US2282754A - Stable dry preparation for diagnostic purposes of a biological antigen extract and a substance capable of forming a blood isotonic solution - Google Patents

Stable dry preparation for diagnostic purposes of a biological antigen extract and a substance capable of forming a blood isotonic solution Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2282754A
US2282754A US188927A US18892738A US2282754A US 2282754 A US2282754 A US 2282754A US 188927 A US188927 A US 188927A US 18892738 A US18892738 A US 18892738A US 2282754 A US2282754 A US 2282754A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
forming
isotonic solution
dry preparation
diagnostic purposes
substance capable
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US188927A
Inventor
Bickert Friedrich-Wilhelm
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
WINTHROP CHEM CO Inc
WINTHROP CHEMICAL COMPANY Inc
Original Assignee
WINTHROP CHEM CO Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to DE2282754X priority Critical
Application filed by WINTHROP CHEM CO Inc filed Critical WINTHROP CHEM CO Inc
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2282754A publication Critical patent/US2282754A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N33/00Investigating or analysing materials by specific methods not covered by groups G01N1/00 - G01N31/00
    • G01N33/48Biological material, e.g. blood, urine; Haemocytometers
    • G01N33/50Chemical analysis of biological material, e.g. blood, urine; Testing involving biospecific ligand binding methods; Immunological testing
    • G01N33/53Immunoassay; Biospecific binding assay; Materials therefor
    • G01N33/531Production of immunochemical test materials

Description

Patented May 12, 1942 STABLE DRY PREPARATION FOR DIAGNOS- TIC PURPOSES OF A* BIOLOGICAL ANII- GEN EXTRACT AND A SUBSTANCE CAPA- BLE OF FORMING A BLOOD ISOTONIC SOLUTION Friedrich-Wilhelm Bickert, Mai-um on the- Lahn, Germany, assignor to Winthrop Chemical Company, Inc., New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York No Drawing. Application February 5, 1938, Serial No. 188,927. In Germany February 6, 1937 Claims. (01.167-78) The present invention relates to a process ofpreparing stable dry preparations.

If the extracts prepared from normal organs and the organs of infected animals or from the cultures of excitants of disease by using organic solvents are dried, precipitates are obtained which redissolve relatively sparingly and which cannot directly be transformed into the aqueous solutions and suspensions wherein they shall be applied later on for the prepartion of diagnostic reactions, for instance of the method of fixing the complement.

Now I have found that precipitates which readily dissolve or suspend in water may be obtained by adding small amounts of salts or other suitable substances to the extracts before drying them. The additions may also be made during the evaporation process as long as suiilcient solvent water is still present which guarantees their homogeneous distribution in the final product. The additions may be applied in such quantities that the final aqueous suspension is isotonic with body fluids. A further surprising effect of this drying of the extracts while previously adding salts is the fact that the aqueous suspensions resultihg therefrom directly have the special de- It has already been tried to stabilize immune serum by adding such a quantity of pulverized sodium sulfate that the entire quantity of water is bound in the form of water of crystallization. Furthermore, there have already been solidified liquid substancescontaining water, for instance as reagent; furthermore, the extremely high con-,

tent of sodium sulfate or milk sugar allows the formation of blood isotonic solutions only in so strong a dilution of, the dry preparation that the gree of dispersion necessary for the application of the reagent. If there is started, as it has hitherto been usual, for instance, from alcoholic extracts from organs or bacteria which are then diluted with physiological sodium chloride solution the desired degree of dispersion and turbidity is only obtained if the physiological sodium chloride solution is added in quite a certain interval drop by drop. By too rapid or too slow an addition of this solution, solutions are obtained which either are not optimal or even useless. By starting, however, irom the extracts dried according to the present process and then adding the water necessary for obtaining the suspension there is always directly obtained the desired optimal degree of dispersion.

' Instead of sodium chloride also other salts or chemicals, for instance urea, mannite, sugar or the like may be added to the extracts prepared from the various starting materials while using organic solvents, but care must be taken that al-' ways such quantities are applied as later on yield together with the necessary dispersion iquid a blood isotonic solution. There may, of course, be used the most diii'erent salts and organic compounds so far as they are capable to form blood isotonic solutions when they are dissolved in distilled water and so far as they do not disturb the method of fixing the complement.

active constituents of the extracts can no longer have any effect in consequence of the extraordinarily strong dilution.

The following examples serve to illustrate the invention but they are not intended to limit it thereto: I

(1) 1.350 grams, of sodium chloride or 2.655 grams of urea or 8.055 grams of mannite are added to 30 cc. of an extract, usual for the Wassermann-reaction, from normal beef hearts or from syphilitic liver. The entire liquid is then evaporated to dryness on the water bath. The stable dry preparation is filled into suitable receptacles.

(2) 0.018 gram of sodium chloride or 0.0354- gram of urea or 0.1074 gram of mannite'are added to 1 ,cc. of a bacterial extract, for instance of the tuberculosis-antigen according to Witebsky, dissolved in benzene. Methods of preparing the tuberculosis-antigen of Witebsky are described in "Zentralblatt fuer Bacteriologie, Parasitenkunde und Infektionskrankheiten," 1931,. I. Abteilu'ng, 122, pages -67 and Medizinische Klinik, vol. 28, p.689 et seq., May 13, 1932. The whole is then dried under reduced pressure in the usual manner andfilled into suitable receptacles.

I claim:-

1. A stable dry preparation useful for diagnostic purposes ,and readily soluble or suspensible in water which comprises a biological antigen extract applicable in the method of fixing the complement and substantially insoluble in water selected from the group consisting of organic' solvent extra ts from animal hearts, livers and excitants of isease, and a water-soluble, physiologically indifferent substance capable of forming a blood isotonic solution in'such a quantity as to which the water-soluble, physiologically indiflo ferent substance is mannite. I

I 4. The preparation described in claim 1 in which the water-soluble, p siologically indifferent substance is sodium chloride.

5. The composition defined in claim 1, wherein said antigen extract is a bacterial extract of the tuberculosis antigen according to Witebsky and wherein said water-soluble; physiologically indifferent substance is urea, and wherein the organic solvent of the extract is benzene.

J FRIEDRICH-W ILHELM BICKERT,

US188927A 1937-02-06 1938-02-05 Stable dry preparation for diagnostic purposes of a biological antigen extract and a substance capable of forming a blood isotonic solution Expired - Lifetime US2282754A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
DE2282754X 1937-02-06

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2282754A true US2282754A (en) 1942-05-12

Family

ID=7993589

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US188927A Expired - Lifetime US2282754A (en) 1937-02-06 1938-02-05 Stable dry preparation for diagnostic purposes of a biological antigen extract and a substance capable of forming a blood isotonic solution

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2282754A (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3452135A (en) * 1966-04-06 1969-06-24 Medimpex Gyogyszerkullkeresked Allergy diagnostic skin test with carbamide or thiocarbamide and lipophilic adjuvants
US3678150A (en) * 1971-07-27 1972-07-18 American Cyanamid Co Process for improving the stability of ppd, qt and histoplasmin on tine applicators

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3452135A (en) * 1966-04-06 1969-06-24 Medimpex Gyogyszerkullkeresked Allergy diagnostic skin test with carbamide or thiocarbamide and lipophilic adjuvants
US3678150A (en) * 1971-07-27 1972-07-18 American Cyanamid Co Process for improving the stability of ppd, qt and histoplasmin on tine applicators

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Baumgartner et al. Effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine on platelet aggregation
Wheeler et al. Canalicular bile production in dogs
MacIntosh Synthesis and storage of acetylcholine in nervous tissue
Hess et al. Transfer of an autoimmune nephrosis in the rat by means of lymph node cells
Cameron et al. The degradation of cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive. I
Fisher et al. Localization of erythropoietin in glomeruli of sheep kidney by fluorescent antibody technique
Margoshes et al. A cadmium protein from equine kidney cortex
Elvehjem et al. Relation of nicotinic acid and nicotinic acid amide to canine black tongue
Ainsworth et al. An ultrastructural staining method for enhancing the size and electron opacity of ferritin in thin sections
SU1487802A3 (en) Method of producing liposoms
Aloia et al. Lipid composition and fluidity of the human immunodeficiency virus
Johnson et al. Experimental basis for the chemotherapy of Trichomonas vaginalis infestations. I.
BRODIE et al. The fate of procaine in man following its intravenous administration and methods for the estimation of procaine and diethylaminoethanol
Duran-Reynals The effect of extracts of certain organs from normal and immunized animals on the infecting power of vaccine virus
Westergaard Enhanced vesicular transport of exogenous peroxidase across cerebral vessels, induced by serotonin
Wilson et al. Quantitative Studies on the Behavior of Sensitized Lymphoid Cells in Vitro: III. Conversion of “Normal” Lymphoid Cells to an Immunologically Active Status with RNA Derived from Isologous Lymphoid Tissues of Specifically Immunized Rats
Robinson et al. Guinea-pig anti-insulin serum
Amos The agglutination of mouse leucocytes by iso-immune sera
Hopwood Cell and tissue fixation, 1972–1982
Kaplan et al. Immunologic Studies of Heart Tissue: I. Production in Rabbits of Antibodies Reactive with an Autologous Myocardial Antigen Following Immunization with Heterologous Heart Tissue
Kaplan LOCALIZATION OF STREPTOCOCCAL ANTIGENS IN TISSUES: I. HISTOLOGIC DISTRIBUTION AND PERSISTENCE OF M PROTEIN, TYPES 1, 5, 12, AND 19 IN THE TISSUES OF THE MOUSE
Welsh et al. Quaternary ammonium bases in the coelenterates
Sayers et al. The cholesterol and ascorbic acid content of the adrenal, liver, brain, and plasma following hemorrhage
Davenport et al. Renal carbonic anhydrase
Skeggs et al. The existence of two forms of hypertensin