US2270123A - Telephone system - Google Patents

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US2270123A
US2270123A US276142A US27614239A US2270123A US 2270123 A US2270123 A US 2270123A US 276142 A US276142 A US 276142A US 27614239 A US27614239 A US 27614239A US 2270123 A US2270123 A US 2270123A
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contact
relay
earth
winding
impulse
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US276142A
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Horn Ernst
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Fides Gesellschaft fuer die Verwaltung und Verwertung von Gewerblichen Schutzrechten mbH
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Fides Gesellschaft fuer die Verwaltung und Verwertung von Gewerblichen Schutzrechten mbH
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M15/00Arrangements for metering, time-control or time indication ; Metering, charging or billing arrangements for voice wireline or wireless communications, e.g. VoIP
    • H04M15/08Metering calls to called party, i.e. B-party charged for the communication

Description

Jan. 13, 1942. E. HORN 2,270,123
TELEPHONE SYSTEM Filed May 27, 1939 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 A froze/v15 x Jan. 13, 1942. E. HORN TELEPHONE SYSTEM Filed May 27, 1939 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 fllZ WA:
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Patented Jan. 13, 1942 UNITED sTArEs PATENT QFFICa i amass 'mLErnoN srs'rsm Ernst Horn, Berlin-Friedman, Germany, assign'or' to Fides Gesellschai't fiir die Verwaltung und 1 Verwertung yon gewerbliclien Schutzreehten mit beschriinkter Haftung, Berlin, Germany, a
corporation of Germany Application May 27, 1939, Serial No. 276,142
I In Germany May 30, 1938 13 Claims.
The present invention relates to a circuit arrangement for determining the subscribers stations in automatic remote signalling installation in particular telephone systems.
In such arrangements it is known to identify the calling subscriber by means of a central arrangement provided in the exchange and by' means of a sender associated therewith to transmit the impulse trains corresponding to the individual digits of a calling subscribers number to the station at which registering arrangements are provided for recording the number of the calling subscriber. a
The arrangements for identifying the calling subscriber are comparatively complicated and expensive since marking must be possible for all subscribers. In order to be able to determine and transmit the calling subscribers number in aseconomic a manner as is possible it is necessary.
for the identifying apparatus to be as simple as possible and for as few apparatus to be provided as is possible, say one for each exchange. Since the operations of identifying and, more particularly, of transmitting the calling subscribers number take a certain and not inconsiderable time, a considerable waiting period for the individual connecting paths to be completedis unavoidable when the marking signal for' transferring the calling subscribers number is transratus is placed at the disposal of other connecting paths.
The invention solves this problem by providing v a central arrangement for identifying the calling subscribers station consisting of a number of contrivances transmitting the impulse trains corresponding to the individual digits of a calling subscriber's number each of the contrivances operating in conjunction with a storage device which stores the signal for the call number transmitted from the identifying arrangement and transfers this to the associated impulse sender.
The four accompanying figures illustrate two arrangements and are to be considered in pairs.
Fig. l to the left of Fig. 2. Figs. 3 and 4 should be placed side by side with Fig. 3 to the left of Fig. 4. It will be seen that each of the pairs comprise one complete circuit diagram.
5 The arrangement according to Figs. 1 and 2 shows an identifying arrangement KR which is associated individually with an impulse sender SS. Both arrangements are seized by a connecting path until the'determination andtransmislid sion of the calling subscriber's number is completed. v
In the arrangement according to Figs. 3 and 4 on the other hand, the identifying arrangement m! operates in conjunction with a number of i5 impulse senders 5st to SS3 of which eachis associated with a storage arrangement SP. The identifying arrangement transmit the signal for the calling subscriber's number to a storage device and is instantly released for further use.
as The storage arrangement remains set until the associated impulse sender has completed the transmission of the calling subscribers number.
In both arrangements only those, parts are shown which are necessary for a complete under- @5 standing of the invention.
At the top of Figs. 1 and 2 is illustrated the part of a connecting path which exm nds from a subscriber Tn over the indicating preselector W, the first group selector NEW, and a, repeater UE from which a two-conductor junction. line for example to a distant exchange. As is indicated by the dotted lines outgoing from the first group selector iGW, the connection may pass through any number of additional'selector switches be- 35 fore reaching repeater UE. The repeater trans -fers the impulse train sent out from the subscriber's station on the initiation of the connectionv over the rest of the junction line and is the intermediary for the operations by which the 0 determination of the number of the calling subscriber is initiated. Further, it transmits impulse trains corresponding to the calling subscriber's number over junction line to the station which is associated with a registeringarrangement 45 (printing or punching device) for recording the calling subscribers number. In addition to the calling subscriber's number other records can be made by the registering arrangement (called number, duration of connection, amount of fee,
'50 period, date, etc).
Figs. 1 and 2 should be placed side by side with W separated from one another, Fig. 2, by a vertical partially shown.
The impulse sender SS after the marking of the number by means of the control relays transmits the impulse trains corresponding to the individual digits of the calling subscribers number over the junction line to the printing arrangement.
In connection with the drawings detailed description will be given only for the circuits and operations for determining and transmitting the call number.
When the pre-selector VW is set on a free line relays A and B in the first group selector IGW are energized over the subscribers loop in known manner. Similarly in the blocking conductor the seizing relay C of the group selector and the cut-oil relay T of the pre-selector are energized. The meter Za cannot at present operate. When the first and second group selectors are set, a blocking circuit is completed in which the test relay P of the first group selector and the seizing relay CI in the repeater are energized.
The arrangement shown in Figs. 1 and 2 makes possible the determination and transmission of the calling subscribers number at any desired instant. It can, for example, be accomplished during the setting up of a connection, after the reply of the called station or after the connection has been terminated. It is'assumed here that the reply of the called subscriber is the signal for initiating the determination and transmitting of the calling subscribers number.
It is a common practice to connect potential to over, apart from the winding II of relay U, the relay K of the impulse sender SS energises, opening its contact 56k and thus the circuit indicated above for winding I of relay U is broken. The completion of the energising circuit of relay U (over winding 1) of other repeaters is thus prevented. Further,-the relay U closes contact 13a and thus completes the following circuit: earth, contacts llcl, 'l3u, winding of relay C2, battery. earth. The relay C2 which at contact 1002 extends metering current to the subscribers meter has a delayed armature release and thus operates only after a certain period. Thus the following result is obtained: In Fig. 2 at the top right hand side a repeater UEI associated with another connecting path is indicated. The contacts 58a and 5% of this repeater correspond to the contacts 60a and Slu of the repeater UE. When the relay U in a neighbouring repeater UEI operates owing to the metering potential on its associated junction line and at this instant berelay U in the neighbouring repeater therefore operates for a short period only. In order that relay U in any repeater when energised momentarily in this manner shall not give rise to one conductor of the talking -circuit when the called subscriber replies in order to operate the calling subscribers meter. In the present arrangement, it is contemplated that this practice be followed for low-valued calls and that for high-valued calls the same potential be connected to the speech path but for a longer period in order to initiate the determination and transmission of the calling station's number. The switching operations in the latter case may be initiated in a simple manner by time zone metering eouipment in the path reached over the repeater UE which, on the reply of the called subscriber connects a potential corresponding to the metering potential to the lower conductor b of the junction line a/b. Such time and zone equipment is well known and has been omitted from the drawings since it forms no part of the present invention.
By means of this potential connection the following circuit is completed: earth in repeater UE, contact 6802, winding of relay ZE, choke Dr3, lower talking conductor b and to the battery potential connected to the time zone arrangements. The relay ZE in the repeater UE operates and completes the following circuit: earth, contact 6502, winding I of relay U, contact 642e, 55s, 56k, resistance Will, battery, earth. In this circuit relay U operates, closes contact Glu and thus completes the following circuiti earth, winding II of relay U, contacts 522e, Elu, 54s, winding of relay K, battery, earth. In this circuit, morefaulty operation of the meter by operation of relays C2 in that repeater this latter relay is arranged to have a slow armature operation so that it will operate only after a prolonged energization of' .relay U. I
when the relay C2 is operated on contact 13a being operated for the required length of time it holds for the duration of the connection in the following circuit: earth, contact I lcl, 1202, winding of relay C2, battery, earth. Relay U remains energised together with relayK until after the determination and transmission of the calling subscribers number in the following circuit: earth, winding II of relay U, contacts 63c2. Flu, 54s, winding of relay K, battery, earth. Relay K closes its contact 96k and thus connects earth potential to the control relay and the contact field. The relay C2 disconnects winding I of relay U at a further point, namely, contact- 65c2. Further, it opens contact 6802 and closes contact B'Ic2. Thus earth potential is disconnected from the lower talking conductor. This can be used as a signal bringing switch means in the time zone arrangement into effect and terminating the potential connection to the lower talking conductor. Relays C2 and U energise and the following circuit is completed for the metering relay ZR in the first group selector: earth, battery,-resistance Wil2, contacts 691:, "c2, choke Dr2, lower talking conductor, windings of the second and first group selectors, choke Drl of the first group selector, winding of metering relay ZR, earth.
Arrangements are known which make possible the transmission of an impuls v over the talking conductors during the conversation without undue disturbances. In the drawings such arrangements are indicated by means of chokes, condensers and equalising networks between the conductors and which are connected to earth.
Metering relay ZR in the first group selector operates and closes the contact 2.21 thus bringing about a current increase on the blocking conductor 0 so that the meter of the calling subscriber operates. Since the contacts 69a and 101:2 in the repeater remain closed, for the time being the metering relay ZR in the first group selector and hence the subscriber's meter remain energised for some time. f
The subscribers meters are so constructed that each metering magnet, in addition to opnected in the contact field l H and at thepoint crating the armature which steps the meter wheel, operates an additional contact. The
metering contacts are arranged in groups and are for example, the digits 123, the contact of that particular subscribers meter is arranged in the contact field ill for the first 100 and at this field at the point which is formed by the abscissa "2 and the ordinate 3. His therefore in the field IH at the 3rd contact in the second row.
If the last three digits of a call number are 290, the contact of the subscribers meter is in contact field 2H, second 100s, at the-point formed by the abscissa 9 and the'ordinate 10. It is therefore the last contact 90 of the 9th row in contact field 2H.
In common for all contact fields H, 2H, two groups of relays are provided which will be named as 10s control relays ZiZil-and units control relays Ei-Elfi." The 10's control relays are situated on the abscissae running through all contact fields. Thus the control relay Zi marking the tens'digit I is on the abscissa l, and
' the control relay Z2 marking the tens digit 2 is on the abscissa 2. The units control relays El-Ei lie on the ordinate multipled together for all contact fields so that the control relay El marking the units digit 1 lies on the ordinate 1, the control relay E2 marking the unit digit lies on the ordinate "2? Each contact field is marked by special switch means.
Resistance Wz' in parallel with relay Hi delays the operation of the relays armature for a reason which will be explained later. I v
The same is the case in the other contact fields. In the ordinates of the contact field 2H the relays G6-Gl0 are connected,..in the field 31-1 the relays Gil-GM. The contacts (3|g6-|0) connect the relay H2 marking the hundreds digit 2 and the contacts (32gl 1-45) connect the relay H3 marking the hundreds digit 3.
For connecting each of the relays H marking the hundreds digits, 5 relays G are provided for each contact field. Other solutions are possible which mark the contact field in which a particular metering contact lies with a smaller number of switch means.
It is assumed that a subscriber with a number "1125 has set up a connection. The contact of the meter of this subscriber is therefore conin the contact field HI.
which has. abscissa -2 and ordinate "5." This is therefore the fifth contact of the second row when, after the reply of thecalled party, potential is connected to the lower conductor of the subsequent arranged time zone equipment, the meter Za of this subscriber is energised, and vthe metering contact in the contact field lI-I is closed. The following cirgroup, actually the first thousands group, then cuit is then completed: earth, contact 95k, windings I and II of tens control relay Z2, metering contact "25 in the contact field IH, winding I of relay G3, windings I and II of relay E5, resistance Wi3, battery, earth. The resistance ratios of the control relays are so selected that in the first placeithe units relay E operates and then the tens relay Z and final relay G. In. the abovementioned circuit the relay E5 first operates and by 'closing its contact 20e5 short-circuits its high resistance winding. By means of the current increase thus produced the relay Z2 is operated,
and closes its contact 122, short-circuitingits high resistance winding I. The further current increase operates '.elay G3 over its winding I.
The relay E5 ciosesits contact l8e5 in the units contact group EK and thus marks the units digit 5 of the call number-in that the common contact ENK of the impulse contact SS is connected over the marking line 5. The relay Z2 closes contact 8522 in the tens contact group SK and thus marks the tens digit .2 of the call number in that the cam contact ZNK of the impulse sender is connected over the marking line 2. The relay G3 closes its contact 28g3 so that the following circuit is completed: earth,- battery, winding of relay Hi, contact 2893, resistance Wit, earth. A resistance Wt in parallel with relay HI is connected and causes relay Hi to operate with as a slow relay. Relay Hi closes contacts 81h! in the hundreds contact group HK and 'thus marks the hundreds digit 1 of the call number in that the cam contact INK of the impulse sender is connected over the marking line 5. Since it is assumed that the contact fields IH, 2H, 3H have the same associated thousands by means of the relays Hl-I-IIO- the thousands digit "1 of the call number is marked. All con tacts of the thousands contact group .TK therefore are' connected to marking line i and ovei this with cam contact iNK of the impulse sender In the case assumed the connection of this contact is performed by contact All hundreds relays HiHi0 have (at their contacts 4llhl. emz to 82MB) control over a relay group V/W which'efiects the connection and operation of the impulse sender SS. The impulse sender is connected by the closing of a metering contact with a considerable delayed operation since one only of the relays E can operate, then one of the relays Z, then one of the relays G and finally one of the relays H (slow). The'delayed connection of the impulse sender is necessary so that its operation by normal (short) metering impulses which are transmitted from other connecting paths is prevented. When a metering contact is closed for a short period, and one of the units and tens relays and perhaps one of the relays G can operate, but the normal metering impulse is much too short to operate a the normal metering impulse is transmitted over other connecting paths then two meter contacts in the contact field will be closed at the same time. Long before either can operate an H relay, however, the normal metering impulse willhave terminated causing the meter contact operated thereby to restore. Finally over the metering contact which is closed for a long time the above-mentioned marking circuits are-completed. When this has once been done and the units and tens relays concerned have Short-circuited their high resistance windings then no other control relay can be operated notwithstanding the fact that othermeter contacts may subsequently be operated by normal metering impulses transmitted over other connecting paths. This is prevented by the locking circuit which extends according to the example as follows: earth, battery, resistance Wi3, winding II of relay E5, contact 2Ile5, winding I of relay G3, metering contact 25 in contact field IH, winding II of relay Z2, contacts I22, 95k, earth.
The impulse sender SS consists of a switch with forty-eight positions in which the positions I- -I2, I3-24, 2536, and 31-48, stepped over by the wiper 17,; are joined to contact segments.
The contact segments I-I2 are connected to contacts 9on1, em: to 921m of the thousands contadfigroup 'I'K. At the segments I32l the contacts 81hI, 88h2 to 89hIIl of a hundreds contact group are connected.
The contact segment 2536 is connected with contacts INzI, 8522 to 862W to the tens contact group ZK and the segment 31-48 with contacts "IleI, I5e2 to 83eI II of the units contact group EK.
The impulse senderhas ten cam contacts INK to IONK which are closed in certain positions of the impulse sender.
The contacts of the units tens and hundreds contact group are so connected with the cam contacts of the impulse sender that .the contact marking a particular digit in each group is connected over the corresponding marking lines I--IIl with its corresponding cam contact INK to IONK, The contacts of the thousands group are however, as has already been mentioned, extended-to the marking line I and over this to the cam contact NKI.
In the given example the following contacts in the individual contact groups are closed I8e5, 8522, 81hI and SIlhI. After the hundreds relay HI is switched in by means of contact 28:73 the following circuit is completed: earth, contacts lllhl, 43s, w, 4512, winding of relay W, resistance Wi5, battery, earth. Relay W operates in this circuit and by opening contact w releases the winding of relay V from its short circuit so that this also can operate. The relay V closes its contact 46v and by short-circuiting relay W causes it to restore. The following circuit is now completed for relay X: earth, battery, resistance Will, winding of relay X, contact 5010, I912, earth. Relay X closes contact "a: and thus connects the magnet DS of the impulse sender so that its wiper ds is stepped on from the zero position to the first contact. The magnet DS has a contact 52113 which is now closed and relay Y is connected: earth, contact 52ds, winding of relay Y, not short-circuited by contact 531:, resistance Wi9, battery, earth. .The relay vY closes its contact Sly and short-circuitswinding of relay X.
Contact ita: opens and disconnects the magnet Q The short circuit for relay X is'opened at contact 5| 1; so that this relay operates again. The interaction between relays X and Y and magnet DS continues until the wiper ds oi the impulse sender has completed a rotation. The cam contacts INK to IONK are now closed in a particular manner in dependence on the position of the impulse sender and for a certain period. It is convenient to operate the cam contacts mechanically by means of cams on the shaft. The cam contact INK for example; is closed in positions 2--I 2, I4--24, 26-36 and 38-48 of the impulse sender. The cam contact 2NK is closed a step later, I. e. in positions 3-I2, I52l, 2'I--3B, and 39-48 of the impulse sender, and the cam contact BNK in a further position i. e. in positions 4-I2, I5--24, 28-36 and 40-48 In Fig. 2 a table is given which shows the positions in which the different cam contacts are closed.
When the impulse sender has executed its first step the wiper ds is operated from zero position to the first contact segment II2 and the shaft contact QBdsll is opened together with the shortcircuit for the winding of the impulse relay J. As mentioned above the relay Y energizes after each connection of magnet DS at contact 52113. When wiper ds reaches the first contact the following circuit is completed: earth, battery, resistance Wi'l, contact 413 winding of relay J, resistance WiG, earth. In this circuit relay J operates which by closing its contact 51? transmits the first impulse for marking the first digit of the call number of the calling subscriber on the lower talking conductor on the following path: earth, battery, resistance WiIII, contacts 511', 66a, 6102, winding of relay ZE, choke Dr3, lower talking conductor b. This impulse travels over the junction line to the station where a registering arrangement is provided (printing or punching device) and typewheels are set corresponding to the impulses transmitted. If the impulse sender has stepped its wiper'ds into the position 2 the cam contact INK is closed. When relay Y is connected again by contact 52:18 the impulse relay J receives no impulse since the following shortcircuit is completed for its'winding: earth, battery, resistance Wi'l, contact 411/, wiper ds of contact segment I-I2, contact Bllhl, marking line I, cam contact INK, resistance WiB, earth. In the given example thereforea single impulse only is transmitted for marking the thousands digit of the call number. In the registering arrangement the type wheel for the thousands digit is In the position I3 of the impulse sender the cam,
contact INK is' opened. It closes in positions -24. After contact I3 has been reached and relay Y is connected at contact 52ds, relay J energises since it is not short circuited andjby closing contact 517', transmits an impulse over the lower talking conductor to the registering arrangement. If the wiper ds is switched from contact I3 to contact I4 impulse relay J can no longer be energised after relay Y operates and contact immediately cam contact ENK closes.
4 11 closes since the following short-circuit exists:
earth, battery resistance Wi7, contact 41y, wiper ds' of contact segment l3 to 24, contact NM,
marking line I, cam contact INK, resistance Wit,
earth. Thus for marking the hundreds digit of the call number a single impulse only is transmitted. In the registering arrangement the type- INK remains closed until wiper ds has left segment l3-2B. The transmission of the marking signal for the tens digit of the calling subscribers number follows. In the tens contact group ZK contact 8522 which is connected over marking line 2 with the cam contact ZNK has been operated. This contact is opened in'positions 25 and 26 of the impulse sender and closed in positions 21 to 36. When the wiper ds has reached contact 25 and relay Y is connected, relay J is energised in'the previously mentioned circuit so that an impulse is transmitted tothe registering pleted for its winding: earth,,battery, resistance Wil, contact My, wiper ds of the contact segment 25 to 36', contact 8522, marking line 2, cam contact ENK, resistance Wi6, earth. When the impulse sender is stepped on over segments 25-36 the relay J is no longer operated. For marking the .tens digit of the calling subscribers number two impulses are thus transmitted to the registering arrangement and the type wheel for the tens digit is set on digit 2.'
' The units digit of the call number is now marked. In the units contact group EK the contact i8e5 has been operated and is connected with marking line and cam contact SNK. The cam contact 5NK as can be seen from the table in Fig. 2 is open in positions 3i4l of the impulse sender and closed in positions 42-48.
When the wiper ds reaches contact 31, the impulse relay J receives an impulse after relay Y is'connected which is transmitted to contact 57 for registering. When the wiper reaches positions 38, 39, 40 and 4| the relay J is energized each time and each time an impulse is transmitted to the registering arrangement. After five impulses have been transmitted to the registering arrangement wiper ds reaches position 42 and Impulse relay J is not energised while the impulse sender is stepped further since the following short-circuit exists for its winding: earth, battery, resistance Will, contact 411/, wiper ds of the segment 3l-48, contact l8e5, marking line 5, cam contact SNK, resistance W16, earth. By means of the five impulses transmitted the typewheel for the units digit in the registering arrangement is set on position 5. i
From this last contact wiper ds reaches the initial position in which contact 96ds0 is closed and the direct short-circuit for the winding or the relay J is again in force. After relay Y is connected and releases and relay X by shortcircuiting its winding at contact Sly, the followof the short-circuit of its winding II at contact 94s. When relay S is energised contact 54s is opened and the circuit for relay U (winding 11) of the repeater and relay K of the impulse sender is broken. Contact 6% opens and disconnects metering potential from the lower talking conductor b, restoring the relay ZR in the first group selector. Contact 227' opens and the potential necessary for energising the meter Za of the subscriber is again disconnected so that it restores.
Relay K releases and opens contact 95k in the impulse sender and the contact for the control relays, so that these restore. When contact Gnu closes other repeaters can be connected with the common impulse sender SS for the purpose of determining and registering a calling subscribers number.
As is clear from the description as long as battery potential is connected over contacts I002 and 69a in the repeater to the lower conductor b is continued for some time, as in the present case,
the danger arises that the cut-off relay of another preselector testing on the seized group selector will operate, so that in view of-the long application of a stronger current to the c-conductor double connections can occur.
To avoid such mistakes entirely the following arrangement is used: Whenthe relay in the first group selector operates owing to the connection of potential to the lower talking conductor, the contact 221' is closed. The low resistance Wi2 is connected over this contact and contact 3zel and, in this manner, the current increase necessary for operating the meter is produced on the blocking conductor. Resistance W12 is connected in parallel with a relay ZEI whose resistance is higher than that of resistance WiZ, and is so arranged that it has a delayed operation and. after opening contact 3zel and disconnecting the low resistance Wi2, on the one hand maintains the meter Za operated for the whole time relay ZR is energised, and on the other hand another testing preselector is no longer able to seize the group selector.
A further embodiment is shown which prevents a double seizing of the group selector during the potential connection actually by setting up the blocking conductor in such a manner as that shown in the sketch (under the talking conductor b in the group selector IGW, Fig. l) enclosed in a dotted outline.- p
When the relay ZR in the group selector is energised by the potential connection, contacts ear and 5.21" are closed. 'The resistance Wil3 is connected by contact 421 and an electrolytic condenser EC by contact 5er. The resistance W213 is so arranged that testing on the seized group selector by another preselectoris not possible. At the moment when thecondenser EC is connected a high charging impulse occurs, the meter call number.
I over choke D1 and contact See.
connections of a particular kind. e. g. for high valued connections only.
Naturally, the digit wheels of the meter are also stepped-on by the potential connection for the purpose of determining and transmitting the Hence the meter shows an amount which is higher than the fee to be charged. This lack of agreement however can easily be removed since the number of times registering arrangement is seized is known.
In the arrangement according to Figs. 1 and 2 the identifying apparatus KR is guarded during the whole duration of determination of the number of the calling subscriber and transmission of the impulses corresponding to 'the individual digits of the calling subscriber's number over other connecting paths. The unavoidable waiting period for connecting paths which simultaneously or almost simultaneously transmit the signal for transferring the calling subscribers number can act as a very disturbing influence on the whole operation.
In the arrangement according to Figs. 3 and 4 this disadvantage is avoided in that the identifying apparatus is associated not, as in the arrangement according to Figs. 1 and 2, with one impulse sender only, but with a number of impulse senders. The period in which the identifying apparatus is used can now be shortened with the aid of storage arrangements associated with the impulse sender which take over the marking for the calling subscribers number from theidentifying apparatus and the period necessary to carry out the marking operation is shortened.
In Figs. 3 and 4 the identifying apparatus KRI which otherwise corresponds with the arrangement KR of Figs. 1 and 2, is associated with three impulse senders SSI-SS3 of .which one only, the impulse sender SS I is shown in its entirety, while both the others are only indicated in part. In these impulse senders the contacts operated by the identifying apparatus are arranged and indicated by to SS2" and to SS3. To each impulse sender there belongs a number of paths (ESi) containing relays and storage arrangements (SP!) Each impulse sender, therefore, is associated with a discriminating selector MW. The free discriminating selectors operate when the marking signal for registering the calling subscriber's number is transmitted from a repeater and hunt for this repeater. The first discriminating selector which finds the repeater couples the repeater with the associated impulse sender until the transmission of the calling subscribers number has been completed.
All the details are given in the following description of the operations.
As in the embodiment according to Figs. 1 and 2 the signal transmitted from the repeater for registering the call number consists in a long period energisation of relay ZE by battery potential which is connected from a time zone arrangement to the lower conducting conductor b. The circuit extends over the lower talking conductor b, choke Drl, winding of relay ZE, contact 14302, earth. The relay ZE operates congtacts like and See. The lower talking conductor b is connected with the contact bank of circuit relay R operates and connects magnet DM of the discriminating selector: earth, contact I581, magnet DM, battery, earth.- .The wipers mwa, mwb, mwc, mwd, of the discriminating selector are thus stepped on to the next contact. Byv the opening of contact iBldm of the magnet DM the circuit for relay R is interrupted. As a result contact I581" is opened and with it the circuit for magnet DM of the discriminating selector. The contact IB'Idm thus restores again and further closes the circuit for relay'R which at the contact l58r connects the magnet DM again. In this manner the wipers of the discriminating selector MW are steppedon until that contact is reached at which the repeater in which the relay ZE is energised is connected. The following circuit is thus completed: earth, battery, resistance Will, contacts See, 102, wiper mwb of the discriminating selector MW, windings I and II of relay Pl, earth. In this circuit relay Pl operates, opens contact i55pi, and thus a point in the circuit for relay R so that a further operation of magnet DM is not possible. Contact 8 2i closes and short-circuits the high resistance winding II of relay Pl preventing other discriminating selectors from reaching the repeater UE.
As will be made clear in the following description the relay K (to the right of Fig. 4) is energised during the identifying operation. This relay is common to-all impulse senders. as the identifying apparatus KRI is claimed by a repeater the operation of relay PI of the discriminating selector is without effect. When the relay K is not energised or has restored after the completion of an identifying operation performed by another repeater the following circuit is completed: earth, winding I of relay M, contacts i36pl, l3lk, resistance WiIZ, battery, earth. In this circuit relay M operates and closes contact I38m and hence the following circuit: earth, winding of relay C3, winding II of relay M, contacts ll'lpl, l38m, winding of relay K, battery, earth. Relay K opens its contact iflk and thus prevents relay M of another impulse sender from operating during the identifying operation. Relay Ci also operates. i320! closes and completes the following circuit: earth, battery, resistance Wil2, contacts 5k, l32c3, lllvl, I30sl, winding of relay VI, earth. The relay Vi operates in this circuit, opens contact Iiivl and hence the shortcircuit for its winding I of relay SI which operates. Earth potential is connected to winding I of relay SI, relay VI is short-circuited and restores slowly. The relay C3 closes contact I420! and thus transmits the potential connected from the time zone arrangement to the metering relay ZR of the first group selector over the following path: earth, battery, resistance Wii3, contacts if, 203, wiper mwc of discriminating selector MW, contact 52c, choke Dr2, lower talking conductor b, wiper of the second and first group selectors, choke Drl in the first group selector, winding of relay ZR, earth. The relay ZR operates and by closing contact 221' increases the current in the blocking conductor 0 as in the arrangement according to Figs. 1 and 2 so that the meter Za can operate. In the same manner So long I as in Figs. 1 and 2 a marking circuit is now completed by means of the contact of the meter of the calling station and the control relays marking the individual digits of the calling subscribers number are energised in the identifying apparatus KRl, i. e., in the same manner as in Figs. 1 and 2 a units control relay (El to Elll) a tens control relay (Zl to Z) and a hundreds marking relay (Hi to Hill) are connected with the aid of one of the relays G.
Relays marking the individual digits of the call number in each of the three contact rows to SSl, to SS2 and to SS3 associated with the individual impulse senders corresponding contacts are now closed. These relays must have more contacts than in the first embodiment (Figs. 1 and 2) as instead of one marking operation, as in Figs. 1 and 2, three marking operations are performed, and actually for each impulse sender one operation is undertaken. The units control relay El for example, in addition to contact 48c! for marking the number 1 in the units contact group EK of the impulse sender SSI, must also have two contacts lllel and Mel for the impulse senders SS2 and SS3.
For marking the units digit of the calling subscribers number the contacts Mel, 49e2 to 5lelll in the units contact group EK of the contact row to SSI are controlled from the units control relays E and in the contact row to SS2 the contacts Mel, 4le2 to Hell], and in the contact row to 3" the contacts 32el, 3362 to New. For marking the tens digit of the calling subscribers number the contacts 582i to 5925 and 6026 to Blzlll in the tens contact group ZK of the contact row to SSI, are controlled from the tens control relays Z and in the contact row to SS2 the contacts 43zl to all! and in the contact row to SS3 the contacts 35al to 36am. For marking the hundreds digit of a calling subscribers number the contacts hi to 3371.5 and 64h6 to 65h! in thehundreds contact group HK of the contact row to SSI, are controlled from the hundreds marking relays H and in the contact row to SS2 the contacts 45h! to kill, and in the contact row to SS3 the contacts 3'lhl to 38h). For. marking the thousands digit of .a calling subscribers number the contacts 667, 61112 to 68hl B in the thousands contact group TK,
of the contact row to SSI" are controlled by,
the hundreds marking relays H, thecontacts fl'lhl-lll in the'contact row to SS2 and the contacts 39hl-l0 in the contact row to SS3.
It is assumed that the storage of the calling subscribers number and the transmission of impulse trains corresponding to its individual digits is performed by the impulse sender SSI shown in complete detail which, as described, is set by means of the discriminator MW on the repeater It is further assumed that the call-number of a calling subscriber 1152 is tobe registered. When subscribers meter has been operated by the potential connection from the time zone arrangement the contact 52 in the contact field lH i. e. the point in the system which has the abscissa 5 and ordinate=2 is closed for a considerable period. As has already been described the following control relays are energised: The units control relay E2, the tens control relay Z5,- the relay Gl (over winding H) and. the hundreds marking relay Hl is connected by contact 26gl. The followirig contacts in the contact groups of the impulse sender are operated: In the units contact group EK the contact 33c! for the impulse sender SS3, the contact B le2 for the impulse sender SS2, and the contact Wei for impulse sender SSI; in the tens contact group ZK the 1. Earth, contact 69pl, Blihl, winding I of relay ITl battery, earth.
2. Earth, contact 69M, 62M, winding I HHl battery, earth.
3. Earth, contact 691, 5925, winding I of relay Z25, battery, earth.
of relay 4. Earth, contact 69m, @962, winding 1 of relay EEZ, battery, earth,
The relays EE2, ZZ5, HHI in the section ESl are energised, and close corresponding contacts in the storage arrangement of the impulse sender completing holding circuits for themselves which extendas follows:
1. Earth; contacts 8521i, 86sl, winding of relay E,
7 contact 1 leez, winding III of relay EEE, bat- .tery, earth. I
2. Earth, contacts 852", 86sl, winding of relay Z,
' contact H225, winding III of relay ZZ5, battery, earth.
3. Earth, contacts M, 86sl, winding of relay H, contact l9hhl, winding III of relay I-IHl, battery, earth.
4. Earth, contacts 85vl, 86sl, winding of relay '1,
' contact 82ttl, winding III of relay TTl, battery, earth.
The storage arrangement SPl of the sender SSI has now taken over the marking of the call number from the identifying apparatus KRI so that the latter can be released immediately for further use.
In the holding circuit described above relays E, Z, H and T are energised in addition to the relays marking the individual digits of the call number. The following circuit is thus completed: earth, battery, resistance Will, contact l22dsll (closeclso long' as the wiper ds of the impulse sender is in the normal position), winding of relay X, contacts l24e, i252, lZBh, l2it, lZBsl, earth. In this circuit relay X operates and closes contact l50:c and thus completes the following circuit for relay C2 of the repeater UE: earth, contact W912i, l50ar, wiper mwc of discriminating selector MW, contact l5lcl, winding of relay C2, battery, earth. The relay C2 locks up for the duration of the connection in the holding circuit: earth, contacts l52c2, l5lcl, winding of relay C2, battery, earth. Contact M102 releases relay Pl which in turn opens the circuit for the relays C3 and M associated with the impulse sender SSl and for the relay K common to all impulse senders. Contact l33k opens, disconnects earth potential from the identifying apparatus and the control relaysare restored. Other connecting paths for marking a further calling subscribers number are now available. The relay C3 which has also restored opens contact 203 and thus disconnects the battery potential are now transmitted. The magnet D8 of the im- 10 pulse sender SSI is connected, after the operation of relay X and release of relay Pl, in the following path: earth, contacts I20pl, l2lat, magnet DS, battery, earth. Wiper ds of the impulse sender is thus stepped on from its home position to contact I. Simultaneously contacts IGOdsll and l22ds0 are opened. The short circuit for winding 11 of relay SI is removed at contact l22dsll so that this relay--the circuit for the winding I of which was interrupted at contacts 13203 and "Sic-remains energised for the duration of the transmission .of the calling subscribers number. The magnet DS operates contact Bats and thus completes the following circuit for relay Y: earth, battery, resistance W115,
winding of relay Y (freed from its short circuit by contact 9.2), contact Ms, earth. At contact [2311 the winding ofrelay X is short-circuited and this relay restores. At contact l2l:c therefore the circuit for magnet DS is interrupted and contact Ms opening, the relay Y which is simultaneously short circuited by contact H91: is restored. Contact 123 1 is now open again and relay X connected. In this manner In the units contact group of the impulse sender the contact 90cc! was closed and thus over marking line "2 the cam contact ZNK of the impulse sender connected. For marking the units 5 di it of the calling subscriber's number two impulses are transmitted over the line. In the registering apparatus the typewheel for the units digit is positioned on digit 2. Thus the transmission of the calling number 1152 is comthe wiper ds of the impulse sender is stepped on over its contact bank.
The method of working of the impulse sender is exactly the same as in the arrangement ac-' cording to Figs. l and 2. A detailed description pleted. The wiper ds therefore reaches its rest position so that the contacts iGlldsIl and i22ds0 are closed. The winding II of relay SI is restored by a short-circuit at contact I22ds0. Relay Sl opens its contact 86sl and breaks the circuits for the relays E, Z, H, T and the holding circuits for the relays marking the individual digits of the calling subscriber's number whichv were energised in the storage arrangement SPI. The impulse sender and the associated apparatus to SSI, ESI and SPI are now restored to normal and ar at the disposal of further users.
In order to reduce the number of relays in the storage apparatus SP! of the impulse sender a Y switch-over relay UI to U4 is provided-for each contact group whereby the individual contact groups in the impulse sender are divided into two sub-groups and can be connected selectively.
If, for example, the number 1657 of a calling subscriber is to be registered a marking circuit by which the control relays El and Z5 are energised is closed by means of the contact of the subscribers meter and over one of the relays G the hundreds relay H6, not shown, is energised. In the impulse sender SSI the following contacts are closed in the contact series to SSI": 54c! of the units contact group EK, 5925 of the tens contact group ZK, 64716 of the hundreds contact group 'HK and in the thousands contact group TK a contact, not shown, of the hundreds markof 'the transmission of the individual impulse 40 trains corresponding to the digits of the calling subscriber's number is therefore not necessary. In the thousands group TK of the impulse sender SSI, the contact I Olttl is closed. Thus the cam contact INK of the impulse sender is connected over the marking line 1. As in the previously described method for marking the thousands digitof the calling subscriber's number an impulse was transmitted to the registering apparatus by means of relay J where the 6D typewheel for the thousands digit was positioned on digit 1. The impulse for. marking the individual digits of the calling subscriber's number extends as follows: earth, battery, resistance Wil3, contact 07', wiper mwd of the discrimisender the contact l03h-hl was closed and thus over marking line 1" the cam contact INK of the impulse sender connected. An impulse is, therefore, transmitted over the lower conductor for marking the hundreds digit of the calling subscriber's number. In the registering arrangement the typewheel for the hundreds digit is thus set on position 1. In the tens contact group ZK of the impulse sender the contact [00225 was closed and thus the cam contact 5NK of the impulse sender is connected over the marking line 5. For marking the tens digit of the calling subscriber's number, therefore, five impulses are sent out over the line and the typewheel for the tens digit in the registering apparatus is positioned on digit 5.
,ing relay H5 which is connected between contacts 61M and 68MB. In the section ESI the following circuit is completed:
3. Earth, contact 69pl, 6411.6, winding II of relay HHI, winding I of relay U3, battery, earth.
4. Earth, contact 69pl, contact, not shown, of the relay H6, winding I of relay 'I'Ii battery, earth.
In the, first circuit relays EE2 and UI operate. The following holding circuits for the relays are completed in the storage device SPI: earth, contacts 850i, 868i, winding of relay E, contact Heel, winding III of relay EEZ, battery, earth, and earth, contacts 8512i, 86sl, winding of relay E, contact liul, winding II of relay Ul, battery, earth. The upper half of the units contact group EK in the impulse sender SSI is disconnected at contact Mal and the lower half of the contact group is connected at contact Bilul. Since relay EEZ has been energised cam contact INK of the impulse sender is connected over contact 88:, contact ee2 and marking linef'i so that seven impulses for marking the units digit are sent out over the line from the impulse sender.
In the tens contact group ZK in the section ESI relay ZZ5 is energised and locks up over winding III and contact l'lzzS. The switch-over relay U2 of the tens contact group is therefore not energised so that the upper half of the tens contact group of the impulse sender remains connected over contact Hui and cam contact SNK of the impulse sender is connected over contact 102.25 and marking line 53 Impulses for marking the tens digit are thus sent out over the iine by the impulse sender.
In the hundreds contact group in the section Est the relay HHI and the switch-over relay U3 are energised. The relay HHI closes contact IShhi and locks up over winding III,"and relay U3 closes contact 8 M3 locking up over its winding II. The upper half of the contact group in the hundreds contact group HK of the impulse sender is disconnected at contact 32:3 and the lower half is connected by the closing of contact 41:3. Over contact illut and contact lllfihhl the cam contact tNK of the impulse sender is now con nected over the marking line 6. Six impulses for marking the hundreds digit are transmitted from the impulse sender over the line.
In the thousands contact group the switchover relay Ud remains unoperated. The cam contact INK of the impulse sender is connected to the marking line 1 over contacts 5nd and iditti so that for marking the thousands digit one impulse is transmitted over the line from the impulse sender.
I claim: I
1. In a telephone system, subscribers lines eac having an individual meter at the exchange, a plurality of registers each common to all of said lines, means for extending a call from any of said lines, means for associating any one of said registers individually with the calling line, means effective after said call has been extended to operate the calling line's individual meter, and means controlled by said meter responsive to said operation thereof to cause said one register to register the identity of said calling line.
2. In a telephone system, subscribers lines, a device for each line at the exchange, switching apparatus accessible to said lines, a plurality of registers common to said apparatus, means for extending a connection from any one of said lines over said apparatus, means in said apparatus then controlled revertively over the extended connection to cause one of said registers to be associated with said connection, means efiective when said register has been associated with the connection to operate that one of said devices corresponding to the calling line, and means controlled by said one device responsive to said omration thereof to cause said register to register the identity of said calling line.
3. In a telephone system, a plurality of calling lines each having an individual device at the exchange, a plurality of registers common to said lines, means for associating the different ones of said registers with the difierent ones of said calling lines, and means efiective after the call has been extended from each of said lines to operate that line's individual device thereby to cause the register associated with that line toregister the line's identity concurrently with the registration of the identity of at least one other of said lines by another of said registers.
4. In a telephone system, a plurality of calling lines, a plurality of registers each common to all of said lines, and line identifying equipment common to said registers operated to register the identity of each of said calling lines in a difierent one of said registersthereby to establish co-existing registrations of the identity of all of said calling lines.
mon to said registers operated'to register the identity of one of said calling lines in one of said registers and then to register the identity of another of said calling lines in another of said registers while the registration of the identity of said one line is maintained in said one register.
6. In a telephone system, subscribers lines, means for extending calls from said lines, a pinrality of registers each common to all of said lines, means operated after a call has been ex- 'said lines, means for associating any one of said control units individually with said connection, means thereafter operated to identify said calling line in all of said control units, and means effective to prevent the identification of said calling line from being registered in each of said control units except the one associated with said connection.
8. In a telephone system, a plurality of groups of subscribers stations, each station having an individual meter at the exchange, a device for each group of stations, each device having a plurality of registers, means for extending calls from said stations, means effective after a call has been'extended to operate the-calling stations 5. In a telephone system, a plurality of calling individual meter, and means controlled by the calling stations meter upon such operation thereof to actuate the device corresponding to the group to which the calling line belongs, thereb to operate one of that device's registers.
9. In a telephone system, subscribers lines each having an individual device at the exchange, switching apparatus accessible to said lines, means for extending a connection from any calling one of said lines over said switching apparatus, a plurality of registers common to said connection, means for associating any one of said registers individually with said connection, means effective when said register has been associated with said connection to operate the one of said devices individual to said calling line, means controlled by said device responsive to said operation thereof to cause the register associated with said connection to register the identity of said calling line, and means thereafter controlled by saidregister in accordance with the registered identity of said calling line to transmit the calling lines number.
10. In a telephone system, a plurality of calling lines each having an individual device at the exchange, a plurality of registers each common to all of said lines, means for associating different ones of said registers with the different ones of said calling lines, means efiective after the call has been extended from each of said lines to operate that lines individual device, and means controlled by each device, when operated, to cause the register associated with the line corresponding to that device to register that lines telephone number, whereby the telephone numbers of difierent ones of said calling lines are registered concurrently in diiierent registers.
11. A system as claimed in claim 10, wherein said last means comprises a line identifying unit common to all of said individual devices and common to all of said registers.
12. In a telephone system or the like, a plurality of calling lines, a diflerent identification number assigned to each of said lines, a plurality of registers each common to all 01 said lines, line identifying equipment common to said registers operated to register the identity of one of, said I lines in one of said registers, means then controlled by said one register for transmitting the identification number of the line whose identity is registered therein, said identifying equipment operated while said number is being transmitted to register the identity of another one of said lines in a different one of said registers.
other of said lines in another of said registers 10 while said registration of the identification number of said one line is maintained in said one register.
ERNST HORN.
US276142A 1938-05-30 1939-05-27 Telephone system Expired - Lifetime US2270123A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2672515A (en) * 1950-01-28 1954-03-16 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Calling station identification circuit
US2872519A (en) * 1952-03-24 1959-02-03 North Electric Co Automatic telephone system
US2884489A (en) * 1950-06-02 1959-04-28 Int Standard Electric Corp Electrical identification or selection equipment

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2672515A (en) * 1950-01-28 1954-03-16 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Calling station identification circuit
US2884489A (en) * 1950-06-02 1959-04-28 Int Standard Electric Corp Electrical identification or selection equipment
US2872519A (en) * 1952-03-24 1959-02-03 North Electric Co Automatic telephone system

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