Connect public, paid and private patent data with Google Patents Public Datasets

Television picture tube screen

Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2289978A
US2289978A US36787740A US2289978A US 2289978 A US2289978 A US 2289978A US 36787740 A US36787740 A US 36787740A US 2289978 A US2289978 A US 2289978A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
member
supporting
particles
material
contact
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Malter Louis
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
RCA Corp
Original Assignee
RCA Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J29/00Details of cathode-ray tubes or of electron-beam tubes of the types covered by group H01J31/00
    • H01J29/02Electrodes; Screens; Mounting, supporting, spacing or insulating thereof
    • H01J29/10Screens on or from which an image or pattern is formed, picked up, converted or stored
    • H01J29/18Luminescent screens
    • H01J29/185Luminescent screens measures against halo-phenomena
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S313/00Electric lamp and discharge devices
    • Y10S313/07Bombardment induced conductivity
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10S428/917Electroluminescent

Description

July 14, 1942. L. MALTER TELEVISION PIVCTURE TUBE SCREEN Filed Nov. 50, 1940 Fifa. 1.

DIRECT] 0N OF' .BE/7M JJ/RL'C "flo/v :Smoentor L0 ,LL L6 Mal t e r 0F' BE/7M f (Ittorneg particularly to Patented July 14, 1942 TELEVISION PICTURE TUBE SCREEN Louis Malter, Newark, N. I., assignor to Radio` Corporation of America, a corporation of Dela- Ware application November so, 1940, seriaiNo. 361,877 y (ci. 25o- 164) h Claims.

i This invention relates to television systems of the type employing cathode ray tubes and more picture screens for kinescope tubes. I

In television receiving picture tubes a decrease in detail f is encountered due to the halation caused by the electron beam striking the screen l of fluorescent material. Halation involves -the spreading of light beyond its proper boundaries. One of the principal causes of halation in a `kinescope screen is `the reflection of the vlight from the fluorescent material between the surfaces of the member supporting the fluorescent material. When .the fluorescent material is coated on the supporting member, light from the fluorescent material is permitted to enter the supporting member at the inner surface over awide angle and hence be reflected from both surfaces to a `comparatively high degree.

Thisreilection can be reduced considerably by decreasing the optical contact between the sup porting member and the screen material. I Ifno optical contact existed between the screen material and the transparent supporting member, none of the light which enters the supporting member on the surface of the supporting member adjacent the fluorescent material can experience total reflection at the opposite surface of the supporting member.

It is practically impossible to reduce the optical contact between the supporting ymember and screen material sutllciently without experiencing the trouble from the screen material dropping on? the supporting member.

According to this invention, the optical contact between the screen material and the supporting member can be effectively reduced without decreasing the mechanical support of the screen material. A layer of small transparent particles of glass or quartz is interposed between the screen material and the supporting member. Therefore, the only eifective contact between the fluorescent material and the supporting member is that comparatively small area of contact between the layer of particles and the supporting member.

The primary object of this invention is to provide a picture screen for'a kinescope.

Another object of this invention is to provide a means for reducing halation in kineseopes.

Other and incidental objects of the invention will beapparent to'those skilled in the art `from the following specication considered in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which Figure 1 is a sectional view of a kinescope.

vvention, and

Figure 2 isl a greatly enlarged cross section of a screen in accordance with one Hform of this inkFigure 3 is anenlarged cross section of another v form of this invention.

Referring inmore detail to Fig. l, there is an envelope I containing an electron gun with an indirectly 4heatedv cathode :3,1 a control. electrode 5, av first anode l, and asecondanode 9. The electron gun is adapted to produce an electron Vbeam which is deflected by the horizontal vdefiecting coils II aridy the' vertical deilecting coils I3 across the image screen I5, the detailv of which is shownmore fully in 'Figs. 2 and 3.

Fig. 2 shows a supporting member I 'I which may be the end of the envelope I of Fig. 1 or it may be a supporting member positioned inside the envelope I'of Fig. `l upon which there vis a layer of small transparent particle'sj I 9 which may be of small polished spheroidal glass or quartz beads. The spheroidalfparticles may be, made adherent to the supporting member I'I by the use of a suitable binder orby actually bringing about a' slight sintering action at the points of contact between the particles I 9 andthe supporting member I1 under the inilu'ence of heat.

It will be 'noticed that only asmall fraction of the supporting member I1 is in actual physical contact with the spheroidal particles i9. The particles are brought into as close physicalvconvtact with each other as is practically possible.

A coating of fluorescent material 2i is then spread over the surface 'of the p/articles.

@In operation, light from the screen material 2| enters the spheroidal particles from the back side. Due to the close physical or optical contact between the fluorescent material 2l and the particles Il, light travels in all directions within the particles I! and is either transmitted through the particles Il after suifering refraction, or is rei'lected until either scattered at the surface of contact between the fluorescent material 2i and the spheroidal particles I9 or transmitted into the supporting member at the point of contact between it and the spheroidal particles I9.

The light which is transmitted through the spheroidal particles I9 in an upward direction will enter the supporting member I'I and will be transmitted without experiencing total reflection, because of the relatively small angle from perpendicular that the light intersects the surtween the spheroidal particles I9 and that light which intersects the supporting member I'I at angles greater than the critical angle. Since the area of the point of contact between the particles I9 and the supporting member I'l is only a small fraction of the total surface of the supporting member II, a marked diminution of the amount of light suffering total reflection in the supporting member I'I is brought about.

Halation will be further reduced by reason of the fact that light which experiences total reflection at the outer surface of the supporting member II would normally suer total reflection again at the lower surface unless it impinges upon a region of optical contact with some other particle or object. In the conventional structure, the optical points of contact between the iluorescent material particles and the bulb serve as points for diiiused reflection of the totally reiiected rays. It is the upwardly directed portion of the diffused reflected rays which result in halation with its consequent reduction of detail and contrast.

Since, in accordance with this invention, only a small fraction of the supporting member I1 is in contact with the spheroidal particles I9, most of the light totally reected from the upper surface of the supporting member I1 will be totally reilected again from the lower surface. This process of reflection will repeat itself with ultimate absorption of the totally reilected rays.

Fig. 3 shows another form of this invention in which the supporting member 23 has thereon a layer of irregularly shaped particles 25 whose optical contact with the supporting member 23 covers a very small relative part of the lower surface of the supporting member 23. The layer of fluorescent material 21 covers the lower surface of the mosaic particles 25. The operation of this form of the invention is similar to that given above for the form of the invention shown in Fig. 2. The light caused by the impinging of the electron beam upon the iluorescent material 21 is caused to reect in the particles 25 until it is projected into the supporting member 23 through its point of contact with the particles 25.

While several systems for carrying this invention into effect have been indicated in this drawing, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art that this invention is by no means limited to the particular organization shown and described but that many modifications may be made without departing from the scope of this invention as set forth in the appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a picture-reproducing system including an envelope and means positioned in said envelope for producing an electron beam, a mosaic positioned in the path of said electron beam and comprising spheroidal transparent particles having a coating of fluorescent material on the surface adjacent said electron gun.

2. In a picture-reproducing system including an envelope and means positioned in said envel lope for producing an electron beam, an image screen positioned in the path of said electron beam and comprising a mosaic of transparent particles having a coating thereon of fluorescent material, a transparent member mounted in one end of said envelope upon which said particles are supported with substantiallly none of said fluorescent material in contact therewith.

3. In a picture-reproducing system including an envelope and means positioned in said envelope for producing an electron beam, an image screen positioned in the path of said electron beam and comprising a mosaic of spheroidal transparent particles on one end of said envelope and said particles having a coating thereon of iluorescent material.

4. In a picture-reproducing system including an envelope and means positioned in said envelope for producing an electron beam, an image screen positioned in the path of said electron beam and comprising a mosaic of transparent particles having a coating thereon of fluorescent material, a transparent member mounted in one end of said envelope upon which said particles are adapted to be supported, the total of the area of contact between the particles and said member being substantially less than the area of said mosaic. 5. In a picture-reproducing system including an envelope and means positioned in said envelope for producing an electron beam, an image screen positioned in the path of said electron beam and comprising a mosaic of spheroidal transparent particles on one end of said envelope and said particles having a coating thereon of fluorescent material, the total of the area of contact between the particles and envelope being substantially less than the area of said mosaic.

LOUIS MALTER..Y

US2289978A 1940-11-30 1940-11-30 Television picture tube screen Expired - Lifetime US2289978A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2289978A US2289978A (en) 1940-11-30 1940-11-30 Television picture tube screen

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2289978A US2289978A (en) 1940-11-30 1940-11-30 Television picture tube screen

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2289978A true US2289978A (en) 1942-07-14

Family

ID=23448995

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US2289978A Expired - Lifetime US2289978A (en) 1940-11-30 1940-11-30 Television picture tube screen

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2289978A (en)

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2422937A (en) * 1943-12-03 1947-06-24 Rauland Corp Tube for color television
US2435436A (en) * 1943-12-18 1948-02-03 Gen Electric Cathode-ray tube screen
US2485561A (en) * 1946-03-29 1949-10-25 Int Standard Electric Corp Cathode-ray tube
US2537388A (en) * 1947-05-14 1951-01-09 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Beam amplifier
US2544690A (en) * 1946-12-26 1951-03-13 Du Mont Allen B Lab Inc Color television
US2555424A (en) * 1948-03-09 1951-06-05 Sheldon Edward Emanuel Apparatus for fluoroscopy and radiography
US2599739A (en) * 1950-04-12 1952-06-10 American Optical Corp Cathode-ray tube
US2612612A (en) * 1950-06-23 1952-09-30 Rauland Corp Cathode-ray tube
US2612611A (en) * 1950-06-23 1952-09-30 Rauland Corp Cathode-ray tube
US2668286A (en) * 1943-10-23 1954-02-02 Milton G White Moving object selective detection system
US2680205A (en) * 1950-11-17 1954-06-01 American Optical Corp Cathode-ray tube and method of making same
US2683834A (en) * 1950-10-07 1954-07-13 Wright Arthur Cathode-ray tube for color television receivers
US2706262A (en) * 1950-07-15 1955-04-12 American Optical Corp Diffusion coated articles
US2756363A (en) * 1954-07-01 1956-07-24 Wright Arthur Stereoscopic television receiving system
US2810660A (en) * 1954-02-01 1957-10-22 Westinghouse Electric Corp Diffusing reflecting coating and method of preparing same
US2898495A (en) * 1958-06-24 1959-08-04 Hyman A Michlin Color display phosphor screens
US3275466A (en) * 1965-05-03 1966-09-27 Rca Corp Method of adhering particles to a support surface
US3330981A (en) * 1963-11-14 1967-07-11 Sylvania Electric Prod Phosphor coated articles
US3621132A (en) * 1969-12-24 1971-11-16 Hazeltine Corp Flare light compensator in a flying spot scanner
US3664862A (en) * 1969-07-22 1972-05-23 Gen Electric Electron energy sensitive phosphors for multi-color cathode ray tubes
US4357368A (en) * 1978-12-26 1982-11-02 Rca Corporation Method of making a photosensitive electrode and a photosensitive electrode made thereby

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2668286A (en) * 1943-10-23 1954-02-02 Milton G White Moving object selective detection system
US2422937A (en) * 1943-12-03 1947-06-24 Rauland Corp Tube for color television
US2435436A (en) * 1943-12-18 1948-02-03 Gen Electric Cathode-ray tube screen
US2485561A (en) * 1946-03-29 1949-10-25 Int Standard Electric Corp Cathode-ray tube
US2544690A (en) * 1946-12-26 1951-03-13 Du Mont Allen B Lab Inc Color television
US2537388A (en) * 1947-05-14 1951-01-09 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Beam amplifier
US2555424A (en) * 1948-03-09 1951-06-05 Sheldon Edward Emanuel Apparatus for fluoroscopy and radiography
US2599739A (en) * 1950-04-12 1952-06-10 American Optical Corp Cathode-ray tube
US2612612A (en) * 1950-06-23 1952-09-30 Rauland Corp Cathode-ray tube
US2612611A (en) * 1950-06-23 1952-09-30 Rauland Corp Cathode-ray tube
US2706262A (en) * 1950-07-15 1955-04-12 American Optical Corp Diffusion coated articles
US2683834A (en) * 1950-10-07 1954-07-13 Wright Arthur Cathode-ray tube for color television receivers
US2680205A (en) * 1950-11-17 1954-06-01 American Optical Corp Cathode-ray tube and method of making same
US2810660A (en) * 1954-02-01 1957-10-22 Westinghouse Electric Corp Diffusing reflecting coating and method of preparing same
US2756363A (en) * 1954-07-01 1956-07-24 Wright Arthur Stereoscopic television receiving system
US2898495A (en) * 1958-06-24 1959-08-04 Hyman A Michlin Color display phosphor screens
US3330981A (en) * 1963-11-14 1967-07-11 Sylvania Electric Prod Phosphor coated articles
US3275466A (en) * 1965-05-03 1966-09-27 Rca Corp Method of adhering particles to a support surface
US3664862A (en) * 1969-07-22 1972-05-23 Gen Electric Electron energy sensitive phosphors for multi-color cathode ray tubes
US3621132A (en) * 1969-12-24 1971-11-16 Hazeltine Corp Flare light compensator in a flying spot scanner
US4357368A (en) * 1978-12-26 1982-11-02 Rca Corporation Method of making a photosensitive electrode and a photosensitive electrode made thereby

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3504212A (en) High contrast display device incorporating a light absorption and scattering layer
Van Raalte Reflective liquid crystal television display
US3712986A (en) Electron imaging device utilizing a fiber optic input window
US2354591A (en) Television apparatus
US2739243A (en) Composite photosensitive screens
US2186123A (en) Illuminating system
US4090104A (en) Optical fiber television screen
US2293529A (en) Image tube
US2605335A (en) Light amplifier
US5414558A (en) Screen for a projector
US2890359A (en) Camera tube
US2093288A (en) Television apparatus
US2905845A (en) Full vision cathode ray tubes
US2297478A (en) Device for the production of visible or photographic images with the aid of a beam of neutrons as depicting radiation
US2977412A (en) Light reflection reducing device
US3392297A (en) Color triad tube having heat-absorptive material on aluminum screen backing for cooling shadow mask
US3660668A (en) Image intensifier employing channel multiplier plate
US2728024A (en) Cathode-ray tubes of the lenticular grill variety
US3303374A (en) Cathode ray tube including face plate comprising tapered fiber optical elements mounted in an opaque mosaic
US2312206A (en) Method of and apparatus for reducing halo from fluorescent screens
US2418195A (en) Luminaire
US2254617A (en) Electron discharge device
US3265804A (en) Radiation shielding light transmitter
US2177360A (en) Optical image intensifier
US3974411A (en) Channel plate electron multiplier tube having reduced astigmatism