US2356456A - Shock-absorbing or cushioning material made from fibrous substances - Google Patents

Shock-absorbing or cushioning material made from fibrous substances Download PDF

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Publication number
US2356456A
US2356456A US49800543A US2356456A US 2356456 A US2356456 A US 2356456A US 49800543 A US49800543 A US 49800543A US 2356456 A US2356456 A US 2356456A
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Prior art keywords
material
absorbing
elements
shock
fabrics
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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Garner Walter
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LISTER AND Co Ltd
LISTER AND COMPANY Ltd
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LISTER AND Co Ltd
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D11/00Double or multi-ply fabrics not otherwise provided for
    • D03D11/02Fabrics formed with pockets, tubes, loops, folds, tucks, or flaps
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D2700/00Woven fabrics; Methods of weaving; Looms
    • D03D2700/01Woven fabrics; General weaving methods
    • D03D2700/0111Double or multi-ply fabrics
    • D03D2700/0118Double or multi-ply fabrics for absorbing shocks
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D10INDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10BINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10B2403/00Details of fabric structure established in the fabric forming process
    • D10B2403/02Cross-sectional features
    • D10B2403/021Lofty fabric with equidistantly spaced front and back plies, e.g. spacer fabrics
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10S428/92Fire or heat protection feature
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24025Superposed movable attached layers or components
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24174Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.] including sheet or component perpendicular to plane of web or sheet
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24942Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.] including components having same physical characteristic in differing degree
    • Y10T428/2495Thickness [relative or absolute]
    • Y10T428/24967Absolute thicknesses specified

Description

Aug. 22, 1944..

w. GARNER 2,356,456 SHOCKABSORBING O R CUSHIONING MATERIAL MADE M FIBROUS S TANCES ed Aug.

Patented Aug. 2 2, 1944 snock-anso'anmcolt CUSHIONING MA- TERIAL MADE FROM FIBROUS sUB- '1 STANCES Walter Garner, Menston, in Wharfedale, England,

assignor of one-half to Lister-and Company, Limited, Bradford, Yorkshire, England 1 Application August 9,1943, Serial No. 498,005

i 15 Claims. This invention relates to improvements in shock-absorbing or cushioning material made from fibrous substances.

The expression fibrous: substances includes any mineral, protein, cellulosic or synthetic material in the form of fibres, especially fibres of an average diameter lessthan 500 micromillimetres and preferably less than 100 micromillimetres.

Examples of such fibres are wool, cotton, mohair,

kapok, glass fibre, asbestos, metal and rayon,*and preferably those fibres which are .inherenty springy and resilient such as mohair. When fibres are used which do not inherently possess be treated, e. g. by'impregnation with synthetic resin, 'e. g. phenol formaldehyde resin, so as to impart or augment. such property. r

Broadly stated, the basic feature of shock absorbing or cushioningmaterial accordng to the invention is that it comprises two or more units held or secured in superposition, and each unit comprising as component elements two text'le fabrics into which are woven resiliently flexible textile elements which connect the fabrics togather and provide legs between the fabrics which, due to their length, their substa'ntal inclination, or approach to normality, to the surof the connecting elements. It would not exceed,

' the desired degree of resilient flexib'lity,-they may I v say, three inches and generally would be consicia erably less than that. In the case of mohair,

for example, it will be found that the optimum The resilient connecting legs may be disposed in strips, e. g. 2" wide separated by a. gap of say wide, in order, for example, to lighten the fabrication ,without substantially impairing its resilience.

" In Great Britain April 2, 1942 By employing as the connecting legs, textile elements or yarns (e. g. a two-fold yarn) which are resiliently flexible or compartively rigid in character, and closely packing'them if required, there is imparted to the fabrication asubstantial springy resistance to compression which renders it suitable for use as a shock-absorbing or cushioning elementwhich' may be cut to any size or shape according to the particular purpose of its application in use. Thusffor example, it may be used as a substitute for soft or sponge rubber sheets in the manufacture of s'eat'ng', or other articles, or as a mattress or mattress component.

-The closenessof the packing of the connecting ,legs required for obtaining anyparticular degree ofresiliency with a particular kind of fibre, will depend of course on the count of the yarn. By way of example it may be indicated that a satis-- factory degree of resiliency may be obtained by;

using 1000, or between 500 and 2000, legs or elements per square inch of 2/32s mohair. yarn, or by using 500, or between 250 and 1000, legs per squarev inch of 2/16s mohairyarn. It may be stated therefore that a more open spacing than corresponds to 300 or 400 legs per square inch of 2/32s yarn wouldnot be satisfactory.

The holding or securing together in superposition of the fabricated units may be effected by means of adhesive, stitching or other. positive methods of fastening, or in some cases the units may be held in superposition, without being attached together, by encircling or encasing means.

The fibres or yarns employed in the weaving of the unit fabrications may have been treated to impart desired properties such as fire-resisting and water repelling. Alternatively, or in addition, the units themselves may be subjected to such treatment.

One or both of the outer fabrics of the units or of the composite structure may be covered or interwoven with other materials having regard to theparticular purpose and nature of the employment of the fabrication, or merely for decorative purposes.

Figures 1, 2 and 3 of the accompanying schematic drawing show, by way of example, three forms, of unit fabrication which may be used in the production of shock-absorbing or cushioning material according to the invention.

In the drawing, l. and 2 represent the ground warp of one outer fabric of a unit, and 3'and 4 represent the ground warp of the other outer fabric of the unit. The weft picks in the respective outer fabrics are shown in section as 5 and 6.

In Figure 1, which represents a standard weave,

V i'the: connecting elements or legs are produced by weavin gin a pile yarn l to engage all the Weft picks of both outer fabrics.

In Figure 2, which represents a derivative of the standard weave, the connecting elements or legs are produced by weaving in the pile yarn I to. engage alternate weft picks in the respective unit comprising as com-ponent'elements two textile fabrics into which are wovenresiliently fi'exible textile elements which connectthe fabrics fabrics is from 0f1te 0.4 inch and in" which the connecting elements are 2/16s mohair yarn packed to the extent of between 250 and 1000 elements per square inch.

6. Shock-absorbing material as claimed in claim 1, in which resilient flexibility in the fibres of the connectingelements'oia unit is imparted by a treatment such-as impregnation with synthetic resin.

7. Shock-absorbin material as claimed in claim 1, in which a. unit fabrication has been produced in oneoperation on a loom capable of weaving affwarppile fabric to the uncut stage.

8. Shock-absorbing material as claimed in claim-1; in which the connecting elements of a unit aredisposed in strips.

9.'Shock-'absorbing material as claimed in claim 1, inwhich the fibrous substance has been together and provide legsbetween the fabrics which are capable of holding the fabrics spaced apart by at least 1% inch and, if external compression has been applied, of restoring them to *suchsp'acin apart when the. compression is rev 'bsorbin g. materialas claimed in in I, which'ftliepacltingof the connecting 7 elements is 7 elements of l2/32js' yarn per. square inch. 3.; Shocl'c-.abso'rbing material s claimed .in elaimf 1," in whichithe iibres of the connecting J 'Qfthe twoit extile fabrics .i s from 0.1 to-0.4 inch. Shock-absorbing material asclaimed. in

.claiml' in'which the spacing of the twoitextile fabrics" is from 0.1 to 0.4;.inch and in which the nr'iecting. elementsv are; 2/32'5 mohairiiyarn elements per-square inch.

"'pack dijtet X .ent r between 500 and 2000 M .5. Shoclr-absorbing. material as claimed in jf ei'ei in which thespacing of the two textile 4 atjle'ast as closeas correspondsto 300 i elements ofralunit' are mohair and. the spacing treated to impart waterrepellency.-

treated: to impart fire resistance.

10. Shock-absorbing material as claimed in claim 1, in which the fibrous substance has been 11. Shock-absorbing material as claimed in claim 1, in which an outer fabric'of afiinit is covered with other material- 12. Shock-absorbing material as claimed in claim 1, in which an. outer fabric ofa unit is interwoven with other material. 1 I 13. Shock-absorbing material as claimed in claim 1, in which the units are positively secured together. 1 i

14. Shock-absorbing material as claimed in claim 1, in'which the units are held insuberpoition, without being attached together y .circlingmea'ns; i

= 15..seat's,- mattresses. mattress components and other articles of manufacture comprising shock-absorbing material as claimed in 'claiml.

WALTER GARNER.

US2356456A 1942-04-02 1943-08-09 Shock-absorbing or cushioning material made from fibrous substances Expired - Lifetime US2356456A (en)

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Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2477403A (en) * 1944-11-24 1949-07-26 Owens Corning Fiberglass Corp Surgical bandage
US2857654A (en) * 1956-07-06 1958-10-28 Gen Tire & Rubber Co Interwoven fabric for vehicle tops or the like
US3217751A (en) * 1963-12-09 1965-11-16 Goodyear Aerospace Corp Loom apparatus for weaving contoured thread connected dual wall inflatable fabric
US3224466A (en) * 1964-01-31 1965-12-21 Goodyear Aerospace Corp Method for weaving contoured thread connected dual wall inflatable fabric
US3228426A (en) * 1963-12-04 1966-01-11 Goodyear Aerospace Corp Method for weaving contoured thread connected dual wall inflatable fabric
US3232319A (en) * 1963-12-09 1966-02-01 Goodyear Aerospace Corp Method for weaving contoured thread-connected dual wall inflatable fabric on a single shuttle loom
US3612110A (en) * 1968-10-22 1971-10-12 Gerald Charles Wildi Woven tapes
US3978894A (en) * 1973-02-05 1976-09-07 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Energy absorbing tear-webbing
US4015641A (en) * 1975-07-16 1977-04-05 Johnson & Johnson Cushioned narrow woven tubular fabric
US4135025A (en) * 1976-02-02 1979-01-16 Kufner Textilwerke Kg Fabric web for production of reinforcing inserts for garments
US4297796A (en) * 1979-07-23 1981-11-03 Stirtz Ronald H Shoe with three-dimensionally transmitting shock-absorbing mechanism
US4914836A (en) * 1989-05-11 1990-04-10 Zvi Horovitz Cushioning and impact absorptive structure
US5480697A (en) * 1991-01-12 1996-01-02 Vorwerk & Co. Interholding Gmbh Structural part based on a sandwich fabric
US20150231425A1 (en) * 2013-07-11 2015-08-20 Skylotec Gmbh Belt-type fall damper

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2477403A (en) * 1944-11-24 1949-07-26 Owens Corning Fiberglass Corp Surgical bandage
US2857654A (en) * 1956-07-06 1958-10-28 Gen Tire & Rubber Co Interwoven fabric for vehicle tops or the like
US3228426A (en) * 1963-12-04 1966-01-11 Goodyear Aerospace Corp Method for weaving contoured thread connected dual wall inflatable fabric
US3217751A (en) * 1963-12-09 1965-11-16 Goodyear Aerospace Corp Loom apparatus for weaving contoured thread connected dual wall inflatable fabric
US3232319A (en) * 1963-12-09 1966-02-01 Goodyear Aerospace Corp Method for weaving contoured thread-connected dual wall inflatable fabric on a single shuttle loom
US3224466A (en) * 1964-01-31 1965-12-21 Goodyear Aerospace Corp Method for weaving contoured thread connected dual wall inflatable fabric
US3612110A (en) * 1968-10-22 1971-10-12 Gerald Charles Wildi Woven tapes
US3978894A (en) * 1973-02-05 1976-09-07 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Energy absorbing tear-webbing
US4015641A (en) * 1975-07-16 1977-04-05 Johnson & Johnson Cushioned narrow woven tubular fabric
US4135025A (en) * 1976-02-02 1979-01-16 Kufner Textilwerke Kg Fabric web for production of reinforcing inserts for garments
US4297796A (en) * 1979-07-23 1981-11-03 Stirtz Ronald H Shoe with three-dimensionally transmitting shock-absorbing mechanism
US4914836A (en) * 1989-05-11 1990-04-10 Zvi Horovitz Cushioning and impact absorptive structure
US5480697A (en) * 1991-01-12 1996-01-02 Vorwerk & Co. Interholding Gmbh Structural part based on a sandwich fabric
US20150231425A1 (en) * 2013-07-11 2015-08-20 Skylotec Gmbh Belt-type fall damper

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