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Suction cleaner

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Publication number
US2300266A
US2300266A US27294739A US2300266A US 2300266 A US2300266 A US 2300266A US 27294739 A US27294739 A US 27294739A US 2300266 A US2300266 A US 2300266A
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Prior art keywords
motor
dirt
fan
suction
casing
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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Donald G Smellie
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Hoover Co
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Hoover Co
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/10Filters; Dust separators; Dust removal; Automatic exchange of filters
    • A47L9/16Arrangement or disposition of cyclones or other devices with centrifugal action
    • A47L9/1658Construction of outlets
    • A47L9/1666Construction of outlets with filtering means
    • A47L9/1675Construction of outlets with filtering means movable, revolving or rotary
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L5/00Structural features of suction cleaners
    • A47L5/12Structural features of suction cleaners with power-driven air-pumps or air-compressors, e.g. driven by motor vehicle engine vacuum
    • A47L5/22Structural features of suction cleaners with power-driven air-pumps or air-compressors, e.g. driven by motor vehicle engine vacuum with rotary fans
    • A47L5/28Suction cleaners with handles and nozzles fixed on the casings, e.g. wheeled suction cleaners with steering handle
    • A47L5/30Suction cleaners with handles and nozzles fixed on the casings, e.g. wheeled suction cleaners with steering handle with driven dust-loosening tools, e.g. rotating brushes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/0081Means for exhaust-air diffusion; Means for sound or vibration damping

Description

Oct. 27, 1942.

D. G. SMELLJE SUCTION CLEANER Filed May 11, 1939 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTQR Donald 6. Sm'ellie I I BY ATTCRNEY Oct. 27, 1942.

D. G. SMELLIE SUCTION CLEANER Filed May ll, 1939 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 lNvE'NToR onald melle ATTORNEY lPatented Oct. 27,4 197,12

SUCTION CLEANER Donald G. Smellie, Canton, Ohio, assigner to The Hoover Company, poration ot Ohio North Canton, Ohio, a cor- Application May 11, 1939, Serial No. 272,947

l1 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in suction cleaners and more particularly to cleaners of the portable handle-maneuvered type in which the motor, fan and handle pivot as a unit about a horizontal transverse axis and carry the dirt separating and collecting apparatus.

It follows that in a cleaner thus designed the dirt-separating element swings with the handle as the cleaner 'is maneuvered over the carpet sur- 'face, and even makes it possible to utilize a portion of the handle as a conduit or extension of the exhaust from the fan chamber, communicating at its outer end with a illter bag or, as in the present instance, With an imperforate dirt collecting receptacle with a rotary dirt-separating member between the discharge end of the conduit and the receptacle.

'I'he object of the present invention is to incorporate in a cleaner of the hereinabove described design, a separate motor-driven dirt separator located at the upper end of the extending conduit, and replacing the more familiar cloth lter bag.

And, a further object of the invention is to conduct the air from which the `dirt has been removed by the rotary lter through a return duct leading to the motor casing and thence through suitable ports or passages through the motor itself, for the purpose of cooling or Ventilating the parts thereof.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is fully disclosed in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a general View in side elevation of the cleaner;

Figure 2 is an enlarged view of the cleaner in side elevation with parts broken away to show the dirtfseparating arrangement;

Figure 3 is a top plan view of the cleaner, with portions thereof shown in section as taken on line 3 3 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is an enlarged detail view in cross section through the motor housing as taken on line 4 4 of Figure 3 and showing the arrangement for conducting the cooling air .through the motor;

Figure 5 is a detail view in cross section through the rotary vdirt-separating unit, as taken on line 5-5 of Figure 2; and

Figure 6 is a wiring diagram showing the electrical connections between the two motors and the centrifugal switch for controlling the starting of the fan motor. y

Referring to the cleaner in its general aspects, the Wheeled carriage or main frame I, includes a nozzle casing 2 having a downwardly facing suction mouth and a cylindrical casing 3 supported 55 centrally of the carriage mounted for limited rotation about a horizontal transverse axis. l Occupying the greater portion of this cylindrical casing 3 is the motor 4, with one end portion closed oil by a transverse partition wall 3a to form the fan chamber 5, the suction fan 6 being mounted directly upon an extension of the motor shaft l.

The cylindric casing 3 is pivotally supported at its ends in trunnions formed by a pair of upstanding side frame members l, 8 carried by the main frame I, these frame members having inwardly projecting annular bearing flanges 8a, la on which .are supported complementary annular flanges integral with the end walls of the casing.

Embracing the side frame members 8,8 supporting the rotative casing 3, is a pair of hollow casing sections 9, 9 integral with the nozzle 2 andfo extending rearwardly therefrom, provide passages extending from the nozzle to the ends of the casing 3. Thus, as shown in Figure 3, one of these passages connects the nozzle chamber with the fan chamber 5 through an annular inlet opening or "eye formed by the annular bearing ange 8a of the adjacent side frame member 8, and it is through this inlet opening that the dirt-laden air from the nozzle is drawn into the fan chamber by the fan-created suction. The passage formed by the casing section 9 on the opposite side of the casing provides a housing for a belt I 0 which drives a rotative agitator il mounted in and extending lengthwise of the nozzle immediately above the suction mouth. For the purpose of the present disclosure it will not be necessary to describe the agitator in detail, or for that matter, any part of the suction-creating system of the cleaner, inasmuch as all are more or less standard in present day cleaner design.

Now, as clearly shown in Figures 1 and 2, the cylindric motor and fan casing 3 is provided with an integral radial extension I2 extending transversely `from one end to the other thereof and in a general upward and rearward direction. This radial extension is divided into two passages by an oblique extension or continuation of the partition wall la which divides the fan chamber from the remaining portion of the casing defined by the motor 4. Thus, on one side of the oblique section of the partition wall la is the outletpassage from the fan chamber diverg'ing as it approaches its open end, and on the other side is a somewhat wider passage leading to the space surrounding the motor I, the latter being characterized by a cylindrical sheet metal shell or frame 4a completely enclosing the field coils and armature and provided with circumferentially spaced slots or ports 4b at either end of the frame. As presently will be pointed out, these openings permit the circulation of air through the motor for cooling purposes, the cooling air being that dischargedfrom the fan chamber but having undergone the process of having the dirt particles removed therefrom by passing it through a rotary filter now to be described.

Attached at the end of the radial extension I2 of the rotative cylindric housing 3 is a casinglike member I3 consisting of a tubular section divided lengthwise into two conduits I 3a and I3b conforming to and providing an extension of the passages leading from and to the fan chamber and motor chamber, respectively. The attaching end of the casing I3 has suitable connection with the extension I2 and by interfitting the open ends together, with the partition wall between the two parallel conduits abutting the outer end of the partition wall 3a within the radial extension I2.

The outer end portion of the casing I3 is enlarged to form a chambered section I4 generally cubical in shape and offset below the conduit section. The conduit I3a, forming the extension of the fan chamber exhaust outlet, opens into the forward end of the chamber I4 through a bottom opening port lla, whereas a transverse partition wall I5 spaced inwardly from the rear end wall of the chamber forms a separate space having direct communication with the other conduit lb forming the return air passage leading to the motor chamber.

Supported within the enlarged chamber section Il of the casing I3 is a rotary filter or dirtseparating unit consisting of a motor I6 and a conical-shaped dirt separator or filter member Il mounted on an extension of the motor shaft and surrounding the outer end of the cylindrical motor casing. The axis of the motor and filter unit extends parallel with the conduits I3a and I3b immediately above, with the base of the motor fastened to the outer end wall of the chamber section and the conical filter member disposed forwardly of the partition wall I5 with its base having sealing contact with the margin of a large annular opening I5a in said partition wall.

The nlter member `II preferably consists of a skeleton frame I1a of conical shape covered with a filter screen Ilb such as fine wire mesh and a series of interttlng annular ribs and grooves around the base of the conical frame and the edge of the opening I5a form a labyrinth seal as at Il to prevent the passage of dirt-laden air between the filter member and the chamber wall,

and otherwise seal the spaces on opposite sides of the nlter screen.

Forming an extension of the chamber enclosing the filter unit is an imperforate removable dirt receptacle I3 open at its upper end and communicating directly with the open lower end of the filter chamber I4. This dirt-collecting receptacle is shaped at its lower end to fit against the underside of the radial extension'IZ of the rotative housing 3 and held in place byhandoperated spring latch member 20, so that it can be readily removed from time to time for emptying purposes.

Briefly then, it may be explained that the dirtladen air entering the nozzle chamber through its suction mouth in contact with the floor covering is carried into the fan chamber under the force of suction created by the fan and then discharged through the extended discharge passage from the fan chamber into the space surrounding the filter or separator where the dirtladen air, coming in contact with the surface of the filter member moving at a high speed of rotation, separates the dirt particles from the air stream allowing the clean air to pass through the screen while the dirt particles find their way into the collecting receptacle I9 below. And finally, the clean air entering the space leading to the return passage I3b to the portion of the cylindric casing in which the main fan driving motor is located, is used for cooling and ventilating the motor, being conducted through the ports 4b as indicated by the arrows in Figure 4 and thence being directed through and around the field coils and aperture and finally exhausted to the atmosphere through suitable ports 3b on the underside of the cylindric casing 3.

By preference, the conduits I3a and I3b leading from the fan chamber and to the main motor casing are lined with a suitable sound-absorbing material and for the purpose of absorbing and thereby reducing materially the noise which ordinarily attends the operation of suction cleaners. Any suitable material Imay be used for this purpose, as for instance, layers of sponge rubber as at 2l. Again, it will be observed that the conduit forming section of the casing I3 is in direct line of the handle by which the cleaner is maneuvered over the floor covering, and hence it simplifies the construction to provide a short tubular extension 22 at the outer end of the casing I3 and in line with the conduits into which a short handie 23 is fitted, the handle proper being shorter than would otherwise be necessary, if it were attached directly to the rotative casing 3.

Now, in the operation of the rotary filter or dirt-separating member by means of a separate motor, it would be a comparatively simple matter to connect it in parallel with the main fandriving motor 4 and thus to control both the motors by the usual switch located near the upper end of the handle. However, it is to be pointed out that the efllciency of the rotary filter as a dirt-separating member is largely dependent upon its high speed of rotation, inasmuch as impact and centrifugal force play a major part in removing the dirt particles from the air stream Assuming then, that the speed of the rotary filter should be brought up to normal before it can be expected to function efficiently, it follows thai the electrical connections should be so arrangec that upon starting the cleaner in operation, s short period of time should elapse between thi starting of the filter driving motor and the maix fan driving motor so as to assure maximum em ciency of the filter being obtained before an: dirt-laden air is discharged into the filter chamber.

Thus to meet this situation, it is proposed ta connect the two motors in parallel and to incluct a centrifugal switch in the rnain or fandrivin| motor circuit, said centrifugal switch 2l heini directly responsive to the speed of the rotar: filter driving motor I6, as illustrated diagram matically in the diagram of Figure 6. With sucl an arrangement, it follows that upon closing th switch in the main line of current supplied to th cleaner, the motor driving the rotary filter wil immediately start and be brought up to norma speed but the main motor will not start unti after the rotary filter has been brought up t I speed and the centrifugal switch 24 closed. I1

this way, the filter is operating at its high em ciency before any suction is created in the ai handling system.

One of the obvious advantages of the arrangement herein disclosed, wherein a separate motor is provided for operating the rotary filter member, is the fact that the operation of the rotary filter can be controlled entirely independently of the suction fan and therefore at a speed to aiIord the most eflicient degree of dirt separation, bearing in mind that cleaners of the socalled bagless type have been designed heretofore with the rotary filter mounted in advance of the fan chamber and having direct driving connection with the suction fan.

And another advantage of the present design is the utilization of the clean air under pressure for motor-cooling purposes and which otherwise would have to be included in the construction of the main fan driving motor itself by an auxiliary Ventilating fan.

Having set forth a preferred embodimentof the invention,I but with the understanding that the same may be variously modified without departing from the spirit thereof, I claim:

l. In a suction cleaner, the combination of a suction-creating unit comprising a fan mounted within a fan chamber having an exhaust outlet, and a motor for driving said fan, a conduit forming an extension of the exhaust outlet from said fan chamber, an independently rotatable rotary lter unit mounted at the outer end of said exhaust conduit remote from said suction-creating unit and including a dirt receptacle, and a return conduit for conducting clean air from said filter unit to said suction-creating unit for cooling said motor.

2. In a suction cleaner, the combination of a suction-creating unit comprising a motor-driven suction fan mounted within a fan chamber, said motor being enclosed within a housing having a port opening to the atmosphere, an exhaust conduit forming an extension of the exhaust outlet from said fan chamber, a dirt-receiving chamber at the end of said conduit, a dirt-separating unit mounted in said chamber at the outer end of said exhaust conduit and remote from said suction-creating unit, and a clean air return conduit leading from said dirt-separating unit to ksaid motor housing for the circulation of air therethrough.

3. In a suction cleaner, the combination of a casing, a suction-creating unit mounted within said casing 'comprising a motor-driven fan mounted within a fan chamber and a driving motor, a conduit forming an extension of the exhaust outlet of said fan chamber extending from said casing, a dirt-separating unit located at the outer end of said exhaust conduit including a separate driving motor, and a clean air return conduit leading from said dirt-separating unit back to said casing and to said first mentioned motor for the circulation of cooling air therethrough, one of said conduits being lined with sound-absorbing material.

4. In a suction cleaner, the combination of a wheeled casing, a nozzle, a motor-driven suctioncreating unit mounted in said casing, a conduit extending from said casing and forming an extended exhaust passage from said fan chamber, an independently rotatable motor-driven filter unit mounted at the outer end of said exhaust conduit and including a removable dirt-collecting receptacle, and a return conduit leading from said filter unit back to said casing and to said suction-creating unit for the circulation of clean air to the motor of said suction-creating unit for cooling purposes, said conduits being lined throughout their lengths with sound-absorbing material.

5'. In a suction cleaner, the combination of a casing, a suction-creating unit mounted in said casing and comprising a fan and a motor for driving said fan enclosed within separate chambers of said casingl an exhaust conduit leading from the fan chamber, a separately rotatable motor-driven dirt-separating unit including a second motor located at the outer end of said exhaust conduit remote from said suction-creating unit, and a clean air return conduit leading from said dirt-separating unit to the motor chamber for the circulation of cooling air therethrough.

6. In a suction cleaner, a wheeled casing, a suction-creating unit including a driving motor mounted within said casing, a pivotally mounted air conduit connected to said unit to convey dirtladen exhaust air therefrom, dirt-separating and storing means at the outer end of said conduit, a handle connected to and rigid with said conduit for propelling said casing, and a. return conduit leading from said dirt-separating and storing means to said casing to conduct clean air through said motor for cooling purposes.

7. In a suction cleaner, a wheeled casing, a suction-creating unit including a driving motor mounted within said casing, a pivotally mounted air conduit connected to said unit to convey dirt-laden exhaust air therefrom, dirt-filtering means at the outer end of said conduit, a dirt receptacle removably connected to said conduit. a propelling handle connected to and rigid with said conduit, and a return conduit connected to said dirt-filtering means to receive clean air therefrom and extended to said casing to convey such air over said motor for cooling purposes.

8. In a suction cleaner, a wheeled casing, a suction-creating unit including a driving motor mounted within said casing, a pivotally mounted air conduit lined with sound-absorbing material connected to said unit to convey dirt-ladeny exhaust air therefrom. a rotary dirt separator including a separate driving motor at the outer end of said conduit, a detachable dirt receptacle open to said separator to receive foreign material therefrom, a pivotally mounted return conduit lined with sound-absorbing material connected to receive clean air exhausted by said separator and convey it to the interior offsaid casing and over the driving motor of saidsuction-creating unit for cooling purposes, and a propelling handle rigidly connected to said `conduits.

9. A suction cleaner comprising a nozzle, suction-creating means including a fan chamber and a rotary fan to draw air through said nozzle, a motor to drive said fan, a muliler connected to said fan chamber to convey dirt-laden air there-h from, dirt-separating means at the outer end of said muffler to separate dirt and air, a dirt receptacle to receive dirt from said separating means, a second muffler to convey clean air from said separating means into said motor for cooling purposes, characterized in that said mutliers, said separating means, and said receptacle are pivotally mounted relative to said nozzle and in that the cleaner handle is connected thereto and pivots therewith.

10. A suction cleaner comprising a nozzle, suction-creating means including a fan chamber and a rotary fan to draw air through said nozzle, a motor to drive said fan, a muiller connected to said fan chamber to convey dirt-laden air therefrom, dirt-separating means at the outer end of said muffler to separate dirt and air, a dirt receptacle to receive dirt from said separating means, a second muflier to convey clean air from said separating means into said motor for cooling purposes, characterized in that said nozzle is movably supported, in that the remaining recited parts are pivotally mounted relative thereto, and in that the cleaner handle is connected to and pivots with the latter.

11. In a. suction cleaner, suction-creating means including an electric driving mot-or, dirtseparating means to receive dirt-laden air from said' suction-creating means and including a second driving motor, a speed-responsive device connected to said second driving motor, a source of electric current connected to said motors, and contacts in the circuit of said first driving motor closed by said speed-responsive device upon said second motor reaching a predetermined speed.

DONALD G. SMELLIE.

US2300266A 1939-05-11 1939-05-11 Suction cleaner Expired - Lifetime US2300266A (en)

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Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2632916A (en) * 1950-05-20 1953-03-31 Hoover Co Counterbalancing means for pivoted motor suction cleaners
US2994903A (en) * 1958-02-06 1961-08-08 Honeywell Regulator Co Tape transport loop chamber apparatus
US3199138A (en) * 1963-04-22 1965-08-10 Whirlpool Co Cleaner
US3218783A (en) * 1963-03-08 1965-11-23 Hoover Co Suction cleaners
US3344460A (en) * 1965-04-23 1967-10-03 Whirlpool Co Vacuum cleaner
US3522994A (en) * 1967-05-18 1970-08-04 Kurt Zenkner Vacuum cleaner
US3665683A (en) * 1969-09-29 1972-05-30 Nat Union Electric Corp Vacuum cleaner having pre-filter and dust bag
US3675268A (en) * 1970-05-19 1972-07-11 Whirlpool Co Vacuum cleaner
US3710412A (en) * 1971-06-11 1973-01-16 J Hollowell Vacuum trash collector
US3854164A (en) * 1973-01-15 1974-12-17 Whirlpool Co Self-propelled upright vacuum cleaner
US3903562A (en) * 1973-04-16 1975-09-09 Garry N Miles Car drying apparatus
US4179883A (en) * 1976-10-21 1979-12-25 Nippon Oil Seal Industry Co., Ltd. Reed valve assembly
US4373228A (en) * 1979-04-19 1983-02-15 James Dyson Vacuum cleaning appliances
US4959885A (en) * 1990-01-12 1990-10-02 Royal Applicance Mfg. Co. Vacuum cleaner
US5279018A (en) * 1992-01-10 1994-01-18 Ryobi Motor Products Corp. Quick connect rotary bearing for a vacuum cleaner
US5289612A (en) * 1992-08-13 1994-03-01 Ryobi Motor Products Corporation Noise reduction system for hard body vacuum
US5479676A (en) * 1994-05-12 1996-01-02 Electrolux Corporation Vacuum cleaner
US6085382A (en) * 1997-01-10 2000-07-11 White Consolidated Industries, Inc. Air filtrating self-propelled upright vacuum cleaner
WO2000044272A1 (en) * 1999-01-29 2000-08-03 Fantom Technologies Inc. Upright vacuum cleaner
US6334234B1 (en) 1999-01-08 2002-01-01 Fantom Technologies Inc. Cleaner head for a vacuum cleaner
US6740144B2 (en) 1999-01-08 2004-05-25 Fantom Technologies Inc. Vacuum cleaner utilizing electrostatic filtration and electrostatic precipitator for use therein
US6782585B1 (en) 1999-01-08 2004-08-31 Fantom Technologies Inc. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air flow
USRE38998E1 (en) 1999-04-06 2006-03-07 Oreck Holdings, Llc Balanced flow vacuum cleaner
US20070209147A1 (en) * 2006-03-10 2007-09-13 Bissell Homecare, Inc. Vacuum Cleaner with Motor Cooling Air Filtration
US8869349B2 (en) 2010-10-15 2014-10-28 Techtronic Floor Care Technology Limited Steering assembly for surface cleaning device
US9282862B2 (en) 2011-10-14 2016-03-15 Techtronic Floor Care Technology Limited Steering assembly for surface cleaning device

Cited By (34)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2632916A (en) * 1950-05-20 1953-03-31 Hoover Co Counterbalancing means for pivoted motor suction cleaners
US2994903A (en) * 1958-02-06 1961-08-08 Honeywell Regulator Co Tape transport loop chamber apparatus
US3218783A (en) * 1963-03-08 1965-11-23 Hoover Co Suction cleaners
US3199138A (en) * 1963-04-22 1965-08-10 Whirlpool Co Cleaner
US3344460A (en) * 1965-04-23 1967-10-03 Whirlpool Co Vacuum cleaner
US3522994A (en) * 1967-05-18 1970-08-04 Kurt Zenkner Vacuum cleaner
US3665683A (en) * 1969-09-29 1972-05-30 Nat Union Electric Corp Vacuum cleaner having pre-filter and dust bag
US3675268A (en) * 1970-05-19 1972-07-11 Whirlpool Co Vacuum cleaner
US3710412A (en) * 1971-06-11 1973-01-16 J Hollowell Vacuum trash collector
US3854164A (en) * 1973-01-15 1974-12-17 Whirlpool Co Self-propelled upright vacuum cleaner
US3903562A (en) * 1973-04-16 1975-09-09 Garry N Miles Car drying apparatus
US4179883A (en) * 1976-10-21 1979-12-25 Nippon Oil Seal Industry Co., Ltd. Reed valve assembly
US4373228A (en) * 1979-04-19 1983-02-15 James Dyson Vacuum cleaning appliances
US4959885A (en) * 1990-01-12 1990-10-02 Royal Applicance Mfg. Co. Vacuum cleaner
US5279018A (en) * 1992-01-10 1994-01-18 Ryobi Motor Products Corp. Quick connect rotary bearing for a vacuum cleaner
US5289612A (en) * 1992-08-13 1994-03-01 Ryobi Motor Products Corporation Noise reduction system for hard body vacuum
US5479676A (en) * 1994-05-12 1996-01-02 Electrolux Corporation Vacuum cleaner
US5640740A (en) * 1994-05-12 1997-06-24 Electrolux Corporation Vacuum cleaner
US5638573A (en) * 1994-05-12 1997-06-17 Electrolux Corporation Vacuum cleaner
US6085382A (en) * 1997-01-10 2000-07-11 White Consolidated Industries, Inc. Air filtrating self-propelled upright vacuum cleaner
US6308374B1 (en) 1997-01-10 2001-10-30 White Consolidated Industries, Inc. Air filtering self-propelled upright vacuum cleaner
US6484352B2 (en) 1997-01-10 2002-11-26 White Consolidated Industries, Inc. Vacuum cleaner with thermal cutoff
US6553611B2 (en) 1997-01-10 2003-04-29 White Consolidated Industries, Inc. Vacuum cleaner with thermal cutoff
US20050177974A1 (en) * 1999-01-08 2005-08-18 Fantom Technologies Inc. Vacuum cleaner having two cyclonic cleaning stages
US6334234B1 (en) 1999-01-08 2002-01-01 Fantom Technologies Inc. Cleaner head for a vacuum cleaner
US6740144B2 (en) 1999-01-08 2004-05-25 Fantom Technologies Inc. Vacuum cleaner utilizing electrostatic filtration and electrostatic precipitator for use therein
US7179314B2 (en) 1999-01-08 2007-02-20 Polar Light Limited Vacuum cleaner
US20050028675A1 (en) * 1999-01-08 2005-02-10 Fantom Technologies Inc. Vacuum cleaner
US6782585B1 (en) 1999-01-08 2004-08-31 Fantom Technologies Inc. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air flow
WO2000044272A1 (en) * 1999-01-29 2000-08-03 Fantom Technologies Inc. Upright vacuum cleaner
USRE38998E1 (en) 1999-04-06 2006-03-07 Oreck Holdings, Llc Balanced flow vacuum cleaner
US20070209147A1 (en) * 2006-03-10 2007-09-13 Bissell Homecare, Inc. Vacuum Cleaner with Motor Cooling Air Filtration
US8869349B2 (en) 2010-10-15 2014-10-28 Techtronic Floor Care Technology Limited Steering assembly for surface cleaning device
US9282862B2 (en) 2011-10-14 2016-03-15 Techtronic Floor Care Technology Limited Steering assembly for surface cleaning device

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