US2346505A - Barge - Google Patents

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US2346505A
US2346505A US480606A US48060643A US2346505A US 2346505 A US2346505 A US 2346505A US 480606 A US480606 A US 480606A US 48060643 A US48060643 A US 48060643A US 2346505 A US2346505 A US 2346505A
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barge
tanks
channel
valve
deck
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US480606A
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Preuss John
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Preuss John
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63BSHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; EQUIPMENT FOR SHIPPING 
    • B63B27/00Arrangement of ship-based loading or unloading equipment for cargo or passengers
    • B63B27/24Arrangement of ship-based loading or unloading equipment for cargo or passengers of pipe-lines

Description

J. PREUSS April 11, 1944.

BARGE Filed March 26, 1943 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. Ja/m' P175056 B April 11, 1944.

J. PREUSS BARGE Filed March 26, 1945 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Ill l l' l lll lll 'llll k Uh\ v5 mu Qvm mm mm INVENTOR. Ja/m/ Fatwa-s,

Patented Apr. 11, 1944 UNITED STATES PATENT f OFFICE BABGE John Preuss, Memphis, Tenn.

Application March 26, 1943, Serial No. 480,606

8 Claims.

Thi invention relates to vessels adapted for the transportation of liquids, usually known as tanker-barges, which have flat bottoms throughout the major portion of their Width and length, and particularly to improvements in such vessels whereby they may be more readily and fully filled and trimmed, where necessary, to even keel, and also'whereby they may be rapidly and substantially completely unloaded at their destination with a. minimum of effort, labor and supervision.

The invention is an improvement on the invention for like purposes disclosed in my Patent No. 2,314,555, issued March 23, 1943, to which reference is here made.

As there recited, a major dificulty in liquid transportation in tanker-barges of known types has arisen through the difiiculty of thoroughly and efiiciently emptying the vessel of its cargo at its destination with the consequence that the empty vessels are returned with a substantial amount of the cargo still on board. This residual cargo often runs as high as 250 to 300 barrels per vessel, and averages approximately 100 barrels each trip, for which payment is not made. The carrier is consequently penalized in the amount of cargo which is not removed, and in effect has carried such amount as additional dead weight, by which the effective capacity of the vessel is curtailed.

The principal purpose of this invention is to enable efiective use to be made of substantially the. entire cargocapacity of the vessel and to reduce to a minimum, residual cargo which would tendto curtail the efiective capacity.

A correlary purpose is to accomplish the ready and rapid loading of the barge and trimming it to even keel.

It is customary in vessels of this character to segregate the hold or hull of' the vessel into compartments or tanks by transverse tank Walls and one or more longitudinal tank walls, the entire vessel being covered with a deck. Each tank is provided with a suction pipe, connected through a header to a suitable pump which may be carriedon the barge or be on the dock where the barge is unloaded, for accomplishing unloading or emptying of the tanks. As is: well known in pumping practice, a serious problem is that of cavitation, or the tendency of the atmosphere to break through the seal of the surrounding. liquid and destroy the pumping vacuum which is dependent on the rate of pumping, the size of the suctionpipe, and other factors. Since cavitation becomes. effective before the. level. of 1 the: liquid teaches the. bottom of the suctionpipe; and removal of liquid below such point it .is almost impossible, a considerable quantity of liquid remains in the compartment, as the residual cargo. In addition, Whenever cavitation breaks through and destroys the vacuum, pumping not only stops, but it is substantially impossible to reprime and start pumping again.

The evil of cavitation inemptying tankerbarges is one of theprimereasons for residual cargo. It has been lessened to the point of the present problem, largely through the general adoption of the unloading'procedure, in which the barge is partially emptiedona substantially even keel, and then is subsequentlyemptied progressively from end to end. In this manner, as one end of the barge is emptied, it floats more buoyantly and the barge is longitudinally .tilted. By positioning the suction pipes adjacent the tank walls and so emptying the barge as to cause it to tilt toward the pipes and adjacent tank walls, the liquid each compartment flows toward the tank wall, and removal is thereby assisted. But. even in the use of this unloading procedure the ,problem of residual cargo continues to exist, and this invention is; directed to the solution of that problem, regardless of the procedure under which it arises.

Additionally constant attention must be given to see that as each tank is emptied Dumping is cutoff and started concurrently in an additional tank, not only to obviate. loss of priming and delay there, but also less oftime by cessation of pumping.

As in my previous patent, the basic means by which this solution: is accomplished lies in a novel anduseful sump keel which is provided for the tanker-barge, being a keel which extends continuously from end to end of the flat floor of the barge, and may be continued following the curved end or ends of the barge to deck level if desired, such a keel adding substantially nothing to, the drag of the barge.

The present construction, however, differsfrom my former one insofar as the'sump keel is con cerned in that thechannel forming the keel while closedat the endsas before is uninterrupted from end to end and provides a connecting channelwayfrom end to-end, at: least of the flat, bottomed-portion of the barge;

The objects of'thisinvention are:

To provide; means facilitating the maximum efiective useoi cargo space in a tanker vessel;

To provide means for minimizing residual cargo in vessel 1 unloading:

To provide meansconcentrating-the liquid ad- To provide a tanker vessel having a channelforming sump keel extending longitudinally of the vessel, and adapted to receive and concen- I trate the entire liquid cargo adjacent a single suction pipe;

To provide means for connecting the various compartments or tanks individually to, or segregating them from, the channel;

To provide a sump adapted to the dual purpose of facilitating pumping and acting as a keel.

The means by which the foregoing and other objects of the invention are accomplished, and the manner of their accomplishment, will be readily understood on reference to the accompanying specification and to the drawings, in which a typical tanker-barge, including the improvements of this invention, is illustrated.

In the drawings:

- Fig. 1 is a'sectional plan of a typical barge as modified, a portion of the barge deck being broken away.

Fig. 2 is a corresponding longitudinal sectional elevation. I

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal sectional elevation, showing unloading of the barge nearing final stage. In this view substan tially all the cross angles of the usual barge construction are omitted.

.Fig. 3A is a fragmentary view showing a modification of channel construction and last stage of pumping.

, Fig. 4 is a fragmentary sectional elevation taken on the line IV.IV of Fig. 3, showing drainage openings below the cross channels.

Fig, 5 is a transverse sectional elevation of the barge on the same scale as Fig. 1, taken as on the line VV of Fig. 3; and

Figs. 6 and '7 are enlarged views taken on the same line, showing preferred valve and stem constructions, Fig. 6 showing the deck end of one of the valve stems and stufiing boxes, and Fig. 7 the lower end of the suction pipe and the two adjacent valves and seats.

Referring now to the drawings in which the various parts are indicated'by numerals:

The tanker bargewhich-is typical of usual barge construction comprises a hull I l and a deck l2. 'Hull Il'includes sides I3 and I4, and a bottom l5, the bottom being curved or sloped upwardly at the'f ront end to join deck l2 and form the bow of the barge, and being similarly curved or sloped upwardly at the rear end to meet the deck and form the stern. Deck l2 extends from bow to stern and is secured to the upwardly extended bottom l5 along each junction with the deck and is also secured to sides 13, I 4, so as to cover the hull.

Hull II is subdivided into a plurality of compartments or tanks I'I, sometimes identified individually hereinafter by theaddition of letters A, B, C, and D, by a longitudinal wall l9, and a plurality of transverse walls 2|, sometimes also similarly individually identified by the addition of letters. These walls extend vertically from bottom I5 to deck [2, and from side wall to side wall, and are secured in usual manner, as by angle irons 23, 24, or in other desired manner. Wall I9 extends from bow to stern and is secured to each in desired manner, as by angle irons 25, and similarly to the transverse walls 2i.

Asshown wall [9 divides the barge into parallel longitudinal rows of tanks IT, a port row and a starboard row. Each of the tanks I1 is preferably provided with the usual manhole 21, having a removable cover for use in filling the tanks, for cleaning, supervision of liquid withdrawal, or other operations.

According to the present invention, underlying the bottom of the barge longitudinally and centered beneath the longitudinal wall I9, is a channel 29 which forms a central keel for the barge. This channel extends the full length of the fiat bottom of the barge, with its opposite ends underlying the end tanks l'l-A and |1B respectively. These opposite ends are closed as by sloping portion 29-A, 29-B, or if desired, though not so shown, the channel may continue along the curved bow and stern to deck level.

Transversely, as shown most clearly in Fig. 4, the channel is in part beneath the port, and in part beneath the starboard rows of tanks 11. The channel throughout its length is integrally secured and sealed to the bottom I 5, as by welds 3|. The channel may be of standard channel cross section, as shown in Fig. 5, or otherwise, as with flared flanges, as shown in Figs. 4 and 7.

Throughout its length the channel 29 is uninterrupted so that liquid entering it may flow without interruption from one end to the other. It may be of uniform depth throughout its length, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, or may be locally deeper beneath the suction pipe, as shown in Fig. 3-A. This deepening may be entirely beneath the tanks l'l-B and I'!C, increasing therefrom uniform channel depth toward the suction pipe, or the increase toward the pipe may be gradual throughout the length of the barge, though not so shown.

Each of the tanks H has in one corner adjacent the longitudinal center wall l9 and a cross wall 2! an opening which overlies the channel 29 and forms the sole means of communication between the tank and the channel. These openings are each respectively provided with a valve 33-by which flow cut-off may be accomplished.

Usually either end of the barge may be designated as the bow or front end. The openings and valves all respectively lie adjacent the cross walls 2 lat the pumping ends of their respective tanks, except those for the two end tanks I1B at the pumping end'of the barge which lie on the opposite side of the cross wall 2lB from those in tanks "-0..

Each valve 33 may comprise a conical plug 35 which seats in a complementary conical hole in a seat 36, the valve plugs preferably having downwardly extending guide lugs 31 which do not clear the seat when the valve is open, and guide the plug into place when being closed. Each valve respectively has a stem 39, which extends upward through the deck of the barge and is there accessible for opening and closing the valve. 40 are collars limiting upward stem movement.

In the preferred construction, to provide against any contingency of oil escape, 4| is a valve stand which is seated on the deck and secured and sealed thereto as by welding. Stand 4| is of greater internal diameter than valve plug 35 to permit plug removal therethrough. Seated on the upper end of stand 4| is a sealing gasket 43 and on this gasket and secured to the stand, as by bolts 45, is a cap 4! which is threaded to receive a threaded portion of the valve stem and provided above such threaded portion with a stufing box 49, through which the stem projects. 5| is a hand wheel. Valve stem and valve .plug may be entirely removed by removal. of cap 41; and plug dressed up,.or replaced if necessary,

With valve plug removed, seat may be reground from deck level.

Also at the pumping end of the boat, the usual cross header 53 is set up for connection to pumping apparatus, not shown, on the dock, this header having flanges 55, or other desired type of fitting, to efiect coupling, and cut-oil valves 57. Connected into the header through a suitable T fitting 59, is a suction pipe 6| which extends downward through the deck l2 and the bottom 15 of the barge into the channel 29, the suction pipe where it passes through the deck and through the barge bottom being sealed to each thereof, preferably by welding. The suction pipe 6i preferably extends through one of the end tanks "ll-B, though if necessary it could extend through one of the adjacent tanks Il'C, but in either case in adjacency to the division wall ll-#3 therebetween and as nearly against the longitudinal wall id as possible, and even so it ordinarily must be somewhat flattened at its lower end to get it into the channel 29. In order that complete drainage of the tanks may occur the intermediate cross angles iii-A have the usual minor drainage openings along the bottom it], here shown in Fig. 4 as adjacent the angles 25 and designated by the numeral 63. s

In equipping a barge already constructed, holes are cut in the deck where valve stands ill are to be placed, and for the suction pipe 6!, the holes for the stands being slightly larger than the intericr diameters of the stands, and all holes there out also cutting away portions of the horizontal legs of the angles. The barge is then inverted, the lines of the center wall 19 and cross walls iii are determined and marked and holes are cut in the bottom for the valve seats 36, and the suction pipe, in desired relation to the walls. Preferably the valve seats are provided with encircling fianges 35A, which prevent upper surfaces of seat from projecting above the upper surface of the bottom i5 and interfering with drainage. Seats are secured and sealed around periphery of flanges to the bottom i5, as by welds 3E-B, and subsequently, if desired, additional weld material 3fi--C may be filled in after barge is reinverted. Suction pipe 6| is inserted through opening cut for it in bottom and extended through deck opening, and is secured and sealed to bottom as by weld 6lA.

After placing valve seats and pipe the channel 29 is laid lengthwise along the barge and the flanges secured and sealed to the bottom by the welds 3i, and its sloping ends 29-A, 28-13 by the welds 3|.

Barge is then reinverted, the pipe ti is secured and sealed to the deck l2, as by welding, and the valve stands 45 positioned over their respective valve seats and secured and sealed by welds 4 IA.

In case extreme flattening of the pipe ii! makes bottom insertion unieas'ible, after reinversion of the barge, the pipe may be carried into the barge through the manhole 27-A, Fig. 1, and pushed upward through deck opening then downward through bottom, and bottom welding done inside barge.

Valve caps 41, carrying valve stem and plug assemblies, are placed with lugs 31 entering valve seats and the caps bolted down solidly on the gaskets. Header 53, and valves 51 carried thereby, is installed and installation is complete.

For filling or unloading, the barge is warped along side or end on to the dock and suitable connection made, as may be most convenient, between one or the other of the ends of the header and the pumping apparatus on the dock.

In filling, all manholes are loosened or removed, or other provision made for escape of air, all the valves 33 are opened, and pumping through header 53 and suction pipe 5! into channel 29 is started and continued until barge filling is completed, each tank filling through its respective valve 33. Should one side or end of the barge be low, as filling approaches completion, valves may be closed on such side or end, and pumping continued to the still open valves to high side or end tanks only. After filling is com pleted all valves are opened and the load allowed to equalize and the barge adjust itself to even keel. Subsequently all valves are closed and the barge ready to get under way.

In unloading, manholes are loosened, or other provision for air entrance provided, about half the valves furtherest from the pump are initially opened and the pump started, drawing oil from channel 29 through suction pipe SI and header 53. As pumping gets under way the remaining valves are opened and pumping continued from all tanks concurrently, usually until oil removal is complete. Should it be desired, however, the valves for the end tanks li-B may be left closed, or more usually be closed when those tanks are about half empty, and then left closed until the balance of the tanks have been fully emptied, the heavier or partially loaded end tanks tilting the barge lengthwise and accelerating flow toward that end of the barge, and also accomplishing final and complete drainage of the other tanks. Also with partially filled end tanks, listv first to one side and then to the other may be accomplished by valve manipulation and complete final drainage of the other tanks established. Final drainage of end tanks is substantially assured by their sloping bottoms.

It will be understood that the detail of valves and other structures, except where specifically set out in the claims, are intended as being typical only, and that details of barge design and construction are intended as illustrative only of ordinary barge construction.

It will be further understood that a barge having a single row of tanks, could also be serviced by a single channel along the longitudinal center of the barge, but that should there be three or four rows of tanks, two channels and suction pipes must be used.

I claim:

1. In a vessel which includes a plurality of tanks having substantially flat bottoms, and adapted to carry liquid, a keel comprising a substantially channel-shaped member depended below and extending as an uninterrupted channel- Way along all of said tank bottoms and adapted to serve as a joint sump for all thereof, said tanks each having a valve controlled opening into said channelway.

2. In a vessel which includes a plurality of tanks having substantially flat bottoms and adapted to carry liquid, a keel comprising a substantially channel-shaped member depended below and extending as an uninterrupted channelway along all of said tank bottoms and adapted to serve as a joint sump for all thereof, said tanks each having a. valve controlled opening into said channelway, said valved openings forming the sole communication between said tanks and said channelway, and means for filling and emptying said tanks, including a suction pipe extending into said channelway adjacent one end thereof.

3. A substantially flat bottom barge having interior walls segregating said barge into a plurality of tanks adapted for liquid transportation, said barge having a channel member depended from said bottom and extending longitudinally from end to end thereof without interruption to form a joint sump for all of said tanks, each said tank having a valve controlled opening into said channel member, said valved openings establishing the sole communication between said tanks and said channel member.

4. A substantially flat bottom barge having interior walls segregating said barge into a plurality of tanks adapted for liquid transportation, said barge having a channel member depended from its said bottom and extending longitudinally from end to end thereof without interruption to form a joint sump for all of said tanks, each said tankhaving a valve controlled opening into said channel member, said valved openings forming the sole communication between all said tanks and said channel member, and means for filling and emptying said barge, including a suction pipe extending into said sump adjacent one end thereof.

5. A substantially flat bottom barge for liquid transportation, having a centrally disposed longitudinal wall extending from end to end thereof, and a plurality of cross walls segregating said barge into two rows of tanks, said barge having a channel member depended from said bottom, centered along said longitudinal wall, and extending as a channelway longitudinally from end to end of said barge bottom without interruption to form a joint sump for all of said tanks, each said tank respectively having a valve controlled opening into said channel member, said valved openings forming the sole communication between said tanks and said channel member, and means for filling and emptying said tanks, including a suction pipe extending into said channelway.

6. A substantially flat bottom barge for liquid transportation, having interior walls, including a central longitudinal wall, and cross walls seg' regating said barge into a plurality of tanks, said barge having a channel member depended from its said bottom and centered longitudinally along said central wall from end to end of said bottom, extending without interruption to form a joint sump for all of said tanks, each said tank having a valve controlled opening through its bottom into said channel member, and means for filling and emptying said barge, including a suction pipe extending into said sump, adjacent one end thereof, all said valved openings except those in the end tanks at the suction end of said barge being positioned adjacent the cross walls at the suction ends of such tanks, and said valved openings in said end tanks being positioned against the last said cross wall.

'7. A substantially fiat bottom barge, having a deck and interior walls segregating said barge into individual tanks, and a channel member depended from said bottom and separated from said tanks thereby, extending longitudinally from end to end thereof to form a continuous channelway, each said tank having a valve controlled opening into said channelway, each said valve having a stem extending upward through said deck, and means on said stem above said deck manually operable for control of said valve.

8. A substantially fiat bottom barge, having a deck and interior Walls segregating said barge into individual tanks, and a hollow member below extending longitudinally from end to end of said bottom to form therewith a continuous channelway, each said tank having a valve controlled opening through said bottom into said channelway, each valve for control of a said opening including a removable closure plug, and a stem attached thereto, and extending upward therefrom; said deck having an aperture of greater size than said plug to permit removal thereof, and closure means for said opening including a removable internally threaded cap, said stem having complementary threads and extending through said deck and cap and being manually operable thereabove.

JOHN PREUSS.

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Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2430380A (en) * 1943-11-08 1947-11-04 Sr David H Welsh Ship hull
US2465779A (en) * 1947-04-01 1949-03-29 Anders S Ahlbom Means for heating viscous liquids in ships' tanks
US2573907A (en) * 1946-10-07 1951-11-06 Humphreys Railways Inc Apparatus for handling fish
US2576143A (en) * 1945-09-21 1951-11-27 Jean C Rochet Means for fighting fire aboard ships
US2720181A (en) * 1949-04-07 1955-10-11 Brandon Barge trim adjustment for confined fluids
US2724357A (en) * 1949-04-07 1955-11-22 N A Hardin Barge trim adjustment for confined volatile fluids
US2840027A (en) * 1953-07-23 1958-06-24 Upper Mississippi Towing Corp Barge construction
US2917018A (en) * 1955-02-04 1959-12-15 Knight Arthur Rhodes Coupling means for barges and the like
US2995015A (en) * 1956-12-11 1961-08-08 Warren Petroleum Corp Method of installing a dry dock storage barge facility
US3109294A (en) * 1961-03-21 1963-11-05 Conch Int Methane Ltd Storage tank and liquid flow control means
US3209715A (en) * 1962-06-01 1965-10-05 Algonquin Shipping & Trading Bilge, ballasting, deballasting and cargo oil pumping system
US3247822A (en) * 1962-12-15 1966-04-26 Algonquin Shipping & Trading Design of tank vessels
US3255724A (en) * 1964-05-04 1966-06-14 Algonquin Shipping & Trading Combination dry bulk and bulk oil carriers
US3952679A (en) * 1972-12-12 1976-04-27 Ste Superflexit Flexible marine transport tank
US4227478A (en) * 1978-10-11 1980-10-14 Paul Preus Inflatable barge with compartmented interior
US4347798A (en) * 1978-06-01 1982-09-07 Gallagher John J Buffer system for tankvessels

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2430380A (en) * 1943-11-08 1947-11-04 Sr David H Welsh Ship hull
US2576143A (en) * 1945-09-21 1951-11-27 Jean C Rochet Means for fighting fire aboard ships
US2573907A (en) * 1946-10-07 1951-11-06 Humphreys Railways Inc Apparatus for handling fish
US2465779A (en) * 1947-04-01 1949-03-29 Anders S Ahlbom Means for heating viscous liquids in ships' tanks
US2720181A (en) * 1949-04-07 1955-10-11 Brandon Barge trim adjustment for confined fluids
US2724357A (en) * 1949-04-07 1955-11-22 N A Hardin Barge trim adjustment for confined volatile fluids
US2840027A (en) * 1953-07-23 1958-06-24 Upper Mississippi Towing Corp Barge construction
US2917018A (en) * 1955-02-04 1959-12-15 Knight Arthur Rhodes Coupling means for barges and the like
US2995015A (en) * 1956-12-11 1961-08-08 Warren Petroleum Corp Method of installing a dry dock storage barge facility
US3109294A (en) * 1961-03-21 1963-11-05 Conch Int Methane Ltd Storage tank and liquid flow control means
US3209715A (en) * 1962-06-01 1965-10-05 Algonquin Shipping & Trading Bilge, ballasting, deballasting and cargo oil pumping system
US3247822A (en) * 1962-12-15 1966-04-26 Algonquin Shipping & Trading Design of tank vessels
US3255724A (en) * 1964-05-04 1966-06-14 Algonquin Shipping & Trading Combination dry bulk and bulk oil carriers
US3952679A (en) * 1972-12-12 1976-04-27 Ste Superflexit Flexible marine transport tank
US4347798A (en) * 1978-06-01 1982-09-07 Gallagher John J Buffer system for tankvessels
US4227478A (en) * 1978-10-11 1980-10-14 Paul Preus Inflatable barge with compartmented interior

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