US2298149A - Continuous heating furnace - Google Patents

Continuous heating furnace Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2298149A
US2298149A US337988A US33798840A US2298149A US 2298149 A US2298149 A US 2298149A US 337988 A US337988 A US 337988A US 33798840 A US33798840 A US 33798840A US 2298149 A US2298149 A US 2298149A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
furnace
heating
billets
steel
chambers
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US337988A
Inventor
William A Morton
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
AMSLER MORTON CO
Original Assignee
AMSLER MORTON CO
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by AMSLER MORTON CO filed Critical AMSLER MORTON CO
Priority to US337988A priority Critical patent/US2298149A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2298149A publication Critical patent/US2298149A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F27FURNACES; KILNS; OVENS; RETORTS
    • F27BFURNACES, KILNS, OVENS, OR RETORTS IN GENERAL; OPEN SINTERING OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • F27B9/00Furnaces through which the charge is moved mechanically, e.g. of tunnel type; Similar furnaces in which the charge moves by gravity
    • F27B9/14Furnaces through which the charge is moved mechanically, e.g. of tunnel type; Similar furnaces in which the charge moves by gravity characterised by the path of the charge during treatment; characterised by the means by which the charge is moved during treatment
    • F27B9/20Furnaces through which the charge is moved mechanically, e.g. of tunnel type; Similar furnaces in which the charge moves by gravity characterised by the path of the charge during treatment; characterised by the means by which the charge is moved during treatment the charge moving in a substantially straight path tunnel furnace
    • F27B9/22Furnaces through which the charge is moved mechanically, e.g. of tunnel type; Similar furnaces in which the charge moves by gravity characterised by the path of the charge during treatment; characterised by the means by which the charge is moved during treatment the charge moving in a substantially straight path tunnel furnace on rails, e.g. under the action of scrapers or pushers

Description

Oct. 6, 1942. w. A. MORTON 2,298,149
commilbus HEATING Ful'mAcE v Filed May 31, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 W lsl zlzuToR M ATTORNEY Oct. 6, 1942 w. A. MORTON CONTINUOUS HEATING FURNACE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 31, 1940 W I. INVE BY .gATToRNEX Patented Oct. 6, 1942 CONTINUOUS HEATING FURNACE William A. Morton, Mount Lebanon Township, I Allegheny County, Pa., assignor-to The Amslerv Morton Company, Pittsburgh, Pa., a. corporation of Pennsylvania Application May 31, 1940, Serial No. 337,988 Claims. (01. 263-) This invention relates generally to heating furnaces and more particularly to heating furnaces of the type wherein articles are heated as they are continuously moved therethrough.
In the steel industry a continuous type heating furnace is employed for uniformly heating billets,
ingots, blooms, slabs, rails and the like, to a predetermined temperature, preparatory to rolling or performing other operations thereon. I
This type of furnace ordinarily contains two charge end, and second, by placing the burners at both the charging and discharge ends with the chambers, namely, a preheating chamber and a main heating chamber. The latter chamber is ordinarily provided with a soaking hearth adjacent the discharge end thereof. Th preheating chamber isomitted when the furnace is to be used for certain types of heating.
The material to be heated continuously passes through these chambers in the order named and each article, when discharged from the furnace,
is uniformly heated to the proper temperature for the operation that is to be performed thereon.
There are several difierent kinds of hearth structuresemployed in the-continuous type of heating furnace art. The most common type of hearth is a flat refractory surface over which the steel is moved as it passes through the furnace.
The firing is wholly above the steel and the furnace is used principally for-the heating of thin slabs, such for instance as slabs four inches thick.
Another type of hearth structure supports the steel on water cooled skids, permitting the application of heat both above and below the steel. The skids form horizontal beams and are supported upon spaced piers or refractory pillows. In some instances the flame is directed'from a common level toward the hearth and against the 7 steel which acts as a division wall, causing the flame to split, one portion of the flame passing above and the other below the steel. 'Inere was no definite control of the quantity of fuel passing above or below the steeland the steel resulted. The heating medium travels in the same direction as the movement of the steel. This type of furnace is fired from the discharge end and the. steel becomes overheated when the rate of production is changed. Again one of the two chambers, above or below the steel, is always. favored,'which results in non-uniform heat distribution, in the vertical plane.
To avoid these difficulties independent burners have been placed above and below the steel to insure proper heat distribution. This method of firing has been practiced in two ways, first by placing the burners at the charging end of the poor heating of v waste gases removed at the center of the furnace. With this character of hearth structure it is impossible to control the furnace atmosphere and it is difficult to control th firing because the firingchambers above and below the steel are connected with one another around the ends of the steel articles.
Another character of hearth structure permits the name to travel above the steel in the same direction of its movement and the waste gases at the discharge end are then circulated back under the steel and pass out through fiues adjacent the firing end. This method is impractical because the fiame, which is above the steel, loses a greater portion of its heat before it is drawn down under the steel, an the gases which are extensively cooled vary greatly in temperature and the top and bottom of the steel is not uniformly heated.
The principal object of this invention is the provision of a continuous type heating furnace having independent firing chambers above and below the steel to be heated.
Another object is the provision of a continuous type heating furnace having independent firing chambers separated by the steel being heated and wherein the flame propagation in both chambers is in the same direction.
Another object is the provision of independent firing chambers in a heating furnace which are separated by the steel being heated and which are fired separately but exhausted into a com-' mon fiue.
Another object is the provision of a continuous heating furnace having a preheating chamber and a main heating chamber and a hearth extending therethrough for supporting the steel to be heated which divides the preheating and the main heating chambers in the plane of the hearth into an upper and lower independent firing chamber.
Another object is the provision of an irregularity in the surface of the soaking hearth for causing each successive article to directly expose its sides to the application of heat when moved thereover.
Other objects and advantages appear in the following description and claims. The accompanying drawings disclose a practical embodiment illustrating the principles of I this invention wherein:
furnace with the waste gases removed at the dis Fig. 1 is a sectional view taken longitudinally of a continuous type furnace comprising this in- VGZItiO Fig. 2 is a horizontal sectional view taken along the plane of the hearth of the furnace shown in Fig. 1.
Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view taken alon the line 3-3 of Fig. 1.
Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken longitudinally of-another style continuous type furnace employing this invention.
Referring to Fig. 1, the furnace illustrated therein is made up of two sections, the heating chamber l having an extended soaking hearth II, and a preheating chamber l2. The preheating chamber [2 is omitted when the furnace is employed for heating certain kinds of steel. Water cooled skids l3, which form the hearth for supporting the steel, extend through thepreheating chamber l2 and the main heating chamber III to one end of the solid soaking hearth II and from the other end ofthe soaking hearth to the discharge end of the furnace. The 'ma-' terial H to be heated is charged through the opening l5 into the preheating chamber l2 and bers I1 and It. The chamber II, which is above the steel, is enclosed by the roof I! and the side walls 20. The steel charge ll forms the bottom of this chamber. The chamber 18 is formed by the steel H and the-floor 2i, which is below the plane of the hearth, and the continuous vertical walls 22 which rise from the floor 2i and support the outermost skids l3 as shown in Figs. 2 and 3. The walls 22 are closely adjacent the side walls 2| of the furnace and extend from the end wall 23 of the preheating chamber to the intermediate transverse-furnace wall 2 at the end of the soaking hearth. Thus the lower heating chamber i8 is roofed in by the materials being heated. The intermediate skids I; are supported on the short continuous walls 25 in the preheating chamber and on the piers 26 within the main heating chamber Ill.
The rear wall 26' of the furnace is provided 2 with two rows of burners 21 and 28 for firing the chambers l1 and II respectively. These burners are supplied with fuel carried by the conduits and with preheated air carried by the ducts 3i and 32 respectively. As shown in Figs. 2 and 3, three burners 28 are arranged to flre the chamber 18 between the vertical walls 22, while the space outside of the walls 22 or between the walls 22 and each of the side furnace walls 20 is fired with the burners 29. The flame from the latter burners heat the under side of the ends of the articles and a portion of the products of combustion from these flames may travel up around the ends of the steel articles into the chamber The burners of the preheating chamber are ordinarily of less capacity than those of the main heating chamber and may be supplied with preheated air by a branch line from the conduit ii. The air induced by the pressure of fuel in these burners and the slight infiltration of air through the charging opening is utilized in supporting the combustion of the fuel. Combustion is substantially complete before the gases reach the main chamber Iii and these burnt gases thereafter blanket the steel as they travel to the exhaust flues at the discharge end of the furnace. In this manner the atmosphere surrounding the steel may be controlled to prevent excess oxidation and/or decarburization of the steel. Radiant heat energy from the hottest part of the flames issuing from the main burners 21 and 28 is thus prevented from being applied directly on the steel.
The preheated steel is thus subjected to radiant heat energy from the furnace surfaces and the flames in both the upper and lower heating chambers I1 and I8 which must pass through the products of combustion blanketing the steel. If the steel is subjected to the direct radiation of the flames, which is the present practice, the
steel is heated in streaks. Streak heating is detrimental in rolling and other mill operations. This disadvantage is overcome by diffusing the radiant heat energy as it passes through the blanketing layer of the products of combustion from the preheating chamber. When the combustion of the main burner flames is substantially complete the products of combustion from both the preheating flames and the main burner flames combine and continue to blanket the steel as they pass on through the furnace. In this manner the atmosphere adja'ent the steel is controlled and prevents excess oxidation and decarburization of the steel.
The radiant heat energy being diffused as it passes through the blanketing products of combustion thereby provides a uniform temperature throughout each article of steel, which eliminates the detrimental effects due to direct heating from initial flame combustion. .Again the efficiency of the heatexchang'e is increased by the extended flame length and the location of the hottest heating areas may be accurately determined.
The hot waste gases passing from the chamber is and from the side burners 2s and :1 below the plane of the hearth, as shown in Fig. 2, flow up over the transverse wall 38 and down through the flues ll which are connected at their lower ends with the transverse flue II.
The hot waste gases passing from the chamber ll above the plane of'the'hearth continue to blanket the steel, as it passes over the soaking hearth II, and are drawn down past the discharge opening into the flue's 42 which are connected at-their lower end to the transverse flue 43. This prevents the entrance of cold air into the furnace chamber,'as any infiltration of air through the discharge door is drawn down directly into the flues. Y 4
The flames produced by the burners '23 travel rearwardly over the soaking hearthv ii substantially parallel with the steel until the velocity of the burning gases is reduced-"to such an extent that the draft induced by the fines 4|. in the vicinity of the burners 3'2, reverses the path .of movement. of the products of combustion.
Combustion issubstantially complete before the gases are redirected. and mingle with the gases blanketing the steel. Thus the flames in the v discharge end of the furnace heat the steel by radiant heat energy in a manner similar to that described above and the hottest portion of these flames is along their initial path. Thus the steel is protected by the products of combustion during the most critical periods. of the heating process.
The collecting flues 4| and 43 are connected by face of the soaking hearth ll adjacent the discharge end. As the steel articles are moved over this portion of the hearth the sides become exthe flue 44 to the'recuperator 45. The waste the main burners are shut. down. During mill .delays the movement of the steel through the furnace is stopped and the furnace temperature rises. The automatic controls then operate to reduce the firing rate of the main burners until this rate is reduced to a predetermined quantity at which time an automatic, transfer is effected for shutting down the main burners and firing the burners 33. These burners are then automatically regulated by the same control mechanism to maintain the steel on the soaking hearth at its proper rolling temperature. When the steel is again taken from the soaking hearth for rolling and new steel is supplied to the chargingend the automatic controls are again actuated by the temperature of the furnace to transfer the firing back to the main burners for normal operating conditions.
The temperature of the furnace is controlled automatically by a fluid system actuated by the pyrometer 49 which measures the temperature-of I the waste gases passing out of the furnace and down through the flue 42, for the purpose of control. The temperature of these gases have a direct relation to the temperature of-the steel which they blanket. This temperature controller regulates the quantity of air delivered by the blower 50 to the recuperator and the fuel delivered to the burners is in turn fed in proportionate quantities with respect to the quantity of air supplied. The pressure of the furnace is automatically regulated by the damper 5| in the flue 46. This damper is controlled by the motor 52 actuated by a mechanism which receives pressure impulses from the furnace. These impulses are preferably taken from the soaking chamber. The soaking hearth ll may be provided with some means for vertically shifting the individual articles during their travel over the soaking hearth. Such a movement exposes the sides of the articles permitting them to receive the same heat treatment as the normally exposed surfaces. Thus the body and the surfaces of the articles are heated uniformly and provide improved material for rolling or other operations.
The articles may be vertically shifted by a mechanically operated device, manually, or by'providing elevations. or'depressions in the surface of the soaking hearth. The latter provides the simplest form for articles which are substantially square or rectangular in cross section. It may be found preferable to vertically shift the whole of the article at one time as some articles may deviate sideways due to their particular shape if one end is raised or lowered.
In s. 1 and 2 a transverse depression 53 and a hump or elevation 54 is shown in the surposed to products of combustion. These surface formations may be constructed to roll each article completely over or throw it on its side. Again a plurality of these transverse surfaces may be provided along the soaking hearth and properly spaced from one another to shift several articles so that their sides are exposed just at the time the leadingarticle is discharged from the furnace.
In the furnace structure shown in Fig. 4, the
burners 21 and 28, which fire the upper and lower independent heating chambers I1 and I8 respectively, are faced in the opposite direction to that shown in Fig. 1. The preheating chamber I2 is not provided with burners and the products of combustion from both of the chambers I1 and I8 flow through the upper and lower levels of the preheating chamber l2, down through the vertical flues 40, past the charging door l5, and along the horizontal-flue 44 to the recuperator and out the flue 46 to the stack. The flames from r the burners '33'project into the furnace chamber over the soaking hearth H until the velocity of the gases is reduced sufliciently to redirect them back over the'steel, in the same manner as that described above. These gases are then discharged thrdugh the flues 42 and the damper controlled auxiliary stack 55.
J'In each of the structures illustrated in Figs. 1 and 4 the two firing chambers, above and below the steel, extend from the-preheatingchamber "through the main heating chamber. These chambers are-structurally independent from one another except for the commonpartit-ion formed by the steel being heated as illustrated. These firing chambers may be exhausted to the same or separate flues. However this does not affect the efficient operation of each of these firing chambers.
Ordinarily the furnace is constructed so that the ends of the steel articles are supported on the outer hearth skids l3. However this furnace can be successfully operated by placing vtwo shorter articles of steel in longitudinal alignment with their adjacent ends touching. Only four hearth skids are shown in Fig. 2 but more may be added if shorter lengths of steel are to be heated. If this is done it may be necessary to relocate the main burners 28 and 29 and the preheating burners 36 and 31 so that the flames will not play directly on the piers.
I claim: 1. A continuous furnace for heating billets and the like comprisingrupper and lower interior portions which during the operation of the furnace are separated into distinct and non-communicating chambers by the row of billets passing through the furnace on spaced apart skids supported by continuous solid walls, and independently controlled separate means for introducing heating flames into and withdrawing the products of combustion from each of said chambers to heat the billets from above and below.
2. A continuous furnace for heating billets and the like comprising upper and lower interior portions which during the operationof the furnace are separated into distinct and non-communicating chambers by the row' of billets passing through the furnace on spaced apart skids supported by continuous solid walls, and independently controlled separate means for introducing heating flames into and'causing them to travel in the same direction in both chambers for substantially the full length thereof longitudinally of the furnace to heat the billets from above and below.
3. A continuous furnace for heating billets and the like comprising upper and lower interior portions which during the operation of the furnace are separated into distinct and non-communicating chambers by the row of billets passing through the furnace, and separate means for introducing heating flames into both chambers and. causing them to travel in the direction of the travel of the billets for substantially the full length of said chambers.
4. A continuous furnace for heating billets and the like comprising a preheating portion and a heating portion connected thereto and through which the billets pass in turn, the upper and lower interiors of said portions being divided by the row of billets being heated which slide on spaced apart skids supported by continuous solid walls to form separate and non-communicating chambers longitudinal of the furnace above and below the row of billets, and independently controlled means for the separate introduction of heating flames into each of said chambers.
5. A continuous furnace for heating billets and the like comprising a preheating portion and a heating portion connected thereto and through which the billets pass in turn, the upper and lower interiors of said portions being divided by the row of billets being heated which slide on spaced apart skids supported by continuous solid walls to form separate and non-communicating chambers longitudinal of the furnace above and below the row of billets, and independently controlled separate means for introducing heating flames into andcausing them to travel in the same direction in both chambers longitudinally of the furnace to heat the billets from above and below for substantially the full length of said chambers. v
6. A continuous furnace for heating billets and the like comprising a preheating portion and a heating portionconnected thereto and through which the billets pass in turn, the upper and lower interiors of said portions being divided by the row of billets being heated which slide on spaced apart'skids supported by continuous solid walls to form separate and non-communicating chambers longitudinal of the furnace above and below the row of billets, and separate means for introducing heating-flames into both chambers and causing them to travel in the direction of the travel of the billets for substantially the full length of said chambers.
7. In a continuous furnace for heating billets and the like having side walls and roof, a pair of longitudinally disposed continuous inner walls within the furnace and spaced from the side walls, skids carried by the tops of said inner walls, the
I billets traveling along said skids in their passage independently introducing and controlling heat- I ing flames into the furnace above and below the billets.-
9. A continuous furnace for heating billets and v the like comprising upper and lower interior portions which during the operation of the furnace are separated into two distinct and non-communicating chambers by the row of billets passing through the furnace on spaced apart skids supported by continuous solid walls, and independently controlled separate means for introducing heating flames into both chambers and causing the same to travel in the direction opposite to that of the travel of the billets for substantially the full length of said chambers.
10. A continuous furnace for heating billets and thelike, comprising a preheating portion and a heating portion through which the billets pass in turn, a pair of continuous inner walls longitudinal of the interior of the furnace and spaced from each other and from the side walls of the furnace and along the tops of which inner walls the billets move forming a continuous partition completing a chamber beneath the billets and between the inner walls and which extends I through the preheating and heating portions of the furnace, said walls and billets forming noncommunicating independent upper and lower preheating and heating chambers, and independently controlled means for the separate introduction of heating flames into the furnace above and below the billets and causing the same to travel in the direction opposite to that of the travel of the billets for substantially the full length of'said chambers.
11. A continuous furnace for heating billets and the like comprising a heating portion which when the furnace is in operation is divided by the row of billets passing through the furnace on spaced apart skids supported by continuous solid walls into independent and non-communicating upper and lower heating chambers. a soaking hearth adjacent the discharge end of the furnace over which the billets pass, independently controlled means for introducing heating flames into each of said heating chambers and causing them to travel in-the direction opposite to that of the tudinal ofthe interior of the furnace and spaced travel of the billets for substantially the full length of said chambers, means for introducing heating flames adjacent the discharge end of the furnace, and means for redirecting the products of combustion from said flames toward the discharge end of the furnace and between the flames and the billets. t
12. A continuous furnace for heating billets and the like comprising upper and lower interior portions which during the operation of the fur-- nace are separated into distinct and non-communicating chambers by the row of billets passing through the furnace, separate means for introducing heating flames into both chambers and causing them to travel in the direction of the travel of the billets for substantially the full length of said chambers, and separate means for discharging the products of combustion from each chamber.
and heating chambers, independently controlled ;3. A continuous furnace for heating billets and the like comprising upper and lower interior portions which during the operation of the furnace are separated into distinct and non-communicating chambers by the row of .billets passing through the furnace, separate means for introducing heating flames into both chambers and causing them to travel in the direction of the travel of the' billets for substantially the full length of said chambers, separate means for discharging the products of combustion from each chamber, and means for controlling the rate of withdrawal of the products of combustion through said discharge means.
14. A continuous furnace for heating'billets and the like, comprisinga preheating portion and a heating portion through which the billets pass in turn, a pair of continuous inner walls longitudinal of the interior of the furnace and spaced from each other and from the side walls of the furnace and along the tops of which-inner walls the billets move forminga continuous partition completing a chamber beneaththe billets and between the inner walls and which extends through the preheating and heating portions of the furnace, said walls and billets forming non-communmeans for introducing heating flames into the furnace above and below the billets, and separate means for discharging the products of combustion from each chamber.
15. A continuous furnace for heating billets and 'the like, comprising a preheating portion and a heating portion through which the billets pass in turn, a pair of continuous inner walls longitudinal of the interior of the furnace and spaced from each' other and from the side walls of the furnace and along the tops of which inner walls the billets move forming a continuous partition completing .a chamber beneath the billets and between the inner walls and which extends through the preheating and heating, portions of the furnace, said walls and billets forming noncommunicating independent upper and lower preheating and heating chambers, means for introducing heating flames into the furnace above and below the billets, separate means for discharging the products of combustion from each chamber, and means for controlling the rate of icating independent upper and lower-preheating withdrawal of the products of combustion through said discharge means.
' 'wnLrAMA. MORTON.
US337988A 1940-05-31 1940-05-31 Continuous heating furnace Expired - Lifetime US2298149A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US337988A US2298149A (en) 1940-05-31 1940-05-31 Continuous heating furnace

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US337988A US2298149A (en) 1940-05-31 1940-05-31 Continuous heating furnace

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2298149A true US2298149A (en) 1942-10-06

Family

ID=23322912

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US337988A Expired - Lifetime US2298149A (en) 1940-05-31 1940-05-31 Continuous heating furnace

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2298149A (en)

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2451349A (en) * 1943-01-12 1948-10-12 Amsier Morton Corp Continuous heating furnace and method of operating the same
US2523644A (en) * 1946-09-04 1950-09-26 Frederick S Bloom Controlling fuel supply to multizone heating furnaces
US2652240A (en) * 1950-11-20 1953-09-15 Surface Combustion Corp Skid rail structure for forge furnaces
US2749106A (en) * 1950-11-28 1956-06-05 Metallurg Processes Co Protection of hot metallic bodies against oxidation
US2776128A (en) * 1953-10-30 1957-01-01 Surface Combustion Corp Forge furnace
US2789928A (en) * 1952-07-01 1957-04-23 Sunbeam Corp Process of hardening steel cartride cases and apparatus for accomplishing such process
US2878011A (en) * 1954-12-03 1959-03-17 Babcock & Wilcox Co Metallurgical furnace
US2927783A (en) * 1957-06-21 1960-03-08 Bloom Eng Co Inc Metal heating furnace system
US2929615A (en) * 1956-10-01 1960-03-22 Midland Ross Corp Flue gas distribution in heating furnaces
DE1159981B (en) * 1956-12-01 1963-12-27 Thermo Industrieofenbau G M B Compensating hearth for push or push-through ovens for heat treatment of metallic goods
US3179390A (en) * 1961-06-27 1965-04-20 Stein & Roubaix Multi-zone pusher type furnace and process for heating flat ingots or slabs, or like products
US4522586A (en) * 1983-11-29 1985-06-11 Price Frank C Thermal conditioning of material in containers
EP1172621A1 (en) * 2000-07-11 2002-01-16 ELTI S.r.l. High-productivity steel heating furnace, particularly for rolling plants

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2451349A (en) * 1943-01-12 1948-10-12 Amsier Morton Corp Continuous heating furnace and method of operating the same
US2523644A (en) * 1946-09-04 1950-09-26 Frederick S Bloom Controlling fuel supply to multizone heating furnaces
US2652240A (en) * 1950-11-20 1953-09-15 Surface Combustion Corp Skid rail structure for forge furnaces
US2749106A (en) * 1950-11-28 1956-06-05 Metallurg Processes Co Protection of hot metallic bodies against oxidation
US2789928A (en) * 1952-07-01 1957-04-23 Sunbeam Corp Process of hardening steel cartride cases and apparatus for accomplishing such process
US2776128A (en) * 1953-10-30 1957-01-01 Surface Combustion Corp Forge furnace
US2878011A (en) * 1954-12-03 1959-03-17 Babcock & Wilcox Co Metallurgical furnace
US2929615A (en) * 1956-10-01 1960-03-22 Midland Ross Corp Flue gas distribution in heating furnaces
DE1159981B (en) * 1956-12-01 1963-12-27 Thermo Industrieofenbau G M B Compensating hearth for push or push-through ovens for heat treatment of metallic goods
US2927783A (en) * 1957-06-21 1960-03-08 Bloom Eng Co Inc Metal heating furnace system
US3179390A (en) * 1961-06-27 1965-04-20 Stein & Roubaix Multi-zone pusher type furnace and process for heating flat ingots or slabs, or like products
US4522586A (en) * 1983-11-29 1985-06-11 Price Frank C Thermal conditioning of material in containers
EP1172621A1 (en) * 2000-07-11 2002-01-16 ELTI S.r.l. High-productivity steel heating furnace, particularly for rolling plants

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3048383A (en) Furnace or like system for gas-supporting and treating flat work
US4153236A (en) Preheating furnace
US3315950A (en) Heating chamber walls, particularly the backwalls of furnaces, such as siemens-martin furnaces
JPH05118764A (en) Steel heating furnace
US3770408A (en) Annealing lehr
US2594914A (en) Burner
US4088180A (en) Regenerator flow control
US2215080A (en) Gas heated furnace and method of operating same
US2436452A (en) Water-cooled furnace supporting member
US2124888A (en) Recuperative soaking pit furnace
US2091172A (en) Apparatus for heating
US2975499A (en) Ceramic tunnel kiln
US3920382A (en) Method and apparatus for heat treating articles in a recirculating type furnace
US1926714A (en) Heating furnace
LU83158A1 (en) Method for supplying combustion air to the regenerators of a regeneration glass melting oven, and this oven
US1701223A (en) Furnace and method of treating bodies therein
US2968894A (en) Annealing lehr
GB2113368A (en) Method of heating a furnace
NL192105C (en) Front fireplace for molten glass.
US3393652A (en) Refuse disposal system
GB1254360A (en) Improvements in continuous heating furnaces
US2257180A (en) Oven
US3261596A (en) Annealing and decorating lehrs
US2529690A (en) Heating apparatus
US3291465A (en) Furnace and burner arrangement for heating steel slabs