US2270957A - Game and practicing device - Google Patents

Game and practicing device Download PDF

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US2270957A
US2270957A US35081540A US2270957A US 2270957 A US2270957 A US 2270957A US 35081540 A US35081540 A US 35081540A US 2270957 A US2270957 A US 2270957A
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ball
player
device
cords
cord
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Stowell W Mears
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Stowell W Mears
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/0073Means for releasably holding a ball in position; Balls constrained to move around a fixed point, e.g. by tethering
    • A63B69/0079Balls tethered to a line or cord
    • A63B69/0084Balls tethered to a line or cord the line or cord being fixed to at least two points

Description

Jan. 27, 1942. s. w. MEARS 2,270,957

GAME AND PRACTICING DEVICE Filed Aug. 5, 1940 INV ENTOR 75 Stowe 20. Means ATTORNEY-5 Patented Jan. 27, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE GAME AND PRACTICING DEVICE Stowell W. Meats, New York, N. Y.

Application August 3, 1940, Serial No. 350,815

3 Claims.

This invention relates to an improved game and practicing device.

It is a prime object of the invention to provide an improved game and practicing device which may be used in practicing and perfecting tennis strokes.

A further object of the invention is the provision of an improved device of the above character which by its inherent, structure requires the player to use proper form in the execution of his strokes.

Among other objects is the provision of a game and practicing device of the above character which may be used indoors or outdoors, which does not require a great deal of space or special apparatus for its use, which may be used by one player alone and in addition to enabling the player to practice and perfect his tennis strokes also affords amusement and exercise.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description.

In the drawing- Fig. 1 is a perspective View of a game and exercising device embodying my invention, showing it in use;

Fig. 2 is an elevational view partly fragmentary of my game device;

Fig. 3 is a cross sectional view through the ball showing the manner in which the flexible resilient cords may be attached thereto;

Fig. 4 is a side view of the ball; and

Fig. 5 is a sectional view through the handle indicating the manner in which it may be attached to the flexible resilient cord.

In my improved game and practicing device I provide a ball II) which is preferably, but not necessarily, a tennis ball, and I also provide suitable means for resiliently suspending the ball in the air at the proper distance from the player so that the player may hit or stroke the ball with a tennis racket and so that the player is required by the construction of the device to properly execute the strokes.

For this purpose I preferably support the ball by means of flexible resilient cords II and I2 made of rubber, rubber strands having a fabric covering, or some similar flexible resilient material as for instance metal springs. The flexible cords may be attached to the ball in any desired manner. However, in the case of a tennis ball I have found that the attaching means illustrated in the accompanying drawing is very satisfactory. This means comprises a flexible nonresilient tape I4 which is extended around the ball beneath the cover I5 and is formed into loops I5 which project outwardly through apertures in the cover formed at opposite sides of the ball. The cover I5 is a conventional tennis ball cover with the exception that the apertures are formed at opposite sides thereof. The flexible cords II and I2 are then extended through the loops I6 and knotted or otherwise secured in position. It will be seen that due to this construction the core of the ball is notpierced and the pressure in the ball is unafiected.

The length of flexible cord II may be varied and at its end it is preferably formed with a loop I! which may be attached to a fixed support such as a hook on a wall or a door knob, as illustrated in Fig. 1. The end of flexible cord I2 is formed into a pair of diverging flexible resilient cords I8 and I9, cord I9 being an integral extension of cord I2 and the cord I8 being connected thereto by a slip knot 23 so that the relative lengths of portions I2 and I9 may be varied by adjusting the position of the knot.

The end of cord I8 is preferably attached to a handle such as the tubular wooden handle 20 and this may be accomplished by providing the handle with an aperture 2I at the center thereof through which the cord I8 is extended, a knot being formed at the end of the cord to prevent its removal. The handle 20 is adapted to be grasped in the hand of the player when the device is in use.

The end of cord I9 is preferably formed with means such as loop 22 adapted to be engaged by the foot of the player when the device is in use.

In using the device the loop I! of flexible resilient cord II is attached to a fixed support as for instance a hook on a wall or a door knob as shown in Fig. 1. In practicing forehand strokes a right-handed player grasps the handle 2|! in his left hand in a natural manner and places the loop 22 around his left foot, as also shown in Fig. 1. He then grasps the handle of the tennis racket in his right hand and a forehand stroke can be executed in the usual manner. will rebound at first in the usual manner. However, the resilient cords will cause it to return to its original position. In practicing backhand strokes the device is assembled in the same manner with the exception that the loop 22 is placed around the right foot of the wearer. In the case 1 strokes the loop 22 should be placed around the When the ball is struck by the racket it opposite foot from that indicated in connection with a right-handed player.

As previously stated, the cord l I may be varied in length so as to suit the general requirements of the place in which the device is used. The cords I 2, l8 and I9 should be properly proportioned in length, however, so that the ball is suspended in the air a proper distance from the player so that he can execute a normal forehand and backhand stroke. This can be varied within limits to suit the requirements of individual players by adjusting the position of knot 23 and also by increasing or decreasing the tension on the elastic cords. The length of cord 18 should be such as to cause the player to bend forward slightly so that the full power of his weight can be put into the stroke and so as to keep his head down.

It will be seen that because of the manner in which the device is constructed and used it causes the player to stand properly with his shoulders substantially at right angles to the imaginary position of the net. Also, it causes him to hit the ball when it is in the proper po sition, i. e., in front of the player, more particularly in the case of a right-handed player, in front of his left foot on a forehand stroke and in front of his right foot on a backhand stroke. The device also tends to induce the player to use a full stroke with a full follow through in order to prevent his wrist, arm or racket from being struck by the cord on the rebound. At the same time it prevents the player from cutting the ball and causes him to use a full stroke either fiat or with top spin.

If desired, a suitable target may also be supported near the ball and this may consist of a fabric target supported by flexible rubber strands, the'object being for the player to cause the ball to hit a predetermined portion of the target. The target should be positioned slightly above the height of the net. The accuracy of the shot can be readily determined by the proximity of the ball to the target.

It should be understood that the device may be used in difierent manners than illustrated and described herein. Thus, for instance, instead of grasping the handle 20 the player may grasp the portion l9 or [2 of the cord enabling him to hold the cord high enough to practice chop or slice shots. Also, at times the end ll of cord I! may be attached at a relatively high point so that the cords are disposed at a sharp angle. In the latter instance the handle 20 is not utilized and may be omitted entirely. In this manner of using the device, chop or slice shots may also be practiced and the left hand may be left free for balance. For practicing serving the loops I1 and 22 are attached to relatively high points as for instance across the corner of a tennis court back stop, so as to suspend the ball at the proper height for serving for the particular player.

It should also be understood of course that various modifications may be made in the illustrated and described embodiment of my invention without departing from the invention as set forth in the accompanying claims.

I claim:

1. A game and practicing device for use in practicing tennis strokes comprising a ball, and a pair of resilient flexible cords connected to and extending from opposite sides of the ball, one of said cords being adapted to be connected to a fixed support and the other'of said cords being formed at its end with a pair of diverging flexible resilient cords one of said last-mentioned cords being adapted to be grasped in the hand of the player and the other of said last-mentioned cords being adapted to be attached to a foot of the player whereby the ball is resiliently suspended in the air adjacent the player.

2. A game and practicing device for use in practicing tennis strokes comprising a ball and a pair of flexible resilient cords connected to and extending from opposite sides of the ball, one of said cords being adapted to be attached adjacent its end to a fixed support and the other of said cords being formed with two diverging flexible resilient cords one of said last-mentioned cords being provided with a handle at the end thereof adapted to be grasped in the hand of the player and the other of said last-mentioned cords being formed with means at the end thereof adapted to engage a foot of the player whereby the ball is resiliently suspended in the air adjacent the player.

3. A game and practicing device as set forth in claim 2 in which one of the last-mentioned cords is attached to the other last-mentioned cords by a slip'connection whereby their relative lengths may be varied.

: STOWELL W. MEARS.

US2270957A 1940-08-03 1940-08-03 Game and practicing device Expired - Lifetime US2270957A (en)

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Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1169347B (en) * 1959-07-13 1964-04-30 Walter Werner Dexterity Spielgeraet with a ball or hollow ring of rubber or plastic
US4108435A (en) * 1976-07-12 1978-08-22 Coleman James T Portable runway with longitudinal supports and tension holding means
FR2569571A1 (en) * 1984-08-28 1986-03-07 Gakken Co Ltd Device for training of tennis
US4966367A (en) * 1989-08-28 1990-10-30 Oyarzabal Hector A Ball striking practice apparatus
US5553848A (en) * 1995-04-10 1996-09-10 Amron; Scott L. Multiple sport practice apparatus
US6033323A (en) * 1998-07-28 2000-03-07 Mccown; Roger Batting training device
US6062993A (en) * 1997-04-04 2000-05-16 Carlos Rodriguez Detachable tennis volley practice device
US6716119B1 (en) 2002-11-06 2004-04-06 Pro Performance Sports, Inc. Sports ball striking training device
US20060009314A1 (en) * 2004-07-12 2006-01-12 Squarehit Sports, Inc. Tennis stroke training apparatus and method
US20120040782A1 (en) * 2010-08-16 2012-02-16 Walter Richard Grabner Baseball swinger

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1169347B (en) * 1959-07-13 1964-04-30 Walter Werner Dexterity Spielgeraet with a ball or hollow ring of rubber or plastic
US4108435A (en) * 1976-07-12 1978-08-22 Coleman James T Portable runway with longitudinal supports and tension holding means
FR2569571A1 (en) * 1984-08-28 1986-03-07 Gakken Co Ltd Device for training of tennis
US4966367A (en) * 1989-08-28 1990-10-30 Oyarzabal Hector A Ball striking practice apparatus
US5553848A (en) * 1995-04-10 1996-09-10 Amron; Scott L. Multiple sport practice apparatus
US6062993A (en) * 1997-04-04 2000-05-16 Carlos Rodriguez Detachable tennis volley practice device
US6033323A (en) * 1998-07-28 2000-03-07 Mccown; Roger Batting training device
US6716119B1 (en) 2002-11-06 2004-04-06 Pro Performance Sports, Inc. Sports ball striking training device
US20060009314A1 (en) * 2004-07-12 2006-01-12 Squarehit Sports, Inc. Tennis stroke training apparatus and method
US20120040782A1 (en) * 2010-08-16 2012-02-16 Walter Richard Grabner Baseball swinger

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