US2310712A - Asphalt or resin shipping container - Google Patents

Asphalt or resin shipping container Download PDF

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Publication number
US2310712A
US2310712A US33941640A US2310712A US 2310712 A US2310712 A US 2310712A US 33941640 A US33941640 A US 33941640A US 2310712 A US2310712 A US 2310712A
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Prior art keywords
asphalt
container
foil
film
metal
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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Oryille K Schmied
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REYNOLDS RES CORP
REYNOLDS RESEARCH Corp
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REYNOLDS RES CORP
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D5/00Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper
    • B65D5/42Details of containers or of foldable or erectable container blanks
    • B65D5/56Linings or internal coatings, e.g. pre-formed trays provided with a blow- or thermoformed layer
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D65/00Wrappers or flexible covers; Packaging materials of special type or form
    • B65D65/38Packaging materials of special type or form
    • B65D65/42Applications of coated or impregnated materials

Description

Fell 9, 1943' l O. K. SCHMIED 2,310,712

ASPHALT OR RESIN SHIPPING CONTAINER Filed June 8, 1940 INVENTOR ATTORNEY Patented Feb. 9, 1943 UNTED STATES PATENT OFFICE ASPHALT R RESIN SHIPPING CONTAINER.

Orville K. Schmied, Upper Montclair, N. J., as-

sig'nor to Reynolds Research Corporation, Richmond, Va., a corporation of Delaware Application June 8,1940, serial No. 339,416

(ol. zoe-s4) 2 Claims.

lcharacteristics similar to asphalt, namely, of

being fluid and adhesive when heated, and relatively solid when at room temperatures.

Heretofore, asphalts and like materials havecommonly been shipped in kegs, barrels, and tin and wood containers and various attempts have been made to line such shippingN containers in such fashion so that the asphalt or like mass would not solidly adhere to the interior walls of the container when at room temperatures. When hot asphalt was poured molten into a keg for shipping, it became solidied, and the asphalt tenaciously adhered to the walls ctfthe keg, and so it was necessary in order to remove the asphalt to literally chop pieces of the same out of the container; when this was done, either the relatively expensive container was ruined or substantial amounts of asphalt remained upon the side walls of the keg. Various linings suggested for the walls of such containers have not been widely acceptable cominerciallyfi It has been suggested to -tretgthe interior surfaces of metal containers ,for the shipping of asphalt with thin lms of oxide of iron and also to treat such metallic Walls with oxalic acid. It also has been suggested to treat the interiors of rubber cement paper packages with thick coatings of liqueed soap. It has also been suggested to line the interiors of fabric bags for shipping asphalt, with coatings of clay. It has also been suggested to line the interiors of kraft paper packages for the shipping of asphalt with a. higher melting point pitch or asphalt than the asphalt to be packed therein.

All of the prior art eiforts to form a cheap, economical and convenient package for the shipping of asphalt or equivalent substances have been relatively unsuccessful.

Therefore, it is an objectV 0f my invention to provide a strippable lm or lacquer coating upon a layerqf aluminum foil as an interior surface upon a kraft paper liner for an asphalt ship- .ping container formed of cheap and economical to mount the film coated or lacquer coated aluminum foil directly to the interior of a suitabl cardboard or equivalent container.

It is a further object of my invention to provide a lacquer or similar film, particularly a -cellulose acetate nlm upon an aluminum foil lining so that the said coating, since relativelynon-adherent to the smooth aluminum foil, may be easily stripped therefrom; by this means, when molten asphalt is poured within the container and solidies, the asphalt tenaciously adheres to the strippable acetate or other lacquer coating, but the latter is easily strippable from the foil thereby permitting the exterior paper or cardboard container to be stripped from the block of asphalt which adheres to, and is covered by thel film or lacquer coating.

It is also within the purview of my invention to provide a cellulose acetate nlm as ya coating upon foil lined shipping containers for asphalt or the like, which nlm when the temperature of vthe asphalt is raised to 400 F. or higher, for

suitable periods, will disintegrate, and so be diS- dium to prevent adhesion of asphalt, or other 25 like substances, to an aluminum foil lining upon cheap 'and economical vpaper or cardboard shipping containers and in this conjunctiomit will be observed that the metallining protects the cardboard from highly heated substances packed within the containers, tending to prevent charring, and that such metal linings, being substantially impervious to liquids, also prevent leakage of the molten liquids and prevent the materials pa-cked or the lm coatings from impregnating or seeping through the brous package wall.

Other objects and -advantages of the invention will appear from the description of preferred embodiments of the invention which are set forth for illustrative purposes only and in which changes may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention.

In the gures:

Fig. 1v is a perspective view of a cardboard shipping -container with a liner, suitable for shipping asphalt, or the like, and embodying my 1nvention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary cross section taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary section, partly broken away for purposes of clarity, of the liner illustrated in Fig. 2;

Fig. 4. is la fragmentary perspective, partly broken away, of the stock utilizedin fabricating a modified embodiment of my invention wherein packed within the container I0.

the coated metal lining is directly mounted to a. cardboard stock;

Fig. is a fragmentary perspective, partly broken away, of a further modified embodiment of my invention wherein an oily film is applied t0 5 a metal foil lining directly mounted by means of adhesive to cardboard container stock.

Referring to Figs. 1, 2 and 3, a box like container I 0 formed of heavy cardboard or corrugated paper or the like is provided with a liner I2. Liner I2 may be formed of 40 pound kraft paper I4 as a base, laminated to .0004" thick aluminum foil I6, using casein latex, or other suitable foil adhesives, as a laminating means, which latter is indicated as I8. The exposed foil surface is in turn, coated with a thin cellulose acetate film which will normally be about .0003 thick. Such acetate film is relatively nonadherent to the metal and can be easily stripped therefrom. 20

It will be realized that various other equivalent relatively non-adhering plastic or lacquer films may be applied to the metalfoil in place of the cellulose acetate lm coating. Such films normally may be suitable cellulose derivatives, or suitable synthetic resins or mixtures thereof, but should be relatively non-adherent to metal. It is Within the purview of my invention to pre-treat the metal foil surface with a medium, such as an oil nlm, before applying the strippable film thereto, in order to insure easy stripping and relative nonadherence to the metal layer; by such pretreatment of the metal, many ordinarily metal adherent lms may be utilized as the strippable lm. Preferably the metal surfaces and the lacquer or strippable film surfaces of the liner will be continuous and uninterrupted.- The metal tends to prevent any charring eifects in the paper due to highly heated asphalt or plastic substances When molten asphalt is poured within the lined container I0, it tends to solidify into a solid block indicated at Fig. 2 as 22. The container may be shipped, and then when used, torn or stripped from the block of asphalt 22, leaving theA asphalt covered by the film coating 20 which is relatively non-adherent to the metal foil I6 but which is adherent to the asphalt block 22.

If the asphalt block with the adherent nlm of cellulose acetate 20 is heated approximately to 400 F. for a suitable period, it will be observed that the acetate film`disintegrates and is dissipated into the molten asphalt for all practical purposes, and my invention includes. other equivalent disslpating lms.

It will be recognized that such a lined shipping container I0 may be utilized for the shipping of various plastics, natural and synthetic, resins, rubber derivatives, waxes. and compounds thereof, and the like which have certain properties generally similar to asphalt, namely, the characteristics of being relatively solid at room temperature and which when poured in heated molten condition into a shipping container are tenaciously adherent when solidified to the shipping container walls, and therefore, the utilization of the shipping containers herein described for such substances is included within, the purview of my invention.

It will be further recognized that the metal 70 foil while preferably aluminum and ofthe gauge described, may be formed of copper, zinc or the like. The gauges of the metal foil may of course,

` vary from .0003"- to .002" thick.

'I'he metal foil has the advantage of presenting 75 a relatively smooth non-adherent surface to which the acetate layer does not readily bond and from which it may be readily stripped.u Also, the metal layer serves to seal and protect the paper or cardboard from the foil coating and from the contents of the containers. It will be recognized that heretofore a relatively impervious surface such as afforded by the metal foil, was only approached by expensive all metal containers which made costs practicallyprohibitive.

It will be further recognized that various other forms of containers might be lined with a film coated or a lacquer coated metal foil and so such containers formed of light woods or the like are considered within the purview of my invention. The liner base instead of being 40 pound kraft paper, could be formed. of much lighter stock, such as 10 pound tissue, or in fact, could be as heavy a-s cardboard.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary perspective of a container 24 formed generally similar to container I0 but having no liner; in this instance container 24 may have the foil I6 directly mounted upon its interior surfaces by the adhesive I8 and be in turn overcoated with the lm coating of cellulose acetate 20, or the like, it being understood that the elements I6, I8 and 2|l will be similar as described above.

As indicated in Fig. 5 by a fragmentary perspective similar to the perspective shown in Fig. 4, an oily film 26 may be substituted if desired for the cellulose acetate coating 20, for the metal foil. The oily film normally may be a petroleum derivative light oil applied in a thin film coating by brushes or the like and serves to prevent the adhesion of any appropriate molten resinous or rubber derivative substances poured within the container, as a liquid. When such appropriate substances solidify into a block, the container may be stripped therefrom, leaving the block with a slight oil residue. The oil is particularly appropriate when the melting point of the suitable material packed does not approach the disintegration temperature of the stripping film coating.

From the foregoing description of preferred embodiments of my invention, it Will be recognized that the essence thereof includes the conception of packing asphalt, or substances having substantially equivalent packing properties, within cheap cardboard or like containers lined with metal foil, the latter being overcoated upon its interior surfaces with a suitable non-adherent film coating, which permits the stripping of the shipping container from the solidified block of the packed material in an easy and economical manner.

I claim:

l. A shipping container for a block of asphalt, or the like, which container includes an outer casing, an inner lining of foil, a continuous strippable plastic film'on said foil, said foil adhesively secured to said casing by a bond of substantial strength, said film adhered to said foil by a bond of less strength and said lm adhering to said block of material more'strongly than the adhesion to said foil whereby upon removal of said block, the lm clings to the' surface of the material and is removed in its entirety from the surface of the foil. i

2. A container as defined in claim 1, in which to insure strippable adhesion between the foil and the film an intervening oil film is disposed l therebetween. Y i ORVILLE K. SCHMIED.

US2310712A 1940-06-08 1940-06-08 Asphalt or resin shipping container Expired - Lifetime US2310712A (en)

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Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2480352A (en) * 1944-11-04 1949-08-30 Warren S D Co Separable liner for tacky elastomers
US2572959A (en) * 1945-03-24 1951-10-30 Standard Oil Dev Co Packaging tacky isobutylene-diolefin rubber in film of compatible styrene-isobutylene copolymer
US2639808A (en) * 1947-03-13 1953-05-26 Du Pont Packaging of tacky materials
US2666523A (en) * 1951-11-01 1954-01-19 Standard Oil Dev Co Packaging method
US2690255A (en) * 1951-10-30 1954-09-28 American Can Co Method of packing adhesives in shipping containers for easy removal
US2702580A (en) * 1954-04-06 1955-02-22 Du Pont Metallic finish laminated sheet material and process of making same
US2771333A (en) * 1951-10-16 1956-11-20 Phillips Petroleum Co Container for deliquescent materials
US2954912A (en) * 1957-08-26 1960-10-04 Excel O Therm Container Corp Insulated perishable food carton
US2998178A (en) * 1957-02-04 1961-08-29 Reynolds Metals Co Lined container for liquids and liner therefor
US3013923A (en) * 1957-02-11 1961-12-19 Chicago Carton Co Metal foil bonding
US3051598A (en) * 1958-03-25 1962-08-28 Gen Tire & Rubber Co Heat resistant laminated counter top
US3088646A (en) * 1956-08-29 1963-05-07 Reynolds Metals Co Flexible container adapted for fluids
US3095134A (en) * 1960-03-23 1963-06-25 Reynolds Metals Co Lined container for liquids and liner therefor
US3251382A (en) * 1963-06-24 1966-05-17 Tatsch Richard Foldable conduit structure
US5193740A (en) * 1988-02-12 1993-03-16 Cundell Decorprint Limited Disposable fold-up container for used medical materials
USRE36177E (en) * 1990-08-01 1999-04-06 H. B. Fuller Licensing & Financing, Inc. Method of packaging an adhesive composition and corresponding packaged article
US20090166234A1 (en) * 2007-12-31 2009-07-02 Lincoln Global, Inc. Vapor barrier for electrode packaging
GB2457273A (en) * 2008-02-08 2009-08-12 Mohammed Pervaz Paper board stay fresh box with aluminium lining
US9630737B2 (en) 2013-09-25 2017-04-25 Neil Draper Method of making an asphalt container

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2480352A (en) * 1944-11-04 1949-08-30 Warren S D Co Separable liner for tacky elastomers
US2572959A (en) * 1945-03-24 1951-10-30 Standard Oil Dev Co Packaging tacky isobutylene-diolefin rubber in film of compatible styrene-isobutylene copolymer
US2639808A (en) * 1947-03-13 1953-05-26 Du Pont Packaging of tacky materials
US2771333A (en) * 1951-10-16 1956-11-20 Phillips Petroleum Co Container for deliquescent materials
US2690255A (en) * 1951-10-30 1954-09-28 American Can Co Method of packing adhesives in shipping containers for easy removal
US2666523A (en) * 1951-11-01 1954-01-19 Standard Oil Dev Co Packaging method
US2702580A (en) * 1954-04-06 1955-02-22 Du Pont Metallic finish laminated sheet material and process of making same
US3088646A (en) * 1956-08-29 1963-05-07 Reynolds Metals Co Flexible container adapted for fluids
US2998178A (en) * 1957-02-04 1961-08-29 Reynolds Metals Co Lined container for liquids and liner therefor
US3013923A (en) * 1957-02-11 1961-12-19 Chicago Carton Co Metal foil bonding
US2954912A (en) * 1957-08-26 1960-10-04 Excel O Therm Container Corp Insulated perishable food carton
US3051598A (en) * 1958-03-25 1962-08-28 Gen Tire & Rubber Co Heat resistant laminated counter top
US3095134A (en) * 1960-03-23 1963-06-25 Reynolds Metals Co Lined container for liquids and liner therefor
US3251382A (en) * 1963-06-24 1966-05-17 Tatsch Richard Foldable conduit structure
US5193740A (en) * 1988-02-12 1993-03-16 Cundell Decorprint Limited Disposable fold-up container for used medical materials
USRE36177E (en) * 1990-08-01 1999-04-06 H. B. Fuller Licensing & Financing, Inc. Method of packaging an adhesive composition and corresponding packaged article
US20090166234A1 (en) * 2007-12-31 2009-07-02 Lincoln Global, Inc. Vapor barrier for electrode packaging
WO2009083766A1 (en) * 2007-12-31 2009-07-09 Lincoln Global, Inc. Vapor barrier for electrode packaging
US9493294B2 (en) 2007-12-31 2016-11-15 Lincoln Global, Inc. Vapor barrier for electrode packaging
GB2457273A (en) * 2008-02-08 2009-08-12 Mohammed Pervaz Paper board stay fresh box with aluminium lining
US9630737B2 (en) 2013-09-25 2017-04-25 Neil Draper Method of making an asphalt container

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