US2331776A - Toy - Google Patents

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Publication number
US2331776A
US2331776A US497564A US49756443A US2331776A US 2331776 A US2331776 A US 2331776A US 497564 A US497564 A US 497564A US 49756443 A US49756443 A US 49756443A US 2331776 A US2331776 A US 2331776A
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Prior art keywords
strips
polished
layers
cut
outline
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Expired - Lifetime
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US497564A
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Emil J Heggedal
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Emil J Heggedal
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Priority to US497564A priority Critical patent/US2331776A/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS OR BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H3/00Dolls
    • A63H3/08Dolls of flat paper to be cut-out, folded, or clothed
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S446/00Amusement devices: toys
    • Y10S446/901Detachably adhesive

Description

Oct. 12, 1943. E. J, HEGGEDAL' TOY Filed Aug. 6, 1943 INVENTOR 5v/L J /EGGEQAL AQTTORNEY Patented Oct. 12, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE TOY Emil J. Heggedal, Woodside, N. Y.
Application August 6, 1943, Serial No. 497,564
4 Claims.
This invention relates to toys in general, and especially to an improved cut-out doll assembling toy.
Among the objects of the invention, it is aimed to provide a cut-out master, corresponding in outline as an instance to the body of a doll, house, animal or the like having formed thereon at predetermined locations, layers which have an exposed surface that will act with a similar exposed surface, to adhere to one another so that the child can decorate the doll, house, animal or the like with Various devices. The child in this way can with facility dress and undress a doll, saddle and unsaddle a horse, and attach various decorative pieces to a house or the like.
More specifically, it is an object of the present invention to provide a master outline, having layers permanently attached thereto for temporarily receiving other layers, the surfaces of which layers will not smear or materially change in the use thereof, which surfaces in turn can ordinarily not be transformed in use and which surfaces can be readily washed in the interest of sanitation and which surfaces, nevertheless, will have a suflicient anity for one anothertemporarily to adhere to one another when contact is made, which adhesion, however, is so slight that the average child can with facility quickly remove the attached layer without in any way destroying the surfaces engaged.
To achieve this end, it has been found that when a cut-out master has secured thereto a layer of oil cloth, with the polished surface exposed and cut-outlayers of oil cloth with one or both surfaces polished are provided, such latter cut-out layers may be attached to the polished surface of the oil cloth secured to the cut-out master.
When the cut-out master such as a cardboard doll has secured to parts thereof a layer of oil cloth and cut-out strips or layers of oil cloth are provided which have one or both surfaces polished, a polished surface of the cut-out strip may be brought into engagement with the polished surface of the oil cloth secured to the cut-out doll by merely pressing the strip in place on the doll, the surfaces of such oil cloth portions will not smear or ordinarily change during use, the polished surfaces can be readily washed in the interest of sanitation, and the strips are durable to prevent easy destruction of the same by the child, all to the end to produce a valuable and improved cut-out toy.
These and other features, capabilities and advantages of the invention will appear from the subjoined detail description of one embodiment thereof illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which Figure 1 is a plan view of a cut-out master. Fig. 2 is a section on the line 2-2 of Fig. l.
Figs. 3, 5, 6, '7 and 8 are plan views of cut-out strips to be attached to the cut-out master illustrated in Fig. 1, a corner of the cut-out strip shown in Fig. 3 being turned up.
Fig. 4 is a section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3.
In the embodiment shown, the master I corresponds in outline to a doll. This master I is preferably composed of cardboard or the like semi-rigid material having parts of the front and rear faces covered with coloring matter, as an instance to depict the bare arms 2 and 3, the bare legs 4 and 5, the face 6 and the hair 1 of the doll. When the cut-out master corresponds to the outline of a doll, then it may be desirable as here illustrated to secure to the trunk portion of the doll from the shoulders 8 and 9 to the upper portions of the thighs, as for instance down to the lines I0 and II, layers of oil cloth I2 and I3, the layer I2 to the front of the master I and the layer I3 to the rear thereof. It may also be desirable as here illustrated to cover the ankle and feet portions of the master I from about the lines I4 and I5 down to the lower ends I6 and I1, respectively, with layers of oil cloth I8 and I9, these layers also preferably being applied to the front face of the master I as well as to the rear face thereof. The oil cloth layers I2, I3, I8 and I9 may be permanently secured to the master I and therefore it is only necessary for one of the surfaces of each layer, that is the exposed surface, to be polished as is the case with the origif' nal oil cloth sheets today extensively used for table cloths and the like. It is understood that there are various types of oil cloth and that the present invention may be carried out with any of these types. achieved when the oil cloth is made of the ordinary cotton or burlap fabric and the polished surface is produced by a paint mixed with linseed oil. It has also been found that excellent results have been produced when the oil cloth used is one having as the base a fabric composed of cotton, burlap or the like, a polished surface produced by a paint having linseed oil mixed therewith, and a final protective coating of varnish. The layers I2, I3, I4 and I5 have the unfinished surface secured to the cut-out master I by glue, mucilage or other adhesive. The cutout strips 20, 2|, 22, 23, 24 and 25 are, according to the present invention, composed of oil cloth having a fabric .layer of cotton, burlap, or the like and preferably have both faces of the fabric base coated with a paint having linseed oil mixed therewith in order that both of its exposed faces may be polished. It is obvious, however, that it is within the purview of the present invention to produce the strips 20 to 25, inclusive, or at least l some of them, with only one polished surface, without departing from the spirit of the invention. The strip 20 in the present instance is Excellent results have beenv formed in the outline of the upper portion of the slip of a doll. The strip 2| is formed in the outline of the skirt for the doll. The strip 22 is formed in the outline of a dress. The strip 23 is formed in the outline of a belt. The strips 24 and 25V are formed in the outline of socks and slippers. The strips 20 to 25, inclusive, may have different designs on the opposing faces. As an instance, while one face of the strip 20 may be pink, the other strip may be blue. It is also conceivable that a plurality of strips, having the outline of the strip 20, may be provided for the toy, all having different colors on their opposing faces so that the child may be provided with a large choice of strips 20, at least with regard to color. Similarly the opposite faces of the strips 20 may have different ornamental designs or patterns. It is also conceivable that the strips 20, 2| and 22 at least may not al1 be identical in outline, but vary from one another to correspond to predetermined patterns, without departing from the general spirit of the invention. As a result of this choice of colors and designs, it is, of course, intended to provide an educational toy that will draw upon the childs ingenuity and imagination to select a combination of colors to fit a predetermined design.
It is also intended that a plurality of sheets of oil cloth having polished surfaces on the opposite sides thereof be provided which are not cut into outlines corresponding to strips 20 to 25, inclusive, with a view to enable the child to cut out its own dress outlines and the like, corresponding as an instance to the strips 20 to 25, inclusive.
When the outer faces of the layers I2, I3, I8 and I9 have the characteristic qualities of the polished surface of an oil cloth sheet, and the polishedfaces of the strips 20 to 25, inclusive, have the characteristic qualities of oil cloth, then in the manipulation of this toy the child can, as an instance, select the strip 20 and place it upon the upper body portion of the layer I2 and by slight pressure, cause the same effectively to adhere to the layer I2. On the other hand, when the child then wishes to remove the strip 20 from the layer I2, it merely engages the corner or edge of the strip 2l and by a slight tug strips it from the layer I2 without in anyway affecting the adherence of the layer I2 to the outline I. Similarly, when the child wishes to attach the skirt 2I to the outline I, it will only be necessary for the child to press the skirt 2i to the lower portion of the layer I2 and by a slight pressure cause the same effectively to adhere. In turn, after the strips 20 and 2I have been attached to the layer I2, these strips 20 and 2I to serve as the underwear of the doll, then the child may pick up the strip 22 and press it on top of the strips 20 and 2I until the strip 22 is caused effectively to adhere to the strips 20 and 2|. Then in turn, the child may wish to attach the belt 23 and'press it at the waist line of the strip 22. Finally the child may wish to attach the strips 24 and 25 to the ankles and feet of the -outline I, and in turn press the strips 24 and 25 onto the layers I8 and I9 to cause them effectively to be secured in place. It is understood that various attempts have been made to provide a toy where parts may be pressed in place by pressure. It has been found, however, that these attempts have failed to produce a toy where the surfaces of the strips are not altered or impaired when attaching the strips in place and again when removing them from the master outline. These various attempts also have failed to produce a toy in which the various strips. as well as the layers of the outline, may be readily and quickly washed in the interest of sanitation as is the case with oil zloth without in any way impairing the toy itse f.
It is obvious that various changes and modications may be made to the details of construction without departing from the general spirit of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.
I claim:
1. A toy having a master cut-out conforming to a predetermined object suitable for decoration or dress and having areas thereof predetermined as suitable for decoration or dress, oil cloth layers conforming in outline to said areas and permanently secured thereto with their polished surfaces exposed, and strips composed of oil cloth and having at least one surface polished, parts of the polished surfaces of said strips brought into engagement with polished surfaces of said layers to be removably attached thereto by hand pressure.
2. A toy having a master cut-out conforming to a predetermined object suitable for decoration or dress and having areas thereof predetermined as suitable for decoration or dress, oil cloth layers conforming in outline to said areas and permanently secured thereto with their polished surfaces exposed, and strips composed of oil cloth and having both surfaces polished, parts of the polished surfaces of some of said strips brought into engagement with polished surfaces of said layers to be removably attached thereto by hand pressure, and parts of the surfaces of other of said strips brought into engagement with polished surfaces of said first attached strips to be removably attached thereto by hand pressure.
3. A toy having a master cut-out conforming to a predetermined object suitable for decoration or dress and having areas thereof predetermined as suitable for decoration or dress, oil cloth layers conforming in outline to said areas and permanently secured thereto with their polished surfaces exposed, and strips composed of oil cloth and having at least one surface polished, parts of the polished surfaces of said strips brought into engagement with polished surfaces of said layers to be removably attached thereto by hand pressure, said oil cloth layers and strips being composed of a fabric such as cotton, each having a coating consisting of a paint mixed with linseed oil on one face thereof to form a polished surface.
4. A toy having a master cut-out conforming to a predetermined object suitable for decoration or dress and having areas thereof predetermined as suitable for decoration or dress, oil cloth layers conforming in outline to said areas and permanently secured thereto with their polished surfaces exposed, and strips composed of oil cloth and having at least one surface polished, parts of the polished surfaces of said strips brought into engagement with polished surfaces of said layers to be removably attached thereto by hand pressure, said oil cloth layers and strips being composed of a fabric such as cotton, each having an intermediate coating consisting of a paint mixed with linseed oil on each face thereof, and a final protective coating of varnish on said intermediate coating to form the polished surface.
EMIL J. HEGGEDAL.
US497564A 1943-08-06 1943-08-06 Toy Expired - Lifetime US2331776A (en)

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Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2585924A (en) * 1947-09-10 1952-02-19 James S Cushman Game
US2586017A (en) * 1947-09-10 1952-02-19 James S Cushman Game
US2586039A (en) * 1947-04-08 1952-02-19 James S Cushman Combination display or supporting board and attaching parts
US2586009A (en) * 1947-09-20 1952-02-19 James S Cushman Interchangeable letter display device
US2896372A (en) * 1957-05-07 1959-07-28 Mary I Austin Doll with disposable hand and foot members
US2919502A (en) * 1956-10-02 1960-01-05 William C Henry Mutable feminine facial style display means
US2987831A (en) * 1958-03-24 1961-06-13 Dorothy L Stepat Teaching aid for demonstrating clothing designs
US3065568A (en) * 1958-12-24 1962-11-27 Ideal Toy Corp Toy facial feature-forming attachment
US3458189A (en) * 1965-07-09 1969-07-29 John W Holt Duplicate books or kits for assembling game
US3646705A (en) * 1970-06-10 1972-03-07 Kiddie World Toys Ltd Doll cutouts and process of making same
US3753312A (en) * 1972-03-22 1973-08-21 A Hughes Doll and doll clothing ensemble
US3783554A (en) * 1972-02-04 1974-01-08 Mattel Inc Appliable doll decorations
US3855714A (en) * 1973-03-05 1974-12-24 B Block Instructional device and method for studying the gross anatomy of the human or animal organ systems
WO1997028867A1 (en) 1996-02-09 1997-08-14 Mattel, Inc. Doll fashion game having computer generated printed doll clothing articles
US5665448A (en) * 1994-08-24 1997-09-09 Graham; Barbara Electrostatic display device
US5746639A (en) * 1992-12-18 1998-05-05 Pockets Of Learning, Ltd. Flat stuffed doll and clothing combination
US6159325A (en) * 1994-08-24 2000-12-12 Graham; Barbara Electrostatic webs for sewing patterns
US6280283B1 (en) * 1999-02-10 2001-08-28 Constance R. Sisler Doll kit
EP1342492A1 (en) 2002-03-08 2003-09-10 Maria Teresa Ruiz Gonzalez Composition toy
EP1342493A1 (en) 2002-03-08 2003-09-10 Maria Teresa Ruiz Gonzalez Composition toy
US20050164598A1 (en) * 2004-01-22 2005-07-28 Mandalay Point, Inc. Removable and reconfigurable doll clothing
US20180093196A1 (en) * 2016-09-23 2018-04-05 Erin M. Smelcer Connecting system for doll, clothing, and accessories
US20180264370A1 (en) * 2017-03-20 2018-09-20 Mga Entertainment, Inc. Peel-Away Surprise Doll

Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2586039A (en) * 1947-04-08 1952-02-19 James S Cushman Combination display or supporting board and attaching parts
US2585924A (en) * 1947-09-10 1952-02-19 James S Cushman Game
US2586017A (en) * 1947-09-10 1952-02-19 James S Cushman Game
US2586009A (en) * 1947-09-20 1952-02-19 James S Cushman Interchangeable letter display device
US2919502A (en) * 1956-10-02 1960-01-05 William C Henry Mutable feminine facial style display means
US2896372A (en) * 1957-05-07 1959-07-28 Mary I Austin Doll with disposable hand and foot members
US2987831A (en) * 1958-03-24 1961-06-13 Dorothy L Stepat Teaching aid for demonstrating clothing designs
US3065568A (en) * 1958-12-24 1962-11-27 Ideal Toy Corp Toy facial feature-forming attachment
US3458189A (en) * 1965-07-09 1969-07-29 John W Holt Duplicate books or kits for assembling game
US3646705A (en) * 1970-06-10 1972-03-07 Kiddie World Toys Ltd Doll cutouts and process of making same
US3783554A (en) * 1972-02-04 1974-01-08 Mattel Inc Appliable doll decorations
US3753312A (en) * 1972-03-22 1973-08-21 A Hughes Doll and doll clothing ensemble
US3855714A (en) * 1973-03-05 1974-12-24 B Block Instructional device and method for studying the gross anatomy of the human or animal organ systems
US5746639A (en) * 1992-12-18 1998-05-05 Pockets Of Learning, Ltd. Flat stuffed doll and clothing combination
US5665448A (en) * 1994-08-24 1997-09-09 Graham; Barbara Electrostatic display device
US6159325A (en) * 1994-08-24 2000-12-12 Graham; Barbara Electrostatic webs for sewing patterns
WO1997028867A1 (en) 1996-02-09 1997-08-14 Mattel, Inc. Doll fashion game having computer generated printed doll clothing articles
US6280283B1 (en) * 1999-02-10 2001-08-28 Constance R. Sisler Doll kit
EP1342492A1 (en) 2002-03-08 2003-09-10 Maria Teresa Ruiz Gonzalez Composition toy
EP1342493A1 (en) 2002-03-08 2003-09-10 Maria Teresa Ruiz Gonzalez Composition toy
US20030176143A1 (en) * 2002-03-08 2003-09-18 Maria Teresa Ruiz Gonzalez Composition toy
US6790117B2 (en) 2002-03-08 2004-09-14 Ruiz Gonzalez Maria Teresa Composition toy
US20050164598A1 (en) * 2004-01-22 2005-07-28 Mandalay Point, Inc. Removable and reconfigurable doll clothing
US20180093196A1 (en) * 2016-09-23 2018-04-05 Erin M. Smelcer Connecting system for doll, clothing, and accessories
US10940398B2 (en) * 2016-09-23 2021-03-09 Erin M. Smelcer Connecting system for doll, clothing, and accessories
US20180264370A1 (en) * 2017-03-20 2018-09-20 Mga Entertainment, Inc. Peel-Away Surprise Doll

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