US2313652A - Adjustable antenna for vehicles - Google Patents

Adjustable antenna for vehicles Download PDF

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US2313652A
US2313652A US390391A US39039141A US2313652A US 2313652 A US2313652 A US 2313652A US 390391 A US390391 A US 390391A US 39039141 A US39039141 A US 39039141A US 2313652 A US2313652 A US 2313652A
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antenna
reel
section
head member
head
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US390391A
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Harry J Lyman
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Philco Radio & Television Corp
PHILCO RADIO AND TELEVISION Corp
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Philco Radio & Television Corp
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01QANTENNAS, i.e. RADIO AERIALS
    • H01Q1/00Details of, or arrangements associated with, antennas
    • H01Q1/08Means for collapsing antennas or parts thereof
    • H01Q1/084Pivotable antennas
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/20Control lever and linkage systems
    • Y10T74/20012Multiple controlled elements

Description

March 9, 1943. H. J, LYMAN 2,313,652

ADJUSTABLE ANTENNA` FOR VEHICLES Filed April 25, 19421l 4 Sheets-Sheet l March 9, 1943. H. J. I YMAN ADJUSTABLE ANTENNA FOR ,VEHICL f 4 sheen-sheet 2 1 Filed April 25, 1941 March'9, 1943. H. J. I YMAN ADJUSTABLE ANTENNA FOR VEHICLES Filed April 25, 1941 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 March 9, 1943.

H. J. LNYMAN v 2,313,652

ADJUSTABLE ANTENNA vFOR VEHICLES Filed April 25. 1941y 4 sheets-sheet y4 Patented Mar.- 9, 1943 ADJUSTABLE ANTENNA FOR VEHCLES Harry J. Lyman, Detroit, Mich., assigner tollihilco Radio and Television Corporation, Philadelphia, Pa., a corporation of Delaware Application April 25, 1941, Serial No. 390,391

(Cl. Z50-33) 16 Claims.

This invention relates to radio antennas, and has particular reference to extensible and retractable antennas which may be used on automobiles or other vehicles.

The primary object of the present invention is to provide an antenna which may be operated, by a single control within the vehicle, either to swing the antenna up or down about its mounting on the vehicle body, or vary its extension above the body.

A more particular object of the invention resides in the provision of an antenna which may, for example, be brought from fully extended to fully retracted position, and thereafter may be caused to swing downwardly about its mounting, all by the continuous movement, in one sense only, of a single control within the Vehicle. Preferably the antenna is mounted on an automobile roof directly above and near the center line of the windshield.

Afurther object of the invention is to provide an antenna comprising-two or more intertting or telescopic sections, in which the upper sections may be adjusted as to extension, to suit varying conditions of signal reception; and in which', at the will of the operator, the upper sections may be substantially or completely telescoped within the lower section, after which the antenna may be swung about its pivot point and disposed adjacent the windshield mullion.

The invention also contemplates and has as a further object the provision of a exible joint in the mounting head, to permit the antenna to fold forward or backward in the event that it is accidently struck while extended, as in passing.

under a low garage door.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an antenna, the various parts of which will 'make Agoed electrical connection, even after long periods of use.

A further object of the invention is to provide an antenna which may be sold as a complete, operative unit, and may be installed Without the necessity of disturbing or adjusting theworking parts.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be best understood by a consideration of the following description taken together with the accompanying drawings, wherein is illustrated a preferred embodiment of the invention.

1n the drawings:

Figure i is a sectional view of an automobile windshield and a portion of the roof, with an elevational showing of the novel antenna applied thereto;

Fig. 2 is a side elevational view, cn a smaller scale, oi the same portions of the automobile, showing the antenna in a different position;Y

Fig. 3 is a View similar to Fig. 2, showing the antenna in the fully extended position;

Fig. 4 is a longitudinal, sectional view through the head and actuating mechanism of the device;

Fig. 5 is a View similar to Fig. 4, illustrating the flexible joint feature `of the invention;

Figs. 6 and 6A are fragmentary perspective views showing theface and'back, respectively, of the support, or stanchion tube used in the device (a back View being considered as a view looking from the control knob end of the device);

Fig. 7 illustrates a pair of arcuate spring members adapted to be associated with the stanchion tube of Figs. 6 and 6A;

Fig. 8 is a perspective View of the ber, taken from the back thereof;

Figs. 9 and 9A are perspective views of the vface and back,respectively, ofthe reel used in the antenna, while Fig. 9A illustrates, in addition, the reel lockv adapted to cooperate with said reel; l

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary perspective view of the drive rod'used in the present invention;

Fig. 11 is a view in perspective of a portion oi the tube adapted to cooperate with theI driveV rod;

Fig. 12 shows one end of the lower; or base section of the antenna proper; f

. Fig. 13 is a perspective view of one endof the extensible section of the antenna, illustrating the attachment of the driving tape thereto;

Fig. 14 is a View in perspective of the backof the head cap; I i

Fig. 15 is a rear face' View showing this'head cap on a larger scale; v

Fig. 16 is an enlarged front face view of the stanchion tube of Fig; 6, showing the disposition of the arcuate springs therein;

Figs. 17 and'l'lA are also enlarged front and rear face views, respectively, .of the head member-illustrated in Fig. 8, showing ,the reel lock mounted therein;

' Figs. 18 and 18A'are front and rear face-views head memof the reel of Figs. 9 and 9A onalarger scalato` more clearly illustrate certain details; and

. Fig. 19 is an exploded, perspective View showing the sequential arrangement oi the variousparts of the device.

Referring more particularly to the drawings,

Fig. 1 shows the device mounted on an automo-f bile roof, generally indicated at 2, just above the center mullicn 3 of the windshield fi. .The mech.- anism is illustrated in the fully retracted restposition, i. e., with the antenna basel section 5 swung downwardly and in snap-engagement with a support member 6 xed to the mullion 3. As appears in the ligure, the stanchion tube 8 is held in the inside and outside roof members 9 and I0, by means of collar and nut assembly I I, and outside collar I2. To prevent rotation of the stanchion tube, it may be keyed to member I2.

The collar members are made of insulating material so as to insulate the antenna from the automobile body, and a lead-in rod I3 is provided. This rod may be connected to any convenient part of the antenna assembly, as by means of clip I3a, since the two collar members effectively insure that the entire assembly is insulated fro-m the car body. In this connection, it should also be noted that the construction of the entire antenna is one which assures good electrical contact, from the extensible antenna section, back through the device to the lead-in wire. As will appear fully hereafter, the extensible section is moved by means of a driving tape, one end of which is xed to said section and the other to a reel nested within the head. Since this tape is spot welded to the extensible section, it may be seen that the construction, in effect, provides a continuous lead-in wire extending throughout the device.

Control knob I 4 is provided within the car and, as will be brought out fully as the description proceeds, the mechanism is such that clockwise rotation of this knob will rst swing the antenna up to the position shown in Fig. 2, and secondly extend an additional antenna portion I5, as may be vseen in Fig. 3. Rotation of knob I4 in the counter-clockwise sense, will first cause portion I 5 to be telescoped within the lower section 5, and continued counter-clockwise rotation will serve to swing the antenna downwardly to the rest position shown in Fig. 1. It should be here pointed out that the control requires simple rotational movement only, and that the mechanism conditions itself so as to initiate extension and swinging movements of the antenna in their proper sequence.

The individual parts by which the advantages of the mechanism are realized, will now be taken up in detail. Y f

Figs. 6 and 6A show that the xed, stanchion tube 8 has an enlarged cap portion I6 having an annular ange II extending rearwardly therefrom. Apertures I8 and I9 are formed in the cap portion I6, for a purpose which will appear later. The tube 8, shown broken away for convenience, is hollow to accommodate the driving shaft, and as appears in Figs. 1, 4 and 5, has an externally threaded portion 20, adapted toI cooperate with the mounting nut.

Disposed within the annular flange Il and concentric therewith is an annular shoulder portion 2l in which is countersunk a bore 22, of larger diameter than the bore in the tube 8, and having anarcuate stop shoulder 23 formed therein (see Fig. 1 6).

` Behind the cap portion I 5 are two pairs of short projecting ypins 24-24, as most clearly appears in Fig. 16. VA pair of arcuate spring members Y25 and 25 (Fig. 7), having forwardly proliecting-portions 21 and 28, are arranged behind the cap portion I6 with portions 21 and 28 disposed in openings I8 and I9, and the springs are securely fastened to the pins 24 as, for example, by riveting. The springing action of these arcuate `members is such that portions 21 and 28 tend to resist alforce acting to move them out of apertures I8 and I9. As clearly appears in Fig. 16,

portion 28 is substantially wider than portion 21 and thereby extends radially outwardly further than portion 27. To assure positioning the proper spring in its corresponding aperture, only one of the apertures, i. e. aperture I9, is made wide enough to accommodate the wider portion 28.

Referring now to Figs. 8, 17 and'17A, the head portion 1 is adapted to be rotatively carried by the stanchion member just described. The back of this centrally-bored head member (Figs. 3 and 17A) is configured to cooperate with the face of the stanchion member, and has two projecting legs 29 and 38, of arcuate outside shape, which `are adapted to seat in the counterbore 22 o-f the stanchion member, and provide a bearing for rotation of said head with respect to the stanchion. Leg 29 is providedwith a projecting portion 3|, which, when the two members are fitted together, extends sufficiently far into the counterbore 22 to engage the stop-shoulder 28 formed in said counterbore. This stop-shoulder and the cooperating portion 3I are so formed as to permit only 180 rotation of the head with respect to the stanchion. At either end of this travel, as may be seen by inspection of Figs. 16 and 17A, the portion 3i will strike the stop-shoulder 23. As appears from Figs. 8 and 17A, an aperture 82 is provided through the end wall 33 of the head, adjacent leg 29. This aperture is so positioned that when the head is at either end of its 180 travel relative to the stanchion, one or the other of the spring portions 2l and 28 will extend therethrough. Diametrically opposite to the aperture 32 there is provided a depression 34 into which will snap the spring which is not extending into said aperture.

. Referring to Figs. 17 and.19, the face of the head member 'l is bored out to a `depth suflicient to receive the real 35. Associated With a smaller bore which extends completely through wall 33, are two keyways 35 which, as best seen in Fig. 17A, extend partially through the legs 29 and 30. A further out 3'! is made partially through the wall 33. This cut begins at aperture 32 and extends through a circular arc of about Into this cut is fitted a reel locking bar 4l which is pivoted for limited rocking movement as at 42 and urged out of the recess 3l, at one end thereof, by a spring indicated in dottedflines at 43.

` This reel locking bar has oppositely turned lugs 44 and 45 at its ends (Figs. 9A, 17 and 17A) Lug 44 normally extends into aperture 32 formed in head 1, while lug 45 is urged outwardly from recess 8l by spring 43, toward engagement with radial slots 46 (Fig. 18A) formed in the back of reel 35.

- Head member "l is also provided at one side with a hollowed out shank 38 which,-as seen in Fig. 19, terminates in a conical portion 39, centrally bored at 40 to receive the lower antenna section 5.

Referring to Figs. 9, 9A, 18 and 18A, the reel 35 is provided at one side with a hub portion 4'! (see Fig. 9A), forming a circular bearing 4of a size to fit and turn freely within the smaller central bore of head member l. This hub 41 has a bored-out portion in which a pin 48 is fixed (Fig. 18A). Through this pin 48 the torque of drive-shaft 49 is transmitted to the reel, as by means of slot 58 formed in the end of said shaft (see Fig. 10).

The reel itself has an inner drum 5I (Figs. 9 and 18) upon which the drive tape 52, secured as at 53, may be wound. The reel is also provided with a circumferential Wall 54. The tape bears against this wall, and is guided thereby, during the unreeling operation, as described hereinafter. The tape 52 is preferably a steel tape of generally known form.

The cap member 55 is best illustrated in Figs. 14 and 15. This member has a central recessed bearing portion 56 to cooperate with a bearing spindle l formed on the front face of reel 35 (Fig. 18). A wall 58 on the cap member exactly fits and cooperates with the circumferential wall 54 of the reel. This wail 58 is of substantial depth at the lower portion of the cap, as viewed in Fig. 14, and of a very small depth at the upper portion of the cap. Thus, when the members are assembled, as seen in Fig. 4, the plane of the reel is cocked somewhat with respect to the passage in conical portion 39 of head member i. This permits the drive tape to unwind freely from drum 5| and to pass through gate 59 (see Fig. provided in wall 58, without interference by the reel wall 5.

The particular configuration of the reel and the cooperating head cap, is of importance as it enables the tape to be wound both in and out by the rotation of one barrel member. The cooperation between the drum 5l, wall 54 and cap- Wall 58, in the present device, provide both inner and outer winding reels. In operation, when the tape is wound in, the drum 5I serves as the winding drum, and when the tape is thrust out, walls 54 and 58 cooperate to form a tape extruding drum.

The inner and outer telescopic sections of the antenna, as well as the drive tape which is fastened to the above-described reel and drives said inner section, will now be more particularly described. Reference should be had to Figs. 5, 12 and 13.

The larger section 5 is cut away near its lower end, as at 69, and this end is snugly fitted into the hollowed shank 38 of the head. Cooperating cap member 55 is recessed as at 5|, which most clearly appears in Fig. 15. When section 5 is iitted into the head member, its lowermost circular portion seats in recess 6I of the cap member. A retaining screw B2 fastens the head and cap together, and it can be seen that lower section 5 is tightly held against endwise displacement in said head member. As appears in Fig. 13, the extensible tube I5 is iiatted as its inner end, and one end of the drive tape 52 is fastenedto this atted portion. To the opposite side of said portion is fastened a short tape section 53, which is employed to prevent rattling of the tube l5 within tube 5. As may be seen from the phantom lines on Fig. 15, as well as from the section of the reel illustrated in Fig. 1'?, the tape is brought in through hollow shank 38 of the head member, through aperture 59 provided in wall 58 of the cap member, fixed to the reel as at 53 and is then wound thereon.

Referring to Figs. 10 and 11, the former shows the driving shaft 49, while the latter figure shows a hollow tube 64 of a diameter to fit within the stanchion tube 8 and adapted to receive the driving shaft. one end thereof and is provided with two oppositely disposed and outwardly extending ears 85. Drive-shaft 49 has its corresponding end slotted as at 50. As assembled (see e) the tube and drive-shaft have operatively interposed between them a spring S8. This spring, by reacting between the annular wall 51 of the tube and a retaining washer 68, fixed to the driveshaft, maintains the two members in the relative axial positions shown in Fig. 4, under all normal conditions of operation of the device. However, the spring will permit tube $4 some axial movement with respect to drive-shaft 49. The direction and approximate extent of this movement,

will be apparent by a comparison of Figs. 4 and 5.

In assembling the device, referring to Figs. 4 and 19, the above-described drive-shaft and tube assembly is first inserted through the central bore of the head member 1, and the tube ears 65 engaged with the retaining keyways 36 formed in the head member. Following this, the stanchion tube 8 may be slipped onto tube Sii, and this assembly fastened against axial displacement of the parts, by a retaining washer 68a which clips into a circumferential groove formed adjacent the splined end 69 of the driveshaft. Next, the reel lock 4|, may be properly positioned, and the reel placed in the'recessed head with its drive-bar i48 in-v engagement with the slotted end of the` drive-shaft. Lastly,V the driving tape may be introduced and fastened to the reel, as above described. Positioning. the cap member 55 and inserting retaining screw 62 completesthe assembly. Positioning ofthe collars ii, and i2 as well as the inside finish bezel 'fil and control knob i4 has not been particularly described, as they are not a part of the antenna assembly per se,and may be utilized in any convenientorder when the antenna is being installed. v f

The operation of the device is as follows, and is described, with particular reference to Figs. 4:, 5 and 19. For purposes of illustration, it will be first assumed that the antenna is in the position shown in Fig. 1, and that it is desired to rotate it upwardly and extend it to the position shown in Fig. 3.

At this lower limit of the 180 rotation possibie between the head 'l and the fixed stanchion tube 8, the narrow spring lug 2T is protruding through the aperture 32 in the head. This spring lug being narrow, will not strike lug 44 of reel lockbar 4l, and therefore the forwardly extending lug l5 aty the opposite end of lock bar 4I will have moved on pivot 42 under the inuence of spring 43, into engagement with one of the radial slots it in reel 35. Since the lock bar 4I is fixed in the head member 1, the head member is now locked to drive-shaft 49 through the reel. Turning the control knob I4 clockwise (which knob always drives the reel directly through the pin-engaging slot in the drive shaft) will now serve to rotate the head through 180, until it is disposed directly upwardly, as seen in Fig. 19. At this end of the 180 travel, the por- Tube 6i has a V-shaped out in tion 3l of leg 29 abuts one edge of the arcute step-shoulder 23 in the cap It, and thereby prevents further clockwise rotation of the head member relative to the stanchion. Simultaneously, the wider spring lug 23 drops into and protrudes through the aperture 32 in the head member. This lug is suiiciently wide to engage cooperating lug 46 on the reel locking bar, and the lock moves about its pivot, forcing lug 45 out of engagement with the radial slot 43 in the reel. In this position of the parts, it Vwill be apparent that the reel is no longer locked to the head, and further turning of the control knob ciockwise turns only the reel, forcing the drive tape 52, and thereby the extensible antenna section l5 outwardly. The head is now held against any tendency to inadvertently return over its travel, by the action of the spring lugs, the lug 28 having sprung into aperture 32, while the lug 2'1 is snap-engaged with the depression 34 formed on the back of the head member.

When it is desired to return the antenna section i somewhat from the fully extended position, or to completely retract the antenna and re-align it with the windshield mullion, the control knob is turned in the counter-clockwise direction, When this return operation is initiated, the head member itself will not rotate until the upper section is completely retracted. This, as explained above, is due to the fact that the reel is unlocked and is free to turn relative to the head member, and the spring lugs 2'! and 28 are engaged respectively with the recess 34 and aperture 32 formed in the head member and hence resist any tendency of the head member to turn. However, as soon as the upper section is completely retracted, the small knob on top of the extensible section is brought into rm engagement with the top of the lower section. Since the tape can be wound in no further, continued counter-clockwise rotation of the control knob tends to rotate the head member and overcomes the pressure of the spring lugs 21 and 28. These are, accordingly, forced out of the recess 34 and aperture 32, permitting the lock bar 4| to again lock the reel to the head member, and the head returns over its 180 rotational travel, to its position of rest as shown in Fig. 1. In this position the antenna again springs into clip 6 and is held rmly.

In the event that the antenna is struck, which may occur when it is in elevated position, the head member 'I will merely bend rearwardly or forwardly, depending on whether it is struck from the front or the rear. The ears 65 on the end of tube 64 and their keyways 36, by which the head member 1 is secured, form a swivel joint which together with the slidability of tube 84 permits the head member to move rearwardly or forwardly. Fig. 5 illustrates one such movement, i. e. the forward movement of the head member. As will be seen from a comparison of Figs. 4 and 5, the head member will draw away from the slotted end 50 of the drive-shaft, carrying with it the tube B4 against the pressure of spring 6E. In this position, the head is free to move in any direction without harming the mechanism. With removal of the displacing force, the pull of the spring E6 transmitted through ears 65 to the keyways 3S in the head, will re-engage slot 50 and drive-pin 48 so that rotation of the knob I4 will move the antenna to any desired position.

From the foregoing description, it will be seen that the invention provides a novel antenna device embodying means responsive to rotary movement only of a control element to swing the antenna from its rest position to its operative position or vice versa, and means responsive to additional rotary movement of the control element for extending or retracting the antenna when in its operative position. Thus the device is very easy to operate and requires a minimum amount of elort on the part of the operator, and furthermore the device may -be operated by the driver of the vehicle without distracting his attention from the driving of the vehicle.

Further the swivel joint feature of thedevice safeguards it against injury by its being struck by objects, particularly when entering a garage. This is a very important feature in a device of this character which may extend a considerable distance above the vehicle roof, and is virtually certain to be struck at some time.

From the above description, it will also be apparent that the invention provides an antenna device which is highly compact, simple to install and operate, and has numerous advantages and desirable features. As an example of the compactness of the device, but not intended as a limitation, it might be pointed out that the device extends only about an inch beyond the outer roof line of the automobile. Further, in the present embodiment, the head diameter is in the neighborhood of one and one-quarter inches, while the steel tape drive permits the use of a base antenna section which, while it is only about five thirty-seconds of an inch in diameter, is capable of considerable extension.

The illustrated embodiment, and its particular positioning on an automobile body, are merely illustrative, and the invention contemplates such changes and modications as may fall within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

l. An extensible and retractible antenna device for a vehicle, comprising a rod-like multisection antenna whose sections are normally retracted, means for pivotally mounting said antenna on a vehicle so that it may move pivotally through a predetermined angle from a rest position to an operative position, a rotatable control element, means operable in response to rotary movement only of said control element for moving said antenna from its rest position to its operative position, and means responsive to additional rotary movement of said control element in the same direction for effecting relative movement between said antenna sections to increase the eiective length of the antenna.

2. An extensible and retractible antenna device for a vehicle, comprising a rod-like multisection antenna whose sections are normally retracted, means for pivotally mounting said antenna o-n a vehicle so that it may move pivotally from a downwardly extending rest position to an upwardly extending operative position, a rotatable control element, means operable in response to rotary movement only of said control element for moving said antenna from its rest position to its operative position, means for stopping the pivotal movement of the antenna when it reaches its operative position, and means rendered operative when the antenna reaches its operative position and responsive to additional rotary movement of said control element in the same direction for effecting relative movement between said antenna sections to increase the effective length of the antenna.

3. A vehicle antenna, comprising a swingable base section arranged for disposition exteriorly of a vehicle, a second section carried by said base section and extensible therefrom actuating means for swinging said base section about its mounting point and for varying the extension of said second section, and means drivingly connected to said actuating means and arranged to extend interiorly of the vehicle, and operable by rotational movement alone to control said actuating means.

4. A vehicle antenna, comprising a swingable base section arranged for disposition exteriorly of a vehicle, a second section carried by the base section and extensible therefrom, a driving element associated with said second section, actuating means, including a rotatable element operatively connected with said driving element and with said base section, for swinging said base section about its mounting point and for varying the extension of said second section, and control means connected with said actuating means and arranged to extend interiorly of the vehicle, and operable by rotational movement alone in one sense to bring the antenna from the lower extreme position of its swinging movement to the extreme extended position, and operable by rotational movement alone in the opposite sense to bring the antenna from its position of extreme extension to the lower extreme position of its swinging movement.

5. A vehicle antenna, a swingable head member, a ixed base member in which said head member is mounted, an antenna section carried by said head member, a second antenna section carried by said first section and extensible therefrom, actuating means for swinging said head member about its mounting point, and for varying the extension of said second antenna section, and rotatable means extending through said base member and drivingly connected to said actuating means, and operable by rotational movement alone to Abring the antenna from the lower extreme position of its swinging movement to the extreme extended position.

6. A vehicle antenna, comprising a swingable head member arranged for disposition exteriorly of a vehicle, a base antenna section carried by said head member, a second antenna section carried by said base section and extensible therefrom, a driving tape connected with said second section, a reel mounted in said head member and operatively connected to said driving tape, control means operatively connected to said reel and adapted to rotate the same, means operative to lock said reel against rotation relative to said head member whereby to provide swinging of the head member under the influence of said control means, and means for rendering said locking means ineffective, thereby to effect actuation of said driving tape under the influence of said control means.

7. A device in accordance with claim 6, said reel being provided with an annular recessed portion within which the driving tape is coiled, and a cap member tted over the head member and configured to cooperate with said reel so as to retain said tape against dislodgement from the reel.

8. A vehicle antenna in accordance with claim 6, wherein the reel locking means comprises a recess formed in said reel, and a member pivotally mounted in said head member for movement into and out of engagement with said recess, said member normally being urged toward the engaged position.

9. A vehicle antenna, comprising a head member, a base antenna section carried by the head member, a second antenna section carried within the base section and extensible therefrom, actuating means for varying the extension of said second antenna section, said actuating means comprising a fiexible drive element and a rotatable reel, one end of said drive element extending within said base section and being secured to said second section, and the other end of said drive element being secured to said reel and Wound thereon for actuation thereby, said reel having an annular wall disposed radially outwardly from the zone on which the tape is wound, and said head member having a wall cooperating with the annular wall of the reel to confine said flexible drive element and direct its motion, when the reel is operated in a direction to thrust the drive element outwardly.

10. A vehicle antenna in accordance with claim 9, wherein the wall formed in the head member partially defines a passage leading through said head member to the base section.

11. A Vehicle antenna, comprising a fixed base member, a head member carried by said base member and swingable through a predetermined angle with respect thereto, an antenna section carried by said head member, a second antenna section carried by said rst section and extensible therefroma exible driving element connected with said second section, a reel mounted in said head member and operatively connected with said driving element, control means operatively connected with said reel and adapted to rotate the same, means operative to lock said reel against rotation relative to said head whereby to provide swinging of the head member under the inuence of said control means, and means for rendering said locking means ineiective, thereby to effect actuation of said flexible driving element under the influence of said control means, said last means comprising a spring member mounted on said fixed base member and adapted to engage and hold said locking means out of operation after the head member has been moved to the upper limit of its swinging movement.

12. A vehicle antenna, comprising a swingable head member, a fixed base member in which said head member is mounted, an antenna section carried by said head member, a second antenna section carried by said first section and extensible therefrom, actuating means for swinging said head member about its mounting point, and for varying the extension of said second antenna section, means drivingly connected to said actuating means and operable by rotational movement alone to bring the antenna from the lower extreme position of its swinging movement to the extreme extended position, and resilient I means interposed between the head and base members and constructed to permit yieldingly opposed movement of the head member out of the plane of its swinging movement.

13. A vehicle antenna, comprising a swingable head member, a fixed base member in which said head member is mounted, an antenna section carried by said head member, a second antenna section carried by said first section and extensible therefrom, actuating means for swinging said head member about its mounting point, and for varying the extension of said second antenna section, means drivingly connected to said actuating means and operable by rotational movement alone to bring the aerial from the lower extreme position of its swinging movement to the extreme extended position, and resilient means interposed between the head and base members, comprising an anchor member fixed to the head member and extending within the base member, and a spring yieldingly resisting movement of said anchor member out of said base member.

14. An antenna structure as claimed in claim 9, wherein the wall formed in the head member partially defines a passage leading through the head member to the base section, and the rotational plane of the reel is angled with respect to the longitudinal axis of said passage, the arrangement being such that the flexible drive element may pass over said reel wall into operative association therewith.

15. A vehicle antenna comprising a swingable base section arranged for disposition exteriorly of and to vary the extension of said second section, and means drivingly connected to said actuating means and adapted to extend interiorly of a vehicle, said means being operable by rotational movement alone both to swing said base section and vary the extension of said second section.

16. A Vehicle antenna comprising a sWingable base section arranged for disposition exteriorly of a vehicle, a second section carried by the base ksection and extensible therefrom, actuating means including a reel member and a tape in driven engagement therewith and drivingly connected to said second section, said actuating means being operable both to swing said base section and to vary the extension of said second section, and means drivingly connected to said actuating means and adapted to extend exteriorly of a vehicle, said means being operable by rotational movement alone both to swing said base section and vary the extension of said second section.

HARRY J. LYMAN.

US390391A 1941-04-25 1941-04-25 Adjustable antenna for vehicles Expired - Lifetime US2313652A (en)

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2695957A (en) * 1948-03-31 1954-11-30 Casco Products Corp Projectable antenna
US3188881A (en) * 1961-12-29 1965-06-15 Gen Electric Rotary switch actuator
US4107695A (en) * 1976-08-11 1978-08-15 Urban Donald E Antenna raising and lowering device
US4109251A (en) * 1976-07-08 1978-08-22 Macdougall James B Adjustable antenna mounting bracket
EP1162685A2 (en) * 2000-06-06 2001-12-12 Harada Industry Co., Ltd. Pivotable connection configuration of retractable roof mounted antenna

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2695957A (en) * 1948-03-31 1954-11-30 Casco Products Corp Projectable antenna
US3188881A (en) * 1961-12-29 1965-06-15 Gen Electric Rotary switch actuator
US4109251A (en) * 1976-07-08 1978-08-22 Macdougall James B Adjustable antenna mounting bracket
US4107695A (en) * 1976-08-11 1978-08-15 Urban Donald E Antenna raising and lowering device
EP1162685A2 (en) * 2000-06-06 2001-12-12 Harada Industry Co., Ltd. Pivotable connection configuration of retractable roof mounted antenna
EP1162685A3 (en) * 2000-06-06 2002-09-04 Harada Industry Co., Ltd. Pivotable connection configuration of retractable roof mounted antenna
US6486842B2 (en) 2000-06-06 2002-11-26 Harada Industry Co., Ltd. Pivottable connection configuration of retractable roof mounted antenna

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