US2337145A - Firearm - Google Patents

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US2337145A
US2337145A US33414740A US2337145A US 2337145 A US2337145 A US 2337145A US 33414740 A US33414740 A US 33414740A US 2337145 A US2337145 A US 2337145A
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Prior art keywords
toggle
firing pin
solenoid
trigger
sear
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Albree George Norman
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Albree George Norman
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A19/00Firing or trigger mechanisms; Cocking mechanisms
    • F41A19/58Electric firing mechanisms
    • F41A19/59Electromechanical firing mechanisms, i.e. the mechanical striker element being propelled or released by electric means

Description

1943- a. N. ALBREE 2,337,145

FIREARM Filed May 9. 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 \nven'ror.

George Norman AI bree b iuw M&W ATTys.

Patented Dec. 21, 1943 IOFFICE Georg e Norman Albree, Winchester, Mass.

Application May 9, 1940 Serial No. 334,147

6 Claims.

This invention relates to firearms and has been shown as applied to shoulder arms, although I wish to state that certain features of the invention are equally applicable to firearms. of other types.

One feature of my invention relates to the firing mechanism, which is so constructed that the release of the firing pin is controlled by a toggle device constructed so that when it is straightened it locks the firing pin in cocked position. the breaking of the toggle by the actuation of the trigger operating to release the firing pin.

An advantage of this construction is that the toggle not only provides a lock for holding the firing pin in cocked position but because of the principle on which a toggle lever operates a relatively small force is required to break the toggle from its straightened position and thereby release the firing pin.

Another feature of my invention relates to electrically actuated means for releasing the firing pin.

According to this feature of the invention, the sear which normally holds the firing pin in cocked position is rendered operative to release the firing pin by a suitable magnet which can be energized by the actuation of the trigger.

With this construction, the trigger is relieved of any work in connection with moving the sear, and its only function is to close the circuit of the magnet, the operation of releasing the sear being done entirely by the magnet. This makes -it.possible' to provide a firing mechanism with a perfectly smooth even trigger take-up which is free from any jolt or jar at the let-01f that might disturb the alinement of sights.

A further advantage incident to this construction is that if when aiming the weapon, the sights go off the target at. partial take-up of the trigger it is not necessary to hold the slack already taken up while the sights are being brought back onto the target because a partial take-up of the trigger has no effect on the sear,

that the trigger is placed well in front of the gun's action. I

A further object of the invention is to provide an electrically actuated firing mechanism which is constructed so that while the actuation of the trigger results in closing the circuit and thus energizing the magnet which releases the firing pin, yet the forward movement of the firing pin serves to de-energize the magnet again, even though the pressure may be retained upon the trigger.

A further object of the invention is to provide a novel construction by which the toggle device that controls the release of the firing pin is actuated by means of the magnet.

A further object of the invention is to provide an electrically actuated firing mechanism for firearms in which the magnet can be energized either from a source of electricity carried in the stock of the firearm or from some outside source of electricity.

Other objects of the invention are to improve trating the action of the device in releasing the said sear only being actuated when the trigger has been given its full take-up.

This feature of an electrically actuated means for releasing the firing pin is especially adapted to shoulder arms in which the breech end of the barrel is situated at or closely adjacent to the butt of the stock because the sole function of the trigger is to close the circuit of the electrically actuated firing mechanism, and hence no dimculty is encountered by reason of the fact firing pin.

' Fig. 4 is a section on' the line 4-4, Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view showing the manner of connecting the firing mechanism to an outside source of electricity.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary view illustrating the application of the invention to a difierent type of action from that shown in Figs. 2 and 3..

Fig. 7 is a sectional view of the solenoid which controls the release of the firing pin.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary view illustrating a different embodiment of the invention.

In the drawings, I indicates the barrel of a shoulder arm and 2 the stock. The firearm herein shown is of the familiar single shot breech loading type, and 3 indicates the bolt which is provided with the usual handle 4 by which it may be manipulated. Associated with the bolt is the usual firing pin 5 by which the cartridge 6 is detonated, said firing pin having the shank I which is acted upon by a suitable spring 8 that gives the firing pin its operative movement when it is released. The firing pin is held in its cocked or retracted position by a sear element 9 as usual in firearms, said sear element being pivoted to the barrel at I and having a lateral projection I I adapted to engage a shoulder I2 formed on the shank I of the firing pin. When the sear is in the raised position, shown in Fig. 2, it will hold the firing pin in a cocked position against the action of the spring 8, but when the sear is swung downwardly about its pivot I0 to withdraw the projection I I from the shoulder I 2, then the firing pin is released and it is given its operative movement by the action of the spring 8. 3| are blocks or supports secured to the barrel'and which provide a mounting for a telescope sight.

The parts thus far described are such as are commonly found in firearms Of this type.

In the firearm illustrated, the barrel I is so mounted on the stock 2 that the receiver or breech end 80 of the barrel is closely adjacent. the butt end of the stock, and the stock 2 is constructed to extend substantially the full length or the barrel. With this construction, the overall length of the firearm may be considerably reduced without shortening the length of the barrel because such over-all length is approximately the same as the combined length of the receiver and the barrel. The shoulder arm is provided with the usual trigger 3|, and in my improved gun, the trigger is located in a trigger opening 82 that is cut in the stock 2. The stock has a progressively increasing vertical dimension from its front end to a point in the rear of the trigger and the lower wall 8I of the trigger opening constitutes a trigger guard which is flush with the lower face of the stock.

In the construction shown, the trigger 3| is pivotally mounted on a pin 90 which is secured to the under side of the barrel I, the upper end of the trigger having a recess to receive the pin which is of a depth to embrace slightly more than one half the circumference of the pin. In using a gun of this type in the conventional way, the face of the shooter will lie alongside the barrel in front of the bolt instead of being situated behind the barrel, as is the case when operating an ordinary shoulder arm. I regard this as of considerable importance because of the safety factor involved. With my improved gun, if the bolt should accidentally give way during use, said bolt would pass harmlessly over the shoulder of the gunner instead of striking him in the face, a thing which might happen where the face of the gunner is located behind the breech end of the barrel, as is the case when using the ordinary shoulder arm. Furthermore, since the face of the gunner is in front of the bolt, there i no danger of the gunner being injured by the escape of gases around the bolt due to a blown primer or any other cause.

This construction has the further advantage that the center of gravity of the shoulder arm is located nearer to the butt end than in the ordinary shoulder arm, which makes it easier for the gunner to manipulate the gun, especially when aiming at a moving target.

The reason for this is because in the gun herein illustrated, the center of gravity of the firearm is located well in the rear of the portion of the stock which is normally grasped by the extended arm of the gunner and is, therefore, located between the gunners extended hand and his shoulder. Because of this fact, the retarding effect of the inertia of the gun on any quick movementsor the gunner in following a moving target is greatly reduced, and this makes it that much easier for the gunner to manipulate the gun when following-a moving target.

The barrel is secured to the stock by means of the bolt 88 which extends through the stock at the butt end and has screw-threaded engagement with a supporting block I"! which, in turn, is secured to the under side of the barrel by attaching screws I8. This single bolt 88 is sufflcient to hold the barrel to the stock, but if desired, additional securing means may be employed between the trigger and the muzzle of the barrel.

One feature of my invention relates to a novel construction by which a toggle device is used for controlling the release of the firing pin, said toggle device being so constructed that when it is straightened, it holds the firing pin locked in its cocked position, means separate from the trigger being provided whereby when the trigger is actuated, the toggle will be broken, thereby releasing the firing pin. In the construction herein illustrated, this toggle device comprises the toggle members I3 and I4 which are pivotally connected at 26, the toggle member I3 being pivoted at 89 to the free end of the sear 3 and the toggle member I4 being pivotally connected at I5 to an extension I6 formed on the block Il.

The construction is such that when the toggle device is straightened with the arms I3 and I4 thereof in line with each other, as shown in Fig. l, the sear will be in its operative position with its projection II engaging the shoulder I2. The block I1 is formed with the abutment face I8 against which the toggle arm I3 rests when the toggle device is thus straightened, so that the toggle device can break in one direction only. The toggle device might thus be described as a one-way toggle device.

The toggle arm I4 is acted on by a light spring 20 which tends to straighten the toggle, said spring thus normally holding the toggle in its straightened position, as shown in Fig. 2.

This toggle device not only serves as a means for giving the sear 9 its movement into and out of operative position but it also serves to lock the sear in its operative position and to prevent any accidental release of the firing pin.

When the toggle is in straightened condition, shown in Fig. 2, with the toggle arm I3 held against the abutment I9 by the spring 28, said toggle acts as a rigid bar which locks the sear in its operative position. This toggle will thus function as a lock for the sear.

Means are provided whereby when the trigger 3| is actuated, the toggle device I3, I4 will be broken, thereby swinging the sear 9 downwardly into a position to release the firing pin, as illustrated in Fig. 3.

While various means may be employed for breaking the toggle when the trigger is actuated, I have herein illustrated for this purpose a magnet and have provided means for energizing the magnet when the trigger "3I is actuated.

Various types of magnets are suitable for this purpose, but I have chosen herein to illustrate a magnet of the solenoid type, partly because the solenoid type permits a greater range of movement of the armature.

The solenoid is shown at 22 and is illustratedas being supported on posts 23 that are secured to the block I1. The armature or core 24 of the solenoid is connected by a. link 25 to the center joint 26 of the toggle device. When the solenoid isde-energized and the toggle is straightened, the end of the core 24 will be projected beyond the winding of the solenoid. When the solenoid is energized, the core 24 is drawn into the latter, thereby breaking the toggle, as shown in Fig. 3, and releasingthe firing pin.

The\ solenoid is constructed so that the core will havesumoient movement not only to release the firing pin but to withdraw the projection H of the sear sumciently from the barrel to permit the bolt 3 to be removed. When the solenoid is de-energized, the spring 20 will tend to straighten the toggle l4. Such straightening, however, will be prevented so long as the firing pin is in its" forward position, shown in Fig. 3, an it is only permitted after the firing pin has been withinward movement of the core but also cushions such movement.

The solenoid may be energized from any suitable source of electricity, and in the case of a shoulder arm, it is satisfactory to employ a battery in th form of dry cells 28 which may be conveniently located in a pocket or chamber 29 formed in the butt end of the stock. The usual butt plate 30 is shown as having a door portion I9 pivoted thereto at I8, said door, when opened, giving access to the chamber 29 and to the batteries therein, so that battery cells may be removed from the chamber or replaced therein in much the same way that battery cells are redrawn to its cocked position, shown in Fig. 2,

to break the toggle and conversely, when the solenoid is de-energized, a relatively light spring 20 will be sufiicient to straighten the toggle. This is in accordance with the following well-known formula for a toggle lever action:

in which R is the resistance. to the straightening movement of the toggle lever, P is the power applied to the joint of the toggle lever and a is the angle which the toggle elements'make at any time to the longitudinal central line of the straightened toggle.

' While the above formula is generally usedin connection with the operation of straightening the toggle, yet it is believed that it is equally applicable to the reverse action of breaking the toggle device.

In applying this formula to the construction herein shown, and assuming, for instance, that a pull of two pounds on the end of the sear 9 is necessary to move it sufllciently to release the firing pin, the pulling force required to be applied to the joint 26 of the toggle to move the sear downwardly can be readily calculated for difierent angular positions of the toggle arm l3 and I4. When, for illustration, the toggle arms l3 and I4 have an angular position of 0, l5 to a line joining the pivots 89 and I5, then substituting these known quantities in the above formula, we obtain the .following result:

2:P=.99999 (cos. angle of l5) :2 .00436 (sin angle of 1-5) Solving this equation, it is found that P equals .01'744 lb.

It will be evident that a the angle a increases, the value of P in the above formula will increase, and as the angle a. decreases, the value of P will decrease. Hence a relatively small pulling force applied to the joint 26 will be sufficient to break the straightened toggle and actuate the same, because of which it is possible to use a relatively small magnet operating under a low voltage and involving small current consumption to actuate the sear and thus release the firing pin.

I have illustrated herein a rubber bufifer element 21 situated within the solenoid and adapted to be engaged by the. core 24 when it is moved inwardly. This buffer element not only limits the moved from or replaced in a'fiash light.

Means are provided whereby when the trigger 3| is actuated, the circuit connecting the battery 28 with the solenoid 2| will be closed, there-- by energizing the solenoid, and in the preferred embodiment of my invention, means are provided for de-energizing the solenoid when the firing pin is released.

The switch which is operated'by the trigger for closing the solenoid circuit and thus energizing the solenoid comprises the two contact members 32, and 33, which are carried by a block 34 of insulating material that is secured to the supporting block I1, The contact 33 is a spring contact adapted to be moved into and out of engagement withthe contact 32, but the resilience of the contact 33 normally holds it separated from the contact 32.

For actuating the contact 33, there is provided a push rod 35, one end of which operates in an aperture 36 with which the block 34 is provided, and the other end of which is connected to the trigger 3|. The end of the push rod 35 which engages the contact 36 will preferably be provided with insulation 31 to prevent any short-circuiting.

In order to provide a suitable resistance for th trigger movement, I have employed a spring 38 which encircles the push rod 35 and is confined between the block 34 and set nuts 39 that are screw-threaded to the push rod. The adjustability of the nuts 39 provides for adjusting the trigger resistance to any desired point.

The switch which is opened to de-energize the solenoid when the firing pin is released comprises the two contacts 40 and 4| which are mounted against the contact 4| as shown in Fig. 2 by the bolt stop 45 of the firing pin when the latter is in cocked position. These contacts 40 and 4| are located in an opening 43 formed in the under side of the receiver l. The contact 40 is extended at its end and is provided with the rounded portion 44 of insulating material that is situated to be engaged by the bolt stop 45 when said firing pin is in cocked position, as shown in Fig. 2. The engagement of the bolt stop 45 with the contact 40 holds it in engagement with the contact 4|, thereby closing the circuit at this point. When the solenoid 2| is energized thereby to release the firing pin, the forward movement of the latter will carry the bolt stop 45 on from the rounded end 44 of the contact 40, thereby allowing said contact to spring away from the contact 4| with the result that the solenoid circuit will be instantly opened or broken at this point.

The solenoid circuit comprises a wire connection which leads from the solenoid either to the battery 28 or to an outside source of current supply, a wire connection 41 which leads from the solenoid to the contact 4|, a-wire connection 48 leading from the contact 40 to the contact 33 and another wire connection 49 leading from the contact 32 either to the battery 28 or to an outside source of electricity.

The battery 28 is shown as having two battery leads so and 5| (shown in dot-and-dash lines), one of which, the battery lead 58, connects to the wire 46, as shown at 52. The other battery lead 5| leads to a contact 53 of a jack switch mounted in a recess 55 with which the stock 20 is provided, the other contact 54 of said jack switch being connected to the circuit wire 49.

such as are found in the well-known Winchester model 70.

In applying my invention to this construction,

I connect the arm |3a of the toggle lever device to the retaining member 95, the other arm Ha of the toggle device being pivotally mounted at |5a to a fixed support l6a. 22a indicates a magnet, the armature 24a of which is secured to the toggle device l3a, |4a at th Joint thereof. .The toggle device is acted on by-the-light spring 20a which tends to hold it in straightened condition shown in Fig. 6, with the toggle arm |3a resting against the abutment l9a.

When the magnet 22a is energized, the armature 24a is pulled rearwardly, thereby breaking the toggle device and releasing the sear, the release of which allows the firing pin to move forwafrdly, as will be understood by those familiar with the above Winchester model.

In this embodiment, the sear 38 will be released by a very small movement of the retaining member 95, which will result from a slight breaking movement of the toggle.

backward movement thereof will operate through the push rod to close the contacts 32, 33, as shown in Fig. 3, and such action will close the solenoid circuit from the battery, thereby energizing the solenoid 22. The energization of the solenoid causes its core 24 to be drawn inwardly, thereby breaking the toggle joint I3, I4,'and swinging thesear 9 downwardly to release the firing pin, as shown in Fig. 3. The forward movement of the firing pin carries the projection-45 off from the rounded 'end 44 of the contact 40, whereby the resiliency of the contact 48 will separate it from the contact 4|, thereby opening the solenoid circuit and causing the solenoid to be de-energized. 'I'he' solenoid cir- I cuit, therefore, is closed only for the briefest period of time, even though the contacts 32, 33 are held closed by continuing pressure applied to the trigger.

The battery, therefore, will besubjected to minimum drain. Ordinary flashlight batteries can be successfully used for energizing the solenoid 22.

When the bolt is retracted for inserting a fresh cartridge and for cocking the firearm, the solenoid circuit will be closed again at the contacts 40, 4|, by the engagement of the bolt stop with the rounded end 44 of the resilient contact 48, thus putting the solenoid circuit again in con-. dition to be closed for energizing the solenoid by the actuation of the trigger 3|.

Figs. 2 and 3 illustrate my invention as applied to one type of breech-loading shoulder arm, but I desire to state that the invention is equally applicable to other well-known types. In Fig. 6,

I have illustrated how the invention might be applied to the type of action embodied in'-.the

-Winchester model 70 rifle, in which 99 indicates sear is'actedn by a spring I08 which tends-nor--.

mally to swing it into its operative position, and

said. sear-isheld in such position by a retaining leverI'95 which is pivotaliy mounted at 84, said lever-having a shoulder 93 which engages the seat and holdsthe latter inthe position shown in thefdrawings in Fig. 6; The above parts are -L'-shaped framemembr 56.

an end terminal 84'r-connected .to one wire .01

In this embodiment also, the toggle lever, when in straightened condition as shown in Fig. 6, constitutes a lock for the sear which will positively hold the sear in its operative position and thus prevent premature discharge of the gun, even though the gun is dropped or is jarredviolentiy.

I have stated above that my invention involves a construction wherein the current for energizing the solenoid 22 may be taken from. an outside source instead of from batteries 28 carried within the stock 2. ,This i provided for by the use of the jack switch mounted in therecess 55 and comprising the contacts 53 and 54. This jack switch. which may. be of any usual construction, comprises an- L-shaped frame member 56 which is secured to a cover plate 51 of insulating material that is securedto the stock by screws 58 and which serves to close the open end of the recess. 55. The circuit,wire 48 leading to the solenoid is connected to this frame member 56.

The contact member 54 which is a spring or resilient contact, is carried by a plate 59 that is insulated from the frame member, 56 and to whichthe circuit wire 49 is connected.

, The contact'53 of this jack switch is carried by aplate '68 which. is also insulated. from the plate 59 and the frame member 56, and to which the battery lead 5| is connected. When the current for energizing the solenoid 2| i taken from the battery, the complete circuit will comprise the battery lead 5|, the plate 60,-contact 53, contact, plate .58 wire connection 49, contacts 32","33, wire connection 48, contacts 48, 4|,f'wlre connection, to the solenoid-windings, wire connection 46 and the battery 1ead58;

' When a current fronianoutside' source is to be used,'said current will be brought from any suitable current supply through a twowire cable 6| (see' Fig. 5) having at -its end'a ja clrvplug '62 adapted to plug through-the sleeves: carriedby; the coverplate 51 and which 'to-the jacki'blug has the two-wire cable- 6| and a" terminal portion 66 connected to the wire 61 of'i saidztwo-wireiterminal, these twoiterminal portions "64' and 66 being insulated from each otherby-insulation-fl. When the jack plug is inserted through the-sleeve 63, as shown atzFig. 5, the end. terminal 64 enages the contact 54 and forces-it away from the contact 53, thus opening ,the'battery-circuit at thi point. The terminal 66;=hnwever,' which fits within the sleeve 53 is electrically connected to the frame plat 56 and thus to the wire connection 46 leading from the solenoid. When the jack switch is used, as shown in Fig. 5. the solenoid circuit comprises the wire '65 of the two-wire cable, the terminal contact 54, the con tact 54,. the plate 59, the wire connection 49, the contacts 32, 33, wire connection 48, contacts 40, 4 1, wire connection 41, solenoid windings, wire connection 46, the frame plate 56, the terminal portion 56 of the jack plug and the wire 61 of the two-wire cable.

The two-wire cable may be of any length and may be connected to any suitable source of current, either D. C. or A. C. If it is connected to an ordinary lighting circuit, it will be necessary, of course, to employ suitable resistance or a transformer in the circuit to reduce the voltage to that required by the solenoid 2 I.

When the current for actuating the solenoid is taken from an outside source, the circuit of the battery 28 will be open between the contacts 53, 54, as shown in Fig. 5, and, therefore, it will make no difi'erence whether the battery cells 28 are in the gun or not.

vIn Fig. 8 I have shown a modified form of the invention in which the initial movement of the trigger serves to relieve the spring pressure on the toggle device, and further movement of the trigger serves to close the switch, thereby to energize the solenoid. Since the spring pressure on the toggle is relieved prior to the energizing of the solenoid, the only work which the solenoid is required to do is to break the toggle, an operation which requires very little force. In Fig. 8, the toggle device, which is similar to that shown in Figs. 2 and 3, comprises a toggle lever l3b, 14b, the toggle element |3b being pivotally connected to the sear element 911 and the toggle member i4b being pivotally connected at l5b to the projection I611. The solenoid is indicated at 2217, and the core 24b thereof is connected by a link 25b to the toggle in the same manner as illustrated in Fig. 3.

2012 indicates the spring which acts on the toggle and normally tends to hold it in straightened position. In this embod ment of the invention. the rod 35b by which the switch contacts 32. 33, are closed has secured thereto an auxiliary rod member or extension liil which extends forwardly into-position to engage the end of the spring 20b, said spring and the end of the rod being properly shaped to have such engagement when the rod I0! moves toward the left, the con struction is such that during the initial movement of the tri ger and before the rod 35b has been moved suificiently to close the contacts 32, 33, the rod extension Ilii will have engaged-the spring 20b and moved the latter backwardly, thus relieving the toggle from its spring pressure.

When the rod 35bhas been moved sufilciently to .close the contacts 32, 33, thereby energizing the solenoid 22b, the only work which isv required of the solenoid is to break the toggle device. Since the spring pressure on the toggle device has been previously relieved, a relatively small force will be required to break the toggle and thus actuate the sear element 9b.

. The construction shown in Fig. 8 would'make it possible to use smaller batteries 28.

My invention is capable of use with either A. C. or D. C. current.

types than shoulder arms. I

While I have illustrated my invention as applied to shoulder arms, yet I wish to state that many features of the invention, such as the toggle device for controlling the sear element, and the electrically actuated means for releasing the firing pin,'are also applicable to firearms of other I claim:

1. A firearm having a barrel, a firing pin, means for holding the firing pin in cocked position, an electrically actuated means to release the firing pin, a trigger for rendering said electrically actuated means operative, and means controlled by the firing pin to render the electrically actuated means inoperative. when said firing pin is released. i I

2. A firearm having a barrel, a firing pin, means for holding the firing pin in cocked position, electrically actuated means to release the firing pin, a-circuit controlling said electrically actuated means, a trigger, means actuated there by to close said circuit thereby rendering the electrically actuated means operative, and means controlled by the firing pin for opening the circuit when said firing pin is released.

3. A firearm having a barrel, a spring-actuated firing pin, a sear element for holding the firing pin in cocked position, a. magnet for operating the sear to release the firing pin, a circuit for the magnet, said circuit including a normally open switch and a second switch which is held in closed conditionby the firing pin when the latter is in cocked position but which is opened when the firing pin is released, a trigger, and means to close the normally open switch by movement of the trigger.

4. A firearm having a barrel, a firing pin,

means for holding the firing pin in cocked position, a magnet to actuate said means, thereby to release the firing pin, a trigger, means actuated by the trigger to energize the magnet, and means rendered operative by the operative movementof the firing pin to de-energize the magnet.

5. A firearm having a barrel, a firing pin, means for holding the firing pin in cocked position, a magnet to actuate said means, thereby to release the firing pin, a trigger, means actuated by the trigger to energize the magnet, and means controlled by the firing pin to de-energize the magnet as the firing pin has its operative movement.

6. A firearm having a barrel, a firing pin, a

scar for holding the firing pin in cocked position,

a trigger, a toggle joint device connected to the sear, said toggle joint device when in straight line, dead center condition holding the sear in its operative position, a stop preventing breaking movement of the straightened toggle joint device in one direction, a magnet, an armature therefor connected to the toggle joint device at the central joint of the toggle and operative to break said toggle joint device when the magnet is energized, and trigger-actuated means to energize the magnet, the straight line condition of the toggle joint device necessitating a minimum pulling force to break it, whereby the sear may be actuated to release the firing pin by a, relatively small magnet operating under low voltage.

GEORGE NORMAN ALBREE.

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US2642779A (en) * 1944-10-14 1953-06-23 Dunlop Rubber Co Firing mechanism for automatic guns
US2703942A (en) * 1952-01-04 1955-03-15 John A Lizon Tear gas gun
US2747312A (en) * 1952-10-25 1956-05-29 Frank J Kaszynski Gun compass attachment
US2780882A (en) * 1953-11-16 1957-02-12 Olin Mathieson Electrically powered fire control mechanism for firearms
US2846802A (en) * 1956-11-30 1958-08-12 Thomas F Trefny Gun switch connector
US2972933A (en) * 1957-12-23 1961-02-28 Gen Dynamics Corp Missile hand launching system
US2990471A (en) * 1956-12-28 1961-06-27 Tiffany Frank Emery Combat radio rifle
US3072911A (en) * 1957-12-04 1963-01-15 Sarmi S A Societa D Applic De Fixing guns adapted to drive nails and the like, such as for example studs and plugsin hard compact materials
US3103758A (en) * 1960-12-22 1963-09-17 Wilhelm Gary Firing mechanism for firearms
US3208181A (en) * 1963-11-26 1965-09-28 Remington Arms Co Inc Electrically controlled firearm utilizing a piezo-electric crystal
US3250034A (en) * 1964-08-05 1966-05-10 Ernest P Simmons Electric gun firing mechanism
US4329803A (en) * 1980-07-07 1982-05-18 Browning Arms Company Electronic set trigger
US4416631A (en) * 1982-05-08 1983-11-22 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Small arms firing effects simulator
US4503633A (en) * 1983-02-10 1985-03-12 Edward D. Jasper Muzzle loading firearm
US4793085A (en) * 1987-01-28 1988-12-27 Colt Industries Inc. Electronic firing system for target pistol
US6951071B1 (en) 2004-08-20 2005-10-04 Adelfo Acosta Electronic rifle trigger mechanism
US20060266881A1 (en) * 2005-01-14 2006-11-30 Hughey Electricopter Corporation Vertical takeoff and landing aircraft using a redundant array of independent rotors
US20130167423A1 (en) * 2012-01-03 2013-07-04 Trackingpoint, Inc. Trigger Assembly and System Including a Blocking Mechanism
US8915004B1 (en) 2011-10-24 2014-12-23 F. Richard Langner Systems and methods for a firing pin
US9200881B1 (en) 2011-10-24 2015-12-01 F. Richard Langner Systems and methods for an improved firing assembly
US20170167812A1 (en) * 2015-12-11 2017-06-15 Vadum, Inc. Ergonomic Takedown Firearm Apparatus

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