US2346886A - Oil float operated switch - Google Patents

Oil float operated switch Download PDF

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Publication number
US2346886A
US2346886A US400077A US40007741A US2346886A US 2346886 A US2346886 A US 2346886A US 400077 A US400077 A US 400077A US 40007741 A US40007741 A US 40007741A US 2346886 A US2346886 A US 2346886A
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Prior art keywords
lubricant
compressor
sump
motor
reservoir
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US400077A
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Walter W Williams
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Walter W Williams
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01HELECTRIC SWITCHES; RELAYS; SELECTORS; EMERGENCY PROTECTIVE DEVICES
    • H01H35/00Switches operated by change of a physical condition
    • H01H35/18Switches operated by change of liquid level or of liquid density, e.g. float switch

Description

April 18, 1944.
w. w. WILLIAMS OIL FLOAT OPERATED SWITCH Filed June 2'7, 1941 .ZNVENTOR. WALTER MW/LL/AMS BY A TORNE YJ'.
Patented Apr. 18, 1944 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE OIL FLOAT oremrno swrron Walter W. Williams, Bloomington, Ill.
Application June 2-1, 1941, Serial No. 400,071
9 Claims.
This invention relates to refrigerating units, with particular reference to units including a compressor and oil separator, rectifier or sump- During the building up of the pressure in the crankcase, the refrigerant vapors returning from the evaporator dissolve to a material extent in the lubricant in the crankcase, and this lubricant and dissolved refrigerant therein drain into a sump or chamber below th crankcase. The pressure outlet conduit from the compressor extends through the oil in the sump, and the high temperature of this conduit will heat the lubricant sufficiently to expel the major portion of the dissolved vapors which have been carried into the sump with the lubricant.
In operating the compressor, it is of course necessary to retain at all times a sufiicient quantity of lubricant in the sump to properly lubricate the mechanism. Furthermore, it is desirable that the level of the lubricant in the sump should never be below the refrigerant conduit passing therethrough, as otherwise the lubricant may not be sufllciently heated to vaporize the refrigerant dissolved therein.
It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide an automatic means which will make the motor and associated temperature control ineffective to operate the compressor except when the lubricant level is at a-predetermined height relative to the refrigerant conduit in the sump.
A further object is to provide a lubricant and refrigerant control which will be effective to P vent operation of the unit except when the lubricant and lubricant heating means are in a predetermined relationship adapted to produce efiective vaporizing of dissolved refrigerant and efiicient lubrication of the mechanism.
Further objects will be apparent from the specification and the appended claims.
the drawing:
Fig. 1. 1s a side elevation partially in section of the compnessor forming a part of the usual refrigerating system.
Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic view illustrating the pressure control switch, the motor, and the lubri-' cant level control element in cooperative relation to simultaneously control the refrigerating unit and the lubricant level associated therewith.
Fig.3 is a top view of the electrical control switch illustrated in Fig. 1.
The embodiment illustrated comprises a well known type of multiple piston compressor having cylinders i, a crankcase 2. and the usual connecting rods 3 in driven relation with a crankshaft 4 having a pulley 5 secured thereto whereby the compressor may be driven by the usualelectric motor as illustrated in Fig. 2. A sump 8 is positioned below the crank-case 2 and may comprise an elongated chamber substantially as illustrated.
A drainpipe 1 leads from th crankcase into the sump 6, whereby lubricant from the crankcase 2 may drain into the sump. A conduit Heads from the bottom of the sump 6 to an oil pump 9, the latter being mounted on the casing 2 and operatively connected to the crankshaft. The oil pump 9 withdraws lubricant from the bottom of the sump 6 and forces it through suitable conduits to the various bearing surfaces of the compressor. A constant circulation of lubricant to the bearings is thereby provided when thecompressor is in operation. The lubricant, after passing through the bearings, drains downwardly from the crankcase 2 through the drainpipe I and into the sump 6, and the refrigerant vapors expelled from the surface of the lubricant in the sump 6 may pass upward through the drainpipe i into the crankcase 2 and be drawn by the pistons into the compression cylinders, while at the same time the substantially pure lubricant at the bottom of the sump 5 is circulated through the working parts of the compressor by means of the pump 9. Also,
if desired, a conduit in may be provided leading from the top of the sump 6 to the top of the crankcase 2, through which the refrigerant vapors expelled from the lubricant may be conducted to 1 the upper part of the crankcase 2 closely adjacent the cylinders.
In order to heat the lubricant in the sump 6, the compressor outlet conduit ll leads from the top of the cylinders l to the sump 5 and a portion Ha of this conduit ii extend preferably horizontally through the sump 6 in a position to be submerged in, or at least sufficiently in contact with, the lubricant to cause vaporization of the dissolved refrigerant. In operation, the level 2| of the body of lubricant in thesump is preferably materially above the conduit I la. Therefore, the
lubricant will be heated sufficiently to expel the electrical control cir it. including the usual 1 dissolved refrigerant vapors from the lubricant.
In order to maintain at all times a suiilcient amount of lubricant in the siunp i to contact the necessary area of the heating conduit Ha so that the lubricant will maintain the required temperature, a float operated switch is provided for making ineflective' the operation of the usual motor and the usual pressure controlled switch associated therewith, when the lubricant in the sump 6 reaches a predetermined minimum low level. The float operated switch comprises a float l2 mounted on the end of a short arm 13, the arm being pivoted at ll on a bracket l5 secured to the end wall of the sump. A mercury switch ii of well known type is supported on the float l2 and arm l3, as shown in Fig. 3, a nd is tiltable in response to movement of the float in accordance with variations in the lubricant level. The positioning of the switch [6 may be adjusted by an adjusting screw Ila. The switch I6 is connected in series with and between a motor l1 and a pressure control switch l8 in a power circuit l9, as illustrated in Fig. 2, the power circuit being initially controllable by means of a main switch 20. When the lubricant level 2| is above the level indicated by the dotted line Zia in Fig. l, the mercury switch [6 will be retained in on position so that the unit may operate in the usual manner under the control of th low pressure switch l8, and when the lubricant reaches a predetermined low level, such for instance as indicated by the dotted line Zia, the float switch will then be positioned to break the motor circuit and the motor will not operate in response to action of the low pressure control switch It until more lubricant has been introduced into the sump 5.
To prevent adversely affecting the mercury switch i5 by variations in temperature and pressure, the float I2 is provided on its upper side with a small vent conduit l2a.
It is intended, of course, that the invention should not be limited to the specific embodiment or embodiments disclosed herein, since modifications may be made, and it is contemplated, therefore, by the appended claims to cover any such modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of this invention.
Having thus described this invention, what is claimed and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:
1. In a sealed refrigerating system including a compressor having a crankcase and lubricant reservoir therefor forming apart of said sealed system, means for circulating'lubricant from said reservoir through the operating mechanism of said compressor and returning the said lubricant to said reservoir, a motor for operating said compressor, means operable by refrigerant pressure in said system to cause intermittent operation of said motor, and additional means controlled by the lubricant level in said reservoir to make said motor ineffective to operate said compressor when the lubricant level in said reservoir is at or below a predetermined level.
2. In a sealed refrigerating system including a compressor having a crankcase forming a part of said sealed system, an oil supply for said compressor, a motor for operating said compressor,
'said compressor and returning the said lubricant to said reservoir, a motor for operating said compressor, a low pressure control means associated with said motor and said sealed system for controlling said motor in accordance with variations in pressure in said sealed system, and float operated means in said reservoir for making said motor ineffective for normal operation when the lubricant in said reservoir -is below the predetermined level.
5. In a sealed refrigerating system including a compressor having a crankcase and lubricant reservoir therefor forming a part of said sealed system, means for circulating lubricant from said reservoir through the operating mechanism of said compressor and returning the said lubricant to said reservoir, an electric motor for operating said compressor, a low pressure control means associated with said motor and said sealed system for controlling said motor in accordance with variations in pressure in said sealed system, float operated means in said reservoir for making said motor ineffective for normal operation when the lubricant in said reservoir is below a predetermined level, and heating means in said reservoir extending at least partially below said predetermined level.
6. In a sealed refrigerating system including a compressor having a crankcase and lubricant reservoir therefor forming a part of said sealed system, means for circulating lubricant from said reservoir through the operating mechanism of said compressor and returning the said lubricant to said reservoir, an electric motor for operating said compressor, an electrical circuit for said motor, a switch controlled by the pressure in said system for alternatively making and breaking said circuit, and means controlled by the level of said lubricant to control the effectiveness of said circuit.
'7. The combination with a sealed refrigerating system including a compressor having the usual crankcase as a part of said sealed system, a pressure lubricating system for said compressor and a separate sealed sump below said crankcase and having one or more conduit connections therewith for oil drainage to said sump and gas return to said refrigerating system, anda high pressure refrigerant conduit in said sump in heat transfer contact with said lubricant, of a motor for operating said compressor, a motor circuit, a normally closed switch in said circuit, and a float in said sump arranged to open said switch when the lubricant falls below a predetermined level relative to said conduit.
8. The combination with a sealed refrigerating system including a compressor, a lubricant sump, and a pump for circulating said lubricant through said compressor and said sump, of an electric motor for operating said compressor, an automatic low pressure control switch for the motor said compressor and returning the said lubricant to said reservoir, a high pressure refrigerant conduit in said reservoir in heat transfer contact with said lubricant for vaporizingrefrigerant dissolved Within said lubricant prior to circulation thereof through said operating mechanism, and means controlled by the lubricant level in said reservoir for causing intermittent operation of said compressor, said conduit being positioned within said reservoir so as to be at all times at least partially immersed in the lubricant while 10 said compressor is operating.
WALTER W. WILLIAMS.
l ke
US400077A 1941-06-27 1941-06-27 Oil float operated switch Expired - Lifetime US2346886A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2966295A (en) * 1956-10-11 1960-12-27 Champion Pneumatic Machinery C Low oil level control
US3105629A (en) * 1961-04-27 1963-10-01 Fred A Van Vooren Safety control mechanism for electric motor-driven machine
US3200603A (en) * 1963-11-15 1965-08-17 Carrier Corp Lubricant control means for refrigeration apparatus

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2966295A (en) * 1956-10-11 1960-12-27 Champion Pneumatic Machinery C Low oil level control
US3105629A (en) * 1961-04-27 1963-10-01 Fred A Van Vooren Safety control mechanism for electric motor-driven machine
US3200603A (en) * 1963-11-15 1965-08-17 Carrier Corp Lubricant control means for refrigeration apparatus

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