US2331431A - Automatic air vent valve for hot water systems - Google Patents

Automatic air vent valve for hot water systems Download PDF

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Publication number
US2331431A
US2331431A US38070541A US2331431A US 2331431 A US2331431 A US 2331431A US 38070541 A US38070541 A US 38070541A US 2331431 A US2331431 A US 2331431A
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Prior art keywords
valve
water
air
radiator
vent
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Charles B Simoneau
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Charles B Simoneau
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Priority to US38070541 priority Critical patent/US2331431A/en
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24DDOMESTIC- OR SPACE-HEATING SYSTEMS, e.g. CENTRAL HEATING SYSTEMS; DOMESTIC HOT-WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS; ELEMENTS OR COMPONENTS THEREFOR
    • F24D19/00Details
    • F24D19/08Arrangements for drainage, venting or aerating
    • F24D19/082Arrangements for drainage, venting or aerating for water heating systems
    • F24D19/083Venting arrangements
    • F24D19/085Arrangement of venting valves for central heating radiators
    • F24D19/087Arrangement of venting valves for central heating radiators automatic
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/2931Diverse fluid containing pressure systems
    • Y10T137/3003Fluid separating traps or vents
    • Y10T137/3084Discriminating outlet for gas

Description

Oct. 12, 1943. c. B. SIMONEAU AUTOMATIC AIR VENT VALVE FOR HOT WATER SYSTEMS Filed Feb. 26, 1941 FIG 6 FIG 7 FIGS FIGM
FIG. 1'5
INVENT OR.
Patented Oct. 12, 1943 AUTOMATIC AIR VENT VALVE FOR no'r wA'rEn. SYSTEMS Charles B. Simoneau, Lynn, Mass.
Application February 26, 1941, Serial No. 380,705
2 Claims. (Cl. 137122) This invention pertains to means for the automatic venting of air from hot water heating systems and is particularly adapted to systems operating under forced circulation pressure.
Various means, such as screw plugs, pet cocks, etc., are in common use for venting air from hot water heating systems, the plugs, cocks or other devices being opened and closed manually when it is deemed necessary to free the systems from pent up air. This often results in situations where there may be an accumulation of air which impedes circulation and reduces the ef ficiency of the systems. To remedy the unsatisfactory condition resulting from the presence of air, it is often necessary to call in a plumber, steam fitter or other service man to remove the air and return the system to normal condition.
As is well known to those who are skilled in the art, when preparing a hot water heating system for operation, all parts are filled with water to a point above the highest radiator or the upper floor line. While the filling operation is going on, all radiator plugs, pet cocks, etc., where air might gather and make air pockets, are opened manuallyto vent air from the system. As the water rises to these open vents they are closed by hand as the appearance of the water at the vents shows that the air has been expelled, thus creating a theoretically perfect circulatory system. It is found in practice, however, that air pockets form in the radiators and continue to increase in area without the knowledge of the user until a condition arises where due to the air pockets the radiators fail to function properly.
Then the system is tapped by hand to release the air, as referred to above.
- It is well known that water expands when heated. The result is that when the burner is started after the system has been filled with water and the air expelled, the radiators work efiiciently. During the off-cycles the water cools and manual vents that are. not 100 percent sealed take in air. When the burner goes on and heats the water the water expands again as stated and often the vents cannot release the air quickly enough to avoid forming air pockets, thus cutting down the water circulation in the radiators and lowering their heating efllciency. For example, during an on and off cycle there may be a decrease in efficiency of, let us say, 5 percent. During each successive cycle this deficiency builds up, due to increased amounts of air in the radiators. It is a known fact that air pockets are detrimental to the efficiency of hot water heating systems because circulation and radiation capacities are lowered thereby. It is also common experience that one or more radiators in every installation having manual vents must be relieved of accumulated air frequently, sometimes several times per week.
I have devised a means, which I will describe fully hereinafter, by which but water heating systems are automatically vented so that air does not interfere with the circulation and so that perfect circulation is maintained at all times.
Some of the advantages arising from the use of my invention are that there is no delayed or obstructed circulation of the water due to air pockets, resulting in conservation of fuel and heat; better heat radiation; elimination of manually operated vents and the building up of air resistance between said manual operations; saving of the expense incurred in hiring persons to clear the system of air; and other advantages that are obvious.
In the drawing that accompanies this application for a patent as a part thereof, Figure 1 is a vertical view of the unit, partly in section; Figures 2 and 3 are details showing the vent cap; Figures 4 and 5 are details showing the valve seat; Figures 6 and '7 are details showing the upper disc; Figures 8 and 9 are details showing the adjusting screw; Figures 10 and 11 are details showing the valve and stem; Figures 12 and 13 are details showing the plunger; Figures 14 and 15 are details of the lower disc; Figure 16 shows the adapter; Figure 17 shows the position of the unit on an exposed radiator and Figure 18 the preferred position on a concealed radiator.
Referring to the drawing, I9 is a valve casing with a threaded extension l9; l9 indicates threads in the upper end of the casing to engage an adjustable vent cap; I9 indicates threads to engage an adjusting screw; 20 is a chamber in extension I9; 20 is an enlargement of the lower end of chamber 20 to receive a disc; 2| is a chamber in the upper end of the casing and reduced downward to chamber 20; 22 is the disc in 20 22 is a port in the disc; 23 is a plunger in chamber 20; 24 is a valve mounted on a valve stem 24 25 as a valve seat and 25* the valve port; 26 is an adjusting screw with threads 26 engaging threads |9, '26 is a slot in the top of the screw 26 and 26 is a port in the screw; 21 is a disc in chamber 2|; 28 is an adjustable vent cap having threads Ml engaging threads I9 and a vent 28 29 is an adapter on reduced scale, 2!! threads on the adapter for attachment to a radiator and 29 a threaded port for engagement with the threaded extension l9 of the unit.
Automatic venting of hot water heating systems diners from the venting of steam and vapor systems in several respects, giving rise to the problem of venting the air successfully without permitting water to leak through the vent. In steam and vapor systems, in which water does not fill the pipes and radiators, this problem is not present. In order to solve the problem there must be a nice adjustment of the parts which permit venting. I obtain this adjustment by means of the proper positioning of the operative parts of my invention with relation to each other, this adjustment being obtained by means of the screw 26 which positions the valve seat accurately with relation to the valve and plunger and also holds it accurately to prevent leaking, and the adjustable vent cap 28 by means of which venting through the cap is controlled. I also provide a disc 21 in chamber 2! in the vent cap, which, in the event of failure of the valve to operate, will prevent leaking of water through the vent 28, the disc being composed of material that when exposed to water will expand and close the vent by pressure thereon. The space in chamber 2| between the disc and vent may be increased or lessened to obtain the proper operating pressure of the disc on the vent to get perfect closure.
The manner of assembling the unit should be understood from Figure 1. The valve seat 25 is inserted from the top and held in position by screw 26. The casing is then inverted and the valve stem inserted in the valve port, then the plunger is positioned in chamber 20 and disc, 22 pressed into position. By turning screw 26 proper adjustment of the valve seat is obtained, thendisc 21 is positioned in chamber 2| and the vent cap screwed into position, as shown. When the unit is in operative position on a radiator, the plunger rests on disc 22, the end of the valve stem rests on the top of the plunger with valve 24 normally in open position. The adjusting screw and the adjustable cap may be turned with a screw driver or other suitable implement in making adjustments.
As it is not necessary to create a vacuum in the unit or radiator, the disc 21 and shoulder 2| do I not make a perfect contact as would be the case if the shoulder were a valve seat. The result is that air is permitted to enter the unit during off cycles of the heater.
The unit should be installed in a vertical position so that the vent in the cap will be at the top. It is not desirable to place a unit of this kind on the top of an exposed radiator for reasons that will be readily understood. Therefore the radiator is tapped on one end, near its top, and the adapter 29 used to give the unit a vertical position, the unit being attached to the adapter at 29 On concealed radiators, the unit may be positioned in this manner or positioned on the top.
When preparing the system for operation, water is flowed in and as it rises to fill the radiators and reaches the chamber 20 in each unit the water forces the plunger 23 upward to close the valve, the air being expelled as the water rises in the chamber. When the water fills the chamber the plunger releases its pressure on the valve, drops -to the bottom of the chamber and the water holds the valve tightly closed. As heat is developed, the expansion of the water increases the pressure on the valve and there is no leakage.
When heat is withdrawn during off-cycles, there is a reduction of pressure on the valve, so the. some or all of the units may open, letting in air. However, when heat comes on again the air is expelled, the plunger closes the valve and the expanding hot water creates pressure to keep the valve closed against leakage, this occurring automatically to keep the system free from and unimpeded by air during the on-cycles, resultlngin perfect circulation and heat requirements.
In order to obtain the most efficient form of plunger I provide it with a diameter that is slightly smaller than the diameter of chamber 20 and shape it preferably, as shown in Figure 12, so as to permit rise of water in the chamber and accurate positioning of the plunger with relation to the adjacent end of the valve stem.
This unit may be used on steam heating systems in combination with steam radiator valves, also on hot water tanks for domestic and other purposes. When used in combination with steam radiator air vent valves, the unit is attached to the radiator valve above the vent port of the latter so that the vent port provides a passage between the air valve chamber of the radiator valve and the plunger chamber of the unit.
Water of condensation in a steam radiator frequently results in leakage through the radiator air vent valve. The accumulation of such water in a radiator, due to improper drainage for reasons well known to those skilled in the art, forms an obstruction to the free entry of steam into the radiator. In steamheating systems, the change from the ofi" cycle to the on cycle results in rapid movement of steam through the system and when this steam reaches a radiator that is clogged with water of condensation the steam causes sudden intermittent upward movements or sur ing of the water, some of which enters the radiator air vent valve and causes the well known spitting of water from the valve that is frequently observed. This spitting of water into the room continues while the water remains unvaporized in the radiator and at times causes considerable damage to floors, walls and ceilings. By positioning applicant's device on the radiator air vent valve as described, water is prevented from passing into the room. The water projected through the radiator air vent valve hits the plunger 23 and forces it upward immediately to close port 24 as described in relation to hot water systems. At each surging of the water of condensation to cause leakage from the radiator air vent valve the plunger is forced upward in the manner stated and drops back between the surging periods. If such surging fills applicants unit with water under pressure the plunger drops and the water pressure continues to hold valve 24 in closed position as when used on hot water systerns.
As an article of manufacture, the unit is economical in the use of material as it is only about 1% x inches.
While the foregoing is a description of my preferred construction, alterations may be made, as, for example, a buoyant ball or other element 7 instead of the plunger described, or changes in valve for engaging said seat, a stem for said valve projecting through said seat Port, a separate pressure operated plunger in said housing for seating said valve, a member screw threaded in said housing to clamp said seat in position, a separate chamber in said housing, in communication with said seat port, an adjustable cap having a vent port therein closing one end of said chamher and means within said chamber adapted to be expanded by water to close said vent port.
2. In a vent valve device, a housing, a removable valve seat providing a port in the housing, a valve for engaging said seat, a stem for said valve
US38070541 1941-02-26 1941-02-26 Automatic air vent valve for hot water systems Expired - Lifetime US2331431A (en)

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Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2467217A (en) * 1947-10-23 1949-04-12 Dole Valve Co Hot-water automatic vent valve
US2485437A (en) * 1945-02-17 1949-10-18 Frank W Dwyer Pressure gauge
US2519578A (en) * 1946-01-26 1950-08-22 Jimenez Ramon Castro Automatic relief valve
US2544476A (en) * 1944-08-10 1951-03-06 John Venning & Company Ltd Air or gas relief valve
US2601216A (en) * 1948-12-18 1952-06-17 Taco Heaters Inc Automatic air valve
US2633131A (en) * 1949-03-03 1953-03-31 White John H Medicament inhaler
US2654385A (en) * 1949-03-10 1953-10-06 Taco Heaters Inc Automatic hygroscopic type air vent
US2705094A (en) * 1950-03-20 1955-03-29 Jr Alleyne C Howell Metering valve
US2713871A (en) * 1950-04-22 1955-07-26 Ernest A Kroder Automatic vent valve
US2823694A (en) * 1955-11-25 1958-02-18 Orenda Engines Ltd Safety vent plug
US2823693A (en) * 1954-09-16 1958-02-18 Taco Heaters Inc Automatic vent valve
US2850033A (en) * 1953-05-05 1958-09-02 Nat Lead Co Automatic air vent valve
US2972355A (en) * 1957-06-03 1961-02-21 Taco Heaters Inc Vent valve with hydroscopic discs therein
DE1550554B1 (en) * 1965-04-07 1970-12-17 Taco Heizungen Ag Automatic vent valve controlled by the source body

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2544476A (en) * 1944-08-10 1951-03-06 John Venning & Company Ltd Air or gas relief valve
US2485437A (en) * 1945-02-17 1949-10-18 Frank W Dwyer Pressure gauge
US2519578A (en) * 1946-01-26 1950-08-22 Jimenez Ramon Castro Automatic relief valve
US2467217A (en) * 1947-10-23 1949-04-12 Dole Valve Co Hot-water automatic vent valve
US2601216A (en) * 1948-12-18 1952-06-17 Taco Heaters Inc Automatic air valve
US2633131A (en) * 1949-03-03 1953-03-31 White John H Medicament inhaler
US2654385A (en) * 1949-03-10 1953-10-06 Taco Heaters Inc Automatic hygroscopic type air vent
US2705094A (en) * 1950-03-20 1955-03-29 Jr Alleyne C Howell Metering valve
US2713871A (en) * 1950-04-22 1955-07-26 Ernest A Kroder Automatic vent valve
US2850033A (en) * 1953-05-05 1958-09-02 Nat Lead Co Automatic air vent valve
US2823693A (en) * 1954-09-16 1958-02-18 Taco Heaters Inc Automatic vent valve
US2823694A (en) * 1955-11-25 1958-02-18 Orenda Engines Ltd Safety vent plug
US2972355A (en) * 1957-06-03 1961-02-21 Taco Heaters Inc Vent valve with hydroscopic discs therein
DE1550554B1 (en) * 1965-04-07 1970-12-17 Taco Heizungen Ag Automatic vent valve controlled by the source body

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