US2343227A - Suction cleaner - Google Patents

Suction cleaner Download PDF

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US2343227A
US2343227A US29151839A US2343227A US 2343227 A US2343227 A US 2343227A US 29151839 A US29151839 A US 29151839A US 2343227 A US2343227 A US 2343227A
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Prior art keywords
nozzle
means
suction
cleaner
surface
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William D Sellers
Alfred G Gross
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Hoover Co
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Hoover Co
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L5/00Structural features of suction cleaners
    • A47L5/12Structural features of suction cleaners with power-driven air-pumps or air-compressors, e.g. driven by motor vehicle engine vacuum
    • A47L5/22Structural features of suction cleaners with power-driven air-pumps or air-compressors, e.g. driven by motor vehicle engine vacuum with rotary fans
    • A47L5/28Suction cleaners with handles and nozzles fixed on the casings, e.g. wheeled suction cleaners with steering handle
    • A47L5/34Suction cleaners with handles and nozzles fixed on the casings, e.g. wheeled suction cleaners with steering handle with height adjustment of nozzles or dust-loosening tools

Description

Feb, 29, 1944. w. D. SELLERS ET Al.

SUCTION CLEANER Filed Aug. 23., 1939 5 Sheets-Sheet l Feb. 29, 1944. W, D, SELLERS ET AL 2,343,227

SUCTION CLEANER Filed Aug. 25,1939 5 sheets-sheet 2 n NA o Il .u n N M Jlwd/w William Sellers Alfred 6. Gross Feb. 29, 1944. w. D. SELLERS ETAL sUcTIoN CLEANER File-d Aug. 2s, 1939 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 75 Illll y/ l Fly/0 '4 Wi zzz'amsezzem Alfred 6'. Gross Feb 29, 1944- w. D.I SELLERS ET'AL 2,343,227

s UcTIoN CLEANER Filed Aug. 25, 1939 5 sheets-sheet 4 INVENTOR William Sellers Alfred 6. Grasas ATTORNEY Feb. 29, 1944. W, D, SELLERS Er AL` 2,343,227

SUCTION CLEANER Filed Aug. 25, 1939 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR Se l [e119 6. Gross William A fred 5.' @wa/f ATTORNEY vide a new and improved suction cleaner. another object of the invention .to'provide a new Patented Feb. 2.9, 1944 SUCTION CLEANER William D. Sellers, Glen Ellyn, and Alfred G. Gross, Wilmctte, Ill., assignors to The Hoover Company, North Canton, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Y Application August 23, 1939, Serial No. 291,518

(Cl. -*6i 25 Claims.

The present inventiony relates to suction cleaners in general and more particularly to an improved nozzle height adjusting means in a suction cleaner. More specifically the invention comprises a suction cleaner in which the surface-contacting nozzle mouth and cleaner-v agitator are automatically positioned in proper operating relationship to a surface or to a surface .covering undergoing cleaning under all conditions of cleaner operation.

It is an object of the present invention to pro- It is improved nozzle height adjusting meansin a s suction cleaner. Another object ofthe invention is to provide anew and improved agitatorpositioningmeans in'a suction cleaner. A still further object of the invention is to provide a suction cleaner embodying automatic nozzle height and agitator-height-adjusting means to compensate for variations in surface coverings undergoing cleaning. A still further object of the invention is to provide a feeler-controlled nozzle height adjustment which automatically positions the cleaner nozzle in the proper operating relationship to a covering undergoing cleaning. A further object of the invention is to provide a suction-operated -automatic nozzle height adjustment in which a surface-contacting reeler controls the nozzle position. Still another object of the invention is to provide'a suction cleaner in which a floating sub-nozzle is automatically positioned-.to the proper 'relationship to a surface covering undergoing cleaning by means including a surface position ieeler. A still further object of the invention is to provide a sub-nozzle including surface-contacting lips and a driven agitator which is automatically positioned relative to a surface covering undergoing cleaning to the optimum position by means controlled by a surface-contacting feler or gauge. Still another object of the/invention is toprovide an automatic nozzle height adjust ment which is feeler-operated and which/includes electrical means to vary the nozzle height. These and other more speciiic objects will appear upon reading the following specication and claims and upon cnsidering in connection theref with the attached drawings to which they relate.

Referring rnow to the drawings in which preferred embodiments of the present invention are disclosed, and in which the same reference character refers to the same part throughout:

Figure 1 is a side view of asuction cleaner' embodying the present invention with certain parts broken away and shown in section in the inoperative relationship and upon abare floor:

Figure 2 is a partial bottom view of the cleaner illustrated in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is an enlargedA view-of the suctionoperated bellows of the air motor;

Figure 4 is a viewlsir'nilar to Figure l but illustrates the cleaner positioned upon a bare door in operation;

Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 4 but with a cleaner positioned upon a surface covering and inY operation;

Figure 6 is a section upon the line B-S of Figure 4 and illustrates the nozzle-lifting bellows and its connection to the ambulatory body-supporting chassis;

Figure 7 is a longitudinal section through the feeler-controlled valve which connects the lower chamber of the air motor to atmosphere; y

Figure 8 is a section upon the line 8-8 of Figure 7;

Figure 9 is a side elevation of a cleaner constructed in accordance with the second preferred embodiment of the invention and in which a sub-nozzle construction is movably mounted relative to the remainder of the cleaner body# and is automatically positioned by a feeler-controlled mechanism as in the first embodiment;

Figure 10 is a bottom view of the cleaner illustrated in Figure 9;

Figure 11 is a view of the cleaner constructed in accordance with the second embodiment oi the invention in operation upon a bare floor;

Figure 12 is a front view of the cleaner nozzle of the second embodiment of the invention with aportion of the front wall broken away to show the sub-nozzle positioned therein; 1

Figure 13 is a partial side elevation of a s uction cleaner embodying a third preferred `em.

bodiment oi the invention, with certain parts broken away and shown in section, the cleaner being positioned upon a bare floor and in the inoperative relationship;

Figure 14 is a bottom view of the cleaner constructed in accordance with the third embodiment o! the invention:

Figure 15 is a transverse cross section through the feeler-controlled switch of the lthird ern-- bodiment;

Figure 16 is a section through the cut-out switch mounted upon the cam shaft;

Figure 1'? is a diagrammatic disclosure of the electrical circuit of the cleaner of the third embodiment, theparts being related as in Figures 13 Yand 15.

linherent weakness embodied the inherent 2 aplacar i V suction cleaners provided with manually-opported by front and rear wheels 2 and 3. respecerable nozzle height adjusting means have been tively. y'I'he cleaner handle l is pivotally conm'ade and sold for many years. vThey have' the nected directly tothe chassisi.

that when the operator.. after setting the machineproperly for a surface covering of one type, later moves the machine onto a covering of a dfherenttypehe frequently fails to reset the adjusment. The result is that the cleaner is improperly positioned i'or-v operation upon' this second coveringwand inemcient operamore recent development. has been the automatic .nozzlel height..v adiusiznieiit.,

adjustmentsjl'however., ,y ,Y

wfshaftgliextends;

tionv results. A

These. prior automatic v v weakness that vthead- Justment of thecleaner l,supporting means".wa"s

dependent upon 4the '-lengthj of; the` 'pile fand stiffness. No accountlwas-taken by such adilusty' ments of the variationsin` densityl ortightness of weave of the rugjback, n or yoifthe stiffnessof e rug. These latter elementsare just asimrtant as any present'in determining 'the :response of the surface coveringun'der'going cleaning to the nozzle suction.rv l.Also Ait has `been imf' possible to ,accommodate all these' factors 'per-y-- fectly for they vary indiscriminatelyv in different if coverings. While the automatic adjustment v meansmight be designed yto be accurate in .positioning thenozzle at the proper height relative to a surface covering undergoing cleaning where that covering had one y pile height, one pile -thickness and one back weave, the .variation of one of those factors, `su'ch as the tightness of weave of the rug `baci-r or the stillness thereof might render the adjustment means unsatisfactory.

In the automatic nozzle height adjustment means constructed in accordance with the present invention the adjustment of the nozzle and of the cleaner agitator is made so as to be entirely independent of the weight of the cleaner. the stiffness ofthe surface covering pile, the density thereof, or the tightness of weave or stiffness of the rug back. The only condition which controls the operation of the nozzleheight adjustment constructed in accordance with the present invention is the relationship of the covering undergoing cleaning to the surface-contacting portion of the nozzle and the agitator. Ii the relationship is the optimum no adjustment takes place. If it is any other relationship adjustment automatically follows and continues until the optimum relationship is established. This result is obtained by the provision of a feeler which is adapted to contact the supporting surface below the cleaner nozzle and below the cleaner agitator. 'Ihis feeler member has one optimum position which corresponds to the optimum nozzle and agitator height adjustment. If properly positioned the surface covering undergoing cleaning will hold this feeler member at its optimum position and no adjustment takes place. If the relationship of the nozzle and agitator relative to the surface covering varies so that the feeler moves from its optimum position, it rides at all times upon the supporting surface in the cleaner operation, automatic adjustment instantly i'ollows and the height position of the nozzle and agitator is changed until the feeler is again moved by the. coveringundergoing cleaning to its optimum position. I

Referring again to the drawings and to Figures 1 to 8, inclusive. a suction cleaner embodying the rst'preferred embodiment of the Ainvention is illustrated. The cleaner is seen to include an ambulatory U-shaped chassis I which is sup-y I'he cl'caner'body includes anozzle l having I sume-contacting front and rear lips 'I and I, respectively.- a fan' chamber! to the eye Il of which the'j nozzle `lis interiorly connected by apassageway Il', and an exhaust outlet i2 of the' lian chamber whichv is provided with bag-selilcuring manually Aoperable means I3. A motor f enclosesjan unshown driving motor, l1 anrljajis positioned vin nnediai'ely above the fan l. ham r1 Q andfexhaust' outlet I2. The motor l y .l downwardly through the fan g-'chamber where it .carries the suction-creating y. l iran' ifl andfis'i'formedY at its lower end within the air passageway? il as a driving pulley. 'Ihe body also includes appearance skirts il which extend rearwardly i'rom'the ends of the nozzle I to conzoceal partially the supporting chassis l and the supporting wheels 2 and 3. l f The cleaner body'is pivotally supported upon the ambulatory chassis i by a pivotal connection il immediately forward pf the rear supporting z5 wheels 3. About this pivot point the cleaner body. together:with the filtering bag 2l, pivots to raise and lower nozzle 3 relative to the chassis, there being supporting springs 22 between the arms of the chassis i andthe overlying skirts I 4 which 80 carry the weight of the cleaner body forwardly o f the pivotal connection. Each of these springs encircles a post 23 which extends downwardly from the cleaner body skirt l 4 and which is adaptedy to abut the chassis. as illustrated in Figure 4. 85 with the cleaner nozzle in its lowermost position. A restraining bolt 2l passes through an aperture 2l in each arm of the chassis and into the bottom of depending post 23 with its headed end spaced therefrom to provide a lower stop to determine, with the end of post 23, the possible angular movement of the cleaner body relative to the chassis.

Positioned within the nozzle casing 8 is an inner nozzle casing 21 the top and front walls of which are spaced from the casing i to provide a space therebetween. fact opens directly into this inner nozzle"casing 21 and the top. integral therewith as is the frontlnozzle lip 1. The rear lip 8 is formed integrallyy with the removable bottom plate 28 oi' the passageway il.

Rotatably ing 21 is a rotatable agitator 30 which is formed with a cylindrical body upon which are provided elongated helically extended rigid beater elements 3| and axially extending Ilexible brush elements 32. A pivoted latch member 33 at each end of the agitator removably retains it within the nozzle and a power-transmitting belt 34 connects it to the lower end of the motor drive shaft. y

Within the space between the outer nozzle casing 8 and the inner nozzle casing 21, and in front of the fan chamber 9, is positioned an air motor which provides the power by which the nozzle end of the cleaner is raised and lowered. This air motor is indicated generally by the reference character 3 5and isseen to comprise a V-shaped bellows construction having rigidly mounted top wall 3l and a rigidly mounted bottom wall 31 which extends the length of the nozzle. An intermediate movable piston wall or plate 38 is pivoted at 39 at the angle of the V, there being enclosing, collapsible, flexible air-impervious seals 40 joining the peripheral edges of the walls 38, 37 and 38. 'I'hese seal members 40 are accordion- The air passageway il inl bottom and side wallsaregformed" mounted within the inner nozzle caslike. as is clearly illustrated in Figures 1 and 4, so that the intermediate plate 88 is permitted a range of angular movement between the top and bottom walls of the bellows.

At the ends of the air motor the plate 38 is provided with projecting shoulders 4I to each of which pivotally connects a pivoted arm 42 the lower end of which is pivotally connected to the ambulatory chassis I. The relationship is such that the tilting angular movement of the cleaner body relative to the chassis is accompanied by the pivotal movement of the plate or piston 38 of the air motor, that member being given a range of movement adequate to accommodate the permitted angular pivotal movement of the cleaner body.

The upper and lower chambers formed in the air motor upon the opposite sides of the plate or piston 38 are internally connected by conduits 44 and 45 to the interior of the fan chamber immediately inside oi' the eye I8 thereof, and at a point which is in substantial alignment with the eye of the fan chamber and the point of cut-oi! thereof which is indicated at 48. It has been found that when so located suction is alf ways present in the pipes 44 and 45 and accordingly within the chambers of the air motorin all operating relationships of the cleaner which includes operation in which the cleaner nozzle is sealed to a surface covering undergoing cleaning and also operation in which the nozzle is entirely unsealed and the flow of air through the cleaner is unrestricted. The suction available to the motor chambers by the suction-creating means of the cleaner is the same.

A feeler member 48 is pivotally mounted at 49 and extends rearwardly between the nozzle lips 1 and l and below the rotary agitator 3l. This element is positioned below the portion of reduced diameter of the agitator which serves as the pulley to seat the driving belt 34 and is movable upwardly to a point within the confines of the circle described by the surface-contacting beating elements 3l. Forwardly of its pivot point the surface-contacting feeler 48 is pivotally connected to a vertically extending rod 50' which carries a fixed abutment shoulder 5I which is at all times urged upwardly by a helical coll spring 52 the lower end of which seats upon an L-shaped seat 53 mounted upon the forward wall of the interior nozzle casing 21. The force exerted by the spring 52 at all times urges the feeler 48 downwardly and with a predetermined force. Upward movement of the feeler 48 to` ward the agitator is accomplished only by the contact therewith of an underlying surface undergolng cleaning, as illustrated in Figure 5. The lowermost position of the feeler is determined by the abutment of the forward end thereof with the forward face of the front wall of inner nozzie 21,as indicated at 41 in Figure 4, and in this position the feeler just contacts a bare supporting surface.

To the lower motor chamber is interiorly connected, by an air passageway 55, a valve cham- `ber 56 which is open to atmosphere at its one end by an aperture 51 and which has its opposite end closed by a counterbored screw plug 58. Extended into the valve chamber 56 through the open end 51 thereof and seated in screw threaded relationship therewith is a cylindrical valve chamber wall 60 which is formed with elongated axially extending ports 6I which open into the space between the wall 68 and the surroundchamber wall Il is a rotatable valve t2 which is provided with air seals 83 at its opposite ends in the form of enclosing gaskets and also with longitudinally extending ports 84 which are similar in size and shape to the ports 6I in the en-` closing valve chamber wall 60. The stem of valve 62 extends through the counterbored chamber-closing plug 58, there being a sealing gasket therearound indicated at 58 which is compressed by the stem-enclosing nut 61. The outer end of the valve stem non-rotatably carries the valve arm 68, which is itself pivotally connected to the upper end of the plunger rod 50. It is clear that the pivotal movement of the feeler 48 resulting in the vertical displacement of the plunger rod will cause the angular rotary movement of the valve arm 68 and will result in the rotation of the valve 62 within its enclosing chamber wall 60.

The function of the surface covering feeler 4|-, the air motor 35 and the connections between the air motor and the chassis is to provide automatically the proper adjustment of the nozzle and agitator relative to a surface undergoing cleaning. If that surface is a iioor covering elcient cleaning demands that `it be lifted from the supporting surface by the nozzle suction into contact with the nozzle lips and the rotary agitator in the Gil -pressure of the upper chamber.

manner illustrated in Figure 5. If a bare floor isbeing cleaned, it is desirable that the nozzle be lowered until the lips closely approach the iloor and the agitator brush elements 32 extend into contact therewith in the manner illustrated in Figure 4, the beater elements having a smaller radial extension will not contact the bare floor. Ihemanner in which 'the supporting surface feeler 48 and the air motor cooperate properly to position the nozzle and agitator will now be described.

Let it be assumed that the cleaner is positioned upon a bare floor with the motor turned of! and the cleaner inoperative, as illustrated in Figure l. Upon the energization of the cleaner motor, which is accomplished by the operator turning on the usual cleaner switch of any ordinary type and which is not shown in the drawings, the motor begins to rotate and the shaft I8 drives the suction-creating fan I1. Immediately there results a flow o! air into the cleaner nozzle as a result of the suction created by the fan I1. This suction is effective at the point of connection interiorly of the fan chamber of the conduits 44 and 45 and immediately air is drawn from both chambers of the air motor into the fan chamber. The upper motor chamber is sealed to the exterior and air is exhausted therefrom immediately creating a sub-atmospheric pressure. With the cleaner positioned as shown in Figure 1 the feeler is in its lowermost position and below its optimum position, being forced downwardly by the spring 52. The valve 62 is in a wide open relationship to permit the pressure in the lower motor chamber to approach atmospheric and to exceed greatly the sub-atmospheric This difference of pressure acting upon the two sides of the plate 88 forces that element upwardly within the mo- .l

ing chamber 56. Rotatably mounted within the mains upon a bare floor. -When the motor is turned olf and the suction dissipates, the springs 22 will again raise the forward end of the cleaner to the position illustrated in Figure 1.

When the machine is so adjusted upon a bare floor as just described the nozzle lips 'l and 8 are positioned closely adjacent the surface and the agitator 30 is brought suiliciently close there` to that the flexible brush elements 32, which have a greater radial extension than the rigid beater elements 3|, are able to contact and sweep that floor. Foreign material positioned thereon is dislodged by the brushes and is swept up into the air passageway and conveyed by the fan to the ltering bag 28 attached at the rear of the machine.

Let it be supposed that the machine is pushed from the bare floor, and in the adjustment just described, onto a ysuri'ace covered by a carpet or rug, as illustrated in Figure 5. The sink ,of the supporting wheels into the pile of the covering and the resultant contact of the covering with the feeler 48 will cause that element to be pivoted upwardly into the nozzle against the resisting force of coil spring 52. This angular movement of the feeler results in the angular movement of the valve arm 68 with the attendant rotation oi' valve 62 which moves its ports 84 partially out of alignment with the chamber ports 8| thereby cutting down the flow of atmospheric air into the valve chamber and so into the lower motor chamber. Immediately a f pressure drop is effected therein as less atmospheric air is available and as the same suction is always provided by the suction-creating fan. The pressure in the lower motor chamber being reduced, the body-supporting coil springs 22 are able to force the forward end ofthe cleaner body upwardly. This adjustment continues until the feeler element 48 assumes its optimum position which it does when the covering is lifted into optimum relationship with nozzle and agitator. At that time the flow of air into the lower motor chamber through the valve 62 provides a differential pressure across the plate or piston 38 which is just sufllcient to counterbalance the lifting effect of the coil spring 22. A state of equilibrium will exist and the surface covering will be properly positioned relative to the nozzle y lips and to the agitator for it is the surface covering which positions the feeler 48.

If the machine is positioned while inoperative upon a surface covering then the operation is substantially that described in connection with the bare floor, except that the nozzle moves vdownwardly into contact with the surface covering to make the necessary contact of the feeler member therewith and thereafter the lifting operation just described takes place.

The construction has the advantage that no manual attention is necessary and the machine automatically repositionsI itself upon variation in surface coverings. Y

Referring now to Figures 9 to l2, inclusive, the second preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated. This embodiment differs primarily from that first described in that the ambulatory chassis I of the first embodiment has been eliminated and instead the supporting wheels 2 and 8 are mounted directly to the cleaner body and no relative vertical movement takes place therebetween. There is again provided the pivoted handle 4, the outer nozzle casing 6, the front and rear surface-contacting lips 1 and 8, the fan chamber 9 having its eye I0 and formed with an exhaust outlet I2 to which the bag 24 is removably secured by manually operable nuts Il.

As distinguished from the first embodiment the inner nozzle casing or sub-nozzle 21, which includes the air passageway I I and the surface-contacting lips 1 and 8, is pivotaliy mounted at the rear of the fan chamber by a bracket 15 upon av pivotal connecting pin 16 carried by the supporting bracket 18 of the rear wheels 3. As in the first embodiment the air passageway II is closed by a removable bottom plate 28 which also is pivoted with and forms a part of the subnozzle construction. The upper wall of the air passageway II immediately below and adjacent the eye I 0 of the fan chamber 8 is formed with a circular opening 19 which is resiliently connected to the eye III by a flexible, collapsible conduit 80 of material such as rubber. The entire sub-nozzle construction 21fand the rotatable agitator 30 carried thereby are adapted to move up and down about the pivot point 1B and within the main body of the machine, the front lip 1 being provided with a vertical extension 82 which rides against the inner face of the forward wail 25 of the outer nozzle casing 6 and is provided with a slot 83 which cooperates with a pin 84 carried by that outer nozzle casing to determine the limits of angular movement of the sub-nozzle. Coil springs 86 at each end of the nozzle connect the rear face of the sub-nozzle 21 to the underside of skirt I4 of the main nozzle casing and at all times exert a lifting force thereon which normally lifts the sub-nozzle to its uppermost position with the cleaner inoperative. Springs 86 have suillcient force to lift the sub-nozzle together with a surface covering undergoing cleaning which is suction-sealed thereto but is adapted to be overcome by the pressure differential existing within the air motor which is also present in this emo bodiment of the invention.

The air motor 35 in this second embodiment of the invention is again positioned forwardly of the fan chamber 9 and between the inner nozzle casing 21 and the outer nozzle casing 6 but in this .I instance is mounted directly upon the top of the former andlis movable therewith. The upper and lower chambers thereof are again connected by the conduits 44 and 45, respectively, to that portion of the Interior of the fan chamber 9 adjacent the eye I0 thereof at which there is always substantially the -same suction available. The conduits 44 and 45 in this embodiment should be suiliciently flexible to permit unhindered the vertical movement of the sub-nozzle with which they move at their .forward ends. The feeler 48 is pivotally mounted as before and is here movable with the sub-nozzle construction. as is the valve chamber `56 and the interconnecting parts which are the same as in the firstembodiment.

50 The link 42 which connects to the movable piston or plate 38 in the present embodiment. however, connects directly to the underside of the main casting which includes the nozzle 6 and fan chamber 9 rather than to the supporting chaso5 sis as in the first embodiment. As the sub-nozzle is adapted to rise and fall relative to the main casing of the machine, it is obvious that when so connected the arm 42 is capable of transmitting the force exerted upon the piston 38 to cause the movement of the sub-nozzle relative to the main casing.

The operation of the cleaner constructed in accordance with the second embodiment of the invention greatly resembles the firsty embodiment.

T5 The feeler 48 is, as in the rst embodiment. adaptaccesar i ed to control the flow of air into the lower rnclo, such action being permitted by the exible lo conduit 6b. ln 'Figure 1l the machine is illus-` trated in the operating position having been lowered to the extent permitted by the pintfl and slot @3. If the machine were positioned upon a surface covering the sub-nozzle would be lowered until the ieeler element made contact therewith at which time the eeler element would be pivoted upwardly, the valve t@ would be partially closed, the pressure differential existing across equilibrium `would finally be reached in which the lifted weight of the surface covering undergoing cies in contact with the nozzle lips l and d combined with the dir'erential pressure existing the plate do of the air motor would equal the lifting force exerted by the springs tit. The automatic adjustment feature of this second ernf-f--"1fent duplicates that of the first construction, the essential dierence being that in this case cnw the surface-contacting portions ci the 39 nozzle and the agitator are adjusted vertically to obtain the proper cleaning action Whereas in the first embodiment the entire cleaner was moved relative to s, supporting chassis.

Referring now to Figures l2 to l?, inclusive', 35

the third preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated. vThis embodiment closely resembles the rst described embodiment with the exception that the cir motor thereof has been replaced by an electrical motor. A U-shaped arriC a@ bulatory chassis l is again moi/ably supported by iront and rear Wheels il and respectively, and nivotally carries the handle @l by which the cleaner is actuated.. The outer nozzle casing 6 is formed in the same main casing with the fan chamber il to and again houses the sub-nozzle il in lxed relationship, the letter being interiorly connected by the air passageway li, including the removable bottom plate ille, to the eye l@ of the ian charnber il. im this embodinient'the sub-nozzle or iniii terior nozzle casing 2i' is not movable reiative to the main casing including the ian chamber o and noazle casing t. es in the second embodiment, but instead the entire cleaner body is bivotally connected at the pivot point i9, as in the first es embodiment, for pivotal movement relative to the chassis.

The pivoted cleaner body is supported at its n front end, in the manner o the first embodiment,

by coil springs 2i which entend between tiet body @g and the chassis i, there being a depending post 2li with its screw threaded and spaced bolt 2li which limits the pivotal movement of the body relative to the chassis. ln the present embodiment the coil springs 22 at all times urge the es cleaner nozzle upwardly relative to the chassis to an extent permitted by the rotatable cams de positioned et each side or the nozzle. These bodycarrlcd cams are spring-pressed upwardly into Contact with overlying abutment shoulders iii on the chassis l. To rotate the positioning cam ed there is provided an electric motor e2 which is suitably mounted on the underside of the cleaner body below the slrirt i5, and which is connected' tion.

sears indicated generally at The rotation of `the motor $2 in one direction causes the cam to cated generally at ce. A leaf spring 99 exerts a. force to move the feeler member downwardly and replaces the coil spring used in the previous embodiments. The switch 98 is seen to comprise an insulating casing idc which is seated upon the inner nozzle casing El. andin which a sliding actuator lili operated by the lever arm 91 is itself connected to andl ectuates the movable snap acthepiston llt? would be reduced until a state of 2@ tion contacts iili and H93 which are movable between contacts lofi, ist and i, itl, respectively, as illustrated in Figures 15 and 17. The movable contacts itil and tot are of the over center type and the movement of the actuator lill to the extreme right causes both contacts to assume the position illustrated in Figure 15. which is also illustrated diaerammatically in Figure 17. Movement oi the actuator lili to its midpoeition places movable contacts m2 andv its in contact lwith the central contacts it and litt, a position which represents the motor-off condi- As can loe seen in Figure i7 stationary contacto ifi, lilla, iii@ and le? are divided into parts c and o which are adapted to be interconnected in each instance by the movable contacts. In Figure it the incoming conductors itil and lil@ are seen to connect directly to the armature ilo of the main cleaner motor and to its eld ill in series therewith, there being a current-controlline.' manually operable switch H2. The camactuatinr motor e2 is seen to be connected in parallel with the main cleaner motor, lead it@ extending to one terminal o the armature 92a while the lead teil, after passing through the ual control switch H2, connects directly to the freeler-operated switch 98. More specically, lead iut connects directly to the central stationary contacts lilic and iota/the contacts iilib m ltltb being connected directly to opposite sides of the motor ield winding @2b. Contacts lililb and Selb connect to opposite sides of motor held @2b and to the same sides thereof as contacto itch and llico, respectively. Of the two reiuainhng contacts iililc and lilla, lola connects directly to the armature 92o by the lead 25. iontect leila is connected directly, by the leed tail, to the stationary arcuate contact ring IM .ci the' switch ii, the movable contact illi of which is connected to the leed i, and so directly to the contact icio, by the lead lt.

Movable contact liti of switch H is mounted upon the shaft il@ or earn et, as is best shown in Figure 16, and is connected thereto by the shaft-carried pin ii which seats in a circumerentially extending slot i2@ of limited extent in the contact. e torsion spring ill on the shaft @il abuts and crees the contact iid in a. counterclockwise direction, as viewed in Figure 16. A raised portion is provided on the collector` ring titl at its end, as indicated at HB, and an insulation section it@ ls positioned between that portion and the stop lli. The purpose oi the raised portion iid and the spring ill is to give e snapto the shaft -i or" cani uit by suitable reduction operation to the switch and this is now explained.

It it be assumed that the movable contact H is upon the ring ||I and against the raised portion I I in particular, counterclockwlse movement v of the shaft -89 under the operation of the motor 92 will eil'ect no movement of the contact ||6 until the pin ||9 has abutted the end of slot |20 and has forced the contact over the raised portion ||0. The spring ||1 will then move contact H6 with a snap action from contact ||4 and over insulation |22 and against stop |2l. Current is thus interrupted with a quick break. The closing action will result from the contact `oipin ||9 with the opposite side of slot |20 and the resultant contact movement uponv continued shaft movement. v,This will not be a snap action but this is not necessary on the circuit-closing stroke.

The operation of this lastA embodiment 'of the invention is as follows: vThe relationship illustrated in the Figures 13, and 1.7 o1' the'pdravwings is that in whichthe cleaner nozzle and agitator are positioned attheir greatest heightl above the surface covering or supporting surface.; The

cam 90 has' been so rotated that the supporting coil springs 22 haverlifted the forward end of the body toits maximum height. Thesurfaoecontacting feeler VI0 is pivoted `downwardly toits lowennost position andthe lever 96 vthereofvhas moved ,theswitchflever arm 91 toits rrighthand position andtthe'actuator 10| `of thefswitch 98 has been moved thereby to the positionv illustratedwin Figure l5. The movablej contacts |02 and |03'are positioned as shown in Figures '15 and 17 and the motor 92 is operated.r

The circuit vof the height adjusting motor is as follows: The current-carrying lead |08 connects to the armature 92a on one side, the other side thereof being connected through the leads |25 and iZ to the movable Contact H6 of switch 'i i5. The circuit then includes the stationary contact Hd, the leadl23, stationary contact |04 and movable contact |02 to the field 92h. The opposite side of the iield is connectedto stationary contact |06b which is connected by the movable contact |03 to contact |06a and the incoming currentcarrymEiead |09. Current thus iiows through the height-adjusting motor and causes the rotation of the height adjusting cam 90. As it rotates it forces the body downwardly by exerting a force against the overlying shoulder 9| of the chassis l. This downward movement continuesuntil, if the cleaner is positioned upon a bare iioor, the movable contact H6 of the switch H5 moves od the end of the contact ring l le by the continued rotation of the cam shaft 89, the separation of consects ne and als being accomplished by a snap action because of the presence of the spring H1. Ihe opening of the adjusting motor circuit by the switch ||5 occurs when' the nozzle has been lowered into cleaning relationship to a bare floor. However, .if the cleaner were positioned upon a surface covering the lowering would have'stopped when the feeler member 00 contacted that covering and was pivoted upwardly thereby to its optimum position. In moving, to that position the lever ann 90 would have Apivoted sumciently to move the lever arm 01 and actuator |0| would have caused movable contact |02 to move into contact with stationary contact |05. 'lloc circuit of the motor iield 02h would therelipon have been opened, movable contacts |02 and w3 being seated upon contacts |05 and E00 which are short circuited at 105e Mita.

If, because oi the weight of the rug. or because oi excessive suction in the cleaner, the carpet is raised too high or extends too far into the nozzle mouth and too close to the agitator, the Afeeler 48 will be pivoted above its optimum position. This will result in further movement of the actuator 5 0| to the loft as viewed in Figure 15 and the movable con'tact |03 will be moved with a snap' action from contact |06 to contact |01. Current through the motor field 92h will then ow in the opposite direction. In the iirst instance, with the contacts 02 and |03 positioned as illustrated in Figure 17 current could enter from lead |09, pass through contact |06 and movable contact |03 to the right side of field 92h and thence in the direction to the left and to movable contact |02 and i5 thence to the switch H5.A In this last relationship, however, in which movable contact |03 seats upon stationary contact |01 and movable contact |02 is seated upon stationary contact |05, the lead |09 will Abe connected to the movable contact |02 -20 throughthe lefthand side of the eld and current will move to the right therethrough.

Variations in the position of the surface covering undergoing cleaning relative to the nozzle in this last embodiment of the invention, as in the preceding embodiments, eifect variations in the angular position of the feeler element 48. This change in position effects change in the position of contacts |02 and |03 of switch 98 which in turn causes the motor 92 to rotate in one direction or the other to raise or lower the nozzle. The functional result is substantially the equivalent of the first two embodiments but. is accomplished by electrical means rather than by suction.

We claim: 1. In a suction cleaner, the combination of a body having suction-creating means and a nozzle communicating with said suction-creating means,

with respect to the floor covering being cleaned, and means including a prime-mover actuated by said suction-creating means and operative to supsurface of said floor covering, air-conducting means connecting said prime-mover to said suction-creating means and controlling means for said prime-mover including a noor contacting element responsive to variations in the position of the floor covering relative to said nozzle.

face of the door-covering being cleaned, and

means including surface-contacting means movable relative to said nozzle and responsive to variations in the position of the iioor covering relative to said nozzle for regulating the eiective suction actuating said prime-mover.

3. In a suction cleaner, the combination of a casing including suction-creating means and having a nozzle at its forward end, supporting wheels rat the front and rear ends of said casing, said 7o front wheels being mounted for limited vertical adjustment relative to said casing, a pressureresponsive element mounted on said casing and having operative connection with said adjustable front wheels, air-conducting means connecting rg said element to said suction-creating means, said pressure-responsive element operating to maintain said nozzle normally in a predetermined relationship to a surface covering undergoing cleaning, and means for controlling the effective suction acting on said pressure-responsive element comprising a valve connecting the same with the atmosphere and having a lever adapted to contact the floor covering and to shift with changes in the position thereof relative to said nozzle, whereby said valve acts to relieve the suction in said pressure-responsive element and allows said nozzle to be adjusted accordingly.

4. In a suction cleaner, the combination of a casing including. suction-creating means and having a nozzle at its forward end, front and rear wheels supporting said casing, a frame carrying the wheels and having pivotal mounting on said casing, a bellows member mounted on said casing and operatively connected with said wheel supporting frame, air-conducting means connecting said bellows to said suction-creating means said bellows being responsive to the suction created by said suction-creating means to maintain said nozzle normally in contact with the surface covering undergoing cleaning, and means for varying the eective suction acting on said suction-responsive element, comprising a valve leading from said bellows member to the atmosphere and having a lever adapted to contact the surface covering undergoing cleaning and shiftablewith variations in the position of the covering below the nozzle relative thereto to position the nozzle for effective cleaning action thereon.

5.. In a suction cleaner, the combination of a casing including suction-creating means and having a nozzle at its forward end, supporting wheels at the front and rear ends of said casing, a frame pivotally mounted on said casing and carrying said wheels, a pressure-responsive element mounted on said casing and having operative connection with said wheel carrying frame, said pressure-responsive element communicating with said suction-creating means and subject to the suction thereof to maintain said nozzle i at a predetermined height above the iloor surface, tension means acting to prevent the lowering of said nozzle toward the floor surface, and means for controlling the effective suction acting onl said pressure-responsive element comprising a valve leading from said element to the atmosphere, and a lever operatively connected with said valve and shiftable in contact with the floor covering to permit atmospheric pressure to relieve the suction and allow saidv spring to effect the adiustment of said nozzle to the position of the iioor covering being cleaned.

-6. In a suction cleaner, the combination of a casing includinga nozzle and suction-creating means communicating with said nozzle, a wheeled frame supporting said casing having pivotal connection therewith whereby said casing may be tilted to raise or lower said nozzle, a spring acting to maintain said casing normally in a position of maximum nozzle height, a bellows mounted on said casing and operatively connected with said wheeled frame, said bellows being connected with said suction-creating means and normally capable of overcoming the tension of said spring, a valve connecting said bellows with the atmosphere and having a spring-pressed lever adapted to-contact the? oor covering and operative to relieve the suction in said bellows to effect the adjustment of said nozzle under spring pressure into optimum relationship with the covering being cleaned.

'7. In a suction cleaner, the combination of a casing including a nozzle and suction-creating means communicating with said nozzle, a wheeled frame supporting said casing and having pivotal connection therewith whereby said casing may be tilted to raise or lower said nozzle, a compression spring acting to elevate said casing to a position of maximum nozzle height, a bellows mounted on said casing and including a movable member operatively connected with said wheeled frame, said bellows communicating with said suction-creating means upon both sides of said movable member, a valve opening from said bellows on one side of said movable member to the atmosphere and having a spring-pressed hoor-covering-contacting lever acting to open said valve with a floor covering undergoing cleaning displaced below its optimum position relative to said nozzle whereby the force of suction acting on one side of said movable bellows member vis relieved to enable the pressure on the opposite side thereof to effect the lowering of said nozzle against spring pressure to a height correct for the particular oor covering being cleaned.

8. In a suction cleaner, a nozzle including a surface contacting mouth, suction creating means connected to said mouth, height-adjusting means to raise and lower said mouth relative to a surface undergoing cleaning, an air motor connected to said height-adiusting means to actuate same and including two -chambers, a movable piston in said motor separating said chambers, conduits connecting said chambers to said suction-creating means, valve means connecting one of said chambers to atmosphere, and a surface-contacting feeler at saidmouth inovable with clranges in height relative thereto of a surface covering undergoing cleaning connected to said valve to control the iiow of atmospheric air into one of said chambers and so to control thepressure differential existing across said piston. Y

9:. In a suction cleaner, a nozzle including a surface-contacting nozzle mouth, suction-creating"means connected to said mouth, a surfacecontacting feeler movable with said mouth and adapted to be displaced relative thereto by contact with a surface covering, ambulatory supporting means, means pivotally mounting said nozzle on said supporting means for vertical movement relative to a surface covering undergoing zcleaning, means to raise and lower said nozzle relative to said supporting means, means including an air motor connected to said suction-creating means to actuate said last-mentioned means, and means operated by said feeler to control said air motor.

10. In a suction cleaner, a nozzle having a mouth adapted to contact a surface covering undergoing cleaning, means movably supporting said nozzle for movement over said covering means including a prime mover to raise and lower said nozzle mouth relative to said supporting means and to a supporting surface, and control means for said prime mover including surfacecontacting means positioned at said nozzle to gauge the position of a surface covering undergoing cleaning relative to said mouth to energize said prime mover with said surface covering positioned in other than a predetermined optimum relationship to said mouth.

il. In a suction cleaner, a nozzle having a 8 mouth adapted to contact a surface covering undergoing cleaning, means movably `supporting said nozzle for movement over said covering, means including a prime mover to raise and lower said nozzle mouth relative to said supporting means and toa supporting surface, and con-a trol means to control the movement of said prime mover including a surfacecovering-positioned gauge in said mouth adapted to be raised or low ered relative thereto by that portion ofa suri'ace covering undergoing cleaning positioned immediately below said nozzle.

12. In a suction cleaner, a nozzle having a mouth adapted to contact a surface covering undergoing cleaning, means movably supporting said nozzle for movement over said covering, means including a prime mover to raise and lower said nozzle mouth relative to said supporting means and to a supporting surface, control means including means to eect movement 'of said prime mover in either of two directions or to i'ix said prime mover stationary, said control means also including a covering-feeler movably mounted relative to said nozzle and springbiased into covering-contacting position with that portion of the surface covering contacted by the nozzle and lifted thereby, said ieeler directly determining the position of a surface covering undergoing cleaning relative to said nozzle mouth and by its own position determining the opera-n tion of said control means.

13. In a suction cleaner, a suction nozzle including a mouth, suction-creating means con nested to said mouth, an agitator in said nozzle adapted to contact a surface covering undergoing cleaning at said mouth, means to drive said agitator, a movable feeler at said nozzle to contact that portion oi a surface covering undergoing cleaning positioned immediately below and adapted to be lifted by the suction of said nozzle said feeler being mounted for movement upon variations in the vertical relationship of said nozzle mouth and agitator relative thereto, means to raise and lower said nozzle mouth and agitator, and means controlled by said feeler to actuate said last-mentioned means upon movement of said feeler. f

la. In a suction cleaner, suction-creating means, a suction nozzle connected to said means, a movable feeler in the mouth of said nozzle adapted to contact an underlying surface covenirrg undergoing cleaning, and movable therewith upon variations in the vertical position thereof relative to said nozzle mouth, means to raise and lower said nozzle, and an air motor internally connected to said suction-creating means and operatively connected to said last-mentioned means to actuate same and controlled by said feeler.

15. In a suction cleaner, a nozzle having a'. mouth, suction-creating means connected to said nozzle and adapted to create a reduced pressure therein to eect the lifting of an underlying surface covering undergoing cleaning upwardly into contact with said mouth, a' covering-contacting feeler in said nozzle mouth to determine the position of said covering relative thereto, means to raise and lower said nozzle mouth, an air motor connected to said suction-creating means to actuate said last-mentioned means, and means connecting said feeler to said motor to control the operation thereof upon feeler movement.

16. in a suction cleaner, a body including a nozzle, a vertically displaceabie surface-contacting sub-nozzle within said nozzle, suction-creat= 'accesar ing means connected to said sub-nozzle, feeler means displaceable relative to said sub-nozzle and positioned as to contact that portion of a surface covering undergoing cleaning positioned below said sub-nozzle, means to raise and lower said sub-nozzle, and means controlled by said feeler I means to actuate said last-mentioned means.

lll

Fill

1'7. In a suction cleaner, a body including a nozzle, a vertically displaceable surface-contacting sub-nozzle within said nozzle, an agitator carried by said sub-nozzle, suction-creating means connected to said sub-nozzle, feeler means extended adjacent said agitator and displaceable relative thereto by that portion of the surface covering undergoing cleaning which is positioned under and adapted to be lifted by the suction in said sub-nozzle. means to raise and lower said sub-nozzle relative to said body, and means controlled by said feeler means to actuate said lastmentioned means.

i8. In a suction cleaner, a body including a nozzle, a vertically displaceable suifacacontacting sub-nozzle within saictnczzle, suction=creating means connected to said sub-nozzle, realer means positioned as to be displaceable relative to said sub-nozzle by contact with that portion of a surface covering undergoing cleaning positioned under and adapted to be lifted by the suction in said sub-nozzle, means including a motor inside said body having relatively movable parts con# nested to said body and to said sub-nozzle to move the latter vertically, and means controlled by said feeler means to control the operation oi said motor.

19. In a suction cleaner, a body including a nozzle, a vertically displaceable surface-contacting sub-nozzle within said nozzle, suction-creating means connected to said sub-nozzle, feeler means displaceable relative thereto by contact with a surface covering undergoing cleaning, means including an air motor carried by said sub-nozzle inside said body and having relatively movable parts certain of which are connected to said body to move said sub-nozzle relatively to V said body, said air motor being connected internally to said suction-creating means, and means controlled by said eeler means to control the operation of said motor,

2d. In a suction cleaner, a vertically displace able surface-contacting element, a feeler vertically movable with said element and movable determine the contact relationship of a surface undergoing cleaning with said element, suction-creating means including a fan chamber having an eye and a cut-oil, means to raise and lower said surface-contacting element, an air motor to actuate said last-mentioned means connecting said air motor or" said fan chamber adjacent the eye thereof and at a point tangent to said eye and between said eye and said cut-ofi, and feeleroperated means controlling said motor.

2l. in a suction cleaner, a surfacecontactible element vertically adjustable above and below an optimum position with respect to a surface covering undergoing cleaning, a gauge positioned to gauge the height or" that portion of the surface covering contacted by said element and vertically displaceable with said element and movable relative thereto between limits and upon both sides of an optimum position it assumes whenI the eiement is in its optimum position, means to :raise 22. In a suction cleaner, a surface cleaning means, ambulatory means movabiy supporting said cleaning means, adjustable means mounting said cleaning means on said ambulatory means for vertical movement relative to the plane of a surface covering undergoing cleaning and including an electric motor, switch means to control said motor, a gauge adjacent, vertically movable with, and movable relative to said cleaning means to determine directly the position of a surface covering undergoing cleaning relative to said cleaning means under a torce received from that portion of a surface covering undergoing cleaning positioned immediately opposite said cleaning means, said gauge being movable under said force above and below an optimum position, and means connecting said gauge to said switch to position the latter in accordance with the position of said gauge. f

23. The construction recited by the preceding 20 claim characterized in that a second switch is provided to control said motor and including relatively movable parts, and means to actuate said parts to open said switch to stop said motor upon said cleaninl means tion as in the cleaning of bare noon.

reachingalowermostpod- 25.

24. In a suction cleaner. a body, an agitator carried by said body adapted to make contact with a surface covering undergoing cleaning. means to actuate said agitator, a movable feeler adjacent said agitator to contact that portion of a surface covering undergoing cleaning positioned below said agitator, said feeler being mounted for movement upon variations in the vertical relationship of said agitator relative to said covering, means to raise and lower` said agitator, and means controlled by said feeler to actuate said lastmentioned means upon movement of said feeler.

25. In a suction cleaner, a body, an agitator carried by said body adapted to make contact with a surface covering undergoing cleaning. means to actuate said agitator, a movable feeler adjacent said agitator to contact that portion of a surface covering undergoing cleaning positioned below said agitator, said feeler being mounted for movement upon variations in the vertical relationship of said agitator relative to said covering, a reversible electric motor to raise and lower said agitator. and means actuated by said feeler to control said motor.

n D.SELLERS. ALFREDG.GROB8.

US2343227A 1939-08-23 1939-08-23 Suction cleaner Expired - Lifetime US2343227A (en)

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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2446985A (en) * 1944-06-01 1948-08-10 Singer Mfg Co Vacuum cleaner having a floating nozzle
US2474448A (en) * 1943-05-05 1949-06-28 Hoover Co Semiautomatic nozzle adjustment for suction cleaners
US2555887A (en) * 1944-07-15 1951-06-05 James B Kirby Airflow controlled nozzle adjustment for vacuum cleaners
US2583054A (en) * 1946-04-22 1952-01-22 James B Kirby Automatic nozzle adjusting device for vacuum cleaners
US2592710A (en) * 1948-01-26 1952-04-15 James B Kirby Sweeper type vacuum cleaner having automatic nozzle adjustment
US2655678A (en) * 1948-07-20 1953-10-20 Keogh Hedley Benjamin Mobile apparatus for working on roadways or the like
US2864104A (en) * 1956-12-18 1958-12-16 Armstrong Cork Co Scraper
US3460187A (en) * 1966-02-18 1969-08-12 Mauz & Pfeiffer Suction cleaners with wheel adjustment
FR2030296A1 (en) * 1969-02-04 1970-11-13 Electrolux Ab
US4342132A (en) * 1980-10-01 1982-08-03 The Singer Company Carpet pile sensor and indicator for carpet cleaner
US4706327A (en) * 1986-05-30 1987-11-17 Whirlpool Corporation Automatic vacuum nozzle height adjustment system for vacuum cleaner
US20100095478A1 (en) * 2005-09-16 2010-04-22 H-P Products, Inc. Vacuum cleaning nozzle

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2474448A (en) * 1943-05-05 1949-06-28 Hoover Co Semiautomatic nozzle adjustment for suction cleaners
US2446985A (en) * 1944-06-01 1948-08-10 Singer Mfg Co Vacuum cleaner having a floating nozzle
US2555887A (en) * 1944-07-15 1951-06-05 James B Kirby Airflow controlled nozzle adjustment for vacuum cleaners
US2583054A (en) * 1946-04-22 1952-01-22 James B Kirby Automatic nozzle adjusting device for vacuum cleaners
US2592710A (en) * 1948-01-26 1952-04-15 James B Kirby Sweeper type vacuum cleaner having automatic nozzle adjustment
US2655678A (en) * 1948-07-20 1953-10-20 Keogh Hedley Benjamin Mobile apparatus for working on roadways or the like
US2864104A (en) * 1956-12-18 1958-12-16 Armstrong Cork Co Scraper
US3460187A (en) * 1966-02-18 1969-08-12 Mauz & Pfeiffer Suction cleaners with wheel adjustment
FR2030296A1 (en) * 1969-02-04 1970-11-13 Electrolux Ab
US4342132A (en) * 1980-10-01 1982-08-03 The Singer Company Carpet pile sensor and indicator for carpet cleaner
US4706327A (en) * 1986-05-30 1987-11-17 Whirlpool Corporation Automatic vacuum nozzle height adjustment system for vacuum cleaner
US20100095478A1 (en) * 2005-09-16 2010-04-22 H-P Products, Inc. Vacuum cleaning nozzle
US8096015B2 (en) * 2005-09-16 2012-01-17 H-P Products, Inc. Vacuum cleaning nozzle

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