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Method of and means for cleaning wells

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US2312018A
US2312018A US29108739A US2312018A US 2312018 A US2312018 A US 2312018A US 29108739 A US29108739 A US 29108739A US 2312018 A US2312018 A US 2312018A
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bore
drill
drilling
valve
means
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Fred G Beckman
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Fred G Beckman
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B37/00Methods or apparatus for cleaning boreholes or wells
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B21/00Methods or apparatus for flushing boreholes, e.g. by use of exhaust air from motor
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B21/00Methods or apparatus for flushing boreholes, e.g. by use of exhaust air from motor
    • E21B21/10Valves arrangements in drilling fluid circulation systems
    • E21B21/103Down-hole by-pass valve arrangements, i.e. between the inside of the drill string and the annulus
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B49/00Testing the nature of borehole walls; Formation testing; Methods or apparatus for obtaining samples of soil or well fluids, specially adapted to earth drilling or wells
    • E21B49/02Testing the nature of borehole walls; Formation testing; Methods or apparatus for obtaining samples of soil or well fluids, specially adapted to earth drilling or wells by mechanically taking samples of the soil

Description

Feb. 23, 1943. F. G. BECKMAN 2,312,018

METHOD OF AND MEANS FOR CLEANING WELLS Filed Aug. 19, 1939 :s sheets-sheet 1 Feb. 23, 1943. F. G. BECKMAN 2,312,018

METHQD OF AND MEANS FOR CLEANING WELLS Feb. 23, 1943. F. G. BECKMAN METHOD- OF AND MEANS FOR CLEANING WELLS Filed Aug. 19, 1939 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 d w m w Z W www @xw/// g Fred 6. beck/7751;?

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Patented Feb. 23,v 1943 METHOD F AND MEANS FOR CLEANING WELLS ,Fred G. Beckman, Muskogee, Okla. Application August 19, 1939, 'Serial No. 291,087

(Cl. 16S-20) 22 Claims.

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in methods of and means for cleaning wells.

This application is led as a continuation in part of each of my copending applications, Serial No. 233,754, led October .7, 1938, and Serial No. 268,322, led April 17, 1939. The subject matter disclosed in both of my prior applications is included herein.

In the production of petroleum products from wells, there are many instances where it becomes necessary to clean out the lower portion of the well bore, and particularly that portion adjacent the producing formation, in order to increase the production. During the drilling operation, it has been found that an accumulation or deposit may occur on the wall of the bore, such accumulation being mud or cuttings which are not carried to the surface by the circulating drillmoval of such accumulation is not only desir' able but practically essential.

Further, the lower portion of the well bore may become filled by the caving of a softer formation or stratum from above, which caving may be caused by the action of acid` or other treatment; or such caving maybe the result of shooting" the well, that is, setting off an explosive, such as nitroglycerine, in the well bore. Also, abandoned or old wells which have been standing for some time may have an accumulation or coating of parafn on the walls of the bore, which accumulation prevents proper iiow of the well products from the producing formation.

In order to thoroughly clean out well bores so as to remove the accumulation or deposits, above referred to, it has been recognized that washing of the bore, in addition to a drilling step, is necessary and various types of washing tools have been used. The usual type of washing tool is ordinarily substituted for the drill bit, being secured to the lower end of the drill pipe or stem. With such arrangement, it is only possible to perform either the drilling step or the washing step each time the drill stem is run into the hole. In other words, it is necessary that the entire drill stem be removed each time it is desired to change from drilling to washing, and vice versa. Ordinarily, in performing the cleaning of the well, the bore is partially drilled, and then washed, after which an additional drilling step is performed and washing prevents cave-ins and makes for thorough cleansing. Obviously, if the drill stem must be pulled each time a change is made from drilling to washing, a great 4deal of time and labor is required to complete the cleaning operation.

It is one object of this inventionto provide an improved method of cleaning wells wherein the accumulation in the well bore may be drilled out, after which the walls of the bore may be'thoroughly washed, the steps of the method being performed without the removal ci the drill pipe from the Well bore, whereby a minimum amount of time and labor is required for the cleaning operation.

Another object of theinvention is to provide an improved method of cleaning out wells which includes, drilling through the accumulation inthe well bore and circulating a drilling fluid under pressure downwardly outside of the drill stem and upwardly through said stem to carry the removed cuttings to the surface, and then circulating the fluid downwardly through the stem and directing the same radially outwardly at a relatively high velocity into contact with the drilled bore so as to thoroughly wash the bore and remove all of the loosened material therein.

An important object 1 of the invention is to provide an improved device for cleaning well bores by a washing action which is adapted to be connected in a drill string above tne drill bit, said device having a bore which communicates with the bore of the drill string to permit normal circulation of the drilling fluid during the drilling operation; the device also having a plurality of restricted radial orices extending from its bore, whereby when said bore is closed, a fluid under pressure may be directed outwardly through said orices at a relatively high velocity into contact with the side wall of the bore to perform the washing operation.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved washing tool, of the character described, wherein the bore of said tool is arranged tofbe closed by a removable closure, said closure -being adapted to be dropped through the drill stem to close said bore and thereby allow the Washing operation to be carried out, and being l, adapted to be removed either by fluid pressure or following by washing. This alternate drilling vby a suitable tool after said operation is completed to permit drilling to be continued; the

arrangement making it unnecessary to remove` the drill stem to alternately drill and wash the accumulation from the well bore.

Still another object or the invention is to provide an improved washing tool, of the character described, wherein the high velocity ports are normally closed'by valves, which are constructed so that they may be moved to an open position `to uncover the ports by iluid pressure, whereby mechanical means for operating the valves is eliminated.

A construction designed to carry out the invention will be hereinafter described, together with other features oi the invention.

'Ihe invention will be more readily understood irom a reading of the following specification angl by reference to the accompanying drawings, in which an example of the invention is shown, and wherein:

Figure 1 is a transverse, vertical, sectional view of the lower portion oi the bore hole which requires cleaning,

Figures 2 to 5 are similar views, illustrating the various steps of the improved method oi cleaning out the bore.

Figure 6 is a transverse, vertical, sectional'vie# of an improved washing tool, constructed in ac,.- cordance with the invention, and illustrating said tool connected in the drill string above thev drill bit. Figure '7 is an enlarged, transverse, vertical, sectional view of said tool, with the valvein a position uncovering the velocityport,

Figure 8 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view, taken on the line 8 8 oi Figure 6,

Y the exterior thereof.

Figure 9 is a horizontal. cross-sectional view, e

taken on the line 8-9 oi' Figure?,

Figure 10 is a view, partly in elevation and partly in section, and illustrating a modified form of closure for closing the bore of the tool,

Figure 11 is a view similar to Figure 6 illus- A trating a modified form of the invention,

Figure 12 is an enlarged transverse, vertical, sectional view oi' this form, with a ball valve dropped in position and closing the bore of the tool,

Figure 13 is a horizontal, cross-'sectional view, taken onthe line I3--I3 oi Figure ll, and

Figure 14 is a transverse, vertical, sectional view of a portion oi the tool, with the velocity ports closed by check valves.

In the drawings, the numeral I0 designates the usual rotatable drill pipe or stern which is adapted to be lowered through the well bore A.

' The lower end of the drill pipe is connected by means of a coupling collar II with a washingtool T and the lower end of said tool is coupled to the usual drill bit I2. The bit I2 may be oi' any desired construction and is shown as including ythe upstanding screw-threaded pin I3 and the usual axial boreV I4. Manifestly, the drill bit I2 is connected to vthe drill/pipe through the washing tool T and the coupling collar I I, the tool being` shown as substituted for the usual drill collar which connects these parts.

The washing tool T includes an elongate, cylindrical body I5, which is illustrated as made in two sections, which are connected together by means vof screw threads IB.. The upper section is provided with external screw threads at ,its

upper end which are coupled into the collar IIl while the lower end of said upper section threads into the bore of the lower section. The lower section oi the body I5 has its lower end internally screw-threaded to receive the pin I8 oi the drill bit and above the screw-threaded portion,"

an internal, annular flange I1 is formed within the bore oi the body. When the drill bit is connected to the body I5, the upper end of the pin I 3 of said bit abuts the underside of the ange I1.

The bore of the lower section oi' the body is slightly larger in diameter than the bore of the upper section of said body, whereby when the sections are connected together, the underside of the upper section'forms an internal, annularV ange or shoulder I8 within said body.. I! desired, the upper section of the body may beprovided with annular serrations or teeth I8, whereby a suitable fishing neck vis formed 'below the screw threads at the upper end of this section.

'Ihe lower section of the body I5 is provided with a plurality of velocity ports or orinces 2l, which ports are spaced below the internal shoulder I8. The ports have been illustrated as two in number and have been shown as diametrically opposite each other, but it is pointed out that any desired number of said ports may be employed. Maniiestly, the ports establish communication between the bore of the'body I5 and The ports are oi a relatively small diameter or size as compared to the cross-sectional area oi the bore oi the body II and the bore of the drill pipe I D.

For controlling the ilow through the velocity ports 20, a piston or sleeve type valve 2| vis slidably mounted within the bore oi the lower section of the body I5, said valve being coniined between the internal shoulder I8 andthe internal iiange I1. The valve includes a tubular mandrel 22 which has its upper end enlarged to form a head 23. A plurality of metallic rings 2l'are mounted on the mandrel, the lowermost ring being threadved thereon. A suitable elastic packing collar 2.5

is preferably confined on the mandrel between two of the rings 24. If desired, each ring 2ly may carry a suitable packing ring 26. Whenthe valve 2i is in theposition shown in Figure 6./the elastic packing collar 25 is opposite or in alinement with the velocity ports 2li, whereby said ports are closed and no flow throughsaid ports is possible. However, when the valve is moved downwardly within the bore oi' the body I5 to the :position -shown in Figure 7,y the ports 20 are uncovered to permit a ow therethrough. 'I'he upper end oi' the bore of the mandrel 22 is bevelled or ilared outwardly to form an annular'valve seat 21, the Y purpose oi' which seat will be hereinafter ex'"- plained.

For guiding the valve 2| in its vertical move- I ment within the bore oi' the body I5, a tubular stem 28 is provided. The lower end of the stem is suitably supported or secured within' the annular ange I1 provided within the lower portion of the body, while the upper'end oi said stem engages within the bore of` the tubular mandrel 22. The guide stem 28 is provided with a flange 29 at its lower end, which iiange overlies the ange I1. An external, annular shoulder 30 is provided on the guide stern intermediate its ends and said shoulder serves as a stop to limit the downward movement of the valve 2 I. A coiled spring 3l surrounds the guide stem 28 and is conned between the flange 29 oi saidI stem and the underside of the valve 2|, said spring constantly exerting its 4 pressure to urge the valve to its upper or closedI position, as shown in Figure 6. It is noted that upward movements of the valve 2| -is limited by said valve striking thev shoulder I8 formed within tfle upper. portion of the lower section of the body When the valve 2i is in its uppermost position, the velocity ports 28 are closed and the normal drilling operation may be performed. During the drill stem and the drill bit, the

rotation of the usual drilling fluid is circulated downwardly through the well bore A on the outside of said drill stem. Upon reaching the lower portion of the bore, the drilling fluid circulates upwardly through the axial bore I4 of the drill bit, then upwardly through the tubular guide stem 28. tubular valve 2| and finally upwardly through the drill stem I0. This circulating drilling uid serves to carry the cuttings which are removed by the drill bit to the surface of the well in the usual manner. It is noted that at this time the valve 2| and its associate parts do not, in any Way, interfere with the usual drilling.

When it is desired to wash the well bore and to utilize the washing tool T, it is only necessary to drop a ball valve 32 downwardly through the drill stem I0, said ball falling downwardly and iinally f. seating on the valve seat 21 provided at the upper end of the tubular mandrel 22 (Figures 7). Of

jcourse, rotation oi the d rill stem I is halted, as lis the circulation of the drilling fluid. After the Il'ball 32 is seated, the direction of circulation of the drilling fluid is reversed, that is, the fluid is pumped downwardly through the drill stem instead of exteriorly thereof, as is the case during the drilling operation. The pressure 'of the drilling uid falling downwardly through the drill stem |0 acts downwardly on the ball valve 32, as well as on the sleeve or piston valve 2|, thereby forcing the latter valve downwardly under tension of the spring 3|. When the pressure forces the sleeve valve 2| downwardly to the position shown in Figure 1, the velocity ports 20 have been uncovered and the drilling fluid can escape through said ports outwardly into the well bore A. Since the ports 2|) are of a relatively small diameter, -as compared to the cross-sectional area of the drill stem, it will be obvious that the drilling fluid will escape from said ports at a relatively high velocity. The stream of high velocity fluid striking the wall of the well bore A will serve to wash the wall and to remove any material adhering thereto.

After the washing operation is complete, it is only necessary to halt the circulation of the drilling fluid, whereby the coiled spring 3| can immediateiy return the sleeve valve to its uppermost position as shown in Figure 6, to close the ports 20. The fluid may then be circulated in its original direction, that is, downwardly through the well bore exteriorly of the drill stem and upwardly through the bore-of the drill bit H. The circulation of the fluid in this direction will carry l' the ball 32 upwardly to the surface of the well, whereby the bore of the washing tool T is again opened to permit a free circulation of the drilling fluid. Obviously, the drilling operation may' then be continued. v

As has been previously explained, various conditions may occur in the lower portion of the well bore which will require that said bore be cleaned out. For the purpose of illustration, it will be presumed that a cave-in has occurred within the lower portion of the bore, such cave-in having been occasioned by the setting ofi of an explosive within said bore. In describing the improved method of cleaning out this type of bore, which is shown in Figure 1, reference is made to Figures 2 to 5. The material, which has'caved and which is within the lower portion of the bore A, is indicated by t-he letter B in these figures. The drill stem I0 having the washing tool T and the drill bit l2 secured to its lower end is moved downwardly within the. bore A until the bit'strikes the caved-in material or debris within the lower portion of the bore. At this time, the drilling oper.

ation is commenced with the drilling uid being circulated downwardly through the well bore outside of the drill stem and. upwardly through the bit, tool T and stem, as indicated by the m. rows in Figure 2. As the drilling proceeds, the bit penetrates a portion of the caved-in material and the cuttings which are removed by the rotating bit are carried to the surface of the well by the circulating drilling fluid. The drilling is continued until a portion of the material B is removed. All of the material which has been loosened by the explosive is not removed by the drill bit and, although it is more or less detached from the remainder of the formation, as shown by the undulating lines in Figures l to 5, said material will not fall into the lower portion of the bore formed by the rotating bit. In other words, although this'material is detached from the remainder of the formation, it adheres to said formation and does not fall free of its own accord..

After a portion of the caved-in material or debris B has been removed by the bit, the bit is raised to the position shown in Figure 3, whereby the openings 20 in the washing tool T are located adjacent the upper end of the caved-in portion. At this time, the rotation of the drill stem is halted, as is the circulating drilling uid. The" bore which has been formed by the bit in the previous drilling operation. Due to the size of the ports 20, it will be manifest that the fluid es'- capes at a relatively high velocity which is sumcient to remove the loosened material and cause it to detach from the remainder of the formation. The greater portion of this material which is removed by the washing action is carried to the surface by the drilling fluid which passes up#N wardly through the well bore A after it has contacted the wall of the bore at the lower portion thereof. Some of the material may fall downwardly into the lower end of the bore but it has been found that this is a minimum amount.

The washing action continues by lowering the drill stem gradually through the bore which has been formed bythe previous drilling operation, whereby the entire wall of said bore is washed and the loosened material removed. therefrom. This step oi' the method is clearly shown in Figure 4. After the entire length of the bore, which is formed by the bit i2, has been thoroughly washed, the circulation of the fluid downwardly through the drill stem l0 is shut oil'. The bit is then lowered to the extreme lower endV of the bore and the drilling operation is continued by imparting rotation to the drill stem and bit and by circulating the drilling fluid downwardly through the.bore A and upwardly through the stem. as is shown in Figure 5. The drilling operation continues until the bit has penetratedl another portion of the caved-in material B, after which drilling is stopped. The circulation is shut of! and the ball valve 32 is again dropped to close the bore of the washing tool T. Circulation is then set up downwardly through the drill stem and the washing operation, as described above, is repeated. Obviously, after this washing operation is complete, the drilling operation is again continued and the ball 32 raised to the surface by means 'of the circulating drilling iiuid. Therefore, the drilling and washing may be doneV alternately without removing the drill stenifrom the l well bore. Y

The ball 32, which is arranged to be dropped downwardly through the drill stem and which is arranged to be raised by the pressure of the drilling fluid, as above explained, may be omitted and in place thereof a valve 33, as shown in Figure 10, substituted therefor. This valve includes avalve head 34 arranged to engage the seat 21, said head havingan upstanding pin 35, preferably made integral therewith. An external shoulder 36 is provided at theupper portion of the stem 35, wherebya suitable fishing tool may be engaged therewith so that said valve may be manually raised and lowered through the drill Y stem. When the valve 33 is used in place of the ball 32, the fluid pressure' is not depended upon to raise said valve to the surface.

In Figures 11 to 14, aA modified form of washing tool is illustrated. In this form, the tool includes a body I5"which is similar in construction to the body l5, being preferably made in sections connected together by screw threads. 'Ihe body I5' has an axial bore I5a which'extends entirely therethrough, the lower end of said bore being reduced in size so as to provide a bevelled shoulder or seat I 5b within the lower pcrtion of the body. Velocity ports which are preferably disposed diametrically oppositely each other, extend through the wall of the body I5 and are located above the seat lib. In this form of the invention, the slide valve 2| and its associate parts are eliminated.

In the operation of this form of the invention, the ports 20' are open lat all times and, during the drilling operation, the drilling :duid is circulating downwardly outside of the washing to al afnd upwardly through the bore thereof. Due to the fact that the ports 20 are of a relatively small size, they do not materially affect the circulation of the drilling fluid since said drilling ihid flows freely through the larger cross-sectional area of the drill stem. When it is desired to wash the well bore, the ball valve 32 is dropped drwnwardly through the stem until it engages the seat lib within the bore of the body l5'. The fluid pressure is then introduced downward- Yy through the drill stem and, manifestly, since the valve 32 closes the .bore 15a of the body, said drilling fluid is forced outwardly through the relatively small velocity ports 20 to perform the washing operation. This form of the invention includes a fewer number of working parts than the form shown in Figures 6 to 10, but operates on substantially the same principle. When the tool shown in Figures 11 to 14 is employed, the method is practiced in the same manner as above described.

It may be desirable in some instances to close the ports 20' during the drilling operation, whereby no fluidA can pass through said ports while the drilling is being performed. In such instance, spring-pressed check valves 35 may be located within the openings 20', as shown in Figure 14. These valves are arranged to close the ports 2v when the drilling fluid is circulating downwardly through the bore and upwardly through the drill stem. However, when circulation is reversed with the iiuid owing downwardly through the drill stem and the ball valve 32 n position on the seat I5b, it will be manifest that the fluid pressure will unseat the spring-pressed balls 35 and eject the drilling fluid through the velocity ports 20.

It is pointed out that although two velocity ports have been illustrated in the drawings, any desired number may be employed. Also, although it is preferable that reverse circulation, that is, flowing the drilling fluid downwardly through the well bore and upwardly through the drill stem, be employed, this is not essential as it would be possible to employ normal circulation during the drilling operation. Such normal circulation would, of course, carry the cuttings to the surface.

The foregoing description of the invention is explanatory thereof and various changes in the size, shape and materials, as well as in the details of the illustrated construction, may be made,

within the scope of the appended claims, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. 'I'he method of cleaning out well bores which -includes, removing a portion of the accumulation from the bore adjacent the producing formation by a rotary drilling step, circulating a drilling fluid through the bore during the drilling step to carry the removed accumulation to the surface. then halting the drilling and stopping the circulation through the bore, and' then directing a relatively high velocity stream of pressure fluid against the wall of that portion of the bore which has been traversed during the drilling to remove -the loose material adhering to said wall to thoroughly'clean said bore, the last named step being carried out without'removing the drilling apparatus from the well bore.

2. An apparatus for cleaning well bores including, a rotatable drill pipe having a drill vblt secured to its lower end, means for lowering said pipe through the bore and for rotating the bitv to drill through the accumulation in the well bore, means for circulating a drilling iluid downwardly through the well bore and upwardly through the drill pipe during the drilling to carry the cuttings to the surface, said drill pipe having reduced outlet ports in its lower end above the bit, means for closing the bore of the drill pipe below said ports when drilling vis halted, and means for forcing a pressure fluid downwardly through said pipe, whereby said fluid is ejected through the ports at a relatively high velocity to thoroughly wash the wall of the bore.

3. An apparatus for cleaning well bores including, a rotatable drill pipe having a drill bit secured to its lower end, means for lowering said pipe through the bore and for rotating the bit to .stem after the drilling is halted for closing the bore thereof below the ports, and means for introducing a pressure fluid into the drill stem. said pressurefluid acting on the closing means for the outlet ports to actuate lsaid means and open said ports, whereby said fluid may escape through the ports and into contact with the wall of the bore to wash the same.

4..A well washing tool including, a tubular and arranged to overlie the port to close they same, resilient means engaging the valve for normally holding the same in a position closing the port, and a valve seat at the upper end of the bore of the sleeve valve for receiving a valve,

whereby thevbore of the valve may be closed so that a iuld pressure applied to the valve will move the same against force of the resilient means downwardly in a plane below the ports to uncover the port and permit a iiow therethrough.

5. A Well washing tool including, an elongate body having an axial bore which is reduced at its lower end to form an annular seat within the body, said body having radially extending normally open reduced ports in its wall located above the seat, said ports being of sulciently small size as not to interfere with normal circulation through said bore and to direct uid outwardly therethrough in a fine jet when the bore of the body is closed, and a closure adapted to engage the seat within the bore to close said bore land cause iiuid iiowing into the bore to be ejected through the reduced ports.

6. A well washing tool including, an elongate body having an axial bore which is .reduced at its lower end to form an annular seat within the body, said body having radially extending reduced ports in its wall located above the seat,

' by pressure thereabov'e, and means for removing said passageway closing means by fluid pressure therebelow. Y

il, in a well tool, the combination of a tubular drill stem having a drill bit therein, said drill stem having a passageway therethrough into the drill bit and having a lateral discharge opening in a wall thereof, a sleeve valve slidably mounted in the drill stem in position to close said lateral opening, resilient means acting on said valve in position to close the same, said valve having a central passageway therein, means for closing said valve passageway, and means for applying check valves mounted in said ports for permitting an outward ow and for preventing an inward iiow therethrough, and a closure adapted to engage the seat within the body'to close the bore of said body, whereby iiuid flowing through the bore may unseat the check valves and escape through the reduced ports. 4

7. In a well tool, the combination of a tubular stem having an opening through the wall thereof, valve means for closing said opening, said stem having a passageway therethrough past the valve, means for closing said passageway upon opening of the valve means, and means for opening said passageway and reclosing the valve means.

8. In a well tool, the combination of a tubular stem having an opening through the wall thereof, sleeve valve means in said stem for closing said opening and having a passageway thereduid pressure to the under side of the passage way closing means to remove said means from its Q closed position in the passageway. l l2. An apparatus for cleaning well bores ncluding, a rotatable drill pipe having la drill bit secured to its lower end, means for lowering said pipe through the bore and for rotating the bit to drill through the accumulation in the well bore,

means for circulating a drilling fluid downwardly through the well bore and upwardly through the drill pipe during the drilling to carry the cuttings to the surface, means for closing the bore of the drill pipe labove the bit, and means for forcing a pressure nuid downwardly and outwardly through the drill pipe above the bore-closing means and for directing said pressure fluid outwardly of said pipe into contact with the'wall of the bore which has been formed bythe drill bit ,l I

to thoroughly wash said bore.

13. In a device of the character described, the v combination of a well casing and a drill stem and-bit and means connected to said drill stemand casing to permit iiuid pressure to be yadmitted to either the drill stem or the casing, a body coupling the drill stern and bit together Y and having discharge ports' and a passage therethrough, means for closing said passageway and vstern having an opening through the wall thereof, valve means for closing said opening, said stem having a passageway therethrough past the valve, means for closing said passageway and for opening said valve means successively, and means i'or removing said passageway closing means and for closing said valve means.

10. In a well tool, the combination of a tubular drill stem having a drill bit therein, said drill stem having a passageway therethrough into the drill bit and having a lateral discharge opening in a wall thereof, a sleeve valve slidably mounted in the drill stem in position to close said lateral opening, resilient means acting on said valve in position to close the same, said valve having a central passageway therein, means for closing laid valve passageway for opening the sleeve valve through with the ports in communication therewith, a spring inuenced valve member having a. passage therethrough normally closing the ports and permitting iiuid pressure in the drill stem to reach the blt and escape therefrom, and a valve element manually placed in the drill stem to gravitate against'the valve member and close the passage thereof to permit the iiu'id pressure in the stem to force the valve member into a Vposition of opening said ports and adapted to ascend in the drill stem by uid pressure vreceived from the well casing by way of the bit to. permit said valve member to close 'the ports.

le. In a well tool, the combination of a tubular stern having an opening through the wall thereof, sleeve valve means in said stem for closing said opening and having a passageway therethrough,

means for closing said passageway andvfor openl,

ing the valve means relative to the wall opening, and iiuid pressure means for removing 'said passageway closing means from closed .position permitting reclosing of the valve means.

15. A well washing tool including. a l-tubular l body adapted to be connected in a drill pipe and having a reduced velocity port in its wall for establishmg a communication between the interior and exterior of the body, a closure member slidable within the bore of the body andl arranged to overlie the port to close the same, said member being adapted to be moved out of alinen'ient with the port to open the same by the application of a pressure iiuid thereagainst, resilient means acting on said member for normally urging the member toward a position covering the port, and a protective element disposed within the resilient means and having a bore protecting said means from contact with extraneous matter passing through the device.

16. A well washing tool including, a tubular body adapted to be connected in a drill pipe and having a reduced velocity port in its wall for establishing communication between the interior and exterior thereof, a sleeve valve slidable within the bore of the body and arranged to overlie the port to close the same, a tubular guide element within the body and having one end disposed within the bore of the sleeve valve, whereby said valve is slidable thereon, and a. resilient means surrounding the guide element and engaging the valve for urging the same toward a position closing the port; and a valve seat at the upper end of the bore of the sleeve valve for receiving a closure valve whereby the bore of the sleeve valve may be closed so that a fluid pressure applied to said valve will move the same against the force of the resilient means to uncover the port and allow a flow therethrough.

17. The continuous method of cleaning and washing well bores having an obstructing accumulation therein which includes, drilling through the obstructing accumulation and simultaneously circulating a fluid under pressure through the drill string and well bore to carry the cuttings and drillings from said bore, ceasing the drilling after a portion of the accumulation has been drilled through, then closing oi! the lower portion of the drill string to prevent circulation therethrough, directing iiuid under pressure from the drill string radially outwardly into contact with thebore formed in the accumulation by the previous drilling step to dislodge formation therefrom, then re-opening the drill string, and finally resuming the drilling and circulation of pressure fluid through the string and well bore to continue drilling through the accumulation.

i8. The continuous method of cleaning and washing out weil bores which includes, drilling through obstructing formation in the well bore and having ports therein adapted to elect a washing fluid under high velocity onto the wall of the well bore, valve means carried by the pipe normally closing said ports against outward ejection of the pressure fluid, andrmeans for closing oi! downward flow of pressure iiuid below said valve means and through said bit, the valve means being responsive to a downwardly iiowing uid when said valve means is in a closing position, whereby the ports are opened tofpermit the fluid to eject outwardly therethrough.

20. The combination with a drill pipe having a drill bit on its lower end and arranged so that normal circulation of pressure fluid upwardly through the bit and pipe may occur during a drilling operation, of a. washing tool connected in the pipe above the bit, and having radial ports, said ports being of a reduced size relative to the size of the core, whereby normal circulation of fluid through the bore of the pipe causes a flow past said ports, means for closing the bore of the pipe below the ports to shut ofi circulation through the pipe below said ports and 'through the bit, and means for circulating a iluid under pressure downwardly through the drill pipe when the lower end of the bore thereof is closed, whereby said iluid is ejected through the reduced ports at high velocity to wash the wall of the well bore.

21. The method of cleaning well bores which consists in, drilling out the bore to remove the accumulation therein, circulating the drilling fluid downwardly through the well bore and upwardly through the drilling apparatus to carry the removed accumulation to the surface, halting the drilling, stopping the circulation through the bore, then subsequently circulating a pressure fluid downwardly through the drilling apparatus, and directing said pressure iiuid radially outwardly in a stream at a relatively high velocity into contact with the wall of theA bore which has previously been penetrated during the drilling step, whereby loose material not actually removed by the drilling step is removed from whie circulating in the well bore a'iiuid under a the-bore by the washing action of said stream.

pressure to carry the drillings from said bore,

ting the drilling. temporarily shutting off the circulation of fluid, resuming and reversing the direction oihirculation of said uid, directing the iiuid under high pressure from the interior ci the drill string at a point spaced above the lower end thereof against the wall of the bore, moving the drilling string longitudinally Within the here to wash the wall thereof and to dislodge formation therefrom, shutting off this circulation and discontinuing washing, restoring the circulation to its original direction of flow, and then resuming the drilling through the obstructing formation.

i9. The combination with a drill pipe having e. driii bit on its lower end adapted for circulation oi iiuid through the bit and pipe, of a washing tool connected in the pipe above said bit 22. The method of cleaning out well bores which includes, removing a portion of the accumulation from the bore adjacent the producing formation by a rotary drilling step, circulating a drilling fluid through the bore to carry the removed accumulation to the surface, halting the drilling, stopping the circulation through the bore, then directing a relatively high velocity stream of pressure iluid against the wall of that portion of the bore which has been traversed during the drilling to remove the loose material not removed by the drilling step and adhering to said wall to thoroughly clean said bore, and then alternately repeating the drilling and washing tap until all accumulation is removed from the re. Y

FREI) G. BECKMAN.

US2312018A 1939-08-19 1939-08-19 Method of and means for cleaning wells Expired - Lifetime US2312018A (en)

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Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2425202A (en) * 1943-01-12 1947-08-05 Shell Dev Apparatus for completing wells
US2461727A (en) * 1945-01-20 1949-02-15 Robert I Gardner Means and method for detecting leaks in drill stems
US2518795A (en) * 1946-11-16 1950-08-15 Hydril Corp Valve for drill stems and the like
US2765146A (en) * 1952-02-09 1956-10-02 Jr Edward B Williams Jetting device for rotary drilling apparatus
US2771269A (en) * 1953-06-30 1956-11-20 Exxon Research Engineering Co Enlarging bore holes by pellet drilling
US2814348A (en) * 1953-08-10 1957-11-26 Otis Eng Co Extensible means for circulating fluids through wells
US2828107A (en) * 1955-06-23 1958-03-25 Phillips Petroleum Co Aerated fluid drilling process
US2978048A (en) * 1958-10-01 1961-04-04 Shaffer Tool Works Bumper safety joint
US3081828A (en) * 1960-07-05 1963-03-19 Thomas E Quick Method and apparatus for producing cuts within a bore hole
US3083765A (en) * 1960-10-28 1963-04-02 Archer W Kammerer Method and apparatus for conditioning bore holes
US3104719A (en) * 1961-09-19 1963-09-24 Petroleum Anchor Equipment Inc Multiple stage jet squeeze anchor
US3123159A (en) * 1964-03-03 Jet underreaming
US3334697A (en) * 1964-11-09 1967-08-08 Tenneco Inc Jet sub for drilling well bores
US3454119A (en) * 1967-03-16 1969-07-08 John Mcclinton Jet-type reamer for use with drill pipe strings
US3795282A (en) * 1972-08-31 1974-03-05 Cities Service Oil Co Well flushing method
US3799278A (en) * 1972-08-31 1974-03-26 Cities Service Oil Co Well circulation tool
US3901333A (en) * 1974-10-29 1975-08-26 Gulf Research Development Co Downhole bypass valve
US4300636A (en) * 1979-01-12 1981-11-17 Dailey Oil Tools, Inc. Constant bottom contact tool
US4319784A (en) * 1980-06-04 1982-03-16 Conzinc Riotinto Malaysia Sendirian Berhard Apparatus for water jet and impact drilling and mining
US4361193A (en) * 1980-11-28 1982-11-30 Mobil Oil Corporation Method and arrangement for improving cuttings removal and reducing differential pressure sticking of drill strings in wellbores
US4392527A (en) * 1981-03-03 1983-07-12 Hawk Industries, Inc. Water well developing system
US4645006A (en) * 1984-12-07 1987-02-24 Tinsley Paul J Annulus access valve system
EP0754836A1 (en) * 1995-07-19 1997-01-22 Halliburton Company Method and apparatus for removing gelled drilling fluid and filter cake from the side of a well bore
WO2001004457A1 (en) * 1999-07-08 2001-01-18 Paul Bernard Lee Downhole jetting tool
WO2002014650A1 (en) * 2000-08-12 2002-02-21 Paul Bernard Lee Activating ball assembly for use with a by-pass tool in a drill string
US20070261855A1 (en) * 2006-05-12 2007-11-15 Travis Brunet Wellbore cleaning tool system and method of use
US20100044041A1 (en) * 2008-08-22 2010-02-25 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. High rate stimulation method for deep, large bore completions
US20110017458A1 (en) * 2009-07-24 2011-01-27 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Method for Inducing Fracture Complexity in Hydraulically Fractured Horizontal Well Completions
US20110067870A1 (en) * 2009-09-24 2011-03-24 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Complex fracturing using a straddle packer in a horizontal wellbore
US8210250B2 (en) 2005-03-12 2012-07-03 Thru Tubing Solutions, Inc. Methods and devices for one trip plugging and perforating of oil and gas wells
US8448700B2 (en) 2010-08-03 2013-05-28 Thru Tubing Solutions, Inc. Abrasive perforator with fluid bypass
US8887803B2 (en) 2012-04-09 2014-11-18 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Multi-interval wellbore treatment method
US9016376B2 (en) 2012-08-06 2015-04-28 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Method and wellbore servicing apparatus for production completion of an oil and gas well
US9228422B2 (en) 2012-01-30 2016-01-05 Thru Tubing Solutions, Inc. Limited depth abrasive jet cutter
US9796918B2 (en) 2013-01-30 2017-10-24 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Wellbore servicing fluids and methods of making and using same

Cited By (47)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3123159A (en) * 1964-03-03 Jet underreaming
US2425202A (en) * 1943-01-12 1947-08-05 Shell Dev Apparatus for completing wells
US2461727A (en) * 1945-01-20 1949-02-15 Robert I Gardner Means and method for detecting leaks in drill stems
US2518795A (en) * 1946-11-16 1950-08-15 Hydril Corp Valve for drill stems and the like
US2765146A (en) * 1952-02-09 1956-10-02 Jr Edward B Williams Jetting device for rotary drilling apparatus
US2771269A (en) * 1953-06-30 1956-11-20 Exxon Research Engineering Co Enlarging bore holes by pellet drilling
US2814348A (en) * 1953-08-10 1957-11-26 Otis Eng Co Extensible means for circulating fluids through wells
US2828107A (en) * 1955-06-23 1958-03-25 Phillips Petroleum Co Aerated fluid drilling process
US2978048A (en) * 1958-10-01 1961-04-04 Shaffer Tool Works Bumper safety joint
US3081828A (en) * 1960-07-05 1963-03-19 Thomas E Quick Method and apparatus for producing cuts within a bore hole
US3083765A (en) * 1960-10-28 1963-04-02 Archer W Kammerer Method and apparatus for conditioning bore holes
US3104719A (en) * 1961-09-19 1963-09-24 Petroleum Anchor Equipment Inc Multiple stage jet squeeze anchor
US3334697A (en) * 1964-11-09 1967-08-08 Tenneco Inc Jet sub for drilling well bores
US3454119A (en) * 1967-03-16 1969-07-08 John Mcclinton Jet-type reamer for use with drill pipe strings
US3795282A (en) * 1972-08-31 1974-03-05 Cities Service Oil Co Well flushing method
US3799278A (en) * 1972-08-31 1974-03-26 Cities Service Oil Co Well circulation tool
US3901333A (en) * 1974-10-29 1975-08-26 Gulf Research Development Co Downhole bypass valve
US4300636A (en) * 1979-01-12 1981-11-17 Dailey Oil Tools, Inc. Constant bottom contact tool
US4319784A (en) * 1980-06-04 1982-03-16 Conzinc Riotinto Malaysia Sendirian Berhard Apparatus for water jet and impact drilling and mining
US4361193A (en) * 1980-11-28 1982-11-30 Mobil Oil Corporation Method and arrangement for improving cuttings removal and reducing differential pressure sticking of drill strings in wellbores
US4392527A (en) * 1981-03-03 1983-07-12 Hawk Industries, Inc. Water well developing system
US4645006A (en) * 1984-12-07 1987-02-24 Tinsley Paul J Annulus access valve system
EP0754836A1 (en) * 1995-07-19 1997-01-22 Halliburton Company Method and apparatus for removing gelled drilling fluid and filter cake from the side of a well bore
GB2367317B (en) * 1999-07-08 2003-08-27 Paul Bernard Lee Downhole jetting tool
US6732793B1 (en) 1999-07-08 2004-05-11 Drilling Systems International Ltd. Downhole jetting tool
GB2367317A (en) * 1999-07-08 2002-04-03 Paul Bernard Lee Downhole jetting tool
WO2001004457A1 (en) * 1999-07-08 2001-01-18 Paul Bernard Lee Downhole jetting tool
WO2002014650A1 (en) * 2000-08-12 2002-02-21 Paul Bernard Lee Activating ball assembly for use with a by-pass tool in a drill string
US6923255B2 (en) 2000-08-12 2005-08-02 Paul Bernard Lee Activating ball assembly for use with a by-pass tool in a drill string
US20040011566A1 (en) * 2000-08-12 2004-01-22 Lee Paul Bernard Activating ball assembly for use with a by-pass tool in a drill string
US9777558B1 (en) 2005-03-12 2017-10-03 Thru Tubing Solutions, Inc. Methods and devices for one trip plugging and perforating of oil and gas wells
US8210250B2 (en) 2005-03-12 2012-07-03 Thru Tubing Solutions, Inc. Methods and devices for one trip plugging and perforating of oil and gas wells
US8403049B2 (en) 2005-03-12 2013-03-26 Thru Tubing Solutions, Inc. Methods and devices for one trip plugging and perforating of oil and gas wells
US20070261855A1 (en) * 2006-05-12 2007-11-15 Travis Brunet Wellbore cleaning tool system and method of use
US8960292B2 (en) * 2008-08-22 2015-02-24 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. High rate stimulation method for deep, large bore completions
US20100044041A1 (en) * 2008-08-22 2010-02-25 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. High rate stimulation method for deep, large bore completions
US8733444B2 (en) 2009-07-24 2014-05-27 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Method for inducing fracture complexity in hydraulically fractured horizontal well completions
US8960296B2 (en) 2009-07-24 2015-02-24 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Complex fracturing using a straddle packer in a horizontal wellbore
US20110017458A1 (en) * 2009-07-24 2011-01-27 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Method for Inducing Fracture Complexity in Hydraulically Fractured Horizontal Well Completions
US8439116B2 (en) 2009-07-24 2013-05-14 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Method for inducing fracture complexity in hydraulically fractured horizontal well completions
US8631872B2 (en) 2009-09-24 2014-01-21 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Complex fracturing using a straddle packer in a horizontal wellbore
US20110067870A1 (en) * 2009-09-24 2011-03-24 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Complex fracturing using a straddle packer in a horizontal wellbore
US8448700B2 (en) 2010-08-03 2013-05-28 Thru Tubing Solutions, Inc. Abrasive perforator with fluid bypass
US9228422B2 (en) 2012-01-30 2016-01-05 Thru Tubing Solutions, Inc. Limited depth abrasive jet cutter
US8887803B2 (en) 2012-04-09 2014-11-18 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Multi-interval wellbore treatment method
US9016376B2 (en) 2012-08-06 2015-04-28 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Method and wellbore servicing apparatus for production completion of an oil and gas well
US9796918B2 (en) 2013-01-30 2017-10-24 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Wellbore servicing fluids and methods of making and using same

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