US2310319A - Liquid sprayer - Google Patents

Liquid sprayer Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2310319A
US2310319A US34168640A US2310319A US 2310319 A US2310319 A US 2310319A US 34168640 A US34168640 A US 34168640A US 2310319 A US2310319 A US 2310319A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
liquid
reservoir
discharge
disc
spray
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
William H Rose
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
STANCO Inc
Original Assignee
STANCO Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B11/00Single-unit, i.e. unitary, hand-held apparatus comprising a container and a discharge nozzle attached thereto, in which flow of liquid or other fluent material is produced by the muscular energy of the operator at the moment of use or by an equivalent manipulator independent from the apparatus
    • B05B11/06Single-unit, i.e. unitary, hand-held apparatus comprising a container and a discharge nozzle attached thereto, in which flow of liquid or other fluent material is produced by the muscular energy of the operator at the moment of use or by an equivalent manipulator independent from the apparatus the spray being effected by a gas or vapour flow from a source where the gas or vapour is not in contact with the liquid or other fluent material to be sprayed, e.g. from a compressible bulb, an air pump or an enclosure surrounding the container
    • B05B11/068Single-unit, i.e. unitary, hand-held apparatus comprising a container and a discharge nozzle attached thereto, in which flow of liquid or other fluent material is produced by the muscular energy of the operator at the moment of use or by an equivalent manipulator independent from the apparatus the spray being effected by a gas or vapour flow from a source where the gas or vapour is not in contact with the liquid or other fluent material to be sprayed, e.g. from a compressible bulb, an air pump or an enclosure surrounding the container comprising a liquid-absorbent material

Description

W. H. ROSE LIQUID 'SPRAYER v Feb. 9, 1943.

Filed June 21, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Feb. 9, 1943.

FIG. 9

w. H. ROSE LIQUID S-PRA'YER Filed June 21, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Feb. 9, 1943 UNITED LIQUID SPRAYER William H. Rose, Jersey City, N. 3., assignor to Stanco Incorporated 12 Claims.

The present invention relates to a method and means for spraying or atomizing liquids, and particularly to a means for spraying, liquid insecticides and like materials.

It is an object of the invention to provide a method and means for producing an insecticide spray in which a major portion of the liquid particles will be so finely divided as to remain suspended in the air for a considerable period of time. It is also an object to provide an atomizing device in which with only slight changes, the quality of the discharge may be varied from a light to a heavy concentration of liquid in air. A further object is to provide a reservoir spray gun, in which provision is made for the operative combination of a spray gun pump with a conventional form of shipping container for the liquid.

This invention and its objects may be fully understood from the following specification when it is read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a vertical section longitudinally of a spray pump and reservoir of the character contemplated;

Fig. 2 is a similar view through a portion of an alternate arrangement;

Figs. 3 to 6A, inclusive, are end views of discharge heads showing suitable discharge opening patterns;

Figs. '7 and 8 are vertical sections through alternate types of discharge head fillers;

Figs. 9 to 13, inclusive, are vertical sectional views through alternate forms of discharge head assemblies; and

Fig. 14 is a vertical section through a valved discharge head.

In describing the invention as illustrated by the drawings, like parts have been designated by the same numerals.

Referring to Fig. 1, the numeral I designates a reservoir for fluid, which is preferably a small size can in which the fluid is sold, havin a threaded nozzle or pouring spout 2, and thereby provided for engagement in fluid-tight relation with a spray pump barrel 3 by means of the cap member 4, soldered or otherwise secured'to the barrel. A fluid feed tube 5, carried at the forward end of the barrel 3, and opening therein,

extends downward through and beyond the cap 4 for such distance as to bring it into closely spaced relation with the bottom of the container to be used. The tube is provided with a balance opening' 6 at a' point normally above the liquid within the container, and should be maintained in fluidtight relation with both the cap and the pump barrel at their points of contact. A fluid-tight seal also must be maintained between the cap 4 and nozzle 2, as by gasket 7.

The spray pump is of generally conventional nature, having a pump plunger 8 disposed in the barrel 3, except that the spray discharge head is formed according to the inventive concept herein set forth.

A partition 9, having an air passage opening 9a, disposed adjacent the end of the barrel, forms a chamber it in communication with the reservoir l by way of the tube 5. The partition 9 also serves to prevent any free liquid which may be present in the chamber In, from tim to time, from draining back into the pump barrel. The closure H for the end of the barrel is provided with an opening or openings l2 t permit the discharge o-f a fluid spray. In the form shown by Fig. 1, a disc l3 of an absorbent and preferably a non-fibrous material, such as fine cellulose sponge, a porous ceramic material, pumice, or fine steel wool, and the like.

The material used is preferably one having a multitude of small, generally discontinuous cells, voids or passages distributed in closely adjacent relation throughout the mass of the material, the mass of the material, however, being of such nature as to be substantially self-supporting. As indicative of the characteristics of the material contemplated, it may be said that the preferred material is one in which:

l. The number of cells, voids or passages is not substantially less than 45,000 per cubic inch;

2. The total air space produced by the Voids, cells or passages is equivalent to approximatel 97% of the volume per cubic inch;

3. The average size of the cells, voids or passages does not substantially exceed .034 inch.

Of the materials suitable for use as indicated above, that which is most preferred is a fine cellulose sponge material, which may be produced under such controlled condition as to obtain the characteristics desired.

Although a self-supporting filler material is preferred for use, various structural devices may also be utilized to maintain not only the original conformation of the disc, but also its relative position in the assembly. In the arrangement according to Fig. 1, the partition 9 is provided with a flange portion 922 which, in cooperation with the closure H, maintains the disc I3'in proper operating relationship in the assembly.

The structure illustrated in Fig. 1, while a simple embodiment of the invention, may be referred to in describing the principles and methods of operation. The principle of operation differs from that of comparable apparatus now known in the art, in that in a simple structure, the conventional syphon tube for lifting fluid from the reservoir has been dispensed with, in favor of an arrangement which provides for positive, pressure lifting or displacement of liquid from the reservoir. Whereas, in the conventional spray pump, the fluid is lifted and sprayed on the forward stroke of the pump plunger, in the apparatus according to this invention, a two step operation is contemplated.

On the forward stroke of the plunger 8, air is forced through the opening 90. into chamber Ill. The absorbent filler disc l3, while permitting the passage of air to discharge through the closure II by way of openings l2, in combination with the closure H, restricts the flow of air to such an extent that a slight excess of pressure is built up in the chamber Ill. The chamber ll] being in substantially free communication with the reservoir through tube 5, the pressure in the chamber and in the reservoir tend to equalize, at a point slightly above atmospheric. On the rearward stroke of the plunger 8, the pressure in the chamber i and the pump barrel is slightly reduced, creating a pressure differential between the reservoir and the chamber it] which forces a portion of the fluid contents from the reservoir into the chamber, where it is absorbed by the material of the disc 63. It is to be specifically noted that this is not the conventional syphon action. On the next forward stroke of the plunger 8, the liquid is sprayed from the discharge openings !2, while the pressure within the reservoir is renewed. At the same time, any free liquid in the chamber I0 is forced back into the reservoir. The diameter of the tube 5 must be proportioned substantially with relation to the pump barrel 3 and with the absorbent capacity and air resistance of the absorbent filler !3. If the tube is too large, or the absorbent filler of too great density, an excess amount of air will be forced into the reservoir, and may cause flooding of the chamber I!) on the next rearward stroke of the plunger. The balance which must be obtained is not extremely critical, however, and may be readily determined by simple experimentation in any particular instance, or may be calculated by conventional methods. The principal function of the balance opening 6 is to prevent an accumulation of pressure in the reservoir when not in active use. This opening is not of sufficient size, however, to interfere with the operation of the sprayer in the manner set forth above.

Before the initial use of the device, or when it has remained idle for a considerable period of time, its operation is facilitated if the absorbent filler element is first well wet with liquid. This can be done most simply by partially or entirely blocking the discharge port in the head I I, while building up a slight pressure in the liquid reservoir. Upon releasing such pressure by removing the port obstruction, the spray liquid will tend to flood the chamber Iii sufficient-ly to thoroughly In Fig. 2 the inventive concept is shown applied in a slightly different manner. In the apparatus illustrated, the pump or sprayer barrel 3 is adapted for attachment to a reservoir in which the tube 5 is carried by the nozzle member 2. Also as shown, the partition is spaced from the filler disc l3, and a retainer member Elia is utilized to maintain the position of the disc. It should be noted that in the construction shown, the joints between the pump barrel 3 and cap member 4 should be fluid-tight, and also that the cap 3 should be adapted to make a fluid-tight connection with the nozzle 2. One way in which this may be accomplished is illustrated. A disc 2a of an air pervious substantially absorbent material, such as felt or the like, being inserted between the nozzle closure and tube supporting element 2b, and the inner face of the cap. To some extent, this disc 2a modifies the pressuring effect on the reservoir, and tends to produce a drier but higher velocity spray, due to an increase in the pressure and amount of air discharged through the absorbent disc l3.

As may be apparent, the means by which the pump barrel 3 is affixed to the reservoir nozzle 2 is variable within wide limits, but other arrangements which are particularly suited for use in this invention, have been disclosed in a copending application Serial No. 311,380, filed December 30, 1939.

With reference to the Figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6, it will be noted that contrary to conventional practice when using a syphon tube sprayer, a variety of spray opening patterns are made possible, whereby the utility of the spray device is enlarged. If desired, the opening shown in Fig. 5 may be centered and also it may be enlarged within such limits as are determined by the size of the sprayer and the result desired. With a large single opening, it is usually desirable to insert a piece of wire or fabric mesh between the closure member II and the disc [3 in order to avoid distortion or bulging of a spongy, absorbent material under pressure from within the barrel, or to assist in the spray dispersion.

Referring particularly to Fig. 6 and the related sectional view 6A, a variable spray head has been illustrated in which a closure member I l having an enlarged opening of the type shown in Fig. 5, is backed by a rotatable disc I la having a variety of discharge opening patterns [2a punched therein. The disc Ila may be supported as by a loosely applied rivet Ilb, which being flrmly aiflxed to the disc Ha extends through the closure II and terminates exteriorly in a Winged end by means of which the disc Ila may be turned so as to bring any desired spray pattern into register with the fixed opening l2 in closure member II.

In addition to the possibility of varying the form of the spray discharge by the use of different discharge patterns as illustrated in Figs. 4 to 6 inclusive, it is also possible to vary the character of the discharge by means of changes in the nature or form of the absorbent filler element l3. As shown in Figs. 7 and 8, a disc [3 of any of the materials mentioned may be partially or completely perforated a at I3a, the perforations to coincide with the discharge openings in the particular discharge head or closure which may be used. Many variations and combinations are also possible in the form of the disc arrangement. For example, the disc shown in Fig. 8, may be of half the illustrated thickness, and backed by a similar or greater thickness of the sameonan equivalent material Ito produce a. disc member; having the-same .or-simil'ar characteristics to 'those of thezdisc member shown in Fig; 7. 11118 to benoted that'although a consider-- ablelsvariety or. materialsare available for usein forming the disc members contemplated; it-is preferred to use a material which is substantially unaffected physically by either oily or aqueous materials;. Of'these materials, artificial sponge made from celluloseispreferred, as it is easy to cut-and shape, andiperforations such as have beendescribediin connection with Figs. '7 and 8 maybe made'easily and will not be-substantially changed by use;

More elaborate:arrangementsior the construction. of'the' spray discl'l'argeahead are illustrated" in Figs; 9"to. 13 inclusive, butall are within the scope of the concept set forth in the descriptiOI1:0f.;FigS; 1? and::.2.- The principal object of the variations-maybe sai'd'to be for the purpose more clearly illustrated: by Fig. 9a. The end closure H with the annular partition 9 forms adischarge head; chamber: of "greater length and capacity than. shown. in; any of the previously:

illustrated structures. The. chamber furthermore is not in free" communication with the reservior througlrthe'tuhefi; as in Fig. 1, the principle. of. modifying: the pressuring efifect'. on the reservoir as :mentiorredi with respect to the arrangementshownin Fig. 2'having been developed further. In'this modification; an annularantiflooding member M' is disposed in the .rearward portiorrof the chamber'against the partition 9, covering'theiupper. end. of:;the tube (Fig. 90 provides an end view-of the member l4.) Thus, as previouslymentioned, pressure to the reservoir on: the forwardistroke of the piston, ismodified tosome extent; as is the flow of liquid from the reservoir on the rearward stroke. In addition, the member M. acts as a reservoir for any excess of liquid-which may rise into: the chamber, permitting the liquid .to be more gradually absorbed by the filler" l3; This member 14 isxpreierably separatedifromthe discor absorbent filler member1;|3'by, means-of'spacerdisc l5f'which may-be conveniently formed. fromithin metal or from tough paper and the like. Thespaher. disc l5 also'servesflas an -air distribution medum, in that within. the area of the'opening inthe annular member l4, the disc i provided with perforations Ilia, as show-nin the Figure 9b, to provide a plurality of air streams through the filler I3, and thus prevent localized drying of the filler by a Single stream of air. In addition, peripheral cuts l5?) in the disc l5, provide for easier transfer of liquid from the annular member or from the tube 5.

In Fig. 10, a modification is illustrated in which the absorbent filler l3, and the annular member designated as M in Fig. 9, are combined in a single member 16. In thi showing, the member I6 is of generally tubular nature, closed at the end abutting against the pump barrel closure II, and open at the end adjoining the piston 8 or partition 9. The member I6 is of such length tions iofth'ercap' membenb, which, in this .embodi ment, .is :set into a; sideewa'll of the .apumpzrbanrel;

in-zordento 'obtainramore compact sprayer as:- sembly. with? a.-;reservoir oft the. type; illustrated in Fi 2,

obviously,.the capzmember may a1so'bepr0vided with-"atubeb inthe fashion shown in Fig. 1. An-

other. feature. illustrated in this embodiment is" thei-use of apremova'ble closure element l I, which,

as shown, is';provided for threaded engagement with the. end. of thebarrel; 3, thereby providingforxinterchangeability of closure elements having difierentf discharge" openingpatternsl. In the present instance, openings are provided in the closure l [to correspond with the passages provided through. the closed end 'of-element 16' in" the manner described and-illustrated by Figs: andt8.

In Fig; 11,. astructural arrangement isillus trated..which:provides one means to accomplish production line; assembly of such sprayers; As

shown, the absorbent filler l3 isfirst packedfina cylindrical, two part container or dischargehead l'i, comprising a spray discharge portion lin -and an. air distributing portion Ill): The two: parts; are: joined in fluid-tight relation and then'isoldered 'or otherwise joined to the end of a pump barrel 3, inwhich' the partition 9-previously' has been inserted;

If desired, provision. may bemade for the thneaded'iattachmentjof the head II to the barrel 3;for;the-.same. purposes as. mentioned in connec.=-

tion vvith:Fig. 10, andrfurthenionthe purpose of permitting. the-use of:one sprayer-barrel orpump inspraying eitheroilyior adueousliquids, which obviously may'not'be. sprayed: through" the same" fillerxelement'ronce ithasbeen used in either'service; When: assembled. in: such' fashion, thev discharge heads. may be. fabricated separately and. brought together with a prefabricated pump? barreliattany convenient assembly point; Also,

wherrusing cellulosesponge with aqueousmate .fi'om theclosure lii'either by'means of an an-- nular stop is; as in: Fig; 12, or by a perforate partition l 'a's inFig. 13. In the arrangement according to Fig. 12,. nebulization is a sole function oi the absorbent material carried on within theh'e'ad," with-only a portion of'the-total spray beingdischarged through the opening l2 in'the" head. In the arrangement according to Fig. 13, however, the partition 19 is provided with perforations Isa which function in the same fashion as those illustrated, for example, in Fig. 3, and the closure II is provided with an enlarged opening l2 through which the inner portions of the spray stream is discharged. In both forms however, those portions of the spray stream which may unite to form droplets tend to collect in the area provided, and run back into the absorbent material. In the structure according to Fig. 13, the partition 19 is provided with an opening 19b, or a series of such openings, similar to the cuts shown as 15b in the disc [5 illusthat. iitcco'vers'; and :extendsrbeyond the edge spore Although shown as adapted for use.

trated by Fig. 912. These cuts permit the filler element l 3 to re-absorb any liquid which may not be discharged in nebulized form, or which may drip from around the openings in the partition l9.

Fig. 14 illustrates the application of a means for controlling the flow of liquid to an absorbent material in the discharge head of a device such as illustrated in Fig. 1. As shown, a gland member 20 is secured to the upper surface of the head portion of the sprayer barrel 3, directly over the tube 5. A needle valve member 2| having a knurled top, is provided for threaded engagement in the gland member, and may be turned down or up to regulate the flow of liquid from the tube 5, and also the air delivered through said tube. A look nut 22 maintains the setting of the needle valve as desired.

As has been indicated, the invention is not limited to any specific embodiment set forth for the purpose of illustration, and various changes may be made in the apparatus as described within the scope of the invention as set forth by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A sprayer device comprising in combination with a reservoir for liquid, a spray discharge assembly above and in pressure-tight relation to the reservoir, including a ported discharge head, a conduit for liquid opening at one end into the head, and at the other end into a body of liquid confined in said reservoir, a means for producing surges of pressure air through said head, and a means for restricting the flow of pressure air through the head, diverting a portion of the pressure air through said conduit into the liquid reservoir, said means including a liquid-absorbent, fluid-dispersing element, adapted to receive liquid through said conduit, between surges, under pressure of the air diverted to said reseryou.

2. A sprayer according to claim 1, in which the liquid-absorbent, fluid-dispersing element is a disc of a cellular, non-fibrous material disposed laterally of the head, forward of the conduit opening therein.

3. A sprayer according to claim 1, in which the liquid-absorbent, fluid-dispersing element i a packing of a non-fibrous material substantially filling the head and covering the conduit opening therein.

4. A sprayer according to claim 1, in which the liquid-absorbent, fluid-dispersing element is a substantially cylindrical member, closed at one end, disposed in the head with the closed end of the cylinder adjacent the outer ported end thereof, and a side Wall portion covering the conduit opening into the head.

5. In a sprayer of the character described, a discharge head assembly, comprising a casing, a conduit for liquid opening into the casing at an intermediate point thereof, a closure for one end of the casing having a discharge port therein, a liquid-absorbent, fluid-dispersing element in said head between the discharge port and conduit opening, and a valve means carried by the casing to alter the effective area of the conduit opening in said casing.

6. A sprayer, comprising a spray pump barrel having a discharge end, means carried by the barrel adjacent the discharge end to engage a reservoir for liquid, a ported discharge end closure for said barrel and a perforate, lateral partition disposed within the barrel in spaced relation to said closure member, a conduit carried by the spray barrel, opening thereinto, forward of the partition and extending downward through the reservoir engaging means, and a liquid-absorbent, fluid-dispersing filler element in said barrel, interposed between the discharge port and said conduit, said filler element adapted to divert a portion of the pressure air deliverable through said barrel into the conduit tube, and receiving liquid therethrough from a reservoir, when attached.

7. In a sprayer according to claim 6 in which the filler element comprises a body of a nonfibrous, liquid-absorbent material, the mass of said material substantially enclosing a multitude of cells, voids or air passages, of which the greater number are separated one from another by liquid permeable walls of the material.

8. In a sprayer according to claim 6 in which the filler element comprises a body of non-fibrous, liquid-absorbent material having a substantially cellular structure, in which the total volume of cells, voids and air passages is equal to about 97% of the volume of the body of material.

9. In a sprayer according to claim 6 in which the filler element comprises a body of a nonfibrous, liquid-absorbent material having a substantially cellular structure, in which the total number of cells, voids and air passages is substantially 45,000 per cubic inch of the material.

10. In a sprayer according to claim 6 in which the filler element comprises a body of a nonfibrous, liquid-absorbent material, the mass of said material substantially enclosing a multitude of cells, voids or air passages of which the greater number are separated one from the other by liquid permeable walls of the material, said cells, voids or air passages each having an average size not substantially exceeding .034 inch.

11. In a sprayer according to claim 6 in which the filler element comprises a body of a nonfibrous liquid absorbent material and passages are provided in the material.

12. A sprayer according to claim 6 in which the filler element is spaced from the end closure to form a liquid collection area behind the closure.

WILLIAM H. ROSE.

US2310319A 1940-06-21 1940-06-21 Liquid sprayer Expired - Lifetime US2310319A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2310319A US2310319A (en) 1940-06-21 1940-06-21 Liquid sprayer

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2310319A US2310319A (en) 1940-06-21 1940-06-21 Liquid sprayer

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2310319A true US2310319A (en) 1943-02-09

Family

ID=23338596

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US2310319A Expired - Lifetime US2310319A (en) 1940-06-21 1940-06-21 Liquid sprayer

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2310319A (en)

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2511420A (en) * 1947-12-24 1950-06-13 Kenneth C Thompson Foam forming device
US2607626A (en) * 1948-02-25 1952-08-19 Albert R Goldrick Atomizer
US3088679A (en) * 1960-10-14 1963-05-07 Sprayers & Nozzles Inc Sprayers
EP0812626A2 (en) * 1996-06-14 1997-12-17 Valois S.A. Flat dispenser for fluids

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2511420A (en) * 1947-12-24 1950-06-13 Kenneth C Thompson Foam forming device
US2607626A (en) * 1948-02-25 1952-08-19 Albert R Goldrick Atomizer
US3088679A (en) * 1960-10-14 1963-05-07 Sprayers & Nozzles Inc Sprayers
EP0812626A2 (en) * 1996-06-14 1997-12-17 Valois S.A. Flat dispenser for fluids
EP0812626A3 (en) * 1996-06-14 1998-04-08 Valois S.A. Flat dispenser for fluids
US5950871A (en) * 1996-06-14 1999-09-14 Valois S.A. Spray pump dispenser accommodating thin configurations
US6021930A (en) * 1996-06-14 2000-02-08 Valois S.A. Spray pump dispenser accommodating thin configurations

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3545682A (en) Dispensing device
US3572590A (en) Squeeze bottle atomizers and liquid dispensers
US3527551A (en) Valve system for pump
US3628704A (en) Container with venting gasket
US3326469A (en) Spraying dispenser with separate holders for material and carrier fluid
US3306252A (en) Shielded aerosol medicament dispenser
US3401844A (en) Leakproof aerosol construction
US3034731A (en) Back flow preventing valve assembly
US3502035A (en) Piston pump for dispensing liquids or fluid pastes
US3986644A (en) Dispensing pump
US3379381A (en) Atomizer pump
US4051983A (en) Pump sprayer
US5289952A (en) Device for dispensing foam, and push-button for a device of this kind
US4057176A (en) Manually operated spray pump
US4356941A (en) Squeeze-type dispenser for powdered materials
US4179049A (en) Pump dispenser
US5294058A (en) Regulated drip irrigation emitter
US5535950A (en) Dual trigger sprayer
US5335853A (en) Compact long-lasting sprayer, pump and agitator combination
US2680010A (en) Foam dispensing device
US4305530A (en) Liquid atomizer
US4618077A (en) Liquid dispensing pump
US4147476A (en) Pump assembly for an atomizing piston pump
US5626259A (en) Two liquid sprayer assembly
US4186882A (en) Atomizing liquid dispenser