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Method of applying inserts in pile materials

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Publication number
US2245202A
US2245202A US31302140A US2245202A US 2245202 A US2245202 A US 2245202A US 31302140 A US31302140 A US 31302140A US 2245202 A US2245202 A US 2245202A
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Grant
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Prior art keywords
body
inlay
edges
adhesive
pile
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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Inventor
Samuel H Krasno
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Krasno Bros Glove & Mitten Co
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41HAPPLIANCES OR METHODS FOR MAKING CLOTHES, e.g. FOR DRESS-MAKING, FOR TAILORING, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A41H41/00Machines or appliances for making garments from natural or artificial fur
    • A41H41/005Machines or appliances for making garments from artificial fur
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T156/00Adhesive bonding and miscellaneous chemical manufacture
    • Y10T156/10Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor
    • Y10T156/1052Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor with cutting, punching, tearing or severing
    • Y10T156/1056Perforating lamina

Description

JunelO, 1941. `s. H. KRAsNo METHOD OF APPLYING' INSERTS IN PILE* MATERIALS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 8. 1940 l r n f snit..

June 10, 1941. s H, KRASNO 2,245,202

METHOD OF APPLYING I'NSERTS IN PILE MATERIALS Filed Jan'. 8, 1940 Y Sheets-Sheet 2 InVEntmT r'LKr-a'nr:

Patented June l0, 1941 UETED STATES FFICE liETHO-D 0F APPLYING INSERTS IN PILE RIATERIALS Samuel H. Krasno, Milwaukee, Wis., assigner to Krasno Bros. Glove & Mitten Co., Milwaukee,

Wis.

4 Claims.

This invention appertains tothe novel method of incorporating constrasting inserts or inlays in furs, electrified shearlings, plush, carpets, or any other material having an upstanding pile.

One of the primary objects of my invention is to provide a novel means of incorporating delicate or intricate designs, such as rabbits and other animals or human figures in materials having an upstanding pile, whereby novel effects may be successfully had in relatively small objects in the nature of mittens, ear muifs, etc.

It has heretofore been proposed to cut out designs in fabrics and the like and to insert inlays in the cut-out portion and secure such inlays to a backing fastened to the body. In such arrangements great difculty arises` First, the seam. or meeting edges of the inlay and body are clearly visible (particularly if the material is flexed), and if the material is a pile fabricy the edges of the inlay and body will fray and the joint will soon become unsightly to the eye. This is materially increased if the material is subjected to constant wear.

It has also been suggested to sew the inlays in place. Thismethod is, likewise, highly objecticnable* and utterly impossible if the inlays are small or intricate and contain narrow portions, as the threads cannot nd sufficient purchase in the inlays. Sewing is costly and time-consuming, and the seam will show upon flexing of the material, which renders sewing impractical for mittens and the like.

Therefore, another salient object of my invention is to provide means whereby the inlays can be snugly fitted in cut-out portions of a body and then tightly secured in place by an adhesive applied to the meeting edges of the inlay and body,

A further important object of my invention is the provision of a novel needle for spreading the joint between the inlay and the body, and for applying the desired adhesive to the edges of the inlay and body simultaneously, whereby the adhesive can be quickly and eiciently applied to permit the proper fastening of the inlay in place.

A still further important object of my invention is the provision of means whereby a small quantity of the adhesive can be placed at the base of the fur or electrified Shearling or at the base of the pile fabrics, so that the hair, fibres, and pile will be intermingled and bound together next to the hide or woven fabric body, so that upon the flexing of the material, no seam will be visible to the naked eye. Y

With these and other objects in View, the invention consists in the novel construction, arrangement, and formation of parts, as will be hereinafter more specifically described, claimed, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which drawings:

Figure 1 is a front elevational view showing a body, such as a back of a mitten, constructed in accordance with my invention.

Figure 2 is a similar View, but showing the reverse side thereof.

Figure 3 is an enlarged detail view of one form of a novel' Aself-feeding needle Which can be utilized in my method of applying an adhesive simultaneously to the meeting edges of an inlay or insert and the body portion of the material, the View being shown partly broken away and in section to illustrate structural detail.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary, detail, perspective view illustrating the means of applying the adhesive to the meeting edges of an inlay and a body formed from electrified shearlings.

Figure 5 is an enlarged, fragmentary, detail, perspective View showing a slightly mo'died form of seam for securing inlays in electrified shearlings or the like.

Figure 6 is afragmentary, detail, perspective View illustrating a further modified form of seam.

Referring to the drawings in detail, wherein similar reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several views, the letter B generally indicates a body of material having a pile, such as fur, electrified shearlings, plush, or the like, having an inlay l0 incorporated therewith in accordance with my method.

For the purpose of illustration, the body B may be considered as the back of a mitten, and the material may be considered as arr electrified Shearling. In the present instance, the inlay I0 has been shown to be the ligure of a person skiing, but, obviously, other designs of inlays can be incorporated in the pile material. By examining the inlay, it can be seen that great difficulty would be had in sewing the same in position, particularly around the ski, as thread would not be able to find suiicient material to hold to. Likewise, if the iigure or inlay could be sewed in place, it would result in an expensive time-consuming operation.

In accordance with my invention, the desired design is first cut out of the body B in any desired way, such as by a die. The desired figure is then cut out from a contrasting color, such as by the use of the same die, so that the ligure can be snugly fitted in thercpening cut outv in the 'body'. This is the next step in my method, that is, the snug fitting of the inlay in the opening of the body.

After the inlay has been placed in the opening, an adhesive I I is applied to the meeting edges of the hide of the fur or electrified shearling, or to the meeting edges of the base of a pile fabric. This can be done in several ways, such as by the dipping of a needle or stylus in a. container of adhesive and inserting the needle or stylus between the meeting edges of the inlay or body and draw-V ing the needle along said edges. I prefer, however, to utilize the instrument shown in Figures 3 and 4, which has been invented by me and which serves its purpose admirably.

The instrument includes a hollow needle I2 having oppositely directed openings I3 and I4 formed therein adjacent its free end. The adhesive can be fed through the hollow needle in any desired manner, and, obviously, the needle can be readily inserted in the joint between the inlay and the body B, so as to spread the joint and at the same time apply adhesive to the meeting edges of the body and inlay. This allows the quick and easy placing of the adhesive to the edges of the body and the inlay and insures the proper coating of the edges. If desired, the needle can be provided with a manipulating hand grip I5. Likewise, the needle adjacent the outlet openings I3 and I4 can be provided with a concavo-convex guard'plate I5. This guard plate limits the insertion of the needle in the joint.

By referring to Figure 4, it can be seen that when the adhesive is applied to the insert and body, the body and the insert are turned over so that the hide or leather is exposed to view.

If preferred, the adhesive can be fed to the hollow needle I2 by a flexible hose I'I leading from an elevated tank I 8. This tank contains a quantity of the adhesive, and the adhesive will readily iiow by gravity through the flexible tube I'I and to the needle. If necessary, the adhesive can be fed by pressure to the needle, and this can be accomplished by forcing air under pressure into the tank I8.

Any desired type of adhesive I I can be utilized, and at the present time I prefer to utilize an adhesive having a latex base, as this type of adhesive will adhere strongly to the meeting edges of the inlay and body and prevent the tearing apart of said edges, even when the body is subjected to strains, such as flexing and the like.

Where the inlays are secured in place by the adhesive in pile fabrics, the adhesive effectively seals the edges of the inlay and the cut-out portion of the body and prevents the fraying of said edges. Thus, a tight seam will be had, which will not become unsightly. If preferred, a certain amount of the adhesive can be allowed to seep through to the base of the pile, so that the bases of the pile of the inlay and body will be united by the adhesive. Not only does this provide a tighter joint, but upon the flexing of the body and inlay, the seam or joint will not be visible.

In Figure 5, I have shown such a seam in an electrified Shearling. In this gure, the hide is indicated by the reference character 2l), and the straightened wool by the reference character 2|. In electriiied shearlings there is a certain amount of the wool left matted, as at 22, adjacent the hide 2D, and to this matted portion 22 I apply the adhesive 24, as adhesive 25 is applied to the meeting edges of the body and the inlay. Thus, the matted portion of the electrified Shearling adjacent the hide is firmly united by the adhesive, and upon exing of the Shearling and viewing the same from the outer face, the seam cannot be seen.

In Figure 6, I have shown a further modified form of my seam or joint. Where a particularly strong joint is necessary or desirable, a certain quantity 26 of the adhesive can be applied to the inner face of the Shearling or cut material. Thus, a thin nlm of the adhesive will flow over the joint and over the inner face of the material. This gives an additional bond and the desired added strength.

While my method of securing inlays to material can be applied to a number of different uses, the same is particularly adapted for use in small objects, such as mittens, ear muffs, and the like, as the inlays can be quickly and firmly secured in place at a small cost.

Changes in details may be made without departing from the spirit or the scope of my invention, but what I claim as new is:

1. The method of forming ornamental material having a pile, which consists in, rst, cutting out a desired design from the body; second, snugly inserting in said cut-out portion an inlay conforming to the material out out, whereby the edges of the inlay and the walls of the cut-out portion of the body Will abut; and, third, spreading the abutting edges and simultaneously applying an adhesive thereto.

2. The method of producing an ornamental material having a pile, which consists in, rst, cut ting out a desired design from the body of the material; second, snugly inserting an inlay conforming to the cut-out portion in said body, so that the edges of the inlay will snugly engage the edges of the cut-out portion; and, third, spreading said abutting edges and applying adhesive simultaneously to the edges and to the bases of the pile of the inlay and body.

3. The method of producing an ornamental material having a pile, which consists in, first, cutting out a desired design from the body of the material; second, snugly inserting an inlay conforming to the cut-out portion in said body, so that the edges of the inlay will snugly engage the edges of the cut-out portion; and, third, spreading said abutting edges andapplying adhesive simultaneously to the edges and to the bases of the pile of the inlay and body, and to the inner face of the inlay and body on opposite sides of said meeting edges.

4. The method of producing an ornamental material having a pile, which consists in, rst, cutting out a desired design from the body of the material; second, snugly inserting an inlay conforming to the cut-out portion in said body, so that the edges of the inlay will snugly engage the edges of the cut-out portion; and, third, applying adhesive to the edges of the inlay and the Walls of the cut-out portion of the body and to the bases of the pile of the inlay and the body.

SAMUEL H. KRASNO.

US2245202A 1940-01-08 1940-01-08 Method of applying inserts in pile materials Expired - Lifetime US2245202A (en)

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2592747A (en) * 1949-03-30 1952-04-15 Schumann Hans Maassen Latex impregnated luffa and method of preparing the same
US2942326A (en) * 1959-11-13 1960-06-28 Mitchell William Shadow line deep pile material
US3484316A (en) * 1966-09-15 1969-12-16 Patricia A Dirrim Method for making throw rug
US5656109A (en) * 1995-08-28 1997-08-12 Collins & Aikman Floorcoverings, Inc. Method of making inlaid floor coverings
US5824175A (en) * 1996-01-23 1998-10-20 Step Loc Corporation Carpet seaming tape and method
US20030004695A1 (en) * 2001-05-18 2003-01-02 Ronald Magee Multi-patterned surface covering sample elements, display systems, and methods
US20030019571A1 (en) * 2001-02-05 2003-01-30 Clement Zanzuri Decorative surface covering and method of forming the same
US20040038618A1 (en) * 2002-08-23 2004-02-26 Atkins Daniel Dean Printing process for plush fabric
US20050238856A1 (en) * 2001-02-05 2005-10-27 Clement Zanzuri Decorative surface covering structure and method of forming

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2592747A (en) * 1949-03-30 1952-04-15 Schumann Hans Maassen Latex impregnated luffa and method of preparing the same
US2942326A (en) * 1959-11-13 1960-06-28 Mitchell William Shadow line deep pile material
US3484316A (en) * 1966-09-15 1969-12-16 Patricia A Dirrim Method for making throw rug
US5656109A (en) * 1995-08-28 1997-08-12 Collins & Aikman Floorcoverings, Inc. Method of making inlaid floor coverings
US5824175A (en) * 1996-01-23 1998-10-20 Step Loc Corporation Carpet seaming tape and method
US20030019571A1 (en) * 2001-02-05 2003-01-30 Clement Zanzuri Decorative surface covering and method of forming the same
US20050238856A1 (en) * 2001-02-05 2005-10-27 Clement Zanzuri Decorative surface covering structure and method of forming
US20030004695A1 (en) * 2001-05-18 2003-01-02 Ronald Magee Multi-patterned surface covering sample elements, display systems, and methods
US20050129902A1 (en) * 2001-05-18 2005-06-16 Milliken & Company Floor covering display system
US7383960B2 (en) 2001-05-18 2008-06-10 Milliken & Company Floor covering display system
US7448503B2 (en) * 2001-05-18 2008-11-11 Milliken & Company Multi-patterned surface covering sample elements, display systems, and methods
US20040038618A1 (en) * 2002-08-23 2004-02-26 Atkins Daniel Dean Printing process for plush fabric

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