to theggripperclosing cylinders thepiston I98 ofthe accumulater is. moved against theresistance of the spring 200, andthisspring serves thereafter to maintainthe gripper-closing pressure substantially constantlregardless of conditions such as above 6 mentioned. {The accumulator serves also to compensatefor any; possible leakage of fluid past the grippereclosingpistons which may occur whilethe upper is held under gripping pressure.

. As previouslystated, the gripper support IE is supported initially'at its front end on a lug :20 formed on aslide 22 which; is vertically adjustable on theirame. This determines the height of the several grippers when the shoe is presented tothe machine and when they first grip the marginof the upper materials, their height being such that theimargin of the upper maybe conveniently inserted betweemtheir jaws when the shoe is thus presented. As more fully disclosed in Letters PatentNo..-2,324,5.09, the slide 22 1s adjusted vertically lay-means of a hand wheel 284 (Fig. 3) which serves to operate acrankpin 2% (see also Fig. 1;) connected byxa linkiZiB tothe slide. The slide is held against downward movement from its-adjustedposition by a pin 2 I 0 carried by a disk 2I2 which turnswiththe hand wheel, thepin being arranged-toz-enter any one .ofapluralityof hples2l4sprovided in a plate 2L6 (Fig. 1)v fast on the frame, Thepinis withdrawn fromany one of the. holesby moving the hand wheel and the disk' forwardly. From the position thus .determined by thelug-Mthegripper support .I6 is swung upwardly a short distance to rcause the grippersto-pull theupper .heightwiseof the last rangedto'act on thegripper support respectively near the opposite sides thereof, only'one such piston and cylinder being herein shown (Fig. l) Each piston 218 has an upwardly, extending bar 22l provided at its upper end with a screw 222 arranged to engage the gripper support. Upward movement of each piston is positively limited by a pin 224 mounted in the cylinder 220 and extending through a slot 226 in the piston. Operating fluid is admitted to the cylinders 220 simultaneously with its admission to the cylinders 14 and H2 (Fig. 2) for moving the grippers relatively to the support 16, as fully disclosed in the last-mentioned Letters Patent. To insure further that the grippers will be properly positioned relatively to the wipers, a short additional upward movement is preferably imparted thereafter to the gripper support by means movable upwardly with the wipers, as hereinafter described.

As previously suggested, after the upper has been conformed the first time to the contour of the last it tends to retain the shape imparted to it, and its outturned margin is therefor positioned somewhat higher when it is gripped the second time by the grippers than when it is gripped the first time. The machine herein shown is therefore further provided with means for positioning the grippers somewhat higher when they grip the upper the second time than when they grip it the first time. For the purpose in view the link 208 has therein a slot 228 (Fig. 3) through which the crank pin 206 extends to permit the link and the slide 22 to be moved upward relatively to the crank pin, and the upper end of the link is connected by another link 230 to one arm of a bell-crank lever 232 pivotally mounted on a bracket 234 on the frame, the other arm of this bell-crank lever being connected by a link 236 to one arm of another bellcrank lever 238 mounted on the frame. The other arm of this bell-crank lever is connected by a rod 240 to a plate 242 fast on the gripper support 16, the rod extending through a hole in the plate and having nuts 244 located abov and below the plate. When the gripper support, therefore, is swung upwardly as above described, upward movement is imparted thereby to the link 208 and to the slide 22 which carries the supporting lug 20. Thereafter the slide 22 is prevented from receiving its full downward movement, so that its lug 20 will hold the gripper support in a higher position when the grippers grip the upper the second time. For this purpose there is secured to the link 208 by a screw 246 a member 248, and there is pivotally mounted on a bracket 250 on the frame a detent 252 movable to a position under a downwardly extending portion 253 of the member 248 to limit the downward movement of the slide 22. Such movement is imparted to the detent by a fluid-operated piston 254 vertically movable in a cylinder 256 supported on the frame. Fluid is supplied to the cylinder 256 through a pipe 258 which may be conveniently connected to the fluid line leading to the fluid-operated means for operating the heel rest I0, that fluid line being preferably maintained in open communication with the pressure chamber I38 when the heel rest is in operative position. Since the heel rest is operated substantially at the beginning of the cycle of operations of the machine, the detent 252 is subjected to the pressure of the operating fluid before the slide 22 receives its upward movement. This causes the detent to bear against'one side of the downwardly extending .portion 253 of the member 248, and it is thereafter swung inwardly under this portion of the member when permitted by the upward movement of the slide 22; The movement of the detent is limited by its engagement with a pin 260 on th bracket 250. The screw 246 is threaded in the link 208 and extends through a slot 262 in the member 248 to permit this member to be adjusted tovary the height at which the grippers are supported when they grip the upper the second time. When fluid is released from the cylinder 256 the detent 252 is returned to its initial position by a spring 264, thus permitting the slide 22 to be returned to its initial position determined by engagement of the crank pin 206 with the link 208.

For Wiping the margin of the upper about the toe end of the last inwardly over the insole the machine is provided as heretofore with wipers 266 secured to wiper holders 268 (Figs. 1 and 6) which are mounted for swinging movements along guideways on a wiper carrier 210 about the axis of a pin 212 on the carrier to close the wipers inwardly over the shoe bottom widthwise of the shoe as the wiper carrier is operated to advance them lengthwise of the shoe. Such operative movement is imparted to the wiper carrier by a fluid-operated piston 214 movable in a cylinder 215 and connected to the carrier by a piston rod 216. Wiper-closing movements are imparted to the wiper. holders 268 in response to the movement of the wiper carrier 210 lengthwise of the shoe by mechanism not herein shown but fully disclosed in Letters Patent No. 2,324,509. The wiper carrier 210 and its operating means are supported by a casting 218, which may be termed a wiper support, and this casting is supported on upper and lower pairs of parallel links 280 and 282 for upward and downward movements,

only one of the lower links 282 being visible in the drawings. It is moved upwardly to carry the wipers 266 into position for wiping the margin of the upper inwardly over the insole by a pair of fluid-operated pistons 284 vertically movable in cylinders 286 mounted on the frame, only one such piston and cylinder being herein shown. The means whereby the wiper support 218 is operated and controlled through the pistons-284 is herein illustrated as 'of' the same construction as disclosed in Letters Patent No. 2,354,685, granted on August 1, 1944, on an application of mine, and need not be described in-detail. It need only be stated that the limit of the upward movement of the wiper support is determined by pins 288 extending from the pistons 284 through slots 290 in the cylinders 286 and arranged to engage the cylinders at the upper ends of the slots.

In response to the upward movement of the wiper support 218 the toe-end portion of the upper is wiped heightwise of the last and is conformed to the contour of the last by a substantially U- shaped flexible toe former 292. This toe former in the machine herein shown is controlled by mechanism which is constructed as disclosed in the last-mentioned Letters Patent and which, therefore, will be herein described only in so far as is necessary for an understanding of this invention. The toe former is supported by a block 294 which rests on upper faces of the two wiper holders 268 and which is movable along these faces with the toe former in directions lengthwise of the shoe. In such movements the block is guided by means of a rod 296 which is fasttherein and is slidingly movable in a'bore 298 (Fig. 6) in the piston rod 216. trolled with respect to such movements length- The toe former is :con-

wise of the shoe through two rearwardly extending links 300 and 302 the front ends of which areconnected to the portions of the toe former at the sides of the toe by mechanism disclosed in detailin the last-mentioned Letters Patent. The rear end of the link 300 is pivotally connected to the lower bifurcated end of an arm 304 extending downwardly from a sleeve 306 which is fast on a rockshaft 303 mounted to turn in bearings in the wiper support 218. The rear end of the link 302 is similarly connected to the lower bifurcated end of an arm 310 extending downwardly from the sleeve 306. Connected to the lower bifurcated end of a third arm 3|2 extend- W ing downwardly from the same sleeve is a spring 314 connected at its front end toa hook 3l6 .on the wiper support 218 and tending to turn the sleeve 3'06 and the rockshaft 300 in the direction to impart forward movement through the links 300 and 302 to the toe former 292. An arm 3l8 integral with the sleeve 306 carries a screw 320 arranged to engage a lug 322 on the wiper support 218 to limit forward movement imparted to the toe former by the spring 3 l4 if the machine is operated without any shoe therein. It is by this spring that the toe former is pressed yieldingly against the toe-end face of the shoe in the upwiping operation. The portions of the toe former at the sides of the toe are further controlled through links 324 by springs 326 mounted in sockets in adjusting levers 328, the springs being yieldable to permit the portions at the sides of the toe to be forced somewhat apart by the shoe inthe upwiping operation.

Initially the wiper support 218 is at such a height that the wipers 266 and the toe former 292 are positioned lower than the toe-end of the shoe, as illustrated in Fig. 11. In order thatin operating on a shoe of a style having a bulging toe the toe will not interfere with the upward movement of the-wipers and the toe former, the machine herein shown is so constructed that both the wipers and the toe former are held retracted lengthwise of the shoe until, in their upward movement, they are opposite the toe-end face of the shoe, means being provided for then releasing them and for moving them lengthwise of the shoe toward the toe to apply the toe former to the shoe and to render it properly effective thereafter to wipe the upper heightwise of the last. As shown in Fig. l, a rod 330 is vertically movable in a sleeve.33'2 fast in the wiper support 218 and is arranged to enter a recess 334 formed in-a plate 336 fast on the wiper carrier 210 to hold the wiper carrier at the limit of its retractive movement determined by engagement of i a collar 338' (Fig. 6) on the carrier with a boss340 formed onthe wiper support. The rod 330, which thus serves as a latch or detent, is controlled by a compression spring 342 mounted between a'portion 344 of the frame and a collar 346 fast on a rod 348 extending downwardly from the rod 330. This spring, therefore, moves the rod 330 upwardly intothe recess 334 each time the wiper carrier 210 is retracted by the fluid admitted into the front end of the cylinder 215. In order also to retract the toe former and to hold it retracted, the'wiper carrier 210 carries a screw 350 (Fig. 6) the. head of which is arranged to engage an enlarged portion of the previously mentioned arm 304'which extends downwardly from the sleeve 306 and to rockthissleeve and the shaft 308 againsttheresistance of thespring 314, the sleeve acting-through the links 300 and 302 to retract the toe I former. Mounted on the lower end of the'rod 348 (Fig. 1) is a nut 352 arranged to engage the casting 34'4 andthus to cause the rod 330 to be withdrawn from the recess 334 in the plate 336 to release the wiper carrier 210 in response to the upward movement of the wiper support 218 when the wipers and the toe former arrive in positions opposite the toe-end face of the shoe but before they have-completed their upward movements. It-will be understood that by adjustment of the nut 352 the time of such release of the wiper carrier 210 by the rod 330 may be varied. When the wipercarrier is thus released it is moved forwardly to carry the wipers toward the end of the toe by a spring 354- (Fig. 6) mounted in a closed cylinder 3'56 fastened to the wiper support 218, the spring acting through a block 358 on a screw 360 which is threaded in a lug on the wiper carrier 210 and extends through slots 362 in the cylinder 356. The limit of such forward movement of the wiper carrier is determined by engagement of the block 358 with a pin 364 fastin thecylinder 356. It will be understood that the spring 354 is compressed by the last portion of the retractive movement of thewiper carrier to bring it into position to be held by the rod 330. When the wiper carrier is moved forwardly by the spring 354, the toe former 292 is moved forwardly into position to press the upper against the end of the last by the spring 3l4, sin'cethe arm 304 is released by the screw 3'50 on the wiper carrier. Mounted also in the cylinder '356 is a spring 366 which acts through a block $368 as a buffer to control the screw 360 and thus to prevent the wiper carrier frombeing moved too far forwardlyby the spring 354. 'When the wiper carrier 210 is thereafter moved farther forwardly by the'piston 214 to operate the wipers, the spring 366 is compressed,

. and when the wiper carrier is retracted this spring expands until the block 366 arrives in the position determined by the pin 364. The machine being equipped with the means described for thus controlling both the wipers and the toe former, the mechanism disclosed in the previously mentioned Letters Patent No. 2,324,509 and No. 2,337,558 for use at the will of theoperator to hold the toe former'alone in retracted position substantially throughout the upward movement of the toe former and the wipers is dispensed with.

i As previously suggested, a final short upward movement is preferably imparted to the gripper support 1 I6, after ithas been moved upwardly by the pistons 218. to insure that the grippers will be "positionedhigh enough to clear the wipers when the latter are in position for wiping the margin'of the upper inwardly over the insole. For this purpose the wiper support 213 carries at itsoppositesides two screws 310 (Figs. 1 and 3) arranged to engage the gripper support underneath andto lift it as required beyond the position to which his lifted by the pistons 218.

In additionto the movements of the grippers l2 and-l4 individually in outward directions along the gripper support l6, andto the upward movement of the several grippers as a unit, they are, in the machine shown herein, also moved as a unit a short distance in a direction lengthwise of the last further to,pu1l the upper in that direction. This movement of the grippers is effected by moving the gripper support [6 in a rearward direction relatively to the studs 18 on which it is supported at its rear end, the studs extending into bushings312 which are mounted in arms on therg ripper support and are provided with slots 314-to permit them'ovementiof the-support.- .For

imparting this movement to the gripper support the upper links 280 on which the wiper support 218 is mounted have fast thereon arms 316 (Figs. 1 and 6) through openings in which extend links 318 pivotally connected at their rear ends to the gripper support. These arms are in engagement with nuts 380 threaded on the links 318, and by reason, therefore, of the angular movements of the arms due to the upward swinging movements of the links 280 as the wipers and the toe former are moved heightwise of the shoe the required rearward movement is imparted to the gripper support l6 through the links 318. When the wiper support 218 is moved downwardly, forward return movement is imparted to the gripper suport by the action of the arms 316 on the links 318, springs 382 being interposed between the arms and nuts 384 on the front ends of the links to insure against breakage of parts. The movement of the several grippers lengthwise of the last affords better insurance against the formation of any wrinkles in the upper at the sides of the toe between the side grippers l4 and portions of the upperalready secured in lasted relation to the insole in locations immediately beyond the toe. It will be understood that when the grippers are thus operated the end gripper I2 is controlled by one of the 'pawls I20, and, accordingly, the movement lengthwise of the last which it receives from the gripper support is a positive movement following its earlier movement effected yieldingly through the spring 12. Insurance is thus afiorded that the end gripper will be effective to pull the upper as hard as required lengthwise of the last, its jaws being permitted to slip on the upper when the resistance of the upper becomes great enough as it is thus operated positively. It will be evident that the upper-pulling movement of the grippers lengthwise of the last due to the rearward movement of the gripper support takes place as the upper is being wiped heightwise of the last by upward movement of the toe former 292, such upward movement of the toe former causing the margin of the upper to be drawn inwardly toward the edge of the last bottom. The pawl I20 has at this time the further function of preventing the end gripper from being drawn inwardly toward the last by the pull of the margin of the upper theren,,the upper slipping instead in the gripper jaws, and this affords increased insurance against any wrinkling of the upper at the corners of the toe between the end gripper jaws and the side gripper jaws.

The machine is further provided with mechanism for trimming the margin of one or more inner layers of the toe end of the multi-ply upper while leaving a margin of the outer layer to be lasted inwardly over the insole, and with mechanism for applying cement to the shoe to secure the margin of the outer layer to the insole. The upper-trimming mechanism is indicated generally by the reference character 386 (Fig. 1), and the cement-applying mechanism, the initial position of which is illustrated by dotted lines in Fig. l, is indicated generally by the reference character 388. Since both these mechanisms, except as hereinafter noted, are constructed as heretofore, they will be herein described only in so far as is necessary for an understanding of the present invention. Both mechanisms are supported on a common carrier 390 movable downwardly and upwardly and also mounted to swing about a vertical axis at its rear end. Initially the carrier is in such a position that the uppertrimming mechanism is over the shoe, from which position it is moved downwardly to carry that mechanism into position to operate on the shoe. After the upper-trimming operation the carrier is moved upwardly and is swung to a position in which the cement-applying mechanism is over the shoe, whereupon the carrier is moved downwardly to carry that mechanism into operative position. Thereafter, near the end of the cycle of operations, the carrier is returned to its initial position.

The upper-trimming mechanism comprises two sides knives 392 (Figs. 1 and 21) movable outwardly from positions over the bottom of the toe end of the shoe to trim the margin of the upper at the sides of the toe, and a middle knife 394 movable downwardly and then lengthwise of the shoe from a position over the toe to trim the margin of the upper at the end of the toe. The several knives cut the inner layer or layers of the upper materials on a line generally parallel to the edge of the last bottom, and the side knives 392 carry with them also knives 396 having cuttin edges extending transversely of the edge of the last bottom to sever the ends of the strip of waste material from the rest of the upper materials, as disclosed in Letters Patent No. 2,363,004, granted on November 21, 1944, on an application of mine. The side knives operate first on the upper, the several grippers releasing the upper as these knives begin to act thereon, and thereafter the middle knife completes the upper-trimming operation.

The cement-applying mechanism 388 comprises a cement receptacle 398 (Fig. 7) supported by rods 400 and 492 on the front ends of parallel links 404 and 406, these links being supported at their rear ends on rods 408 and M0 on the carrier 390. Threaded in an ear M2 on the rear end of the link 404 is a screw 4 bearing at its lower end on a compression spring 4| 6 mounted in a socket in the carrier 390. This spring, therefore, tends to swing the links 404 and 406 downwardly, the limit of such downward movement of the links and of the cement receptacle 398 being adjustably determined by a screw 4| 8 which is threaded in an ear formed on the 'link 404 and is arranged to engage a vertical face on the carrier 390. Supported on the lower end of the cement receptacle 398 is a substantially U-shaped member 420 (Figs. 7 and 9) arranged to engage the toe end of the insole near the edge of the latter and provided with a plurality of holes 422 through which cement is forced in response' to the downward movement of the carrier 390, when the cement-applying mechanism is over the shoe, by means not herein shown but fully disclosed in Letters Patent No. 2,324,509. After engagement of the member 420 with the insole the spring M6 is yieldable to permit further downward movement of the carrier 390. The member 420 is provided with an inclined face 424 against which the marginal portion of the upper is pressed by the wipers 266 when they are advanced and closed inwardly over the insole, and by the pressure thus applied to the member 420 at the end and the sides of the toe this member and the cement receptacle 398 are forced upwardly against the resistance of the spring 6 to permit the wipers to move inwardly under the member 420 and thus to wipe the margin of the upper throughout its width down on the insole. The member 420 accordingly acts as a retarder on the margin of the upper to insure that it will be wiped tightly and smoothly over the insole by the wipers. In the construction herein shown 425 extends through an opening in the yoke member 43:0 and has thereon nuts 432 and 43d spaced rfarrenough apart to permit relative move.- ment of the rod and the cement receptacle its lengthwise of the shoe. By two springs 436 connected to the rod 402 the cement receptacle is held normally a position determined by enga ement of the yoke member rat with the nut 143.2, and Fit is against the resistance of these springs that the retarder 42b is moved length wise of the shoe as above described, the cement receptacle swinging about the axis of the rod Mia. 'Ilhe provision for such movement of the retarder Y lengthwise of the shoe against the resistance of the springs 43% "tends further to prevent excessive strain on the upper at the end of the toe,

especially at the beginning of the inward movements St the wipers, as the wipers and the retarder cooperate to apply an inward pull to the of the upper. When the retarder has been moved tar enough iheightwise of the shoe to U clear the wipers, the springs 4% move it quickly in the reverse direction lengthwise of "the shoe to'tbring the yoke member .4130 again into contact The :manner of operation of the machine, in so .far as it is of interest for an understandin of the present invention,will now be briefly described with reference particularly to the chart (Fig. 22)

"' which illustrates the preferable timing of the variou operations. On this chart, as on a similar chart in the previously mentioned Letters Patent No. 2,337,558, the double lines indicate the times when the operating fluid is effective to Operate the parts or to perform the operations designated, or to maintain the parts in operative positions, and the single lines indicate the times when the pre su e of the fluid thus acti g' s relieved.

A previously suggested, after the shoe has been r presented in the position determined by the plate Zan'd the pins ii. the grippe s l2 and :14 are closed Fi 11) to gr p he ma in of the s eral layers f h u p r mate ials by f id ad t d to the cyl nders .316 and 62 (Fig, ,2) in response to movement of the treadle op a ed rod 144 (Fig. 1) prio t he startin of the oy leof op ations of the machine, which cycle of operations corresponds to one cornplete revolution of a fluidoperated valve-controlling drum not herein shown. The pressure of the fluid then acting to hold the grippers closed is automatically determined by the pressure reducing valve M6, the amount of .i r e with which the upper s ri ped depending upon adjustment of the re ef valve I10, as previouslyexplained in detail. The yalye member Hi2 of the pressurerreducing vaylyeas i1.- lustrated in :Fig. v 10, is moved to such a position as to trap the fluid in the grippersclosing .cylins with thetnut 432, the retarder thus bending the ders and to hold it trapped therein regardless of .amargin of the upper 'atthe end or the toe quick- 35 such fluctuations of pressure as may occurin the 1y outward over the wipers before the latter have supply chamber 133 the course of th 013613,- oompletedftheir inward wiping :rnovernents. The tion f the m chine. sprin s 435 are of such strength that if, under any conditions, the margin of the upper should be pressed against the retarder by the wipers at the end of the toe earlier than at the sides of the toe, the retardejr will be moved heelwardly lay the wlipers zbefore it is moved heightwise or the :shoe away from the insole,'so that it will be properly effective to control the upper at the sides pf the toe as well as at the end of the toe. :a .further safeguard against excessive strain on the upper when its margin is wiped inwardly miter the rinsole by the wipers, and also at the time when the trimming knives act thereon, the rrnachine :herein shown .is provided with means for "increasing the pressure of the toe :former on the 'upper, especially around the end of the toe, to hold it more r firmly in the upper-trimming openration and when its margin is wiped inwardly. iFior this'purpose there is fast on the rear face of the wiper support 218 a cylinder 43B (Figs. 1 and 69 m which is a piston Mo provided with a ton l s .58 the gripper support is thus moved u ward extension 1442 of reduced diameter arranged wardlythellug 20 which initially-supports JitriS also toengage the depending arm 31.2 through which 5" moved upwardly by th -m ec hani sm Shown the toe former :is controlled by the spring til-d. Kiss. 1 and .3, permitting thedetent;252, ;a21ready rnncordinglynlluidncting on the rear end of the su jected to pressure by fluid admitted-to the pistonA-M tend-sthrough the links 300 and 30.2 :to dome :the toe former forwardly and thus .to 'increase iits pressure :onthe upper around the end i of the toe. To control the fluid acting on the piston :machine is provided with an addioperator starts the cycle ,of operations, whereupon o the toe rest-6, the instep support 18 and the heel ,rest to are moved into shoe-holding positions. As indicated on the chart, the wiper carrier 21,0 may at this time be subjected briefly to the pres.- sure of fluid in the trout end of the cylinder '2315 to insure that it is in its retracted position under control of the rod 3,30. Near the beginning of the cycle also fluid is admitted to the cylinders M and M2 to cause the grippers to pull the upper yieldingly in outward directions, the end and side grippers being thus operated respectively through the springs .72 and H10 which pref,- :erabl;y are of such strength that no slipping of the jaws ,of the grippers on the upper takes place at this time. At the same time the pistons 2118 are oper ted to impart up a d swinging movement to the gripper support It, thuscausihg the grippers to pull the upper also heightwise of the .Vent thereafter dull downward ;mov-emen;t of the ipp r-support- ,While the grippers are holding the upper-under tension the carrier 3599 {is moved downwardly to tional Malven-nd withmechanism for operating it ca y th up e -t m in mechanism 386 i the ropertimes in the rcycle indicated by the operative :position. Shortly thereafter upward ohart (Eig. 22:). This valve and its operating :rnpvementtisa mp rtedtoxthe wipersupport 2 l8'by m hanism are duplicates of other wvalves and .finidinth cylinderszastoraisethe wipers-26's theirrqperatirrgtmeohanisms with which the ,maand the toe former .292. Up to this time the ohine is provided, and in view, therefore, of the' wipers and the toe former have been held redisclosure of Letters Patent ,No. 23245509 they "r tract-ed lengthwise of the shoe by the action of FEIEIBILDthBfifiiIl ShOWH. the rod 330 .on the -=wiper.carrier 210. When the After the upper has been properly gripped, the

cylinder 2%,. to be s un into p s ti to p etrated, for example, in Fig. 12, engagement of the frame 344 with the nut 352 causes the rod 330 to release the wiper carrier, whereupon the carrier is moved a short distance forwardly by the action of the spring 354 (Fig. 6) to cause the toe former to press the upper against the last as shown in Fig. 12. Further upward movement of the wiper support then causes the toe former to wipe the upper heightwise of the last, at which time the margin of the upper may slip more or less in the jaws of the grippers. In the course of the upward movement of the wipers and the toe former the gripper support I6 is moved a short distance rearwardly through the links 318 to cause all the grippers correspondingly to pull the upper lengthwise of the last. At this time the end gripper I2 is controlled by one or the other of the pawls I20, so that the movement of this gripper lengthwise of the last is a positive movement, the pawl also preventing the end gripper from being moved reversely forward toward the end of the toe by the pull of the margin of the upper thereon in the upwiping operation. Immediately after the upwiping operation the trimming knives are operated to trim the toe end of the upper in the manner described, the grippers being opened to release the upper as the side knives 392 begin their trimming action thereon prior to the action of the middle knife 394 and being withdrawn by the springs 12 and I from the paths of movement of the several knives. Fig. [3 shows the positions of the parts as the middle knife is acting on the upper. Substantially at the time when the side knives begin their operative movements pressure of the toe former 292 on the upper around the end of the toe is increased by the action of the piston 440 on the mechanism which controls the toe former. After the trimming operation the carrier 390 is'raised by a spring (not shown) acting thereon, in response to release of fluid from the means for moving it downwardly, and the trimming knives also are returned to their initial positions relatively to the carrier in response to release of fluid from the means for operating the knives.

Shortly after the trimming of the upper fluid is admitted to the front end of the cylinder 215 to retract the wiper carrier 210, thus withdrawing the wi ers and the toe former lengthwise of the shoe (Fig. 14) to pos tions in which they are again held by the rod 330. The wiper support 218 is then moved downwardly, the toe former being out of contact with the shoe, in response to release of operating fluid from the cylinders 286. Just after the wiper support starts to move downwardly fluid is released from the gripper-operating cylinders 14 and H2, whereupon the grippers are moved inwardly toward the shoe (Fig. 15) by ther return springs preparatory to gripping the margin of the outer layer of the trimmed upper. At the same time release of the fluid from the cylinders 220 permits the gripper support I6 to swing downwardly, but by reason of the position of the detent 252 it is stopped in a position where the grippers are somewhat higher than when they gripped the upper the first time, in view of the higher position occupied by the margin of the upper after the trimming. At substantially the same t me also the carrier 390 is swung to carry the cement-applying mechanism 388 to a position over the toe end of the shoe, and shortly thereafter fluid is again admitted to the gripper-closing cylinders to close the grippers on the margin of the outer layer of the upper, the same grip- 2,377,887 toe former has been raised to the position illus-.

ping pressure being applied to the outer layer as was applied previously to the several layers.

After the grippers have thus been closed on the margin of the outer layer they are operated to pull the upper in the same manner as before, except that the pull is applied only to the outer layer and the upward movement of the gripper support I 6 is shorter than when the first pull was applied. The carrier 390 is then moved downwardly to carry the cement-applying means toward the shoe and to apply cement to the shoe, the retarder 420 being carried into engagement with the toe end of the insole. At substantially the same time fluid is released from the front end of the cylinder 215, thus leaving the wiper carrier 216 under control of the latch rod 330, and the wiper support 218 is then operated to impart the second upward movement to the wipers and the toe former, the wiper carrier being released by the rod 339 and the toe former being moved forwardly into upwiping position when it arrives at the same height as in its first upward movement (Fig. 16). In response to the upward movement of the wiper support rearward gripper-operating movement also is imparted again to the gripper support I6 through the links 318. It will be understood that in this second upwiping movement of the toe former the grippers may slip on the upper in the same manner as during the first upwipe. Fig. 17 shows the positions of the parts at the end of the second upwipe. The wipers are next advanced and closed to wipe the margin of the outer layer of the upper inwardly over the insole, the grippers being opened to release the upper just as the wipers begin to wipe it over the insole. At substantially the same time the pressure of the toe former on the upper around the end of the toe is again increased by the action of fluid admitted to the cylinder 438. As the wipers are moved inwardly the retarder 420 and the cement receptacle 398 are wedged upwardly by pressure of the margin of the upper on the inclined face 424 (Fig. 7) of the retarder at the end and the sides of the toe and are also swung a short distance in a heelward direction in response to pressure of the upper on the retarder at the end of the toe, as illustrated in Fig. 18. As soon as the retarder has been forced upwardly far enough to clear the wipers it is swung reversely toward the end of the toe by the springs 436, bending the margin of the upper quickly outward over the wipers, as shown in Fig. 19. By further movements the wipers wipe the margin of the upper throughout its width flat down on the insole (Fig. 20). When the wipers have arrived in the position illustrated in Fig. 20, fluid is released from the cylinders 286 to permit increased downward pressure of the wipers on the margin of the upper in the same manner as heretofore. With the wipers in their fully advanced and closed positions the machine comes automatically to a stop to allow time for the setting of the cement, and after a brief interval it is again started automatically to cause return of the parts to their starting positions. Immediately after the machine is again started fluid is admitted once more to the cylinders 286 to relieve the pressure of the Wipers on the margin of the upper before they are retracted. When they are retracted by the fluid acting in the front end of the cylinder 275 the wiper carrier 210 is again moved to the position in which it is held by the latch rod 330, preparatory to the operation of the machine on the next shoe. Before the machine stops at the end of the cycle, moreover, the gripper support I5 is returned ".to :its :initial positinn .Iheighbwise '0! the shoe by reason of return movement of the .detent 2.52.

Novel Ieatures f the means disclosed for .con-.

trolling-the pressure ofthefiuid for closingthe 'grip- "pers en the upper are lc'laimed in a divisional applicaiti'on Serial No. 527, 752, filed 011 .March :23,

Having :describedthe invention, what'I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters-Patent o'f t'he Unitedstates is:

1. In a lasting "madh'ine, means tor -lasting the of an upper inwardly over an insele on a 'last, means for pulling the upper before its margin :is thus lasted. inwardly over the insole, said upper-p1illing means cempris'ing jaw-s corrstmc'ted and arranged to grip the margin -of the upper between them to slip en the upper in response to its res'istance to the force at "the pull,

and'means 'ter maintaining the grip of said jaws on the upper with an unvaryi-ng force predetermined'independently of the thid-kness of the upper materials while permitting them thus -to slip on "the-upper.

2. In "a lasting machine, means tor' lasting the margin of an upper inwardly ever an insole on a last, means for pulling the upper before its margin is thus lasted inwardly ever the inso'le, 'said upper-pulling means comprising jaws .construc'ted and arranged to grip the margin of the "upper between them and te slip-on the upper in mespense te its resistance to the force of "the pull, and 'fiuid-pressure means for maintaining the grip 0f sa id jaws on the upper with an unvarying predetermined force while permitting them thus to slip on the upper.

23. In a lasting machine, .means for lasting the .margin of an upper inwardly over an insole on is last, means :for pulling the upper before its margin is thus lasted inwardly ever the iinsdle, :said upper-pulling means comprising 'ja-ws, constructed and arranged to grip the margin-of the upper between them and to slip on the upper in response to its resistance "to the Torre hi the pull,

.fluid-zpressure means 'for nraintaining'the gripe'f .vsaid jaws on the upper while permitting them time :to slip, a source of fluid under pressure from which fluid is supplied to said fluid-pressure :means, and means tor adjustably varying the pressure @Of the "fiuidthus supplied tosa id fluidpressure means independently of the pressure of the fluid at saidsource.

4. In a lasting machine, meansfer -lastingthe margin of an upper inwardly everan insole on a last, means for pulling the upper before its Pmarginis thus lasted inwardly ever the insole, :ssaid upper-mulling means comprising jaws constructed and arranged to grip the margin of the ripper between them and to slip on the upper in response to its resistance to the force of the pull, fluid-ipressure means for maintaining the *gripof FSEJid jaws on the upper while permitting them thuslto slip, a source-e f iiuid under' pressurefrom whichlfiuid *is supplied to '-said "fiuid-'pressure means, and valve meansfor reducing the pressure of the fluidthus supplied to said fluid-pressure means :below the "pressure .of the fluid at said source and for adjustably varying said reduced pressure.

5. .In -a lasting machine, means for lasting the margin of an upper inwardlyover an insole ona last, means for pulling the "upper before its imam gimis "thus lasted inwardly over the insole, said upperepulling means comprising jaws nonstruct- "ed and arranged :to grip the :margin 'of the upper El ll ahetween them and ito aslip run "the upper in :response its its resistance t0 the force of the pull, fluid-pressure'means tor maintaining the grip of said *jaws on the 'upper while permitting them thus to 381113, a source at iiuid under pressure from which is supplied to said fluid-pressure :means, and means fer :adjustahly determining'the pressure of the t lu'id thus supplied to said *fluidmressure means and "for automatically maintaining that pressure substantially constant regardless =of war-'iations in the pressure of the fluid-291i; said source,

:6. in a lasting snadliine, means for lasting the margin of .an upper inwardly over an insole on a Blast, :means ter pu mg the upper before it margin is thus lasted inwardly over the insole, said upper-pulling :means oompr ising jaws constructed and arranged to grip the margin of the=upper leet-ween them and to slip on the upper in response to its resistance to the tems of the pull,

, fluid-pressure means for maintaining the grip of "said jaws en the upper while permitting them thus to slip, ,a sour-6e pf fluid :under pressure from which fluid is supplied to said fluid-pressure means, and valve means tar reducing the pressure pf the *fluid thus supplied to said fluid- ;pressure means below the pressure of the fluid at said source and tar trapping the fluid thus supplied to fimaintainits "pressure regardless of wariait'ions in the pressure at said source.

7. a lasting machine, means for lasting the margin of *an upper'inwardly over an insole on a last, imeans tar pulling the upper before itsmargin is thus lasted inwardly ever the insole, said upper-pulling means comprising jaws constructedandarranged *to grip the margin-of the upper between them and to slip 0n the upper "in re sponse to its resistance 'to the "force 0f "the pull, fluid-pressure means for maintaining the "grip ofsaid 'jaws-on the upper while permitting them thus to slip, a "source o-f flu'idunder pressure from fluid is supplied to said fluid pressure means, valve means for trapping the fluid thus supplied, and an accumulator subject to the =pressure-of said trapped Efiu-id tor preventing reduction of that pressure.

8. In-aflasting maehinehmeans fer pulling the toe end of an upper on 'a last outwardly from. the toe-endtace-=of the last, meansfor-wiping the toe end of the upper height-wise of the last to conform it to the 'contourof the last while it is 'he'ld'under tensi'on 'by said upper pulling means, said upper-pulling means comprising jaws con- :strueted and arranged to grip the margin of "the upper hetween them andto slip on the upper as the upper i-s *thus wiped laeig'htwise of the last, and means tier maintaining the grip of said jaws on the upper with a dome predetermined independently 0f the thiclmess of the upper materials awhile permitting them thus to =slip on the upper.

19. .In a lasting machine, means for pulling the toe-end of an upper on a last outwardly "from the t'oe-endiace :otithe' las't, meanst'or wiping the toe rendsot the upper 'heightwise 0f the last to 0011- 'f-ormit to the .sontour of the :last while it is held :under tension by said zupper pulling *means, said upper-pulling means compr ising jaws constructled and arranged to grip the margin of the upper between them and to 'slip on the upper as the upper is thus wiped heightwise-ot the last, and fluid-pressure means for maintaining the grip of said jaws un the 'upper with an unvarying predetermined ierce while permitting them thus to slip on the upper.

:IO. dna lasting machine, means for pulling the toe end of an upper on a last outwardly from the toe-end face of the last, means for wiping the toe end of the upper heightwise of the last to conform it to the contour of the last while it is held under tension by said upper-pulling means, said upperpulling means comprising jaws constructed and arranged to grip the margin of the upper between them and to slip on the upper as the upper is thus wiped heightwise of the last, fluid-pressure means for maintaining the grip of said jaws on the upper while permitting them thus to slip, a source of fluid under pressure from which fluid is supplied to said fluid-pressure means, and means for adjustably determining the pressure of the fluid thus supplied to said fluid-pressure means and for automatically maintaining that pressure substantially constant regardless of variations in the pressure of the fluid at said source.

11. In a lasting machine, a plurality of grippers comprising an end gripper and side grippers arranged to grip the margin of the toe end of an upper on a last at the end and the sides of the toe respectively and movable to pull the upper outwardly from the end and side faces of the last, means for wiping the toe end of the upper heightwise of the last to conform it tothe contour of the last while it is held under tension by said grippers, said grippers comprising jaws so formed as to permit them to slip on the upper when the upper is thus wiped heightwise of the last, and fluid-pressure means for maintaining the grip of said jaws on the upper with a force predetermined independently of the thickness of the upper materials while permitting them thus to slip on the upper.

12. In a lasting machine, a plurality of grippers comprising an end gripper and side grippers arranged to grip the margin of the toe end of an upper on a last at the end and the sides of the toe respectively and movable to pull the upper outwardly from the end and side faces of the last, means for wiping the toe end of the upper heightwise of the last to conform it to the contour of the last while it is held under tension by said grippers, said grippers comprising jaws so formed as to permit them to slip on the upper when the upper is thus wiped heightwise of the last, fluidpressure means for maintaining the grip of said jaws on the upper while permitting them thus to slip, a source of fluid under pressure from which fluid is supplied to said fluid-pressure means, and means for adjustably varying the pressure of the fluid thus supplied to said fluid-pressure means and for maintaining such adjustably determined pressure substantially constant independently of the pressure of the fluid at said source.

13. In a lasting machine, a plurality of grippers arranged'to grip the margin of an upper in difierent locations respectively about the toe end of a last, said grippers comprising an end gripper and side grippers, means for moving the end gripper lengthwise of the last and the side grippers widthwise of the last to pull the upper, and means for wiping the toe end of the upper heightwise of the last to conform it to the contour of the last while it is held under tension by said grippers, all said grippers comprising jaws so formed and controlled as to permit them to slip on the upper while maintaining a grip thereon when the upper is thus wiped heightwise of the last.

14. In a lasting machine, upper-gripping means comprising jaws arranged to grip the margin of an upper between them and to pull the upper, fluid-pressure means for maintaining the grip. of said jaws on the upper, a source of fluid under pressure from which fluid is supplied to said fluid-pressure means, and means for adjustably varying the pressure of the fluid thus supplied to said fluid-pressure means independently of the pressure of the fluid at said source.

15. In a lasting machine, upper-gripping means comprising jaws arranged to grip the margin of an upper betweenthem and to pull the upper, fluid-pressure means for maintaining the grip of said jaws on the upper, a source of fluid under pressure from which fluid is supplied to said fluidpressure means, a pressure-reducing valve for reducing the pressure of the fluid thus supplied to said fluid-pressure means below the pressure of the fluid at said source, and means for adjustably controlling said valve to vary the pressure of the fluid supplied to said fluid-pressure means.

16. In a lasting machine, upper-gripping means comprising jaws arranged to grip the margin of an upper between them and to pull the upper, said jaws being so formed as to permit them to slip on the upper in response to its resistance to the force of the pull, fluid-pressure means'for maintaining the grip of said jaws on the upper while permitting them thus to slip, a source of fluid under pressure from which fluid is supplied to said fluid-pressure means, and means for adjustably varying the pressure of the fluid thus supplied to said fluid-pressure means independently of the pressure of the fluid at said source.

17. In a lasting machine, upper-gripping means comprising jaws arranged to grip the margin of an upper between them and to pull the upper, fluid-pressure means for maintaining the grip of said jaws on the upper, a source of fluid under pressure from which fluid is supplied to said fluid-pressure means, and valve means for adjustably determining the pressure of the fluid thus supplied to said fluid-pressure means and for automatically maintaining that pressure regardless of variations in the pressure of the fluid at said source.

18. In a lasting machine, upper-gripping means comprising jaws arranged to grip the margin of an upper between them and to pull the upper, fluid-pressure means for maintaining the grip of said jaws on the upper, a source of fluid under pressure from which fluid is supplied to said fluid-pressure means, and a pressure-reducing valve for reducing the pressure of the fluid thus supplied to said fluid-pressure means below the pressure of the fluid at said source and for trapping the fluid thus supplied to maintain its pressure regardless of variations in the pressure of the fluid at said source.

19. In a lasting machine, upper-gripping means comprising jaws arranged to grip the margin of an upper between them and to pull the upper,

- fluid-pressure means for maintaining the grip of said jaws on the upper, a source of fluid under pressure from which fluid is supplied to said fluid-pressure means, valve means for trapping the fluid thus supplied, and an accumulator sub ject to the pressure of said trapped fluid for preventing reduction of that pressure.

20. In a lasting machine, upper-gripping means comprising jaws arranged to grip the margin of an upper between them and to pull the upper, fluid-pressure means for maintaining the grip of said jaws on the upper, a source of fluid under pressure from which fluid is supplied to said fluid-pressure means, additional means arranged to act on the upper while it is gripped by said jaws and to be operated also by fluid from said source, and means for preventing any

US484327A 1943-04-24 1943-04-24 Lasting machine Expired - Lifetime US2377887A (en)

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US52775244 US2525908A (en) 1943-04-24 1944-03-23 Fluid-pressure mechanism

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2479574A (en) * 1947-07-09 1949-08-23 United Shoe Machinery Corp Lasting machine
US2609552A (en) * 1948-04-09 1952-09-09 United Shoe Machinery Corp Machine for shaping uppers over lasts
US2768397A (en) * 1953-10-01 1956-10-30 United Shoe Machinery Corp Lasting machines

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2479574A (en) * 1947-07-09 1949-08-23 United Shoe Machinery Corp Lasting machine
US2609552A (en) * 1948-04-09 1952-09-09 United Shoe Machinery Corp Machine for shaping uppers over lasts
US2768397A (en) * 1953-10-01 1956-10-30 United Shoe Machinery Corp Lasting machines

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