US2342691A - Control apparatus - Google Patents

Control apparatus Download PDF

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US2342691A
US2342691A US378232A US37823241A US2342691A US 2342691 A US2342691 A US 2342691A US 378232 A US378232 A US 378232A US 37823241 A US37823241 A US 37823241A US 2342691 A US2342691 A US 2342691A
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control
means
member
unit
shaft
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US378232A
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Alexander W Plensler
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BELMONT RADIO Corp
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BELMONT RADIO CORP
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H03BASIC ELECTRONIC CIRCUITRY
    • H03JTUNING RESONANT CIRCUITS; SELECTING RESONANT CIRCUITS
    • H03J5/00Discontinuous tuning; Selecting predetermined frequencies; Selecting frequency bands with or without continuous tuning in one or more of the bands, e.g. push-button tuning, turret tuner
    • H03J5/02Discontinuous tuning; Selecting predetermined frequencies; Selecting frequency bands with or without continuous tuning in one or more of the bands, e.g. push-button tuning, turret tuner with variable tuning element having a number of predetermined settings and adjustable to a desired one of these settings
    • H03J5/14Discontinuous tuning; Selecting predetermined frequencies; Selecting frequency bands with or without continuous tuning in one or more of the bands, e.g. push-button tuning, turret tuner with variable tuning element having a number of predetermined settings and adjustable to a desired one of these settings operated by auxiliary power
    • H03J5/143Settings determined by a number of positioning means mounted on a common support, e.g. turret tuner, which is adjustable to determined positions, a different positioning means being in operation in each position
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/15Intermittent grip type mechanical movement
    • Y10T74/1558Grip units and features
    • Y10T74/1584Gripper mountings, slide
    • Y10T74/1585Multiple acting

Description

Feb. 29, 1944.

A. w. PLENSLER 2,342,691

CONTROL APPARATUS Filed Feb. 10, 1941 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Feb. 29, 1944. w PLENSLER 2,342,691

CONTROL APPARATUS Filed Feb. 10, 1941 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 1944- A. w. PLENSLER CONTROL APPARATUS Filed Feb. 10, 1941 Y s Sheets-Sheet 3 VIII/4 'IIIIII Feb. 29, 1944.

' A. w. PLENSLER CONTROL APPARATUS Filed Feb. 10, 1941 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 a .7 i a Feb. 29, 1944. A. w. PLENSLER 2,342,691

CONTROL APPARATUS Filed Feb. 10, 19 41 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patented Feb. 29, 1944 CONTROL APPARATUS Alexander W. Plensler, Chicago, 111., asslgnor to Belmont Radio Corporation, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Application February 10, 1941, Serial No. 378,232

18 Claims. (01. 74-1o)' This invention relates to control apparatus and I in particular to a tuning device for radio receiving apparatus which is operatedstep-by-step to all tuning positions by a single push button or actuator knob.

Radio receiving apparatus for automobiles is generally limited as to size because of the restricted spaces in which it' can be installed. This restriction as to size is pertinent to the control head which is usually mounted on the dashboard as well as to the radio chassis generally located below or back of the dashboard. A control head, therefore, having a minimum of control knobs or push buttons arranged thereon is more readily applicable for mounting on different kinds of dashboards than a control head including a plurality of push buttons. It is well known that tuning devices of the step-by-step type may be operated by a single push button so as to require but a small control head in conjunction therewith. However, tuning devices of this type available in the prior art are generally cumbersome and relatively expensive in cost. As a result, the small size and compactness of a control head having a single push button are offset by the bulk of the tuning device so that these devices are generally unsuitable for use in automobile receiving sets. Because of this bulk these prior art devices need,relatively large operating solenoids which require more electrical energy for their energizatidn than can beobtained from the usual car battery. A further disadvantage is found in the fact that the step-by-step tuners of the prior art are generally unreliable in accurately and precisely tuning the receiver to a predetermined tuning frequency.

It is an object of this invention, therefore, to provide an improved tuning device for radio receiving apparatus.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved radio tuning device of the step-bystep type.

A further object of this invention is to provide a tuning device for radio receiving apparatus which is simple in. construction, inexpensive in cost, dependable in operation and of a size adapted to be positioned within-relatively restricted spaces. a

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved radio tuning device of step-by-step type which is compact and rugged in construction, and adapted to be either manually or electrically operated by a single actuating knob.

vision of a radio tuning device of step-by-step type having a rotary'control unit including a plurality of circularly arranged selector members adapted to be successively moved into operative engagement with frequency changing'means to adjustthe same to a predetermined tuning frequency. The successive rotation of the rotary control unit a predetermined angular distance is accomplished by aQreciprocating actuating unit which is linearly slidable relative to the control unit and acts to rotate the same on linear movement in either direction.

A still further feature of this invention is found in the provision of. a radio tuning device having a pivotally movable'ccntrol or treadle unit which is adapted to be selectively engaged by a plurality of selector members to adjust linearly adjustable frequency changing means to apredetermined tuning position.

Another feature of this invention is found in the provision of an electrically operated radio tuning device in which the operated parts are so constructed and arranged as to be operated with a minimum of electrical energy. All of the actuating solenoids in the tuning device, therefore, may be of a relatively small size to facilitate their assembly in restricted spaces and to assure their eflicient operation from a limited source of elec- 'trical supply, such as a car battery. It is also obvious that the use of small solenoids correspondingly reduces the initial cost of the tuning device.

Further objects, features, and advantages of this invention will become apparent from the following description when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which: v

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of the tuning device of this invention;

Fi 2 is a view illustrated similarly to Fig. 1, showing the rotary control and treadle units in changed position; I

Fig. 3 is a view also illustrated similarly to Fig. 1 showing the rotary control and treadle units in yet another changed position;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view as seen along the line 4-4 in Fig. 1, showing the circular arrangement of the selector members and the relative position of the rotary control means transversely of the treadle unit;

Fig. 5 is a view in perspective of the reciprocating portion of the unit for actuating the rotary control means;

A feature of this invention is found in the pro- 55 Fig. 6 is a view partly in section taken along the Fig. 9 is a view in perspective of a portion of the treadle unit;

Fig. 10 illustrates diagrammatically a control circuit for the tuning device of Fig. 1;

Fig. 11 is a sectional view taken along the line ll-H in Fig. 1 showing a front elevation of the reciprocating unit;

Fig. 12 illustrated similarly to Fig. 11 is taken along the line l2--l2 in Fig. 2 and shows the reciprocating unit in a changed position;

Fig. 13 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along the line l3-'i3 in Fig. 1 showing locking means for the rotary control means;

Fig. 14 illustrated similarly to Fig. 13 is taken along the line ll-ll in Fig. 2 and shows the locking means in a changed position;

Fig. 15 'is a sectional plan view as seen along the line l5-l5 in Fig. 1 showing the selector member adapted to manually tune the tuning device;

Fig. 16 is a viewvin perspective of a spring member for frictionally retaining the selector members in their adjusted positions;

Fig. 17 is a front elevational view of a control head for the tuning device of Fig. 1; I

Fig. 18 is a plan view of the control head shown in Fig. 17; 1

Fig. 19 is a rear elevational view of the control head shownin Fig. 17;

Fig. 20 is a fragmentary sectional view as seen along the line Il -28in Fig. 19; and

Fig.21 is a fragmentary sectional view as seen along the line 21-2 I in Fig. 19.

The radio tuning device of this invention is illustrated as being of the step-by-step type and having linearly adiustable frequency changing means of inductance type. Movable cores for tuning the frequency changing means to predetermined tuning frequencies are operatively connected to one end of a pivoted treadle or control unit which is pivotally movable in a direction toward and away from the frequency changing means. By variably limiting the movement of the treadle unit toward the frequency changing means the cores are adjusted to predetermined tuning positions. This limiting of the pivotal movement of the treadle unit toward the frequency changing means is accomplished by the provision of a rotary control unit including a plurality of selector members concentrically arranged about a control shaft. The selector members or screws are adjustable axially of the coritrol shaft and arranged so that only one thereof is in operative engagement with the treadle unit at one time. By controlling the rotation of the control shaft, therefore, to engage successive selector member with the treadle unit there is provided a step-by-step operation of the tuning device. To accomplish this controlled rotation of the control shaft there is provided at one end thereofa ratchet wheel which is in operative association with a reciprocally movable actuating unit. Pawl members on the actuating unit are alternately engageable with the ratchet wheel so thatfor each reciprocal operation of the actuating unit the ratchet wheel is rotated a predetermined distance by each of the pawls. This rotation of the ratchet wheel during each reciprocal operation of the actuating unit is such as the inductance tuning to successively rotate each selector member into engagement with the treadle unit.

In. the practice of this invention it is contemplated that the tuning device be adapted for both electrical and manual tuning. In providing for manual tuning one of the selector members is assembled for slidable movement relative to the control shaft, and is operatively connected with a controlknob such that rotation of the knob in either direction serves to either retract or extend the slidable member relative to the treadle unit to in turn adjust the movable cores of units to a desired tuning position. It is contemplated further that this control knob also be used when electrical tuning of the device is desired.

Referring to the drawings, the shown in Fig. 1 as including an inverted U- shaped frame member having leg or end portions 25 and 26 and a top or connecting portion 21. Each of the end walls or plates 25 and .28 has mounted thereon transversely extending frame members 28 and 28 of substantially right-angled shape. A transformer for the radio receiver is.

ceiver. Frequency changing means for the tuning device are of the inductance tuning type, with (not I each inductance unit 33 including a coil shown) and a linearly adjustable core member 38 movable within the coil. The inductance units 33 are arranged side by side in horizontal alignment and mounted to the end plate 28.

Each core element 34 is provided at its outer end with a rubber grommet 38 (Figs. 1 andB) for connection to a pivoted bar 35 formed as a part of a pivoted treadle or control unit 31. The treadle unit includes a control arm or lever 38 (Fig. 4) arranged at each end of the aligned inductance units 33 and connected together at the top by a pin or axis means 38 and at the bottom by a brace or tie. bar 4| having openings 82 a formed therein for receiving the end portions of the cores 34. The bottom end of each lever 38 is formed with a recess "adapted to receive therein an axis portion 88 provided on each end of the pivoted bar 35. The axis portions 84 are retained in their corresponding recesses 83 by a wire spring 46 supported on each arm 38 and arranged to exert a holding pressure on the axis portions 44. Because. of the tie bar or brace 81,

the ends of the pivoted bar 35 are clear of the.

control levers 38 so that the bar 35 is freely and easily movable at all times. By virtue of the pivoted bar 35 the pivoted movement of the treadle v unit 31 is transmitted to the cores 34 to provide for a substantially linear movement thereof within their corresponding coils whereby to adjust the inductance units to various tuning positions for the radio receiver.

The pin 39 connecting the upper ends of the control arms 38 is rotatably supported in journal portions 41 mounted on the top 21 of the frame means. The control arms or side frame members 38 for the treadle unit 31 are also connected together at their upper ends by a connecting pin 88 which is in operative engagement with a slidable plunger or core member 48 for an actuatin solenoid 5| mounted on the frame wall 21. By virtue of the small distance between the connecting pins 39 and 48 as compared with the distance between the pin 39 and the axis portions A l on the pivoted bar 35 it is readily apparent that a invention is 51b. The opposite end 68b of the screw 51b is relatively small movement of the plunger 48 effects a relatively large movement of the lower ends of the levers 88 and hence of the adjustable cores 8 4. As a result of this small movement of the plunger 48 a relatively small actuating solenoid can be used to operate the adjustable members 34.

Since a particular tuning position for the radio receiver depends upon the positions of the cores 34 relative to their corresponding coils it is obvious thatthe position of the treadie unit relative to the inductance units 83 determines such tuning positions. The treadie unit on energization of the solenoid 5| is pivotally moved in a direction away from the inductance units 88 and adjustment of the cores 84 is obtained by variably limiting or stopping the pivotal'movement of the treadie unit in an opposite direction, or in other words in its return movement toward the inductance units. The stop position of the treadie unit in its return movement corresponds to a desired position of the cores 84 in their respective coils and hence to a desired predetermined tuning frequency. The return movement of the treadie unit to a stop position is accomplished by. tension springs -52 connecting each of the arms 88 with. the end plate'i25. -T f To variably'limib the return move'm control unit -81? there is provided-Iagi-otary contl'Ol means or unit, designated generally-as 53. m

eluding a control shaft 54=which extends betweenf the lever am 88 and'is, rotatabllsupportedfin the end plates 25 and 25. Mounted. onfiht trol shaft 54 and near one end thereof is"a-selector or barrel 'unit' 58 including a plurality. of .se-'

operatively engageable with a stop or bracket member 64 (Figs. 1, 4 and 9), extending between and connected to the lever arms 38 ofthe treadie unit 81. The outermost position .of the selector member is such as topermit the return of the core members 34 of the inductance units 88 to a substantiall completely retracted position within I their corresponding coils, so that the adjusting or threading of the selector member 51b within the plates 58 and 58 to a predetermined selected posi tion moves the treadie unit 81 in a direction to prevent a complete retraction of the cores. Engagement of the bracket member 84 with the pin end 83b, therefore, limits the pivotal movement of the treadie unit 81 in a direction toward the inductance units 38 to adjust such units to the par.- ticular tuning position. The pivotal movement of the treadie unit 81 in response to the action of the springs 52 is thus in accordance with the ad- .justed positicnof the selector member 51b. The

screws 510 add Sic-51c are similarly adjustable to a preselected control position. Retention of a selector member in its adjusted position is had by means of a flat spring 86 (Figs. 4 and 16) having ear portions 51 adapted to be inserted in corresponding apertures 58 formed in the plate members 58 and 58; Each spring 55 when inserted in the apertures 58 is bowed outwardly from the.

g o i shaft 84 to frictionally engage a corresponding.

1* selector member 5'Ia-5lf.

. In the step-by-step operation or the tuning device it is necessary that the control shaft 54 be rotated a predetermined angular distance whenlector'members 5111-51]. The selectoffmembers .51 are equiangularly spaced in concentric arrangement about the shaft 54 by spacer plates 58 and 58 mounted on the shaft. Although six selector members are shown it is to be understood ever a selector member 5111-51! is to be moved.

out of engagement with the treadie unit 31. To accomplish this controlled rotation of the shaft 54 there is provided an actuating unit, indicated as :88 (Figs. 1, 4 and 6) including a slidable recipro-.

that the number may be changed to any aliquot 1 part of 360 degrees.

The spacing q! the plates.

and so is determined and retained by a spacer or c0llar.5l (Figs. 6 and 15); arranged therebetween. The selector members or screws 5la--51e are threadably. engaged in axially aligned apertures formed in the plate members 58 and 58 so as to be adjustable axially .of the shaft 54. His

contemplated that one of the selector members, such as the one indicated as 51/ (Figs. 4,6 and 15) be slidably movable relative to the plate members 58 and 58, rather than screwed therein to provide for a manual'operating of the tuning device in a manner. to be later explained. As

will also be laterv explained, the selector men-" eating member 58 (Fig. 5.) Sliding member 88 is of integral construction and is comprised of a body portion H having a slot 12 formed near each end thereof and an elongated opening 13 formed therein between such slots. Member 58 includes further a laterally extending end portion 14 having a recess 16 therein. Slots 1! are adaptedto receive supporting or guide pins 11 mounted in the end plate 25 (Figs. 4 and 6). Sliding member 58 is supported on the pins 11 such that pin or stop members 18a and 18bmounted thereon, one

between each slot 12 and the opening 13', are posiq vtioned between the body portion H of the sliding bers 5111-51,! are successively moved to occupy similar positions for each complete revolution of the control shaft 54. By 'virtue of the arrangement and construction of the rotary controlmeans 58 and treadie unit 8-] only one of the selector members 5la5'l .is in. engagement with the treadie unit at any one time. In the admember and they end plate 25. The opening 13 is .of -a size to receive the control shaft 54 therethrough, a ratchet wheel or rotary driven member 18 being m'ounted'on the shaft 54 to one side of the sliding member 58' and a detent or matched Justment of the selector members 51a-5le,

- therefore, it is only necessary to bring a selector member to its tuning position, the selector screw I 51b being indicated in Fig. 1. In axial alignment wheel 8! being mountedon the control shaft on the opposite side of the member 89. The ratchet wheel 18 is illustrated as being formed with six ratchet or teeth portions 82a-82j while the wheel 4 8| is illustrated as being formed with twelve notches 83a-83l. It is thus seen that the rotation of the ratchet wheel 18 by an amount corresponding to one tooth thereon is equivalent to a rotation of the notched wheel 8i corresponding to two of the notches formed therein.

Supported on laterally extending ear portions 1 or legs 84, formed integrally with the sliding member 88 are spring pawls 85 (Fig. 7) of substantially flat form and having bent or hooked ends 81. Each pawl 85 extends inwardly of the member 68 so that the hooked ends 81 are arranged substantially opposite each other and on each side of the opening 13. Wheel 18 is positioned on the shaft 54 between the pawls 88 with its circumference in engagement therewith. The stop pins 18a and 18b are in longitudinal alignment with the axis of the control shaft 54 and on opposite sides of the notched wheel 8|, to alternately engage the wheel 8| during reciprocation of the member 89, as will be hereinafter explained. The reciprocating or sliding member 89 is linearly moved in one direction by an actuating solenoid 88 mounted on the end plate 25 and having a plunger 85 movable therein which is operatively connected with the sliding member 89 at the recess 18 therein. On de-energization of the solenoid 88 the member 89 is moved in an opposite direction'by a tension spring 98 connected at one transversely extending portion 89 on the end to a sliding member 89 and at its other end to a lug-8|- formed on the end plate 25.

In the step-by-step operation of the tuning device it is contemplated that the-solenoids land 88 be simultaneously energized on linear actuation of a control knob 18 provided on a control head 15 (Fig. 17) to be later described. Prior to this energization of the solenoids let it be as sumed that the parts of the tuning device are arranged as shown in Fig. 1, this positioning of the rotary control means 53 and treadle unit 31 in Fig. 1 being in correspondence with the position of the actuating unit 88 as illustrated in Figs. 11 and 13. As also shown in Fig. 1 selector member 51b is an engagement with the stop member 84 of the pivoted control unit 31. When the solenoids 5| and 88 are energized the control unit 31 is pivotally moved to the left as viewed in Fig. 1 and out of engagement with the selector member 511) to its position shown in Fig. 2. Concurrently with this movement of the control unit 31, the sliding member 89 is moved from its position shown in Fig. l to the position indicated in Fig. 12, which corresponds to Fig. 2. As the sliding member 89 moves from the position in Fig. 11 to the position in Fig. 12, the lower pawl 88 by virtue of the opening 91 therein, engages tooth 82b and rotates the ratchet wheel 19 in a counter-clockwise direction from its position in Fig. 11 to the position shown in Fig. 12. During this rotation of the ratchet wheel by the lower pawl 88, the upper pawl, by virtue of its hooked end 81, is sprung in an upward direction by the tooth 82c, until the tooth 82c is received in the opening 9| of the upper pawl.

As previously mentioned, the selector unit 58 is comprised of six selector members 51a--51j. Since the selector members are equally spaced about th control shaft 54, they are spaced a distance apart equal to 60 degrees. During the reciprocal operation of the sliding member 89, therefore, it is necessary that the control shaft 54 be rotated exactly sixty degrees to successively position the selector members in engagement with the stop member 84 of the pivoted control unit 31. Thus on energization of the solenoid 88 the ratchet wheel 19 is rotated one tooth portion by the lower pawl 88 to in turn rotate the control shaft 54 an angular distance equal to 30 degrees. When the solenoid 88 is deenergized, on release of the knob 10, the control shaft 54 is rotated the remaining 30 degrees by the engagement of the'upper pawl 88 with the ratchet 82s on the return movement of the sliding member 89, to in all provide for a 60 degree rotation of the control shaft. Thus on completion of the sixty degree rotation of shaft 54 the screw 51c (Fig. 3) is positioned for engagement with the stop portion 84 of the treadle unit 31. During the return movement of the member 88 it is obvious that the lower pawl is sprung by the tooth 82c until such tooth is positioned in the opening 8| therein. On later energization of the solenoid 88, therefore,

5 the actuating unit is again set to rotate the control shaft 54 a predetermined angular distance. By virtue of the mass of the rotary control means 53, it is readily apparent that unless the shaft 54 is immediately stopped against rotation 10 after each rotational movement by the actuating unit, the inertia forces thereof will tend to overthrow or carry the shaft beyond its predetermined position. To eliminate any overthrow of the shaft 54 and to accurately and positively stop theshaft 54 and hence the selector members in their predetermined positions, the stop pins 18a and 18b on the sliding member 89 are arranged or spaced relative to the notched wheel 8| so that one thereof is positioned within a notch 83 when- 20 ever the sliding member 89 reaches one end of its linear travel. Thus as shown in Fig. 13, which corresponds toFig. 11, the pin 18b is positioned within a notch 83b. On movement of th slide member 89 to its position shown in Fig. 12 the pin 18b is moved out of the notch 83b and the wheel 19 is rotated with the shaft 54 the dis-- tance between two notches to the position shown in Fig. 14, which corresponds with Fig. 12. Thus when the sliding member 89 moves to its extreme position to the right, as viewed in Fig. 12, the pin 18a is moved into the notch 831. Since the wheel '19 is formed with twelve notches it is readily apparent that the notched wheel has been r0- tated an angular distance equivalent to the space between two of the notches or 30 degrees. The shaft '54 is thus locked against further rotation after it has been rotated the first 30 degrees. On the return of the slide member 89 to its rest position by the tension spring 98, pin 18a is 40 moved out of the notch 83; while the wheel 19 is additionally rotated in a clockwise direction by the pulling ofthe tooth 82c by the upper pawl 88. When the slide member 89 reaches its rest position the pin 18b is moved into the notch 83d and locks the shaft 54 against rotation after the second 30 degrees or completionof its BO-degree angular movement. As is clearly apparent from a comparison of Figs. 13 and 14, the shaft has been rota-ted a distance equivalent to th distance between the notches 83b and 83d for exactly a one-sixth revolution of the wheel or 60 degrees. By virtue of the locking action of the pins 18a and 18b and the notched wheel 8i the ratchet wheel 19 and control unit 53 are always retained 55 in synchronism to assure a precise and accurate positioning of the selector members -51a---51f, in their successive positions. This rotation of the shaft 54 thus moves the screw 51b (Fig. 4) out of the tuning position for the selector members and moves screw 510 into such position.

During the time that the shaft 54 is being rotated, the energized solenoid 5| retains the control unit 31 in its outermost position shown in Fig. 2 out of engagement with the selector mem- 05 bers. On release of the push button 18, therefore, to deenergize the solenoids 5| and 88, the selector member 51c is in a position for engagement with the stop member 84 to limit the return of the pivoted control or treadle unit to its rest or idle position. This position of the screw 510 is illustrated in Fig. 3. In the event the pivoted control unit should engage a selected selector member before such selector member has reached its preselected tuning position, the

bent portion 91 of the stop member 84 engages the selector member. As the selector member. therefore, is rotated to its tuning position. a camming action occurs between its engaging pin end and the bent portion 91 which moves the pivoted control unit away from the inductance units 33. It is contemplated, however, that each selector member be in the tuning position prior to any engagement with the treadle unit, so that the core members 34 are always moved in the same direction to their tuning position. Any lost motion in the connecting parts is thus the same for each tuning operation so that the tuning is more precise. A similar operation of the actuating and treadle units occurs whenever the knob is actuated to energize the. solenoids 5| and 08. It is to be understood of course that the rotation of the shaft 54 is uni-directional so that each selector member 510-51! is moved to a tuning position but once during 'each revolution of the shaft 54.

To manually operate the tuning device the control means 53 is successively rotated in the manner above described, until the selector member 51} is in a tuning position relative to the treadle unit 31. The end 52! of the selector member 51! is notched for connection with a plate or disc member 90 (Figs. 4, 6 and 15) having a hub portion 95 slidably supported on the control shaft 54. Arranged in compression between the plate member 58 and the axially slidable disc 38 is a spring I of trumpet form. Plate 98 is engageable with an actuating member I02 which is slidably supported in the end plate 20 and in a U-shaped bracket member I03 mounted on theend plate, for movement axially of the control shaft 54. The actuating member I02 has an upturned lug I04 thereon which is in threaded engagement with a screw shaft I 06 having one end rotatably supported in the bracket member I03 and its opposite end in operative engagement with a flexible shaft I01 which in turn is operatively connected with the actuating knob-I0. On rotation of the knob I0, which will be later explained, shafts I01 and I04 are rotated to move the actuating member I02, which in turn moves the plate 98 and selector member 51! axially of the control shaft 54. This movement of the selector member 51] directly changes the pivoted position of the control unit 31 and hence the position of the cores 34 in their corresponding coils. The tuning device may thus be tuned to any tuning frequency by simply rotating the knob 10. By virtue of the continuous engagement of the actuating member I02 with the plate member 93 the selector member 51 is retained in its last tuned position on later actuation or rotation of the rotary control means 53. It is seen, therefore, that selector members 'Ia-5'Ie are adjusted to a predetermined tuning position by means of a screw driver or the like for later electrical operation, and that the selector member 51!. although manually operated to a plurality of tuning positions may be retained in its last tuned position to in all provide for flxed predetermined tuning positions of all of the selector members 510-411 in the selector unit 56.

The knob 10 and control head I5 which have been previously mentioned and which are now to be fully described are shown in Figs. 1741. As is clearly shown in Fig. 17 the control head is of very simple and compact design and besides theactuating knob I0 includes a panel ill, a control knob I00 for turning the radio receiver oil and on and for controlling its volume,

and a dial I05 arranged in the panel between the control knobs 10 and I". Control knob N18;

is adapted to rotate a flexible shaft I09 which is operatively connected with the control portion 32 previously mentioned and shown in Fig. 1. The dial I05 has an indicator III and a space II2 for visually observing station markings. Although the shafts I01 and I09 are illustrated as flexible shafts for remote control it is obvious.

that the control head is also readily applicable for direct control.

Shaft I 01 is provided at the control end thereof with a shaft portion 3 (Fig. 21) which is in splined engagement with a second shaft portion H4. The control knob I0 is mounted directly on the shaft portion 4. Coupling of the shaft portions H3 and H4 in axial alignment is provided by a housing or sleeve portion IIB adapted to slidably receive such portions therein and having an opening or slot III formed in one side thereof. Sleeve IIB has an enlarged. bore portion H8 therein for slidably receiving an enlarged section I20 of the shaft portion H4 and a collar member H9 axially movable relative to the shaft portion H4. The portion H8 is in registry with the opening ill to permit switch I24 supported on a housing I25 for the dial mechanism I05, the housing including the sleeve, portion III. A recess I28 formed in the slide member I22 is adapted to receive a switch arm I21 which is pivotally connected to the switch unit I24. On linear or axial movement of the control knob I0 inwardly toward the panel II 0 the shaft portion H4 is axially movedrelative to the shaft portion II3 because of their splined engagement. During this relative movement the shoulder portion I20 engages the collar III to in turn move the pin l2l 'andslide member I22. This movement of the slide member I22 pivotally moves the actuating arm I21 to close the switch unit I24 As shown in the control circuit for the tuning device, (Fig. 10) closing of the switch unit I24 closes the circuit for the solenoids 5| and 03 which are connected in parallel between supply lines or conductors I23 and I29. 0n release of the actuating knob I0 the witch arm I21 is pivotally moved to open the switch unit I24 by a spring I3I arranged in compression between a portion of the slide member I22 and the bracket member I23. Each linear actuation of the knob I0 thus energizes the solenoids 5| and 83 to progressively move or operate by'steps the rotary control means 53, as above described.

when the knob I0 is linearly actuated for stepby-step operation of the tuning device the indicator III remains stationary and visual indication as to the identification of the station tuned in is given by the appearance of the call letters for such station in the space I I2. The station call letters appearing in the space I I2 are marked on a suitable disc member or station indicator I I5 selector members dicator I I I pawl member I39 supported on a plunger I for a solenoid I42. As shown in Fig. 10 the solenoid I42 is connected in parallel with the solenoids and 88 so as to be energized concurrently therewith on closing of the control switch I24. The ratchet wheel I38 is provided with teeth portions I38a corresponding in number to the number of 5111-51}. When the solenoid I4! is energized the plunger I is moved to the left, as viewed in Fig. 19, whereby the ratchet wheel I38 is rotated by the pawl I38 one tooth portion or a sixth of a revolution to correspondingly move the station indicator H5 an angular distance of 60 degrees, the gears I34 and I3! having a one to one ratio. A carry over of the disc II! is prevented by a detent or spring I43 which is mounted on the solenoid I42 and engages a tooth portion I38a after each reciprocal movement of the plunger I. The ratchet wheel I38 is thus prevented from rotating in a counterclockwise direction (as viewed in Fig. 19) with the return of the plunger I to its rest position. The plunger Ill on deenergization of the solenoid is moved to its rest position by a spring I arranged in compression between a portion I46 on the plunger and a bracket. I" mounted on the housing unit I25.

It has been previously mentioned-that the in remains stationary when the tuning device is operated step-by-step. In adjusting the selector members or screws Slur-51c to tune in certain stations, a desired station is first identified by a radio set on which the stations are already marked. The program on the second receiver is then tuned in on the receiver being set up by manipulation of the screw being adjusted. The final adjusting of the tuned position is determined by ear. When the station has been thus identified, it is marked on the station disc H5 within the space 2. In this manner all of the stations corresponding to the selector members Ila-51c are identified for visual observation. By virtue of the synchronized action between the station disc II! and the operation of the rotary control unit I3 each selector member and its identifying marker is always maintained in correspondence. Since the'marking for each station appears in the space I I2 only once during each complete revolution of the control shaft 54 it is read- .ily apparent that the rotary unit 53 must be operated step-by-step by the knob Ill until the particular station shows up in the space I II.

A portion of the station indicator H5 is also reserved to indicate when the selector member 51! is in a tuning position so that the tuning device might be manually operated. When the selector member 51! is in such position rotation of the knob I0 concurrently rotates both of the shaft portions III and Hi to in turn rotate the shaft I01 and operate the sliding member I 02 (Fig. 15). The indicator III is operatively connected with the shaft portion Ill for movement over the dial II! when the knob III is rotated. Thus after the setting of the member 51! is indicated in the space III, all tuning positions thereof are indicated directly by the indicator III on the dial I Ill.

From the foregoing description it is seen that the invention provides a tuning device which is simple in construction, relatively inexpensive in cost and dependable in operation. Both the electrical and manual operation of the tuner is accomplished by the actuation of a single control knob mounted on a control head which is very compact and of a size such as to be conveniently mounted on the dashboard of an automobile.

All of the actuating soleno ds are relatively small.

of the entire tuning device so as not to interfere with its installation in restricted spaces.

Although the invention has been described with specific reference to a preferred embodiment thereof, it is to be understood that it is not to be so limited, since modifications and alterations therein can be made which are within the full intended scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In control apparatus having control means including a rotary control member, the combination of means for rotating said rotary control member to predetermined control positions including a reciprocating unit having oppositely arranged laterally extending projections thereon, and a longitudinally extending slot formed therein between said projections for receiving said control member, a driven member mounted on said control member having radially extending portions successively arranged thereon, means supporting said reciprocating unit for movement relative to said driven member, said driven member being positioned to one side of said reciprocating unit so that the radial extensions thereon are selectively engaged by said projections on reciprocal movement of said reciprocating unit to rotate said control member, means for reciprocally moving said reciprocating unit, with said reciprocating unit during each reciprocation 7 ciprocating unit having spaced stop portions thereon, with one of said stop portions being engageable with said toothed member when said reciprocating unit is in a stop position.

2. In control apparatus having rotary control means including a control shaft having a ratchet wheel mounted thereon, the combination of means for rotating said rotary control means to predetermined control positions including a reciprocating unit having a longitudinally extending slot formed therein adapted to receive said shaft, a spring pawl supported on said reciprocating unit on each side of said slot, said ratchet wheel being arranged in a plane parallel to the plane of said reciprocating unit and to one side thereof between said pawls, with the circumference of said ratchet wheel extending into engagement with said pawls, means supporting said reciprocating unit for reciprocal movement relative to said ratchet wheel, means for reciprocally moving said reciprocating unit, said pawls on reciprocal movement of said reciprocating unit alternately engaging sad ratchet to successively rotate said shaft in the same direction, from one of said predetermined control positions to a secmembers mounted on said control shaft in an axially spaced relation, a plurality of axially extending adjustable members supported in said plates in concentric arrangement about said shaft, with at least one of said adjustable members being axially slidable relative to said plates, and the remaining adjustable members being threaded in said plates for adjustment relative to said plate members, a sliding member slidably supported on said control shaft for movement axially thereof, said sliding member being operatively connected with said one adjustable member, manually operated means for moving said sliding member axially of the shaft to in turn adjust said one adjustable element relative to said plate members, and electrically operated means for rotating said control shaft to successively move said adjustable members into operative engagement with said frequency changing means to adjust the same to a predetermined tuning position for said radio receiver, said man- 1 ually operated means retaining said one adjustable member in an adjusted position on rotation of said control shaft by said electrically operated having frequency changing means, movableoon- 4. In tuning apparatus for a radio receiver trol means for adjusting said frequency changing means to a predetermined frequency tuning position for said radio receiver, control mechanism for manually and electrically operating said movable "control means including a control knob, electrical means operatively associated with said "control means to move the same, an energizing circuit for said electrical means including a normally open control switch, means operatively her having a bore therein for slidably receiving said two shaft portions and an axially extending opening formed in one side thereof, and means for mounting said control switch adjacent said 1 coupling unit, said control switch having an actuating element positioned in said opening for operative engagement with said one shaft portion for movement with said one shaft portion I on axial movement thereof, with rotation of said control knob moving said connecting means to manually operate said movable control means, and with pushing on said control knob moving said one shaft-portion and actuating element and closing said control switch to electrically operate said movable control means.

5. In tuning apparatus for a radio receiver having frequency changing means, movable control means for adjusting said frequency changing, means to predetermined tuning frequencies for said" radio receiver, control mechanism for operating said control means either manually or electrically including a control shaft, means operatively connecting said control shaft with said means to move the same, an energizing circuit for said electrical means including a control switch,

said control switch having an actuating element,

and said control shaft including two'separable portions, means operatively connecting said two shaft portions for concurrent rotary, movement but permitting relative axial movement there-f between, means operatively connecting said ac-,

tuating element with one of said shaft portions to operate said actuating element when said onev shaft portion is axially moved, with said movable control means being manually operated when said one shaft portion is rotated and electrically operated when said one shaft portion is linearly moved, said linear movement axially moving said one shaft portion and moving said actuating element to operate said control switch.

6. In control apparatus having rotary control means and aids means therefor, and a ratchet and detent wheels carried on said axis means,

the combination of means for rotating said ro tary control means to successive control positions including a linearly movable reciprocating unit located intermediate said two wheels, with the longitudinal axis of said reciprocating unit being in the plane of said axis means, means supporting said actuating unit for movement in a path normal to said axis means, a pair of spring driving portions carried on said recipro cating unit for linear movement therewith and projected laterally in the same direction from one side of said reciprocating unit, said driving portions being alternately engageable with on,- poslte portions on said ratchet wheel to rotate the same in one direction during each reciprocation of said reciprocating unit. and stop portions projected laterally in the same direction from the opposite side of said actuating unit movable into locking position with said detent trol shaft, a plurality of selector members con-.

centrically arranged about said control shaft, and adjustable axially thereof, supporting means for said selector members mounted on said control shaft, with at least one of the said selector members being slidable relative to said supporting means, means operatively connecting said selector. members with said frequency changing means, means for rotating said rotary control shaft to successively move said selector members into operative engagement with said frequency changing means to adjust the same to predetermined tuning positions, and other means for slidably moving said one selector member when it is in operative engagemet with said frequency changing means to adjust said frequency changing means to any desired tuning position. i

8. In tuning apparatus for a radio receiver having frequency changing means and movable control means for adjusting said frequency changing means to predetermined tuning frequencies for said radio receiver, the combination of control mechanism for operating said control means either manually or electrically including a rotatable control shaft operatively connected with said movable control means, finger means 8 for rotating said control shaft, means supporting said finger means for axial but non-rotatable movement relative to said control shaft, electrical means operatively associated with said movable control means to move the same, an energizing circuit for said electrical means including a control switch operatively connected with said finger means, with axial movement of said finger means relative to said control shaft actuating said control switch to movable control means, and rotary movement of said finger means rotating said control shaft to manually operate said movable control means.

9. In control apparatus having movable control means, the combination of means for moving, said control means in a step-by-step manner to predetermined control positions including a reciprocating unit, spring driving portions oppositely arranged on said reciprocating unit for movement therewith, each of said driving portions having an opening therein, a rotary memher having radial projections thereon and connected with said control means, and means rtatably supporting said rotary member between said driving portions so that said projections are movable within said openings, said driving portions on movement of said reciprocating unit alternately engaging said projections at said openings to rotate said rotary member in one direction to move said control means from one control position to a second control position.

10. In control apparatus having movable control means, the combination of means for moving said control means step-by-step to predetermined control positions including a reciproeating unit, spring operating portions oppositely arranged on said unit and extended laterally in the same direction from one side thereof, a toothed wheel connected with said control means and rotatably supported between said operating portions with the teeth thereof movable into the path of travel of said operating portions, said operating portions on reciprocation of said reciprocating unit alternately engaging said teeth to rotate said wheel in one direction a predetermined angular distance.

ll. In control apparatus having movable control means, the combination of means for moving said control means to predetermined control positions including a linearly movable reciproeating unit, spring operating portions oppositely carried on said reciprocating unit and extended laterally from one side thereof, a rotary member having radial projections thereon and connected with said control means, means rotatably supporting said member between said operating portions, each of said operating portions having one end fixed relative to said reciprocating unit, with said projections being movable into the path of travel of the opposite ends of said operating portions, and means for reciprocally moving said reciprocating unit, said operating portions during such reciprocal movement alternately engaging said propections to rotate said rotary member a predetermined angular distance.

12. In control apparatus having rotary control means including axis means and a toothed wheel member mounted on said axis means, the combination of means for uni-directionally rotating said rotary control means including a linearly movable reciprocating unit having a pair of driving portions oppositely arranged thereon for movement therewith, said portions projecting laterally in the same direction from one side of said reciprocating unit, means supporting said electrically operate said.

reciprocating unit for linear travel in a path normal to said axis means, with said toothed member being disposed intermediate said driving portions, with the linear path of movement of said driving portions being substantially tangential to said toothed member, said driving portions on reciprocation of said reciprocating unit being alternately moved into engagement with said teeth to successively drive said control means, with the linear movement of said driving port-ions providing for the retention of said engagement during the driving operation of each driving portion.

- 13. In tuning apparatus for a radio receiver having adjustable frequency changing means and lb control means for adjusting said frequency changing means to predetermined tuning positions including a control shaft, a pair of plate members mounted on said control shaft in an axially spaced relation, a plurality of axially extending adjustable members supported in said plate members in concentric arrangement about said shaft, with at least one of said adjustable members being axially slidable relative to said plates, and the remaining adjustable members being threaded in said plates for adjustment relative to said plate members. manually operated means for moving said one adjustable member relative to said plate members, and electrically operated means for rotating said control shaft to successively move said adjustable members into engagement with said frequency changing means to adust the same to a predetermined tuning position for said radio receiver, said manually operated means retaining said one adjustable member in an adjusted position on rotation of said control shaft by said electrically operated means.

14. In control apparatus having movable control means including a control shaft, a plurality of adjustable members, controllable means havin a movable portion for engaging said adjustable members, means supporting said adjustable members in concentric arrangement about said shaft, manually operated means for adjusting one of said adjustable members relative to said supporting means, and electrically operated means for rotating said control shaft .to successively move said adjustable members into an engaging position with said movable portion to define a predetermined control position of said controllable means, said manually operated means retaining said one adjustable member in an adjusted position on rotation of said control shaft by said electrically operated means.

15. In control apparatus having movable control means, the combination of means for moving said control means in a step-by-step manner to predetermined control positions including a reciprocating unit of substantially L-form having one leg thereof of substantially flat shape, means supporting said unit for movement of said one leg in a linear path, solenoid means extended longitudinally adjacent said one leg and substantially within the longitudinal dimension of the other leg, said solenoid means being connected with said other leg to move said unit in one direction, spring means for moving said unit in an opposite direction, driving portions carried on opposite sides of said one leg and projected laterally in the same direction from one face thereof, a toothed member rotatably supported adjacent said one face and between said driving'portions, with the teeth on said toothed member being successively movable into the path of linear movement of said driving portions, said driving portions on reciprocation of said unitalternately engaging said teeth to successively move said control means, stop portions projected laterally in the same direction from the opposite face of said one leg, and a detent wheel rotatably supported adjacent said opposite face, said stop portions being alternately movable into locking engagement with said detent wheel to stop the actuating unit at each end of its reciprocal travel to define said control positions.

16. In control apparatus, movable control means including spaced adjustable elements, controllable means, movable means connecting said control means and controllable means including a stop portion engageable with said adjustable elements, means for moving said control means in a step-by-step manner to successively move said adjustable elements into a position for engaging said stop portion, means operated concurrently with said moving means for moving said stop portion in one direction out of an engaging position with said adjustable elements, and means for moving said stop portion in an opposite direction on completion of a step movement of said members, manually operable means for adjusting one of said members relative to said supporting means, and electrically operated means for moving said supporting means to successively actuate said adjustable members into an engaging position with said portion of said controllable means, said manually operable means retaining said one adjustable member in its adjusted position during movement of said supporting means by said electrically operated means.

18. In tuning apparatus for a radio receiver having frequency changing means and movable control means for adjusting said frequency changing means to predetermined tuning frequencies for said radio receiver, the combination for rotating said control shaft, means supporting said finger means for movement in two different directions, an energizing circuit for said electrical means, means responsive to movement of said finger means in one direction for completing said control means to provide for said stop portion circuit, and means including a mechanical conalways being moved in the same direction into engagement with an adjustable element.

17. In control apparatus which includes a plurality oi! adjustable members, controllable means having a portion for engaging said adjustable members, supporting means for said adjustable irecti n. d o

nection between said finger means and said control shaft for directly actuating said control shaft when said finger means is moved in the other ALEXANDER W. PLENSLER.

MMLM

US378232A 1941-02-10 1941-02-10 Control apparatus Expired - Lifetime US2342691A (en)

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Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2426715A (en) * 1941-10-09 1947-09-02 Production Instr Company Counting device
US2453187A (en) * 1946-04-24 1948-11-09 Rca Corp Radio receiver sequence tuner
US2497773A (en) * 1942-01-14 1950-02-14 Hartford Nat Bank & Trust Co Apparatus comprising a revolving head for tuning devices
US2502572A (en) * 1945-07-25 1950-04-04 Philco Corp Tuning mechanism
US2511602A (en) * 1946-04-09 1950-06-13 Rca Corp Radio receiver sequence tuner
US2528519A (en) * 1946-03-23 1950-11-07 Motorola Inc Tuning device
US2547533A (en) * 1945-08-25 1951-04-03 Mills Donald Howard Indexing device
US2571598A (en) * 1946-05-13 1951-10-16 Rca Corp Radio receiver sequence tuner
US2571411A (en) * 1946-06-06 1951-10-16 Gen Motors Corp Turret and treadle bar tuner
US2594981A (en) * 1945-04-25 1952-04-29 Torsten Elis Ullman Trolling spoon
US2694110A (en) * 1947-06-27 1954-11-09 Int Electronics Co Equipment for use with magnetic tape records
US2728622A (en) * 1952-09-20 1955-12-27 Owen H Griswold Display device
US2825237A (en) * 1956-10-17 1958-03-04 George R Keehn Setting mechanism
US2957356A (en) * 1959-07-20 1960-10-25 Oak Mfg Co Fine tuning attachment for index type of tuner
US4141254A (en) * 1976-05-13 1979-02-27 U.S. Philips Corporation Pushbutton reselection tuner with pivoting lever
US5358087A (en) * 1992-02-12 1994-10-25 Moore Michael J Depth stop assembly for a machine tool

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2426715A (en) * 1941-10-09 1947-09-02 Production Instr Company Counting device
US2497773A (en) * 1942-01-14 1950-02-14 Hartford Nat Bank & Trust Co Apparatus comprising a revolving head for tuning devices
US2594981A (en) * 1945-04-25 1952-04-29 Torsten Elis Ullman Trolling spoon
US2502572A (en) * 1945-07-25 1950-04-04 Philco Corp Tuning mechanism
US2547533A (en) * 1945-08-25 1951-04-03 Mills Donald Howard Indexing device
US2528519A (en) * 1946-03-23 1950-11-07 Motorola Inc Tuning device
US2511602A (en) * 1946-04-09 1950-06-13 Rca Corp Radio receiver sequence tuner
US2453187A (en) * 1946-04-24 1948-11-09 Rca Corp Radio receiver sequence tuner
US2571598A (en) * 1946-05-13 1951-10-16 Rca Corp Radio receiver sequence tuner
US2571411A (en) * 1946-06-06 1951-10-16 Gen Motors Corp Turret and treadle bar tuner
US2694110A (en) * 1947-06-27 1954-11-09 Int Electronics Co Equipment for use with magnetic tape records
US2728622A (en) * 1952-09-20 1955-12-27 Owen H Griswold Display device
US2825237A (en) * 1956-10-17 1958-03-04 George R Keehn Setting mechanism
US2957356A (en) * 1959-07-20 1960-10-25 Oak Mfg Co Fine tuning attachment for index type of tuner
US4141254A (en) * 1976-05-13 1979-02-27 U.S. Philips Corporation Pushbutton reselection tuner with pivoting lever
US5358087A (en) * 1992-02-12 1994-10-25 Moore Michael J Depth stop assembly for a machine tool

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