US2347657A - Skill testing game - Google Patents

Skill testing game Download PDF

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US2347657A
US2347657A US324064A US32406440A US2347657A US 2347657 A US2347657 A US 2347657A US 324064 A US324064 A US 324064A US 32406440 A US32406440 A US 32406440A US 2347657 A US2347657 A US 2347657A
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switch
target
aiming
projector
game
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US324064A
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Melvin J Binks
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J H Keeney & Co Inc
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J H Keeney & Co Inc
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/02Shooting or hurling games

Description

May 2, 1944. M. J. BINKS 2,347,657
SKILL TESTING GAME Filed March 15, 1940 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 BY Meat/2L] ATTORNEY.
y 2, 1944- M. J. BINKS 2,347,657
SKILL TESTING GAME Filed March 15, 1940 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 5M i ATTORNEY.
y 2, 1944- M. J. BINKS KILL TESTING GAME 5 Sheets-Sheet 4' Filed March 15 Patented May 2, 1944 SKILL TESTING GAME Melvin J. Binks, River Forest, 111., assignor to J. H. Keeney & 00., Inc., Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Application March 15, 1940, Serial No. 324,064
24 Claims.
The invention relates generally to a skill testing game and, more particularly, to a game in which the skill of an operator in the aiming and firing of a bulletless gun at a moving target is tested.
One object of the invention is to provide an improved game of the character described in which the target is large and exposed to the view of onlookers, yet in which all operating mechanism is housed in or mounted on a single casing obviating all necessity for a connection of any character whatsoever between the mechanism in the casing and the target.
A further object is to provide a skill testing game having a universally mounted aiming element, a target formed by projection of a miniature object upon a screen, and a projector which also is mounted for universal movement.
A further object is to provide a skill testing game having a universally mounted, manually actuable aiming element carrying a contact movable therewith and a universally mounted, automatically driven projector for projecting a target onto a screen having a contact movable therewith, the contacts being so mounted with respect to the aiming element and the projector, and
, the, aiming element and projector being so mounted with respect to one another, that engagement of the contacts will be eifected in any position of the projector when the aiming element is substantially accurately aimed at the target.
Yet a further object is to provide a skill testing game having a movably mounted, manually actuable aiming element with a contact partaking of the same movement as the element and a movably mounted automatically driven target generating element with a contact partaking of the same movement as the last mentioned element, the elements being pivotable about a common axis and each turnable about an axis perpendicular to the common axis and lying in a common plane perpendicular to the common axis.
Still another object is to provide a game having an aiming element and a target projector both mounted for universal movement, and an electrical contact carried by each and disposed to engage upon a proper aiming of the aiming element, with one of the contacts adjustable to permit compensation for error in manufacture or in adjustment of the projector occasioned by variation in the position or the spacing of the screen from the projector.
Yet another object of the invention is to provide in. a skill testing game in which the target is projected onto a screen, means for also projecting directly onto the screen, in full View of the operator of the game as well as bystanders, the number of shots fired and hits scored.
A further object of the invention is to provide in a game having a universally movable aiming element and a universally movable target projector mounted to pivot about the same horizontal axis, means for driving the projector and means for projecting the shots fired and the hits scored onto a screen, a support, swingably suspended from the common horizontal axis of the projector and aiming element, for the target projector driving means and the shots fired and hits scored projector means, the support being adjustable and the shots fired and hits scored projector means being further adjustable relative to the support.
Still a further object is to provide a game having adjustable means for varying the time during which a hit may be scored.
Yet another object is to provide in a skill testing game, in which a normal predetermined number of attempts are allowed, means operating if a predetermined number of hits have been scored during such normal number of attempts to permit an additional number of attempts until a predetermined number of misses have occurred.
Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:
Fig. l is a perspective view of a skill testing game embodying the features of this invention.
Fig. 2 is an enlarged vertical sectional View of the casing shown in Fig. 1, taken approximately in. a plane to the left of the aiming element as viewed in that figure, more particularly approximately along line 22 of Fig. 3.
Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional View taken approximately along the line 3-3 of Fig. 2 and with some parts broken away.
Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary detail View taken approximately along the line 4-4 of Fig. 2.
Fig. 5 is a perspective and somewhat diagrammatic view of a plurality of control cams and their switches better to illustrate the contour of the cams and their angular relationship to one another.
Fig. 6 is a diagrammatic view of the electrical circuits of the game shown in Fig. 1.
While the invention is susceptible of various modifications and alternative constructions, it is here shown and will hereinafter be described in a preferred embodiment. It is not intended, however, that the invention is to be limited. thereby to the specific construction disclosed, but on the contrary it is intended to cover all modifications and alternative constructions falling within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.
As illustrated in the drawings for purposes of disclosure, the invention i embodied in a game in which the shooting skill of an operator of the game is tested. The game comprises generally a movable target [5, simulating an aeroplane, which herein is not a material object but the.pro-. jection of an object onto a screen I6, suitably supported from a wall or standard (not shown) whereby the target is clearly visible to others than the operator of the game. Spaced from, the screen It, to form an operators station, is a casing I! which houses or supports all of the operating mechanism of the game, there being no connection whatsoever between the casing, and the screen or target. Included in the operating mechanism is a target projecting means l8, housed within the casing and given a unique mounting, and driving mechanism l9 for causing the target to traverse the screen in a succession of different paths. This feature of the invention is fully" disclosed and claimed in my U. S. Letters Patent No. 2,335,257, issued on November 30, 1943, on a division of this application. Movably supported above the casing H for manipulation by an operator of the game is an aiming element 29 which is to be aimed at the target and, if properly aimed and actuated, cooperates with means within the casing to indicate the scoring of a hit. In the present instance, the scoring of a hit is indicated to the operator as well as onlookers by flashing the, target red and by projecting onto the screen the total number of hits scored. For the latter purpose, the
mechanism includes a hits scored counter 2i and a hit projector 22. Likewise the mechanism includes a shots fired counter 23 and a shots fired projector 24.
Usually games of this character are coin controlled with a predetermined number of attempts allowed for each coin inserted. The present game is also coin controlled, insertion of the coin starting the driving mechanism to effect movement of the target and rendering the aiming element effective for actuation, the various projectors being normally energized at all times so that the projections on the screen will be an inducement for others to test their skill. Once the coin has been inserted, the target continues to traverse the screen until at least the predetermined normal minimum number of attempts have been made. However, means is provided herein for awarding the skilled operator additional attempts. Thus if during the normal number of attempts allowed a certain number of hits are scored, the driving mechanism continues to operate until a certain number of misses are made, whereupon the target is brought to rest.
Turning now to a more detailed consideration of the various units of the game, the casing I! is upstanding to support the aiming element 26 at a height convenient for Sighting and manipulation by the average person. The casing is composed of solid side walls 21 and 2-3, a front wall 29, a rear wall 36, and a top wall 3!. The front wall 29 is apertured at its top center to provide a window 32 for the projection therethrough of the target l5, and with a pair of windows 33 at either side for the projection therethrough of er detail. Mounted in the upper left hand corner of the rear wall 30 is a conventional coin actuated mechanism 37, and formed in the corner of the top wall 33 above the mechanism 37 is an observation'window 38. The aiming element 2% herein simulates a machine gun and to that end is formed with a cylindrical barrel fill having at one end a pair of hand grips 4| to aid the operator in the manipulation of the gun, the right hand one of which hand grips is provided with a trigger #2. At the other end, the gun is provided with a perforated muzzle 43 within which is concealed a light bulb 44 which is connected to flash intermittently when the trigger 42 is pulled so as to give the effect of the firing of an actual machine gun. Conventional sights 45 and l5 are, of course, provided to enable the operator of the game properly to aim the gun at the target.
To give the aiming element 26 the freedom of movement necessary topermit the operator to follow the target across the screen, a universal mounting for the aiming element is provided. Such universal mounting herein comprises a yoke-like member 48, the cars 49 of which are loosely pivoted upon a horizontal shaft 56 extending transversely of the casing I1 and journaled at its ends in blocks 5| secured to the side walls 21 and 23 of the casing. Collars 52 are pinned on the shaft 56 to retain the member t8 against movement longitudinally of the shaft. Secured centrally of the member 48, as by means of a pin 53, to turn about an axis at right angles to the horizontal shaft 56, is a bracket 54 having an upstanding arm 55 projecting through the slot 36 in the top wall of the casing and secured to a supporting rod 56 extending downwardly from the aiming element 2i To limit the are through which the gun may be swung about the pin 53, the yoke-like member 48 is provided with upstanding lugs 51 and the bracket Ed is formed with a T-bar 58 the opposite ends of which are adapted to engage one of the lugs 51 to prevent further swinging in that direction. To counterbalance the rear or trigger end of the aiming element, tension springs 59 are provided which are anchored at one end to a stationary part and at the other end to a forwardly projecting finger 69 on the yoke-like member 48.
In order that the slot 36 may permit of the necessary movement of the rod 56 without being unduly long, the horizontal shaft 50 is mounted closely adjacent the top of the casing ll. Moreover, to provide a closure for the slot 36, an arcuate hood 6! is mounted thereover which has an elongated slot 62 through which the rod 56 projects. This slot 62 is in turn at all times covered by an arcuate shoe 63 which is carried on the rod 56 and slides on the hood 6! as the aiming element is tilted.
The target projector I8 is of generally conventional construction and comprises an elongated frame 65 upon which are mounted a light 66, suitable lenses 6'! and a reflector 68. Also carried by the frame 65 (see Figs. 2' and 4) is an apertured plate 69 upon which is mounted a film element I8 bearing the real object II, the image or projection of which is cast upon the screen I6 to form the target I5. The apertured plate 69, while adjustable longitudinally of the frame 65, once adjusted is fixed relative to the projector.
Herein the target is given a unique movement in Which the target in its successive traverses of the aiming range of the aiming element 28 travels in different paths in order to enhance the simulation of actual aeroplane movement, as well as to render more difficult and more fascinating the operation of the game. To that end, the projector I8 is given a unique mounting fora game of this character and is also driven in a unique manner. The unique mounting for the projector renders the same universally movable and comprises a first yoke-like member I journaled on the horizontal shaft 58, and a second yoke-like member I6 which carries the frame 65 and is suspended by pin I5 from the bottom of the member to turn about an axis at right angles to the horizontal shaft 58. The yoke I5 is restrained against movement longitudinally of the shaft 58 by collars 'I'I pinned thereto and, moreover, is so positioned that the axis about which the yoke I6 turns lies in the same transverse vertical plane as the axis about which the bracket 54 turns. The desirability of having the aiming element 28 and the projector I8 pivot about the same horizontal axis and turn about right angular axes lying in the same transverse vertical plane will presently become more apparent.
As previously stated, the projector I8 is given a unique movement causing the target I5 to travel through a different path in each successive traverse of the screen I6. Such unique movement is imparted to the projector I8 by the driving means I9 which herein comprises an electric motor I8, which through suitable reduction gearing I9 drives a shaft 88 which has at its outer end an enlarged head 8|. Secured to rotate with the shaft 88 is a gear 82 meshing with a similar but just slightly smaller gear 83 fixed on a shaft 84 which also has an enlarged head 85. While the number of teeth in the gears 82 and 83 may be varied at will, by way of example, the gears 82 and 83 here shown have sixty-one and fiftynine teeth respectively. A suitable frame 86 provides a support for the motor, the reduction gearing 19 and bearings in which the shafts 88 and 84 are rotatably journaled.
The shaft head 8|, as best seen in Fig. 3, is provided with a plurality of (in this instance three) tapped holes 81 spaced at various radii from the axis of the shaft 88 and which are adapted to receive a projecting pin 88. The shaft head 85 is likewise formed with three tapped holes spaced various radial distances from the axis of the shaft 84 in which a projecting pin 89 may be received. The pin 88 operates in an elongated longitudinal slot 98 of a link 9| which is stationarily pivoted at one end to the frame 86. At its free end the link 9| is pivoted to one end of a similar link 92, which likewise is formed with a longitudinal slot 93 in which the pin 89 operates. The upper or remaining end of the link 92 is connected to a rearwardly extending arm 94 integral with the yoke member I6 and hence with the projector I8. In order to permit of the limited relative movement which will take place between the link 92 and the arm 94 in the actuation of the projector I8, the link 92 has swiveled at its upper end a yoke 95 which carries a pin 98 engaging a slot 91 in the end of the arm 94. Gear 82 is driven in a counter-clockwise direction, While gear 83 necessarily is driven in a clockwise direction with the result that the target I5 traverses the screen during the time that the arm 94 of the projector I8 is being propelled to the right, as viewed in Fig. 3. To take up any play or wear in the driving mechanism, so as to have a smooth movement of the target across the screen, a tension spring 98 is connected at one end to the link 92 above the slot 93 therein and at the other end to a stationary eyelet 99 to the left of the link, as viewed in Fig. 3.
It is believed readily apparent from the foregoing that, inasmuch as the pins 88 and 89 are eccentrically mounted, rotation of the shafts 88 and 84 will cause a pivoting of the link 8| about its fixed pivot and thus impart pivotal movement of the projector I8 about the shaft 58, while the link 82 will pivot about its connection to the link 9| and impart turning movement of the projector about its right angular axis. It is believed also apparent that with each revolution of the shaft 84 the target will be caused to traverse the screen I6 and to be returned to initial position. Inasmuch as the gears 82 and 83 are of different size and, more particularly, because they vary by only a few teeth, the gears are constantly out of timed relation so that the movement imparted to the projector I8 is constantly being varied resulting in each successive traverse of the screen by the target I5 being over a different path. By providing a plurality of tapped holes 81, the path of movement of the target I5 may be further varied and the extent of vertical or horizontal travel of the target may also be adjusted to adapt the game for different shapes or sizes of screen, or for different spacing of the casing I! from the screen.
The frame 88 supporting the driving mechanism for the projector I8 is in turn supported upon a shelf I88 forming part of a frame I 8| swingably suspended from the horizontal shaft 58. In addition to the shelf I88, the frame I 8| comprises a pair of side boards I82 pivot-ally supported from the horizontal shaft 58, and a main connecting board or shelf I83. The frame I8I is adjustably secured in a desired position for proper focusing of the projector I8 on the screen I8 by means of an adjusting screw I84 threadedly received in a nut I secured beneath the shelf I83, and rotatably guided but held against axial movement in a bracket I88 secured to a cross brace I81 of the casing. The adjusting screw I84 is accessible through the opening in the front wall 29 normally closed by the removable panel 34.
Supported on the shelf I 83 to be movable therewith is a base I88 upon which aremounted the hits scored counter 2|, the hits scored projectcr 22, the shots fired counter 23, and the shots fired projector 24, as well as certain other units, as will become more apparent hereinafter. The base I 88 is hinged to the shelf I83 at its forward edge and may be swung about such hinged connection by means of an adjusting screw i 39 disposed at the rear of the base I88.
The hits scored and shots fired counters, as well as the hits scored projector and hots fired projector, are of identical construction, and thus it is believed sufiicient that one only be described. Moreover, the counters and the projectors are of conventional construction, and as to their verse vertical plane.
physical construction. form no: part of. this invention; Accordingly, only the hits. scoredcounter and projector, which have been illustrated. in somewhat greater detail in Figs. 2 and 3 than the shots fired counter and projectonwill be described. Sufiice itto say, therefore, that thehits scored counter 21' comprises. a shaft II2 having fixed thereto a ratchet wheel I 63 normally biased to a zero position by a. spring (not shown).
The shaft H2 is rotated by a step up coil I-ISC which, upon energization, actuates an armature: II5' operating upon such actuation to engage the ratchet wheel H3 and advance the same a predetermined. amount. A detent pawl I I6 retains the ratchet. wheel. in itsadvanced position until released by energization of a reset coil EC; The shaft H2 also has fixed to rotate therewith an arm I-IA forming the movable element of a step up switch completed by a plurality of stationary'contacts I I9 carried by a stationary disk I20. Also rotatable with the shaft H2 is. a disk I-2I which has numbers consecutively arranged: about its periphery.
Each of the hits scored or shots fired projectors comprises a frame I upon which are supported a light I25, a reflector IEI, and suitable lenses I28. The disk IZI of the counter is so disposed with relation to the projector that the numbers formed near the periphery of the disk will be projected onto the screen successively as the counter is? advanced step by step.
As previously stated, the shots fired counter and. the shots fired projector are of the. same construction as the hits scored counter and projector. Accordingly, as seen in Fig. 3 and diagrammatic Fig. 6,. the shots fired counter has a shots fired step up coil. SSC, a shots fired reset coil SEC, and a step up switch arm SA. The step up switch of the shots fired counter also has a plurality of stationary contacts H8 corresponding in number to the stationary contacts II 9, which in the present instance is thirty. The shots fired counter differs from the hits scored counter in that the step up coil SSC also controls a normally open switch SSS! and a normally closed switch SSSE. The shots fired projector has a light I26.
Inasmuch as there is no connection either mechanically, electrically or photo-electrically between the aiming element 29 and the target I5, means located wholly within the casing i! are provided for indicating a proper aiming of the aiming element. To that end the bracket 55 has formed integrally therewith an arm I38 projecting forwardly and generally parallel with the aiming element 29. Carried on the tip of this arm is a spring pressed electrical contact I35, while supported on av standard I32 upstanding from the frame 65 of the projector 68 is a cooperating electrical contact I33. This latter contact forms the center of a curved disk I34 of non-conducting material with which the contact I3I first engages as the contacts approach engagement with one another. The arm I30 and the standard I32 are so proportioned and disposed that engagement of the contacts I3I and I33 is efiected when the aiming element 25 is properly aimed at the target I5. Such engagement of the contactsis eflected upon a proper aiming of the element 20 regardless of the position which the projector I8 may have because the projector and the aiming element both pivot about the same horizontal axis and swing about right angular axes which lie in the same trans- In order that variations in manufacture and variations caused by; dififilr' ence in the spacingv of the; casing II fromv the screen I6 may be compensated for, the: disk I34- carrying the contact I33 is adjustably mounted on the standard I52. As best seen in Fig. 4, the disk I34 is secured by means of bolts I35 which project through an elongated slot I35 in an arm I3! of a bracket, the other arm I35 of which is likewise formed with an. elongated slot I39 and is secured to the standard by bolts I lfl projecting through the slot.
When the element 25 is properly aimed so as to effect engagement of contacts I3I and I33 and the trigger E2 simultaneously pulled, a. hit is scored which is indicated, among other. ways, by an appropriate change in the appearance of the target, herein, by a flashing of the target I5 red. To that end, there is. carried by the frame 65 of the. projector I8 a hit indi-- cator solenoid RI, which upon energization attracts an elongated armature I42 and causes a red film M3 carried thereby to be interposed. in. the projecting path of the projector I8. armature I 42 has a resilient construction causing the film I 33 to bob and resulting in a flickering projection heightening the simulation of' a burning aeroplane. Simultaneously a bell B is rung through energization of a bell coil BC. Such scoring of a hit is further indicated, as stated, by a stepping up of the hit counter disk IZI, and such advance of the counter is under the control of a hit relay 1-13. This relay is actuated by a coil I-IRC (see Fig. 6) and has two normally open switches HRSI and HRSZ.
In addition to the relay and the various solenoids and coils already mentioned, there is also a run relay RR which is controlled by a coil RRC (see Fig. 6) and has two normally closed switches RRSI and RRSZ.
Having described the mechanical construction of the game, the operating and control circuits for the various parts thereof will now be described, with particular reference to Fig. 6 in which such circuits are diagrammatically shown. The game is intended to be coin con,-
trolled, and, to that end, has the coin control.
mechanism 31 which includes a slide I45 which. is manually operable upon the insertion of a coin. to close a normally open switch RS which serves to reset the counters 2| and 23 to zero position, and a switch I46 which is biased to open position but which is closed as an incident to outward movement of the slide I45. The control circuit also includes a switch TS actuated by the trigger 42 of the aiming element. Also included in the operating and control circuits are a. plu-v rality of. cam controlled switches CSI, CS2, CS3, CS4 and CS5. These cam switches are respectively controlled by cams CI, C2, C3, C4 and C5. The first four of these cams, as best seen in Fig. 2, are mounted on and fixed to rotate with the shaft 86, and thus rotate once for each traverse and return of the target I5. The cam C5, as best seen in Fig. 3, is mounted on and fixed to rotate with the shaft and thus because of the present ratios of the gears 82 and. 83 rotate something less than one complete revolution with each complete cycle of movement of the target I5. This cam C5, as best seen in Fig. 5, has formed on its periphery a plurality of cam lobes I41 spaced by depressions of someilvahiat greater length than the length ofthe lobes The As best seen in Fig. 5, the cam C5, moreover, is composed of a plurality of like cam disks held together by bolts I41 extending through arcuate slots I41" making the cam disks angularly adjustable relative to one another. The switch CS is wide enough to engage all three disks and thus the effective length of the cam lobes I41 may be varied by such an gular adjustment. The switch CS5 controlled by this cam is, as will presently become more apparent, connected in circuit with the contacts I3I and I33 and serves to limit the time during which a hit may be scored.
The contour of camse CI to C4 is best seen from a consideration of Fig. 5, which discloses that cam CI has its periphery serrated to form a large number of teeth, thereby causing the switch CSI to be opened and closed a large number of times during each revolution of the cam. The switch CSI,.as willpresently be more apparent, functions to cause the repeated flashing of the light 44 in the muzzle of the aiming element to give the efiect of machine gun fire when the trigger 42 is pulled. Cams C2 and' C3 are of like contour and serve to close the switches controlled thereby during one-half revolution of the cams and to permit the switches to open during the remaining half. The cams C2 and C3 are so positioned relative to the target projector driving mechanism l9 that the switches CS2 and CS3 are closed at the time the projector I8 is reversed to start upon what may be termed its forward movement, that is, the movement during which the target is traversing the screen in the normal forward direction of movement of the target, the switches being opened just prior or simultaneously with completion of such forward movement of the projector. The switch CS2 is in the trigger circuit and thus prevents a shooting of the aiming element during the return half of the target cycle, while the switch CS3 is in circuit with the light 66 of the projector I8 and thus renders the projector ineffective during the return half of the cycle during which the target otherwise would appear to be traveling backwards across the screen. Cam'C I is generally similar to cams C2 and C3 save that the notch I48 extends over slightly less than half the circumference of the'cam. Also cam C4 is fixed on shaft 84 rotated 180 with respect to cams C2 and C3. In other words, the notch I48 is so positioned relative to the driving mechanism for the, projector I8 that the switch CS4 is opened just afterfthe target appears on the screen and is closedrjust prior to the time the target leaves the screen, thus serving to continue operation of the gameafter the allowed .number of shots has been ,fired until the target is again visible on the screen.
The circuits comprise a high voltage circuit having line wires LI and L2 connected to a 110 volt alternating current source. This high voltage circuit supplies the power for operating the motor 18 of the driving mechanism I9. To that end, one terminal of the motor 18 is connected to the line wire LI, While the other terminal is connected to the line wire L2 by means of a lead I50 which includes the normally closed vrun relay switch RIRSI and serves as the main motor circuit. Connected in parallel with the switch RRSI is the cam controlled switch CS4 which, as previously stated, serves to cause the motor 18 to run, after the switch RRSI has been broken, until the target I5 is returned to view on the screen I6. The high voltage .circuit also includes the primary P of altrans'former T con.-
nected between the line wires LI and L2. Preferably the high voltage circuit includes a main switch MS which may be either manually actuated or actuated by a time clock for supplying or cutting out all supply of energyto the game.
The secondary of the transformer T is a split secondary, having a first winding SI providing electrical energy to a first low voltage circuit, and a second winding S2 providing energy for a second and still lower voltage circuit. Connected to the intermediate terminal of the split winding is a line wire L3 common to the two low voltage circuits and connected to the remaining terminal of the winding SI is a line wire L4, while connected to the remaining terminal of the Winding S2 is a line wire L5. The second of the low voltage circuits serves primarily to provide energy for the lights of the various projectors. Inasmuch as it is intended that the shots fired and hits scored are always to be projected onto the screen even when the game is not in operation, the hits projector light I26 and the shots fired projector light I26 are connected in parallel between the line wires L3 and L5 by unbroken leads I5I and I52 so that whenever the transformer T is energized the lights I26 and I26 will be energized. The light 66 for the target projector also is connected between the line wires L3 and L5 by a lead I53. Connected in series with the light 66, however, is the cam actuated switch CS3 which serves, as previously stated, to cutout the projector during the return movement thereof during which the target if projected would appear to travel backwards across thescreen.
The first of the low voltage control circuits includes a sub-circuit which maybe termed the starting circuit. This circuit comprises the reset swi'tch RS which is actuated by the chute I45 of the coin controlled mechanism and the resetcoil SRC of the shots fired counter, and the reset coil RC of the hits scored counter. The coils are connected in parallel with one another by means of leads I54 and I55, andin series with the reset switch RS by a common lead I56, with the circuit completed to the line wire L4 by a lead I51.
The lead I51 also forms part of a second subcircuit which may be termed the shooting circuit. This circuit comprises the lead I51, switch I46 which is closed upon return of the slide I45 of the coin control mechanism to normal position, lead I58, the cam actuated switch CS2, and. lead I59 which includes the switch RRSZ of the run relay and is connected to one outside terminal of the trigger switch TS which herein is-illustrated as a three blade switch. Connected to the opposite outside terminal of the trigger switch TS is a lead I60 which is connected to the line wire L3 and has incorporated therein the coil NMC of a noise maker NM, which serves upon energization to simulate the reports of machine gun fire. In this connection it is pointed out that herein the word shot means a burst of shots, i. e., an actuation of trigger 42 and not each individual report of the noise maker NM.
Connected-in parallel with the noise maker coil and in series :with the trigger switch TS is the openedand closed bytheserrated cam CI so as to cause a flashing of the light 44 in simulation of the firing of a machine gun.
Connected to the intermediate contact or blade of the trigger switch TS is a lead I64, which at its other end connects to one terminal of the cam control switch CS5. The other terminal of the switch CS is connected by a lead I65 to the contact I3I carried by the arm I39 of the aiming element 29. The cooperating contact l33 carried by the frame of the projector I8 is by a lead I66 connected to one terminal of the coil HRC of the hit relay, the other terminal of the coil being connected by a lead IS'I to the line wire L3- It is believed apparent from the foregoing that to-energize the hit relay coil it is necessary that the switch CS5 be closed by the'ease of hitting cam C5 and that during such time the operator simultaneously actuate the trigger E2 to close the trigger switch TS and properly aim the gun at the target to effect completion of the circuit through the contacts I3I and $33. It is to be understood, of course, that the cam C5 might be so adjusted that the switch CS5 is constantly held closed and that the cam would be adjusted to causean interruption of the circuit only where the skill of the operators would be so great that otherwise a hit would be too easily scored.
Connected'in parallel with the hit relay coil HRC, through the medium of a lead I68 connected to the line wire L3 and a lead I69 connected to the lead I66, is the coil RIC oi the red or hit indicator solenoid RI. Forming a holding circuit for both the hit relay and the hit indicator solenoid is a lead I19 connected at one end to the lead I59 at thetrigger switch TS and at the other end to the switch I-lRSI of the hit relay and a lead III connected between the switch HRSI and the lead I69. Thus momentary completion of the circuit through the contacts ISI and I33 will energize the hit relay coil EEG and also the red indicator coil RIC, while thereafter both coils will be maintained energized through the closure of the holding circuit including the hit relay switch HRSI. Also connected between the trigger switch TS and the line wire L3 is the step up coil SSC of the shots fired counter '23. The circuit for this i coil comprises a lead I12 connected between the line wire L3 and-one terminal of the coil and lead 113 connected between the remaining terminal of the coil and the lead I 64. A self-holding circuit is provided for the coil SSC which includes the lead I'III, a lead'llfl' connected to the lead-I19 and to one terminal of the switch SSSI actuated by the step up coil of the shots fired counter, the switch SSSI, and a lead I15 connected to the remaining terminal of the switch SSSSI and the lead I13. It is to be noted in this connection that all of the holding circuits forthe various coils in the shooting circuit just escribed are in series with the cam control switch CS2 and thus are broken at the end of each forward travel of the projector I8.
The remaining switch HRSZ of the hit relay has oneterminal'connected by alead I16 to the line wire L4, while the other terminal is by a lead I'll connected to one end of an actuating coil BC for the bell, the other terminal of which connected by a lead I18 to the line wire L3. Connected in parallel with the bell coil BC and in series with the hit relay switch HRSZ is the hit counter stepup coil HSC. To that end a lead I19 isconnected at one end to the lead Ill and at the other end to-one terminal of the step up coil HSC, whilethe other terminal is by lead 199 in this instance thirty, and a movable switch arm successively movable from contact'to contact with each energization of the step up coil of the counter. In the' present instance, the step up switches of the shots fired and hits scored counters are electrically connected in .a unique manner, cooperatively to control the .run relay RR to govern the arrest of the driving motor 18. More particularly, the step up switches of the counters are so interconnected that if the operator of the game is skillful enough to score a predetermined minimum .number of hits durin the normal minimum number .of shots fired allowed, the operator may continue to shoot at the target until .a miss is made. The step up switches, moreover, are so interconnected that where more than the predetermined minimum number of hits have been scored during the normal minimum number of shots allowed the operator may continue shooting until a plurality of misses have been made, the number of misses allowed being in direct proportion to the number of hits scored above the predetermined minimum. It is to be understood, of course, that some outside or maximum limit of attempts made will be set so that the operator may continue making attempts until the permitted number of misses have been made only so long as the maximum limit of attempts has not been exceeded, that is, unless a supernumerary total of attempts have been previously made.
In turning to the diagrammatic illustration of the step up switches and their interconnection and connection in th control circuit, it is pointed out that the uppermost contact in each series of contacts represents a zero or starting position for the respective movable switch arm, and that the second, third, etc., contacts represent the first, second, etc., positions of the respective switch arm, and that the connections hereinafter described will refer to the positions of the switch arm as distinguished from the contacts. It will be seen that a first predetermined number of the contacts I I9, in this instance the zero contact and the contacts representing thefirst fourteen positions of the switch arm SA, are unwired and thus 'inefiective contacts. On the other hand, the zero to twelve position contacts of the contacts I'I9 are interconnected by a common leadIBI which is connected at its other end to the number fifteen position contact of the contacts H9. Thereafter the numbers thirteen to twenty-six position contacts I I9 are connected by individual leads I82 to I95, inclusive, respectively to the numbers sixteen to twenty-nine position contacts I IS. The final four contacts I I9 representing position numbers twenty-seven to thirty are interconnected by a common lead I99 which is connected at its other end to the last contact of the contacts 9'. It is to be understood, of course, that the number of positions included in the predetermined initial groups is, of course, entirely arbitrary and may be varied according to the desire of the manufacturer of the game or even of the owner of the establishment in which'the game is located. The numbers herein selected are entirely arbitrary and the number included in the unwired group of the shots fired step up switch corresponds to the minimum number of shots which will be allowed theoperator regardless of the skill of the operator, while thirty is the maximum number of shots which will be allowed regardless of the skill of the operator. The number of contacts H9 which are interconnected by the common lead [BI i entirely arbitrary. The number of contacts I 9 at the opposite end which are interconnected by the lead liltwill be dictated by the difference between the number of contacts H9 interconnected by the lead l8| and the number of unwired contacts H9. As here arranged, the operator of the game will receive fifteen shots if during those fifteen shots less than thirteen hits are scored. If, however, during the initial fifteen shots, thirteen hits are scored the operator may continue to shoot with one miss is made. Should the operator score fourteen hits during the initial fifteen shots, he may shoot until two misses are made, and if he scores a hit with each shot during the initial fifteen he may shoot until three misses are made, bearing in mind, of course, that in all instances the maximum number of shots allowed is thirty.
The step up switches interconnected in this manner are connected in series with the run relay coil RRC and the second switch SSSZ of the shots fired step up coil between the line wires L4 and L3 by means of a lead I91 connected to the wire L4 and one terminal of the switch SSSZ, a lead I98 connected to the other terminal of the switch SSSZ and the movable arm SA of the shots fired counter step up switch, a lead I99 connected to the movable switch arm HA of the hits counter and one terminal of the run relay coil BBC, and a lead 200 connecting the remaining terminal of the run relay coil to the line wire L3. It will be seen from a consideration of Fig. 6 that until the fifteenth shot has been fired the run relay cannot be energized because the step up switch of the shots fired counter is open until that time. With the firing of the fifteenth shot, however, the switch arm SA of the shots fired counter engages the first wired contact H9 and thus closes the circuit to the run relay coil if less than thirteen hits have been scored, for under those circumstances the switch arm HA of the hits scored counter would be in engagement with one of the contacts H9 interconnected by the lead wire l8! and connected by that lead to the number fifteen position con-, tact H9. Should the operator, however, have scored thirteen or more hits, it will be apparent from a consideration of Fig. 6 that the switch arm EA will be one or more steps in advance of the switch arm SA and thus the circuit to the run relay coil cannot be completed, until sufiicient misses have been made to enable the switch arm SA of the shots fired counter to catch up with the switch arm HA of the hits scored counter. The switch SSS2 which is connected in series with the run relay coil is a normally closed switch which is opened as an incident to energization of the shots fired step up coil SSC, and serves to'prevent the run relay from being energized at the end of a game, that is, when the circuit is completed by the step up switches, until the target is no longer projected onto thescreen. I
For a better understanding of the operation and the function performed by each element, the operation of the game will be described briefly. For the purpose of such description of the operation, let it be assumed that the main switch MS has been closed and that a game has just been com-T pleted in which the operator scored less than the minimum number of hits, namely, thirteen. Under those conditions, the transformer T will be energized and, as a result, the hits projector light I26 and the shots fired projector light I26 will be energized and thereby cause the number of shots fired and the hits scored during the last game to be projected onto the screen 16. Likewise, the target l5 will be projected onto the screen l6 for thecam C3 will be rotated to such position that thecam switch CS3 will be closed to complete the circuit to the target projector light 66. The target l5,'however, will be stationary inasmuch as the run relay was pulled in with the fifteenth shot and thus opened the switches RRSI and RRSZ, and which, moreover, are retained open inasmuch as the run relay coil is continued to be energized. The cam C4 will be in such position that the cam switch CS4 engages the notch in the cam surface and thus is also open to break all circuits to the motor 18.
To play the game, an operator now places the appropriate coin in the slide of the coin controlled mechanism and pushes the slide inwardly, thereby closing the reset switch RS. Closure of this switch energizes the counter reset coils RC and SRC, thereby releasing the counters to return to initial or zero position by the biasing spring provided for that purpose. With the return of the counters and particularly the switch arm SA of the shots fired counter to zero position, the circuit through the run relay coil RRC is now broken and the run relay deenergized to permit return thereof to normal position in which the switches RRSI and RRSZ are closed. Closure of the run relay switch RRSI now establishes the main circuit to the motor 18 and thereby initiates operation of that motor which then causes the target 15 to be successively traversed across the screen l6. As previously pointed out, the cam C3 is rotated in timed relation with the traverse of the screen by the target 15, and is so arranged that the target projector light $6 is energized only during that half cycle of the projector when the target is travelling in a forward direction so that during the return movement of the projector the target will not appear to travel backward.
Deenergization of the run relay also closes the run relay switch RRSZ which is connected in the trigger or shooting circuit and thus further conditions that circuit for operation though the operator may not fire any shots until the slide 145 of the coin controlled mechanism has been returned to its normal position and thereby closed switch [46. With the closure of switch I46, the trigger or shooting circuit is now conditioned for operation by manipulation of the trigger 42 and the proper aiming of the aiming element during that portion of the cycle of the projector when the target I 5 appears on the screen. The cam switch CS2 is connected in the circuit as previously described and is opened by the cam C2 during each return half of the cycle in order to prevent the operator from accidentally wasting shots when the target is not in view.
The operator now aims the aiming element 20 at the target in an attempt to draw an accurate bead thereon. In this connection, it is to be remembered that the game is very fascinatin in that, due to the unique manner of mounting. and driving the projector, a very realistic movement is given to the target and also a constantly varying movement which prevents the operator from positioning the aiming element in a fixed position and then waiting for the target to pass that point in successive appearances as is the case with games now on. the market- When the operator feels he .has drawn an accurate beadonthe targ the trigger 42 is pulled which closes .thetrigger switch TS, thereby in all instances energizing the shots fired step up coil SSC to record the firing of such .shot by the advance of the shots fired counter 23, and particularly the switch arm SA. The circuit for the shots fired step up coil SSC is completed from the line wire L3 through the lead I72, the coil SSC, lead I13 and I6 to the trigger switch TS, and from there through lead I59, normally closed switch RRS2, cam switch CS2, lead I58, switch I46 and'lead I51 to line wire L4. Energization of the shots fired step up coil also establis'hes a holding circuit for the coil including the leads H2 and I13, the lead I15, switch SSSI, lead I14, lead I'IIl to lead I59 and thence, as previously described, to the line wire L4. This holding circuit for the shots fired step up coil prevents the operator from being charged with additional shots should the trigger be pulled more than once during any one cycle of operation. The holding circuit for the shots fired coil is broken at the end of the traverse of the screen by the target through the cam switch CS2. Closure of the trigger switch TS also establishes a circuit through the noise maker coil NMC through the lead I60 and tothe light 44 in the muzzle of the gun through'leads IBI, I62 and IE3 and the cam switch CSI. Thus, during the time that the trigger switch TS is held closed, the noise maker NM will be operated to simulate the reports of a machine gun and the light 44, because of the repeated opening and closing of the switch CSI by the cam CI, will be flashed on and off to simulate the light flashes emanating from a fired machine gun.
Should the operator, while the trigger .42 is pulled, accurately aim the gun at the target, the contacts I3I and I33, carried respectively by the aiming element and the projector, will engage and thus will complete the circuit to the hit relay coil HRC as well as the hit indicator coil RIC provided the switch CS5 is at the time closed by the ease of hitting cam C5. The circuits for the hit relay and hit indicator coils are believed readily apparent from Fig. 6, but may be traced as follows: From the line wire L4 to the trigger switch TS, as previously described, lead I64, switch CS5, lead 165, contacts I31 and I33, lead I66, coil HBO and lead I61 to the line wire L3. The circuit for the hit indicator coil RIC is from line wire L4 to lead I66 as just described, thence through lead I69, coil RIC and lead I68 to the line wire L3. The making of such a hit is indicated first by flashing the target red, this being done through the hit indicator coil RIC attracting the armature Hi2 and thereby positioning the red film I43 in he projecting path of the projector 58. Making of the hit is further indicated by actuation of the hit'counter, with the resultant projection of the total number of hits scored onto the screen I6. Energization of the hit relay closes the switch HRS! which establishes a holding circuit for the hit relay and hit indicator coils which may be traced as follows: From the line wire L4 through the leads and switches previously described to the lead I59, thence through lead ilfl, switch HRSI and lead IlI to lead I69 and lead I68 for the hit indicator coil RIC, and leads I69, 56 and I61 for the hit relay coil HRC. Actuation of the hit relay also closes the switch HRSZ which through leads I13, ill and H8 establishes a circuit to the bell coil BC and through leads I19 and 180 establishes a circuit to the hit step up coil HSC. Energization of the hit step up coil causes the hits scored counter and particularly the disk I2I and the switch arm HA to be advanced one step. It is again to be noted that the establishment of a holdmg circuit for the hit relayand hit indicator coils prevents the scoring of more than one hit in anyone cycle, and this holding circuit is again broken at the end of the forward half of the cycle by the cam switch CS2.
Such attempts at scoring a hit are then continued by the operator until thenumber .of allowed shots, in this instance fifteen, have been fired. With the firing of the fifteenth shot, the switch arm SA of the shots fired counter contacts the number fifteen position contact II9 and, if the switch arm HA of the hits scored counter is now in engagement with any one of the contacts II9 connected to the lead 18!, that is, if the operator has scored less than thirteen hits, the step up switches of the counters have conditioned a circuit through the run relay coil RRC which will cause the machine to be brought to rest during the next cycle. Completion of a circuit through the step up switches does not immediately stop operation of the motor I8, for the circuit through the run relay coil BBC is not fully completed until the switch SSSZ is closed, which does not take place until the shots fired step up coil SSC is deenergized as an incident to the breaking of its holding circuit by the switch CS2 at the end of the first or forward travel half of the cycle of the projector I8. With the closure of the switch SSSZ, the run relay is pulled in and, moreover, is held in to open its switches RRSI and RRSZ, thereby breaking the main circuit to the motor I8 and breaking the trigger or shooting circuit. With the switch RRSI open, the motor I8 is supplied with energy through the switch CS4 and thus continues to run until the switch CS4 is opened by the cam C4. Such opening of the switch takes place at some time after the target I5 has again appeared on the screen I6, in order that during the time that the game is not being operated the target will be in View and thus attract the attention of bypassers.
Should the operator have scored thirteen or more hits in the initial fifteen shots, he will be permitted to continue shooting, as previously described, until asufiicient number of misses have been made to enable the shots fired switch arm SA to catch up with the hits scored switch arm HA or until a maximum of thirty shots have been fired. At that time the mechanism is again brought to rest, the same as just described upon the completion of fifteen shots and less than the minimum number of hits scored.
It is believed apparent from the foregoing description that I have perfected a skill testing game of unique construction which, because of the more exact simulation of the actual movement of an aeroplane by the target, as well as the varied paths of movement of the target, greatly enhances the inducement for a person to play the game and test his skill. However, not only is my invention beneficial from the inducement to play standpoint, but also from the manufacturing standpoint, for all of the operating mechanism is embodied in or mounted upon a single casing forming the operators station, and thus all necessity for any type of connection between the target and the operating mechanism, whether that connection be mechanical, electrical or'photo-electrical, is entirely obviated. This, moreover, is accomplished in a construction in which the target is not hidden in the casing where it is visible only to the operator, but where the target is projected onto a screen in the clear view of onlookers as well as the operator of the game.
Just as the target is projected where it may be viewed by onlookers, so also the shots fired and the hits made and scored are indicated on the screen where they may be observed by onlookers.
'To attain the varied path of movement of the target, I have mounted the projector in a unique manner and have provided unique driving means which operates to drive the projector through a cycle of compounded movements in which, however, the target is caused to traverse the screen once during each cycle. This driving mechanism, moreover, is adjustable to vary the throw which is imparted to the projector and thus vary the extent of horizontal or vertical movement of the target, first, to adapt such movements to the shape or size of screen available, and, secondly, to further modify the paths of movement followed by the target. Moreover, I have so mounted the projector with respect to the aiming element that through means carried by the projector and aiming element a circuit may be established to indicate a proper aiming of the element regardless of the point in the cycle of movement of the projector when such proper aiming is effected.
I claim as my invention:
1. In a skill testing game, a projector for projecting a target onto a screen, a universal mounting for said projector, means for driving the projector to cause the target projected thereby to traverse the screen, an electrical contact carried by said projector and movable therewith, an aiming element movable by an operator of the game, a universal mounting for said aiming element, and a contact carried by and movable with said aiming element and positioned to engage the contact on said projector when the aiming element is properly aimed at the target on the screen,
2. In a skill testing game, a movably mounted manually actuable aiming element having a contact partaking of the same movement as the element, and a movably mounted automatically driven target generating element having a contact partaking of the same movement, said elements being pivotable about a common axis and each turnable about an axis perpendicular to the common axis and lying in a common plane perpendicular to the common axis.
3. In a skill testing game, a projector for projecting a target onto a screen, a universal mounting for said projector, means for driving the projector to cause the target projected thereby to traverse the screen, an electrical contact carried by said projector and movable therewith, an aiming element movable by an operator of the game,
a universal mounting for said aiming element, and. a contact carried by and movable with said aiming element and positioned to engage the contact on said projector when the aiming element is properly aimed at the target on the screen, one of said contacts being adjustable.
4. In a skill testing game, means including a projector forprojecting a target onto a screen, a manually movable aiming element including a trigger, and means for visibly indicating upon aiming of the aiming element and actuation of said trigger to energize said solenoid.
5. In a. skill testing game, a target, an aiming element including a trigger, means for indicating a hit upon proper aiming of said aiming element at the target and simultaneous actuation of said trigger including an electrical circuit having a first switch closable by actuation of said trigger, a second switch closable by the proper aiming of said aiming element, and a third switch, and means controlling said third switch to render closing of said first switch eiIective only during predetermined regularly recurring intervals of uniform length, including means adjustable to vary the length of such intervals.
6. In a skill testing game, a movable target, an aiming element including a trigger, means for indicating a hit upon proper aiming of said aiming element at the target and simultaneous actuation of said trigger including an electrical circuit having a first switch closable by actuation of said trigger and a second switch, and rotatable cam means controlling said second switch to render closing of said first switch efiective only during predetermined intervals, said cam means being adjustable to vary the length of such intervals.
7. In a skill testing game, a movable target, an aiming element including a trigger, means for indicating a hit upon proper aiming of said aiming element at the target and simultaneous actuation of said trigger including an electrical circuit having a first switch closable by actuation of said trigger, a second switch closable by accurate aiming of said aiming element and a third switch, and rotatable cam means controlling said third switch to render closing of said first and second switches efiective only during predetermined intervals, said cam means comprising a plurality of cam disks angularly adjustable relative to one another.
8. A skill testing game comprising a casing, a shaft extending transversely of said casing, an aiming element including a trigger pivotally mounted on said shaft, a main projector within said casing for projecting a target onto a screen, said projector being pivotable about said shaft, driving means for said projector, a support for said driving means comprising a shelved member pivotally mounted on said horizontal shaft and including a first shelf upon which said driving means is mounted, adjustable means engaging said shelved member for adjustably positioning the same to focus said main projector on the screen, an auxiliary projector supported on said shelved member for movement therewith, and means for further adjusting said auxiliary projector relative to said shelved member.
9. In a skill testing game having an objective to be attained and means manipulable by an opator of the game in an attempt to attain that objective, means permitting a predetermined normal number of attempts, and means operable upon the attainment of a predetermined number of objectives in the normal number of attempts allowed to permit additional attempts until a predetermined number of unsuccessful attempts have been made, unless a supernumerary total of attempts have been previously made.
10. In a skill testing game having a target to be hit and means manipulable by an operator of the game in an attempt to hit the target, means for tabulating the number of attempts made, means for tabulating the number of hits scored, said tabulating means being operatively interconnected to arrest operation of thegame upon completion of a predetermined normal number of attempts when the hits scored have been less than a predetermined number, and to permit additional attempts until a predetermined number of misses have been made when the hits scored during the normal'number of attempts exceed a predetermined number, unless a supernumerary total of attempts have been previously made.
11. In a skill testing game having an objective to be attained and means manipulable by an operator of the game in an attempt to attain the objective, means for tabulating the number of attempts made, means for tabulating the number of attainments scored, said tabulating means being operatively interconnected to arrest operation of the game upon completion of a predetermined normal number of attempts when the attainments have been less than a predetermined number, and to permit additional attempts until apredetermined number of misses have'been made when the number of attainments scored exceeds the predetermined minimum, the number of misses permitted during such additional attempts being proportional to the number of attainments scored in excess of the predetermined number, unless a supernumerary total of attempts have been previously made.
12. A skill testing game comprising, in combination, a moving target, an aiming element, a trigger on said aiming element, a motor for driving said target, means for initiating operation of said motor including a relay, a first step up switch, means for advancing said switch with each effective operation of said trigger, a second step up switch, means for advancing said second step up switch with each hit scored, and a control circuit for said relay including said step up switches in series, said switching being electrically connected to permit the firing of a predetermined minimum number of shots regardless of the number of hits scored and to permit additional shots until a predetermined number of misses have occurred when the hits scored exceed a predetermined minimum, unless a superhumerary total of attemptshave been previously made.
13. A skill testing game comprising, in combination, a moving target, an aiming element, a trigger on said aiming element, a motor for driving said target, means for initiating operation of said motor including a relay, a first step up switch comprising a plurality of stationary contacts and a movable arm, a second step up switch comprising a plurality of stationary contacts and a movable arm, a predetermined number of the contacts of said first step up switch beginning with the zero position of said arm forward being unwired, the first contact following said unwired contacts being wired to a predetermined but smaller number of the contacts of said second step up switch, each successive contact of said first step up switch being wired only to the successive contact of said second step up switch, means for advancing said first step up switch arm with each effective actuation of said trigger, means for advancing said second step up switch arm with each hit scored, and a control circuit for said relay including said step up switch in series.
14; In a skill testing game, an aiming element having a trigger, a target repeatedly movable across the aiming range of the aiming element, an electrical relay controlling a hits scored counter, an energizing circuit for said relay including atriggeractuated switch and a switch adapted to be closed, upon proper aiming of, they aiming element, a holding circuit for said relay independent of said trigger actuated switch and said aiming element controlled switch, and means including a switch in the holding circuit for said relay opened upon completion of the traverse of the aiming range of the aiming element by the target to deenergize said relay.
15. In a skill testing game, a movably mounted manually actuable aiming element having an electrical contact stationary with respect to said element but partaking of the same movement as the element, a movably mounted target projector having an electrical contact partaking of the movement of the projector, said contacts being positioned to engage one another merely upon the proper aiming of the aiming element 'in any position of the target projector in. which the target is within the aiming range of the aiming element and independently of simultaneous ac tuation of other means, and'means for indicating a hit scored including said electrical contacts 16. In a skill testing game, an aiming element having a trigger, a target repeatedly movable across the aiming range of the aiming element, a shots fired counter operable to indicate the number of trigger actuations of the aiming element, and means for preventing the recording by said counter of more than one trigger actuation in any one movement of said target across the aiming range of the aiming element while permitting repeated trigger actuations in an attempt to score a hit.
17. In a skill testing game, an aiming element having a trigger, a target repeatedly movable across the aiming range of the aiming element, a step-by-step hits scored counter, means operable upon simultaneous actuation of said trigger and proper aiming of said aiming element to actuate said counter, and means for preventing the recording by the counter of more than one hit in any one movement of the target across the aiming range of the aiming element.
18. A skill testing game comprising, in combi nation, a casing, a movably mounted projector within said casing for casting onto a screen an image forming the target of the game, an object whose image is projected onto the screen and a contact carried by said projector, means simulating a gun disposed outwardly of said casingand movably mounted for aiming by an operator of the game including a trigger outwardly of said casing and an electrical contact partaking of the same movement as the gun simulating means and disposed inwardly of said casing for engagement with the contact on said projector upon proper aiming of the gun means at the target, said projector and said gun simulating means being mounted for pivotal movement about a common horizontal axis and each turnable about an axis perpendicular to the common horizontal axis and lying in a common plane at right angles to the horizontal axis, power means for driving said projector through a cycle of compounded pivotal and angular movements, said power means changing continuously to vary the path of'movement of the target in successive cycles, a relay governing the operation of said power means, means including a manually actuable switch controlling said relay to initiate operation of said power means, a first counter including a step up switch, electrical means operable upon actuation of said trigger to record the number of actuations of the trigger, a second counter, electrical means including the contacts movable with said projector and said gun simulating means operable upon engagement of said contacts and actuation of said trigger to record the making of a hit by said second counter, and an electrical circuit including said relay and controllable by the step up switches of said counters to determine the cessation of operation of said power means.
19. In a skill testing game, a target generating means, a mounting for said means including a pair of axes at right angles to one another about each of which said means is pivotal, driving means for said target generating means, an electrical contact carried by said target generating means and movable therewith, an aiming element movable by an operator of the game, a universal mounting for said aiming element, and a contact carried by and movable with said aiming element and positioned to engage the contact on said target generating means whenever the aiming element is properly aimed at the target.
20. In a skill testing game, means includin a projector for projecting a target onto a screen, an electrical contact partaking of a movement conforming to the movement of the target, a manually movable aiming element including a trigger and an electrical contact operable to engage said first mentioned contact upon proper aiming of said aiming element, and means for visibly indicating upon the screen the scoring of a hit on the target comprising an element normally out of the path of the projecting rays of the projector and being of a character to indicate upon the screen the making of a hit upon being drawn into the path of the projecting rays, a solenoid operable upon energization to project said element into the path of the projected rays to cause a hit to be indicated, and electrical circuit means including said trigger, said contacts, and said solenoid operable upon a proper aiming of the aiming element and actuation of said trigger to energize said solenoid.
21. In a skill testing game, a target generating means, a mounting for said means including a pair of axes at right angles to one another about each of which said means is pivotal, driving means for said target generating means, an electrical contact carried by said target generating means and movable therewith, an aiming element movable by an operator of the game, a
mounting for said aiming element including a pair of axes at right angles to one another about each of which said aiming element is pivotal, one of said pair of axes of said mountings for the target generating means and the aiming element being common, and a contact carried by and movable with said aiming element and positioned to engage the contact on said target generating means whenever the aiming element is properly aimed at the target.
22. A skill testing game comprising, in combination, a moving target, an aiming element, a trigger on said aiming element, a motor for driving said target, means for initiating operation of said motor including a relay, a first step up switch, means for advancing said switch with each effective operation of said trigger, a second step up switch, means for advancing said second step up switch with each hit scored, and a control circuit for said relay at all times in cluding said step up switches in series.
23. A game comprising, in combination, an objective to be attained, means manipulable by an operator of the game in an attempt to attain the objective, means including a relay for conditioning the game for operation, a first step up switch, means for advancing said switch with each attempt made, a second step up switch, means for advancing said second step up switch with each attainment of the objective, and a control circuit for said relay including said step up switches, said switches operating jointly upon the attainment of a predetermined relative position to arrest operation of the game through said relay.
24. A skill testing game comprising, in combi nation, a moving target, an aiming element, a trigger on said aiming element, a motor for driving said target, means for controlling operation of said motor including a relay to be energized to arrest operation of said motor, a first step up switch, means for advancing said switch with each effective operation of said trigger, a second step up switch, means for advancing said second step up switch with each hit scored, and a control circuit for said relay including said step up switches in series at the time of arrest of said motor.
MELVIN J, BINKS.
US324064A 1940-03-15 1940-03-15 Skill testing game Expired - Lifetime US2347657A (en)

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US324064A Expired - Lifetime US2347657A (en) 1940-03-15 1940-03-15 Skill testing game

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2442240A (en) * 1942-02-20 1948-05-25 Raymond T Moloney Photoelectric device
US2456828A (en) * 1944-12-02 1948-12-21 Hawe Philip George Target practice apparatus
US2665133A (en) * 1947-05-06 1954-01-05 Garrido Virgilio Navarro Apparatus for projecting luminous targets
US2743928A (en) * 1954-11-16 1956-05-01 Gen Patent Corp Target practicing and amusement device
US20060270315A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-11-30 Mattel, Inc. Transformation toy and related products
US20060270313A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-11-30 Mattel, Inc. Reconfigurable toy extreme sport hang glider
US20060270320A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-11-30 Mattel, Inc. Transformation toy and related products
US20110076915A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2011-03-31 Fraser Campbell Reconfigurable Toy

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2442240A (en) * 1942-02-20 1948-05-25 Raymond T Moloney Photoelectric device
US2456828A (en) * 1944-12-02 1948-12-21 Hawe Philip George Target practice apparatus
US2665133A (en) * 1947-05-06 1954-01-05 Garrido Virgilio Navarro Apparatus for projecting luminous targets
US2743928A (en) * 1954-11-16 1956-05-01 Gen Patent Corp Target practicing and amusement device
US20060270315A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-11-30 Mattel, Inc. Transformation toy and related products
US20060270313A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-11-30 Mattel, Inc. Reconfigurable toy extreme sport hang glider
US20060270320A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-11-30 Mattel, Inc. Transformation toy and related products
US7722429B2 (en) 2005-05-24 2010-05-25 Mattel, Inc. Transformation toy and related products
US7722426B2 (en) 2005-05-24 2010-05-25 Mattel, Inc. Reconfigurable toy extreme sport hang glider
US20110076915A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2011-03-31 Fraser Campbell Reconfigurable Toy
US8337271B2 (en) 2005-05-24 2012-12-25 Mattel, Inc. Reconfigurable toy

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