US2264224A - Multiply launderable apparel and process of preparing same - Google Patents

Multiply launderable apparel and process of preparing same Download PDF

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Publication number
US2264224A
US2264224A US510535A US2264224A US 2264224 A US2264224 A US 2264224A US 510535 A US510535 A US 510535A US 2264224 A US2264224 A US 2264224A
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Prior art keywords
adhesive
fabrics
fabric
thermoplastic
pressure
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Thomas H Swan
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Cluett Peabody and Co Inc
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Cluett Peabody and Co Inc
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41BSHIRTS; UNDERWEAR; BABY LINEN; HANDKERCHIEFS
    • A41B3/00Collars
    • A41B3/10Collars chemically stiffened
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T156/00Adhesive bonding and miscellaneous chemical manufacture
    • Y10T156/10Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor
    • Y10T156/1002Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor with permanent bending or reshaping or surface deformation of self sustaining lamina
    • Y10T156/1043Subsequent to assembly
    • Y10T156/1044Subsequent to assembly of parallel stacked sheets only
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/30Woven fabric [i.e., woven strand or strip material]
    • Y10T442/3472Woven fabric including an additional woven fabric layer
    • Y10T442/348Mechanically needled or hydroentangled
    • Y10T442/3496Coated, impregnated, or autogenously bonded
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/30Woven fabric [i.e., woven strand or strip material]
    • Y10T442/3472Woven fabric including an additional woven fabric layer
    • Y10T442/3504Woven fabric layers comprise chemically different strand material
    • Y10T442/3512Three or more fabric layers

Description

Nov. 25, 1941. v T. SWAN 2,264,224

MUL'TIPLY LAUNDERABLE APPAREL AND PROCESS OF PREPARING SAME Filed Feb. 5, 1935 OUTERJ PLY FABRICS ZADHESIVF..

Z-ADHESWF.

OUTER. PLY FABRICS 4-ST|TCH\NG S-INTERUNNG Q-ADHESIVE.

ISnvenfor 23m/52H. Swu/w I 'Gttorneg Patented Nov.` 25, 1941 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE MULTIPLY LAUNDERABLE APPAREL AND PROCESS OF PREPARING SAME Thomas H. Swan, Pittsburgh, Pa., assignor to Cluett, Peabody & C0., Inc., Troy, N. Y., a corporation of New York yApplication February 5, 1935, Serial No. 5,105

Claims.

manufactured according to the present state of the. art as, for example, those which are manufactured and worn in theuntreated state, that is, the collars and cuffs have no stiening agent; those having collars and cus and similar exposed portions stiffened with a temporary stiffening agent such as starch; those having collar and cuff units stiiened by partial parchmentization, by means of suitable reagents, and those in which starched interlinings are4 used as stifleners. Further, cellulose derivative coated fabrics taining their shape after laundering without being subjected to a subsequent. stiiening operation.

A further object is the provision ofi-a multiply collar or cuff and the like which upon re-v peated launderings and pressings, will not show the characteristic stitch pucker of present day wearing apparel.

have been proposed as stiffening interlinings in collars and cuffs; garments in. which the component fabrics of the collars and cuffs are laminated by means of cellulose derivative compositions have also been made.

Of these various types mentioned, none are entirely satisfactory; those garments which are made of untreated fabrics-soil quickly and wrinkle easily. The starched type, while presenting a very satisfactory initial appearance, is sensitive to spotting-by water and soon becomes wilted and wrinkled especially in warm weather. lars and cuffs of two-ply and multi-ply construction, the .fabrics of which are laminated and stiifened by partially parchmentizing the fabrics with acid, have the disadvantage of lowered tensile strength and unsatisfactory wearing qualities. In the case of the wearing apparel having the interlinings pre-stiifened with starch, for example, the treatment is effective only until the first laundering which removes the starch. While the collars or cuis can, of course, be restiffened by treatment with starch, they do not retain their appearance for any length of time, particularly in summer weather. Where certain cellulose derivative coated fabric interlinings are used the result is not satisfactory because of the tendency for the coating to disintegrate and disappear and often to discolor when the garment is subjected to laundering processes. The same con- A still further object is the production of collars which will resist distorting inuences and will tend to resume their original appearance when the distorting force is removed. l

These objects are accomplished in the present invention by uniting specially treated fabrics in laminated relation and more particularly by first coating one or more fabrics with an adhesive composition, preferably drying to expel the volatile materials present in -the adhesive in cases where the adhesive contains Volatile material, placing the fabrics in contact with each other to subject the contiguous surfaces thereof to the action of the adhesive, and joining by means of heat and pressure.

The general construction of the wearing apsketch of a three-ply collar laid at. 'Figure 2 The colrepresents a cross section through the collar along the line 2-2 in Figure 1, on an enlarged scale. Figure 3 indicates, on an enlarged scale, the assembly of the parts before forming the the invention disclosed herein. In all the gures is given.

dition prevails with respect to collars andcuffs in which the component fabrics are laminated directly by means of the common cell-ulose.del rivative compositions. f

This invention has as an` object the provision collar. Figure 4 is a sketch of a shirt showing a collar, plaits and cuffs embodying the present invention. ,Figure 5 represents a dress shirt in which\the bosom has been made semi-stili by the outer or facing fabrics are indicatedy as I. The adhesive is shown at 2 while 3 is the interliner and 4 is stitching.

In order that the construction of the wearing apparel of the invention may be more fully understood, the following definition of terms used By a three-ply collar is understood a construction in which an extra layer of fabric, usually of a cheaper and vcoarser gradeis interposed between the fabrics in a ffold over collar. the function of this intermediate layer `being to add stiffness, thickness, and general bodyl to the article. This ply is indicated as interlinmg 3 of unstarched, untreated article on the one hand, and a fully starched article on the other hand.

The practice of the present invention may be illustrated in the preparation of a three-ply collar, in which an interlining, which is usually a cotton fabric of cheap construction, is coated with a thermoplastic adhesive composition. This composition may be one of those referred to hereinafter. The interlining, for example, may be a sheeting weighing 4.7 oz. per yard and having a thread count of 49 warp threads and 54 filling threads. This is coated on both faces with adhesive in any convenient way, as, for example, by means of a doctor knife, squeeze rollers, spraying equipment, or by any of the methods known to those skilled in the art of coating fabrics. The adhesive is then preferably allowed to dry, which may be accomplished either in the air at room temperature or by heating in an oven. The collar may then be assembled by placing the two outer fabrics, which may be broadcloth, madras or the like, on top of the coated interlining and assembling the parts by stitching. The collar is then turned inside out in such a way that the interlining will fall between the two layers or plies of broadcloth, madras or the like. The joining of the parts is then carried out by applying heat and pressure simultaneously; as, for example, by ironing at normal lironing temperatures and pressures, or by applying higher temperatures and/or pressures in any suitable way, it being sufficient simply that the temperatures and pressures employed be adequate to render the interlining coating sufciently plastic and adhesive to cause the fabric plies to be united. The collar may be decorated by ornamental stitching along the edges, if desired, which stitching may be done either before or after the plies are cemented. The edge of the collar which is to be attached to the neck-band may be either stitched ornamentally or such stitching may be omitted therefrom. The collar is aiixed to the neck-band in the usual manner. The neck-band may be either of conventional construction or may be formed by uniting fabric plies in laminated relation through a thermoplastic adhesive in the sa'me manner as above described with respect to the collar proper.

Wearing apparel havingA more or less than three plies may be prepared in a similar manner, as will be evident to those skilled in the art. It

' is apparent, for example, that where two plies are side out so as to bring the two adhesive coatedsurfaces together, inside the collar, after which the joining of the parts may be accomplished by applying heat and pressure simultaneously. It will be obvious that my invention is not limited to the joining in laminated relation of any particular number of plies.

The adhesive composition employed may be of any of the known types which are thermoplastic,

' and especially those. which are resistantv to normal laundering operations. By resistant to normal laundering operations," I mean substantially unsusceptible to undesirable changes or objectionable deterioration under the influence of the reagents (such as the detergents and bleaching agents) and other conditions present in laundering processes as commonly practiced.

' As employed in this specification and the ensuing its temperature is lowered, said substance fur.

thermore remaining thermoplastic at normal ironing temperatures so as to be repeatedly resoftenable at those temperatures to effect rebonding in the event of separation of the fabrics.

The adhesive which I prefer employing, furthermore, while having its plasticity or flow capacity increased under rise in temperature, is nevertheless sufliciently flow-resistant at the boiling temperature of water that migration of the adhesive through the interstices of the fabric is prevented. It is, however, thermoplastic at normal ironing temperatures, such, for example, as of the order of 250350 F. With such an adhesive, if for any reason the bond between the fabric plies of a collar or other article is loosened during laundering, as by rubbing or agitation, such bond is re-established during ironing of the article. The pressures applied to insure joining of the fabric plies by the thermoplastic adhesive may vary from hand pressures applied to the ordinary fiat iron to pressures obtained in machine presses, pressures within the range from a few pounds per square inch to several thousand poundsper square inch being suitable. The adhesive should, moreover, preferablyv retain the` characteristic of thermoplasticity adequate for uniting fabric plies under heat and pressure. despite exposure of the adhesive to air, moisture, or to ordinary laundering conditions.

The following composition has' been t found satisfactory as the thermoplastic adhesive mentioned above. The figures represent percentage by weight.

Resoglaz 8.5 Diethyl phthalate 1.5 Benzene 85.0 Xylene 5.0

* Polymerized styrene.

` of the fabrics used.

Other resins which may be employed are thermoplastic resins of the phenol-formaldehyde group, thermoplastic resins included in the polyhydric alcohol-polybasic acid class, or thermoplastic resins in the toluene sulfonamide-formaldehyde group.

The purpose ofthe volatile solvent in those compositions in which it is used is primarily to act as a' carrier for the solid constituents of the time, it is to be understood that the invention is not restricted to the bonding of fabrics by thermoplastic adhesives from which the solvent has been substantially entirely removed; and instead substantial amounts of solvent, either originally present or added at the time of conibining, may, if desired, be present at the time n the adhesive is subjected to heat and pressure for uniting the fabrics. The use of volatile solvents in certain instances permits the deposition of a smooth film of the thermoplastic material and also assists in the ease of applying the adhesive to certain types of fabrics. The resin may also be cast in sheet'form and inserted between two or more o f the plies.

It is understood that various modifications with regard to solvents used will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art. For example, such solvents as ethyl acetate or other esters as butyl propionate, isopropyl acetate; ethyl methyl ketone, etc. may be appropriately used.

In general, the choice of volatile solvents will bev governed by the degree of solubility of the constituents of the adhesive, the rate `of removal of the volatile material desired and also economic factors. Also, Various modifications with respect which may be used in the construction of the wearing apparel which is described in the invention. Common types of cotton fabrics used for producing collars, cuffs, plaitsof shirts, and the like, wearing apparel such as broadcloth, madras,

oxford`cloth, etc., may be used with `equal satisfaction. Further, silk fabrics and various types of fabrics woven from synthetic yarns such as are made from regenerated cellulose, cellulose lose, etc., are included Within the scope of the invention. Linen fabrics, as well as other natural type yarn fabrics, may also be used.

In the carrying out of the invention it will be. apparent that fabric sheets, after being coated and dried, may be rolled up and stored until required for assembly into the desired articles.V

The 'plies requisite for the formation of the desired collar or any other article may of course be cut from sheets of the respective :fabrics in any convenient way, as by suitable dies, and

then placed together and united in the manner described above.

The product of the invention finds wide usel as a component part of shirts of the negligee type The use of barytes is advantageousv "5o acetate, cellulose nitrate, cuprammonium celluthat the characteristics of the adhesives em- I ployed can be varied to meet the requirements where it is desirableto have a garmentretain its 'crisp freshly laundered appearance even under conditions of very warm weather and high humidity when the ordinary type'of garments are found to wilt, wrinkle and become unsightly from the moisture of the atmosphere and perspiration of the wearer. As previously indicated, in addifinds itself applicable to the manufacture of plaits and demibosoms in the shirt industry, and isfalso particularly adapted for collars, cuffs and other exposed portions of nurses. chauffeurs and maids uniforms and the like. The invention finds further application in the manufacture of neckties of various types where several plies of suitable fabric are laminated to 4yield a nonwrinkling cravat. Because of the unique properties presented by the product of the invention,

many other uses will suggest themselves to those skilled in the art.

Garments which have collars, cuffs, demibosoms, plaits and the-like made" according to the present invention present the advantages of ease of cleanability, and extreme resistance to crumpling 'and wilting' when in contact with moisture. In addition to these properties, collars and the like will retain the starched appearance after the initial assembly of the collar, no special treatment or equipment being required to keep the collar inits intended condition. "Stitch pucker/afault common in collars of the soft variety, is eliminated in the present invention because the plies are rigidly joirfed throughout the surface, and even the stitching tends to become thoroughly anchored and embedded in the adhesive.

The products of the invention presentas an additional advantage the ability to be laundered and pressed without being, restiffened by means of starch or similar stiffening agents. The prod# ucts may be subjected to repeated launderings rain-coats, particularly of gabardine material.

The` advantage in this application consists primarily in that the lapel will 'not pucker when sewed or when -the garment becomes wet from rain. The adhesives disclosed above are not Aaffected by ordinary dry cleaning methods and The viscosity or flow-resistance of the adhesive employed should be such that when the fabric is subjected to heat and pressure, the adhesive will not strike through and stick to the heating iron and rolls; and hence, when .the fabric to be treated .is of a very open or porous weave the viscosity of the adhesive shouldbe correspondingly increased. The proper viscosity can easily be determined by trial with the selected fabric 'andit will be evident to those skilled in the art of the particular fabrics utilized. However, good results will be obtained if the examples are followed.

The invention also'contemplates the application of the thermoplastic adhesives tothe fabric plies in spaced dots, lines, or other spaced portions, instead of in a continuous coating. This maybe accomplished in any convenient way, as

by rollers grooved or having4 suitably spaced projections. l

Itisapparent thatmany widely different emalong the edges of the same, reversing the position of the fabrics so that the interliner will be between the face and back fabric and joining parts by means of heat and pressure.

2. Process of making collars, cuffs and the like, which comprises applying to a suitable fabric a thermoplastic adhesive comprising a resin polymer (approximately 80% vinyl chloride and 20% vinyl acetate), ethyl methyl ketone, tricresyl phosphate, and titanium dioxide, allowing the adhesive to dry, cutting a desired pattern from the fabric, interposing said pattern as an interlining between two fabrics forming the face and back of the finished collar, cuff or the like, stitching said fabrics along their edges and lsubjecting the assembled fabrics to heat and pressure whereby the adhesive is softened and upon cooling forms a bond between the surfaces of the fabric contiguous with the adhesive.

3. An article of launderable apparel comprising a plurality of fabric layers joined by means of a non-cellulosic composition wherein the major non-volatile ingredient comprises a thermoplastic synthetic resin having the property of becoming plastic to effect bonding under the sole action of heat and pressure and of remain- Iing thermoplastic to effect rebonding under subsequent applications of heat and` pressure alone at normal ironing temperatures, said resin being substantially insoluble in hot water.

4. A semi-stiff collar` comprising fabric plies united by an adhesive comprising a thermoplastic synthetic resin substantially in soluble in hot water, said resin also having the property of becoming plastic and effecting bonding under 'the sole action of heat and pressure and of remaining thermoplastic to effect rebonding under subsequent applications of heat and pressure alone if the bond becomes loosened, said adhesive being sufliciently flow-resistant to avoid striking through the fabric upon the application of heat and pressure to effect bonding of the plies.

5. A semi-stiff collar as defined by claim 4, wherein the resin is a vinyl resin.

6. An article of apparel of the class consisting of collars, cuffs and shirts, said article comprising fabric plies united by means of a thermoplastic vinyl resin capable in and of itself of effecting rebonding by the sole action of heat 'and pressure at normal ironing temperatures.

'7. Process of preparing multi-ply collars, cuifs and the like, which comprises coating a `sheet of intermediate ply material with a solution of a thermoplastic synthetic resin substantially insoluble in hot water and having the property of becoming plastic to effect bonding by the sole action of heat and pressure and of remaining thermoplastic to effect rebonding under subsequent application of heat and pressure alone, allowing the solvent to evaporate, cutting out an interliner from said sheet, and firmly bonding thereto a face and back ply by means of heat and pressure.

8. A semi-stiff collar comprising fabric plies united by an adhesive comprising a thermoplastic synthetic resin having the property of becoming plastic and effecting bonding under the sole action of heat and pressure and of remaining thermoplastic to eect rebonding under subsequent applications of heat and pressure alone if the bond becomes loosened, said adhesive being sufficiently flow-resistant to' avoid striking through the fabric upon the application of heat and pressure to effect bonding of the plies, said resin being selected froma group consisting of polymerized styrene and a co-polymer of viny acetate and vinyl chloride.

9. An article of apparel of the class consisting of collars, cuffs and shirts, said article comprisingfabric plies united by means of a thermoplastic synthetic resin capable in and of itself of effecting rebonding by the sole action of heat and pressure at normal ironing temperatures, said resin being selected from a group consisting of polymerized styrene and a co-polymer of vinyl acetate and vinyl chloride.

l0. 'An article of apparel of the class consisting of collars, cuffs and shirts. said article comprising fabric plies united by means of a thermoplastic vinyl resin capable in and of itself of effecting rebonding by the sole action of heat and pressure at normal ironing temperatures, said resin beingl one resulting from the jointpolymerization of vinyl acetate and vinyl chloride, with the chloride predominating.

11. An article of' apparel of the class consisting of collars, cuffs and shirts, said article comprising..

fabric plies united by means of a thermoplastic vinyl resin capable in and of itself of effecting rebonding by the sole action of heat and pressure at normal ironing temperatures, said resin being a co-polymer of vinyl acetate and vinyl chloride. 12. An article of apparel of the class consisting of collars, cuffs and shirts, said article comprising fabric plies united by an adhesive comprising a thermoplastic synthetic resin' which is solid at room temperatures and flexible in thin sheets, said resin being adhesive to said fabric upon becoming softened under the sole action of heat and pressure at normal ironing temperatures and under ironing pressures, and also remaining thermoplastic under repeated heating at ironing temperatures, said resin beingalso substantially insoluble in hot water and sufficiently flowresista'nt at the temperature of boiling water to prevent migration of said substance through theY plastic to effect rebonding under subsequent applications of heat and pressure alone at a temperature within said temperature range and a pressure within said pressure range, whereby said adhesive may effect rebonding by the mere act of ironing, said adhesive being solid and exible in use at atmospheric temperatures and' yremaining substantially solid at 212 F. with resultant ability to avoid migration through the interstices of the fabric layers at the latter temperature, said adhesive being also substantially insoluble in hot water and sufficiently solid to also remaining thermoplastic under repeatedheating -at ironing temperatures, said resin being also substantially insoluble in hot water and sufciently flow-resistant at the temperature of boiling water to prevent migration of said substance through the interstitces of said fabric.

15. A multi-ply fabric comprising sheets of textile material covering an inner fabric sheet which has been coated on opposite sides with a resin composition consisting essentially of a copolymer of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate con-v taining a plasticizer which isthermoplastic and resistant to the action of detergents employed in laundering lprocesses, the separate laminae being permanently bonded together by the resin coating of the inner ply into a composite product.

THOMAS H. SWAN.

US2264224A 1935-02-05 1935-02-05 Multiply launderable apparel and process of preparing same Expired - Lifetime US2264224A (en)

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2264224A US2264224A (en) 1935-02-05 1935-02-05 Multiply launderable apparel and process of preparing same
GB88336A GB473478A (en) 1935-02-05 1936-01-10 Improvements in or relating to wearing apparel and processes of making the same
FR802685A FR802685A (en) 1935-02-05 1936-01-24 Improvements to clothing and to their method of manufacture
US2218387A US2218387A (en) 1935-02-05 1937-11-20 Fused collar
US2269797A US2269797A (en) 1935-02-05 1939-09-23 Fused collar

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Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2723932A (en) * 1951-03-13 1955-11-15 Grace W R & Co Textile print wash blanket and method of making same
US4214319A (en) * 1977-10-06 1980-07-29 Didier Bollag Outerwear garment article
US4330586A (en) * 1977-12-02 1982-05-18 Fieux Robert E Means and method of restoring documents, paintings and the like
US4333980A (en) * 1978-03-20 1982-06-08 Facemate Corporation Multi-ply fabric structure including interliner
US4555428A (en) * 1982-04-13 1985-11-26 Stedman Corporation Multi-layer unitized fabric construction and method of making same
US5568779A (en) * 1994-05-17 1996-10-29 Tal Apparel Ltd. Pucker free garment seam and method of manufacture
US5713292A (en) * 1994-05-17 1998-02-03 Tal Apparel Ltd. Pucker free pocket garment seam and method for production
US5775394A (en) * 1994-05-17 1998-07-07 Tal Apparel, Ltd. Pucker free sleeve placket garment seam and method for production
US5782191A (en) * 1994-05-17 1998-07-21 Tal Apparel Ltd. Pucker free right front hem garment seam and method for production
US5950554A (en) * 1994-05-17 1999-09-14 Taltech Ltd. Pucker free yoke-to-front and yoke-to-back garment seam and method for production
US6070542A (en) * 1994-05-17 2000-06-06 Taltech Limited Pucker free collar seam and method of manufacture
US6079343A (en) * 1994-05-17 2000-06-27 Taltech Ltd. Pucker free garment side seam and method for production
EP1345504A1 (en) * 2001-10-18 2003-09-24 Guangdong Esquel Textiles Co., Ltd. Wrinkle free garment and method of manufacture
US20040151864A1 (en) * 2003-02-03 2004-08-05 Sara Lee Corporation Method of manufacture for stitchless garment
US7013818B2 (en) 2001-10-18 2006-03-21 Guangdong Esquel Textiles Co. Ltd. Wrinkle free garment and method of manufacture
US20130157002A1 (en) * 2011-12-15 2013-06-20 Max Mara S.R.L. Societa' Unipersonale Method for joining two fabric portions, a multilayer structure and an article of clothing
US20150351474A1 (en) * 2012-12-28 2015-12-10 Douglas K. Farmer Garments including elastic composite fabric

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2723932A (en) * 1951-03-13 1955-11-15 Grace W R & Co Textile print wash blanket and method of making same
US4214319A (en) * 1977-10-06 1980-07-29 Didier Bollag Outerwear garment article
US4330586A (en) * 1977-12-02 1982-05-18 Fieux Robert E Means and method of restoring documents, paintings and the like
US4333980A (en) * 1978-03-20 1982-06-08 Facemate Corporation Multi-ply fabric structure including interliner
US4555428A (en) * 1982-04-13 1985-11-26 Stedman Corporation Multi-layer unitized fabric construction and method of making same
US5568779A (en) * 1994-05-17 1996-10-29 Tal Apparel Ltd. Pucker free garment seam and method of manufacture
US5590615A (en) * 1994-05-17 1997-01-07 Tal Apparel Ltd. Pucker free garment seam and method of manufacture
US5713292A (en) * 1994-05-17 1998-02-03 Tal Apparel Ltd. Pucker free pocket garment seam and method for production
US5775394A (en) * 1994-05-17 1998-07-07 Tal Apparel, Ltd. Pucker free sleeve placket garment seam and method for production
US5782191A (en) * 1994-05-17 1998-07-21 Tal Apparel Ltd. Pucker free right front hem garment seam and method for production
US5950554A (en) * 1994-05-17 1999-09-14 Taltech Ltd. Pucker free yoke-to-front and yoke-to-back garment seam and method for production
US6070542A (en) * 1994-05-17 2000-06-06 Taltech Limited Pucker free collar seam and method of manufacture
US6079343A (en) * 1994-05-17 2000-06-27 Taltech Ltd. Pucker free garment side seam and method for production
EP1345504A1 (en) * 2001-10-18 2003-09-24 Guangdong Esquel Textiles Co., Ltd. Wrinkle free garment and method of manufacture
EP1345504A4 (en) * 2001-10-18 2004-07-07 Guangdong Esquel Textiles Co Wrinkle free garment and method of manufacture
US7013818B2 (en) 2001-10-18 2006-03-21 Guangdong Esquel Textiles Co. Ltd. Wrinkle free garment and method of manufacture
US20060096511A1 (en) * 2001-10-18 2006-05-11 Guangdong Esquel Textiles Co. Ltd. Wrinkle free garment and method of manufacture
EP1736067A1 (en) * 2001-10-18 2006-12-27 Guangdong Esquel Textiles Co., Ltd. Wrinkle free garment and method of manufacture
US8336474B2 (en) 2001-10-18 2012-12-25 Yugao Zhang Wrinkle free garment and method of manufacture
US20040151864A1 (en) * 2003-02-03 2004-08-05 Sara Lee Corporation Method of manufacture for stitchless garment
US7191720B2 (en) 2003-02-03 2007-03-20 Hbi Branded Apparel Enterprises, Llc Method of manufacture for stitchless garment
US20130157002A1 (en) * 2011-12-15 2013-06-20 Max Mara S.R.L. Societa' Unipersonale Method for joining two fabric portions, a multilayer structure and an article of clothing
US8689712B2 (en) * 2011-12-15 2014-04-08 Max Mara S.R.L. Societa' Unipersonale Method for joining two fabric portions, a multilayer structure and an article of clothing
US20150351474A1 (en) * 2012-12-28 2015-12-10 Douglas K. Farmer Garments including elastic composite fabric

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