US2229763A - Calculating machine - Google Patents

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US2229763A
US2229763A US2229763DA US2229763A US 2229763 A US2229763 A US 2229763A US 2229763D A US2229763D A US 2229763DA US 2229763 A US2229763 A US 2229763A
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06CDIGITAL COMPUTERS IN WHICH ALL THE COMPUTATION IS EFFECTED MECHANICALLY
    • G06C23/00Driving mechanisms for functional elements
    • G06C23/06Driving mechanisms for functional elements of tabulation devices, e.g. of carriage skip

Description

Jan. 28, 1941. R. MULLER 2,229,763
CALCULATING- MACHINE Filed Aug. 9, 1935 8 Sheets-Sheet 1 3 x I @Z;
ATTORNEYS INVENTOR Jan. 28, 1941. R L MULLER CALCULATING MACHINE Filed Aug. 9, 1935 8 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR ROGlf hm/a fii 04m )%MMZQ 22 3 v I ATTORNEYS Jan. 28, 1941. R. L. MULLER CALCULATING MACHIHE Filed Aug. 9, 1955 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 IIIIIIIIIII! INENTOR Hobs/'2 L. Muller TTORNEYS Jan. 28, 1941. R. L. MULLER CALCULATING MACHINE Filed Aug. 9, 1935 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 w r fi M m \VS a R O 0 m M I97 f O 22 r. n W 8 A g 32 D V: 0 B a zdw M44 Jan. 28, 1941. R. L. MULLER CALCULATING MACHINE Filed Aug. 9, 1935 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 r e 1 MM 8 .VW m m N 0 n n N w A O Jan. 28, 1941. R. L. MULLER CALCULATING MACHINE Filed Aug. 9, 1935 8 Sheets-Sheet 6 Jan. 28, 1941. L MULLER CALCULATING KACHINE Filed Aug. 9, 1935 8 Sheets-Sheet 7 III! II III II III INVENTOR R 01 er) mller Mm @wf" M M ATTORNEYfs Jan. 28, 1941. R. L. MULLER CALCULATING MACHINE Filed Aug. 9, 1935 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 B d mwm 3 585 md m p z fiqawmm INVENTOR fgbel fl jfulleh ATTORNEYS mum ago: mmko Patented Jan. 28, 1941 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CALCULATING MACHINE Application August 9, 1935, Serial No. 35,433
5 Claims.
This invention relates to a calculating machine, and it is concerned particularly with automatic controls for conditioning the machine for difierent types of operation.
Calculating machines are usually conditioned for different operations by means of special keys, or levers, or by having a paper carriage actuate certain parts to condition the machine automatically. One of the difllculties with having the paper carriage actuate the controls is that it places a load upon the carriage that interferes with its proper operation. For example, if there are no controls to be actuated in several columns of the carriage, the carriage will move freely and rapidly in these columns but, if, in other columns there are a number of controls to be actuated, and this number varies, the carriage is loaded up in varying amounts and will move slowly, or sluggishly, or erratically. The present invention has been devised to overcome this difllculty.
The general object of the invention is to provide an improved automatic control for conditioning a calculating machine for different operations.
More specifically, the object of the invention is to provide a machine in which a function indexing means is automatically set after which this means is sensed by a means that conditions the machine for the desired operation.
A further and more particular object is to provide improved controls for governing the movement of the paper carriage of a calculating machine.
Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear from the following specification and drawings.
An embodiment of the invention is shown in the accompanying drawings, in which;
Fig. 1 is a right side elevation of a machine with the invention applied thereto, certain parts being cut away to show others more cleariy, and with the parts in normal position;
Fig. 2 is a left side elevation, some of the parts being cut away to show others more clearly,
' and the parts being shown in normal position;
Fig. 3 is a rear elevation showing particularly the manner in which the paper carriage is controlled and some of the parts that are set by said carriage;
Fig. 4 is a detail right side sectional elevation of certain portions of the machine at the lower rear side, the view showing particularly the indexing means in the position it occupies before the motor bar has been depressed;
Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 4 showing the parts in the position they occupy after the motor bar has been depressed but before the machine has operated Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 5, except that the parts are shown in the position they occupy at the extreme end of a forward stroke of machine operation and just after the printing mechanism has operated;
Fig. 7 is a left side elevation and section certain of the controls, taken near the rear of the machine, the view showing the parts in the position they occupy after the motor bar has been depressed but before the machine has started to operate;
Fig. 8 is a perspective view showing particularly the tabulating mechanism associated with the paper carriage;
Fig. 9 is a view of the carriage return mechanism, the view being taken from the front and showing the manner in which this return mechanism is used with the present invention; and
Fig. 10 is a perspective view of certain portions of the indexing and sensing means.
Fig. 11 is a view showing a sample of one form of work that may be performed with the invention.
The invention is shown applied to a Burroughs calculating machine of a type that is Well known so that a detailed description is not necessary. It will be understood that the invention can also be used with other types of machines.
General machine construction The machine is provided with a plurality of depressible amount keys i6 (Fig. 1) upon which items may be entered after which the machine can be operated by depressing a motor bar I I that causes a motor 2 to give the machine a cycle of operation which includes a forward and a return stroke. During this cycle, the machine performs certain functions depending upon how it is conditioned.
The amount keys control the position of actuator racks l3 which mesh with large gears It, with which a main register i5 and two multiple registers 55 and H are adapted to cooperate.
A printing mechanism including the type bars (8 is operated near the end of the forward stroke in the cycle of machine operation to print the items entered or the calculation performed.
The machine is provided with a platen P about which paper may be held in printing position relative to the printing mechanism. Provision is also made for causing printing to occur in different columns on the paper. This is accomlittle load upon the carriage.
plished by supporting the platen on a travelling paper carriage 20 controlled by a tabulating mechanism of which portions are shown in Fig. 8 and which will be described in more detail later. This tabulating mechanism is normally operated during the latter part of each cycle of operation of the machine to release the carriage for movement to the next column under the urge of a spring 2i (Fig. 3). The carriage can be returned automatically by power through a carriage return mechanism 22 of the type described in Rinsche Patent No. 1,580,534.
Function indexing means Instead of having the paper carriage condition the machine to perform difierent functions, the carriage merely indexes an indexing means which is relatively light and which places very This makes possible a lighter and faster moving carriage and one that may be started and stopped quickly in either direction. Also, the load on the carriage remains the same for all its movements.
The indexing means is in the,i'orm of a rotatable drum 30 (Fig. 2) mounted upon a shaft 36 carrying a worm wheel 32 meshing with a worm 33 fixed to a shaft 36. Fixed to the end of shaft 34 is a gear 35 that meshes with a rack 38 (Fig. 3) fixed to the paper carriage. It will thus be seen that the drum 3t rotates as the carriage is moved, and occupies various indexed positions, or stations, depending upon the columnar position of the carriage.
The indexing drum has a series of cross members til (Fig. 3) to which are detachably connected a series of indexing, or abutment, stops oi which five are shown on the cross bar illus-- trated in Figs. 3 and 10, numbered Qt, ll, 62,
.43 and 44. These stops are of various lengths accordance with the conditioning of. the machine for columnar printing, after which the indexing means is sensed by a means which, in the form or the invention disclosed, is a mechanical feeling mechanism.
Sensing means As mentioned, the machine is conditioned to perform difierent iunctionsloy having a mechanism feel, or sense, the indexing means. The
term function as used herein, is not intended to include only calculating functions such as addition or subtraction, but also functions such as repeat operations of the machine, skip-tab operations, control of the printing mechanism, and similar functions.
For the purpose of sensing the indexin means, a series of vertically movable members, or links, are provided, five being shown in the present embodiment of the invention and numbered N, W, 48, 49 and 50, as shown in Figs. 3 and 10. These sensing members are guided at their lower ends by a plate 58 (fig. 2) and, at
their upper ends, are connected to arms 52 oiwhich there is one for each of the members. The arms 52 are pivoted on a stationary shaft 53 ne r t e rear of the machine. Those sensing members are normally held in elevated position by means of a shaft, or bail, 55 that engages the undersides of the arms. The shaft 55 is-carried by side arms 56 pivoted on the shaft 53 and a spring 57 serves to urge the bail in a. clockwise direc tion as infewed in Fig. 2. Also, springs 58, of which there is one attached to each of the arms 52, serve to urge the arms in a clockwise direction so that, not only the controlling ball 55 but also the arms 52 with the sensing members 46-50 are urged clockwise to a feeling or "sensing position.
The ball 55 is held upward by means of a lever til (Fig. i) pivoted on a shaft iii, The rear end of this lever is positioned under the ball 55 and its forward end is connected to a downwardly extending link 62 whose lower end has a slot 63 in which is positioned a stud IE6 carried by a lever (55 pivoted 611 a stationary stud $5. The lever 65 is urged counterclockwise as viewed in Fig. 4 by a relatively strong spring 62 connected to it by plates lit, but it is normally held against movement by the engagement of a stud ill on the lever with the edge of a cam ll fixed to a shaft 62 that is rotated one revolution during each cycle of operation of the machine. Pivotally connected to the stud 64 on the lever 65 is a second link 73 whose upper end has a stud and slot connection M with the link 62. The link is carries a latch urged counterclockwise as viewed in Fig. i by a spring it to cause a lug ill on the latch to engage over a shoulder it on the link t2.
With the parts in the position of Fig. 4, the ball 55 tends to urge the lever Gt) clockwise, which tends to pull the link t2 upward, but the latter cannot move upward because it is held by the latch '55 carried by the link l3 connected to the lever 65 that is held against upward movement by the relatively strong spring Bl. Accordingly, in this position of the parts, which is the normal position, the bail 55 is held upward and the feeling or sensing members 66-58 remain ele vated in inactive position.
The bail 55 is released, in the embodiment of the invention shown, as an incident to the conditioning of the machine for a cycle of operation by means of the motor bar it.
Referring to Fig. l, the motor bar M is connected to the pivoted levers til and M in the usual manner so that the lever til is rocked counterclockwise as viewed in Fig. when the motor bar is depressed. Movement of this lever, acting through spring t2, tends to raise the long motor control link 81'? that controls the clutch 84 and causesthe motor to give the machine a cycle of operation. The rear end of lever 3i has a stud and slot connection with an arm 85 fixed to a shaft 86. The shaft 86 extends across the machine and, near the center of the machine, another arm dl is fixed to it. The latter is pivotally connected to a downwardly extending link 88 whose lower end (Fig. 4) is connected through a spring 89 to one arm til of a bell crank lever pivoted at iii. The other arm 92 of this bell crank lever is connected to a link 93 provided with a bent end positioned in front of a stud 95 carried by a pass-by pawl 95 pivoted on the latch "l5 and urged counterclockwise by a spring 96.
till
shoulder I8 on the link 52. When this occurs, the link 62 is free to move upward. This means that the lever 60 is free to rock clockwise and that the bail 55 can move downward under the urge of its spring. The net result is that, when the motor bar is depressed, the bail 55 moves downward and the feeling members 46-50 move to their sensing positions. The position of the parts after the motor bar has been depressed but before the cycle of machine operation has started is shown in Fig. 5.
It is desirable to have the members 46-50 sense the indexing means before the machine starts to operate and, since these members are released by depression of the motor bar, provision is made for preventing depression of the motor bar from causing a cycle of machine operation until the sensing members have moved to sensing position and conditioned the machine. Referring to Fig. l, a latch lever I is pivoted adjacent the motor control link 83, the latch lever being urged counterclockwise as viewed in Fig. 1 by a spring II, but being held in the position of Fig. 1 by a cam lever I02 that engages a stud I03 on the upper end of the latch lever. The lower end of the latch lever is positioned to engage a shoulder on the link to prevent upward movement of said link to cause a cycle of machine operation until the latch lever I00 is rocked counterclockwise from its Fig. 1 position. The cam lever I02 is fixed to a shaft I04 to which is also fixed an arm I05 connected to one end of a link I06 whose lower end is connected to a bell crank lever I01 urged counterclockwise as shown in Fig. 1, by a spring I08.
The rear arm of the bell crank lever I0! is positioned under the bail 55 that controls the sensing members 46-50 inclusive. When the bail 55 is moved downwardly, it rocks the bell crank I0I clockwise against the tension of spring I08 and moves the cam lever I02 to release the lever I00, for movement to released position under the urge of its spring. This releases the motor control link 83 and its spring 82 then moves it upwardly to cause the machine to be given a cycle of operation. But, since this cannot happen until the bail 55 moves downward, which action releases the sensing members 45-50 the cycle of machine operation does not occur until the sensing members have moved to condition the machine.
The mechanism above described is returned to normal position during a cycle of operation of the machine as follows: Referring to Fig. 4, the shaft 12 is given a complete revolution during each machine cycle. This shaft corresponds to the shaft in Rinsche 1,580,534 to which the crank 48 of said patent'is attached. This shaft makes a. complete revolution at about the rate of 200 strokes per minute whereas the machine, owing to the spring connections with the drive and thespring return stroke operates at the rate of about 125 strokes per minute. .During the forward stroke of the machine, a raised portion of cam II. engages the stud I0 on lever 65 and rocks the lever to the position of Fig. 6. As it moves to this position, the link' I3 is moved upwardly which moves the latch I5 upward and moves the stud 94 out of the control of the link 93. The latch I5 then moves counterclockwise under the urge of its spring and the lug on said latch moves over the shoulder I8 on the link 52. The movement of the lever 55 by cam ll retensions the spring 81, and when the stud moves oil? of the high portion of the cam, the spring tends to pull the link I3 downward. Since this link is now latched to the link 62, the latter tends to move downward which would rock the lever 60 counterclockwise as viewed in Fig. 6 and raise the bail 55 to raise the sensing members 46-50 to normal. But it is not desired to have the sensing members 46-50 moved upward so early in the cycle of machine operation, owing to the fact that they control certain other parts that will be presently described. Accordingly, a latch H0 is provided (Fig. 6) which is urged counterclockwise by a spring III so that when the link I3 is moved upward to its Fig. 6 position, the latch I I0 automatically moves over a stud II2 on the link and latches the link in Fig. 6 position. The latch is released during the return stroke of the machine by a pass-by pawl II3 carried by a sector II4 on a shaft II5 that is first rocked clockwise from the position ofFig. 4 to that of Fig. 6 and then returned counterclockwise to normal. The shaft I I 5 is the shaft ordinarily known as the 800 shaft in the Burroughs machine, the same being so numbered in the patent to Burroughs 504,963. During the counterclockwise movement, that is, during the return stroke of the machine, the pawl I I3 engages a stud M6 on the latch H0 and moves the latter to release link I3 whereupon the links I3 and 62 are moved downwardly and the bail 55 is restored to normal to restore the sensing members 46-50 to normal. When the bail 55 is restored to normal, the bell crank I01 (Fig. 1) is released whereupon its spring I08 rocks it counterclockwise and restores the cam lever I02 to the position of Fig. l to thereby restore the latch lever I00 to active position.
In this manner, the function indexing means is sensed automatically prior to an operation of the machine; the machine is conditioned to perform predetermined functions depending upon the columnar position of the carriage and the arrangement of the indexing stops on the drum 30; the machine is operated; and, during the cycle of operation, the sensing means is restored to normal to free the indexing means to permit it to move easily when the carriage moves to the next column. Various functions may be controlled but, in order that the operation of automatic conditioning the machine may be clear, five illustrative functions will now be described.
Control of main register Controls are shown for conditioning the main register, sometimes called the crossfooter, for addition, subtraction, or non-add.
Referring to Figs. 2 and I, a four-armed lever I is pivoted at I2I. Its upper arm, to which the reference numeral I20 has been applied, is connected to the lower end of a manually controllable lever I22 pivoted at I23. This lever has three positions. Its central position is a non-add position; its rear position shown in full lines in Fig. 2 is an add position; and its forward position, shown in dot-dash lines in Fig. 2, is a subtract position. The lever is urged counterclockwise as viewed in Fig. 2 by a spring I24 connected to four-armed lever I20, which spring thus tends to move the parts to add position.
The forward arm I25 of the four-armed lever I20 (Fig. 7) is connected to" a suitable mechanism I26, whichhas not been shown in detail, for controlling the main register I5 with respect to its non-add, add and subtract operations. a
The rear arm. in of the four-armed lever 120 is positioned under a stud I120 carried by the sensing member 50 which extends upward and is bent slightly forward for the purpose. When the sensing member 66 moves downwardly under the urge of its spring 58, the four-armed lever i2I--I20 is rocked counterclockwisey as viewed in Fig. 7, to a position that depends upon the length of the indexing stop 30 that is in active position at the time. If a long indexing stop is in position, the four-armed lever will remain in add position. If an intermediate stop is in active position, the sensing member will move down slightly and the four-armed lever will be moved to "non-add position. If a short stop 40 is in active position, the sensing member will move down a considerable distance to move the four-armed lever Mil-[I20 to "subtract position. The lever is also limited in its subtract position by a stud i20 that contacts the edge of lever I20 (Fig. 7).
The four-armed lever is releasably held in any of its three positions by a detent E30 urged counterclockwise by a spring [135 to hold a stud I32 on the detent in engagement with one of several notches in the bottom edge of the arm I33 of the four-armed lever i520.
During a cycle of machine operation, the fourarmed lever I20 is locked against movement until after the machine operation has been com: pleted. This is accomplished by means of the latch I35 (Fig. '7) movable into engagement with notches I36 in a sector I31 forming a part of the rear arm I21 of the'four-armed lever I20. The latch bail I35 is pivoted loosely on a shaft I38 and urged counterclockwise as viewed in Fig. 7 by a spring I39 connected at one end with a projection from one arm of the latch bail. The latch has a downwardly extending arm I40 carrying a stud which is positioned to be engaged by an arm I4I fixed to a shaft I42. The shaft I42 has another arm I43 fixed to it, which is controlled by a shaft I44, the latter being carried by arms I45 fixed to a shaft I46 that is rocked during a cycle of operation of the machine. This shaft is what is ordinarily known as the 100 shaft in the Burroughs machine, the same being so numbered in the patent to Burroughs 504,963, and numbered as shaft 4'7 in Rinsche 1,580,534. The arrangement is such that, during the first part of a machine cycle, the shaft I44 is rocked counterclockwise from the position of Fig. 7 and then returned clockwise during the latter part of the cycle. This results in rocking the arm I H clockwise at the beginning of a machine cycle to permit the latch I35 to move into engagement with one of the notches I36 where it remains until near the end of a machine cycle, whereupon the arm I is rocked counterclockwise and the latch retracted from the notch.
Regardless of the position to which the fourarmed lever I20 is moved, no matter whether manually or automatically, it is always returned to normal "add position at the end of a machine operation.
During each machine operation, a stud I50 (Fig. 7) carried by an arm I that first rocks counterclockwise and then returns clockwise with shaft II5, engages the detent I30 and releases it. At the same time the arm I5I moves away from a stud I52 on a latch I53 pivoted on shaft I2I and urged clockwise by spring I54. As the detent I30 is moved to released position, the latch I53 snaps over a lug I65 on the detent and holds it in released position until near the end of the cycle of machine operation, that is, until after the locking latch E35 has been released, the sensing member 46 restored to normal, and the four-armed lever I 20 thus released so that it together with the manual lever I22 can be returned to add position by spring I24. After these events have occurred, the arm I5I engages the stud I52 and releases the latch I53 to permit the detent I30 to move to normal to hold the four-armed lever in add position.
To summarize the action of the controls for the main register, they are normally in add position but may be manually conditioned for subtraction or non-adding by means of a lever I22. The controls are held momentarily in the position to which they are moved by a detent I30 and, then, during the cycle of machine operation, are locked against movement. Near the end of the cycle of operation, the lock is released and, before the detent I30 becomes operative, the controls are automatically returned to add condition.
The controls are automatically conditioned for subtraction or non-adding by the sensing member 46 that moves the four-armed lever I20 to the desired position where it is temporarily detained by the detent I30. Then, during the cycle of machine operation, the four-armed lever is locked in position and, near the end of the cycle, the sensing member is restored to normal, the lock released, and the controls returned to normal add" condition.
Control of multiple registers The registers I6 and H are controlled in much the same way as the main register.
A four-arm lever I60 (Fig. '7) is provided for the register I6 and a similar lever I6I controls register I'I. Each can be positioned by manual levers I62 and I63 respectively which, however, are movable only to an add and non-add position, no provision being made for subtraction.
A separate .detent, such as the detent I30 is provided for each of the four-armed levers I60 and I6I and these detents operate in the same way as detent I30 except that the detent I30 for the main register is provided with a stud I64 extending under the detents for the registers I6 and I1, so that when the machine is operated and the detent I 30 is moved clockwise to its released position where it is latched, the two detents for registers l6 and H are likewise moved and held. The four-armed levers I60 and I6I are locked against movement by the locking latch I36 in the same manner as the four-armed lever I20 for the main register is locked.
The four-arm levers I60 and I6I are automatically controlled by the sensing members 41 and 48 respectively (Fig. 3) in the same manner as the mainregister. The construction is slightly diflerent for the registers I6 and IT, in that the sensing members 41 and 48 carry studs I66 and I65 (Fig. that engage over the rearwardly projecting ends of levers I61 and I68, respectively, pivoted at I69. The other ends of these levers are positioned to engage studs "0 and III on the four-armed levers I6I and I60 respectively.
The controls for the registers I6 and H are urged to non-add position rather than add position because, while it is generally desired to add items in the main register during each cycl'of operation of the machine, it is not usually desirable to employ the multiple registers except incertain operations.
The four-arm levers I50 and Iii for the registers I6 and H are urged to non-add position by means of. scissors devices (Fig. 'I) of which there is one for each lever. Each comprises two members I12 and I13 pivoted .on shaft I38 and straddling studs I'M or I15, as the case may be, carried by the respective four-arm levers IGI- and IE0. The two scissors members I12 and I13 are urged into engagement with their sds by springs I16.
Normally, each pair of scissors arms straddles a fixed stud I'Il on the frame of the machine. When one of the four-arm levers IE or ISI moves to add position, it is rocked clockwise and the stud H or ill moves its respective scissors member I13 counterclockwise against the tension of Spring I16. During a machine operation when the detent-for the four-armed member is released and, after the locking latch I35 has been released, the four-armed member is restored to its non-add position by the spring urge on the scissors arm I13. The arm H2 will, of course, restore the four-armed member to normal when said member is moved in the opposite direction as is necessary in totaling operations which, however, will not be described.
Tabulating mechanism-Early release of carridge Provision is made for causing the carriage to tabulate from one column to the other at an earlier point in the cycle of machine operation than is ordinarily the case.
The tabulating mechanism is operated by a cam 50 (Fig. 7) fixed to the main operating shaft MB of the machine. This cam rocks a lever It! whose rear end extends through the back plate of the machine where it has a fork and stud connection I82 with a slide I83. The arrangement is such that, during a cycle of machine operation, the slide I83 is first moved downwardly (Fig. 8) and then returned upward. This operates the line spacing mechanism (not shown in detail) to line space the platen during certain oi the machine operations depending upon how the line spacing control is conditioned. The paper carriage supports a tabulating bar 485 (Fig. 3) carrying a plurality of tab stops I85, the bar being rockably mounted on the paper carriage and spring urged to the position shown in Fig. 8. In the different columnar positlons of the carriage, the respective tab stops I85 abut against a block or abutment I90 (Fig. 8) which arrests the carriage in a columnar position corresponding to the stop, the carriage tending to move to the right in Fig. 8. As the machine is given a cycle of operation the'tabulating bar carrying the tab-stop I85 is usually rocked to move the active tab stop above the abutment let, whereupon the carriage moves to the next column, the arrangement being such that the succeeding tab stop I85 strikes the abutment I'9I) to arrest the carriage in the next column.
In the present case, instead of rocking the tabulating bar, the abutment is moved. Referring to Fig. -8, the slide I83 is provided with a pawl 582 having a shouldered end I93 engaging over a lug I94 on the abutment I90. The latter is pivoted at I95 and spring urged clockwise by a spring I96.
With this construction, as the machine starts to operate, the slide I83 moves downward and above described is concerned, the carriage is re-v leased for movement at the beginning of a cycle or machine operation. However. it is not desired to have the carriage move at this time and means is provided for temporarily looking it in position.
Referring to Fig. 7, the lower rail 200 of the paper carriage is slotted at 2M to receive the lower edge of a pawl 202 pivoted at 203 and urged clockwise by a spring 204 connected at one end to the stationary bracket 205. The pawl is normally prevented from moving by a stud 206 carried by a rearwardly extending portion 201 of one of the arms 56 that support the bail 55 heretofore described. As long as the ball 55 is in its uppernormal position, the pawl 202 is held inactive by stud 206 as shown in Fig. 2. It will be recalled, however, that, when the motor car is depressed, the bail 55 is released and it movesdownwardly before the machine starts to operate.
When it moves, the stud 2G6 moves upward and.
releases the pawl 2&2 which is thereupon moved by its sprin 2% into engagement with the carriage, as shown in Fig. 7, to hold the latter against movement. The carriage is thus lore vented from moving to the next column, even though the tabulating mechanism has released it as above described. I
Referring to Figs. 4, 5, and 6, it will be recalled that the bail 55 remains in its lower position during the first half of a cycle of machine operationand that, during this part of the cycle, the link, or slide, i3 is moved upward and latched in the position of Fig. 6. Also, that during the early part of the return stroke of the machine, the slide 13 is released and the release of this slide causes the bail 55 to be restored to normal. The restoration of bail 55 to normal causes the stud 206 (Fig. 7) to cam the latch 202 out of engagement with the paper carriage and the late ter is thereupon released to move to its next columnar position. This release occurs early in the return stroke of the machine to give the carriage enough time to move to its next column by the time the cycle of machine operation has been completed.
The printing mechanism operates near the end of the forward stroke of a machine and. hence the carriage is not released for movement until after the printing mechanism has operated.
As the tabulating pawl i92 (Fig. 8) moves downwardly, during the forward stroke of the machine, a stud 2") on the pawl engages a cam 25! (Fig. 3) which is prevented from rocking clockwise in 3 by a stud. This cam causes the pawl I92 to be pushed clockwise (Fig. 8) to move the shoulder 593 away from lug R94 to thereby release the abutment 90 which is thereupon freed to move back to normal under the urge of its spring 396. But the abutment does not return to normal until after the carriage starts to move to its next column because, when it was first released from the active tab stop 85, it moved to the left slightly (Fig. 8) so as to be under the active tab stop, which thus temporarily prevents its return. This lateral movement of the abutment is due to the fact that the abutment is carried by a stud 2i2 (Fig. 8) supported on a slide 2I3. This slide is connected to the lower end of a lever 2 (Fig. 3) pivoted at 265 and urged clockwise by a spring 2". The other end of lever 2 is connected to a dash pot 2". When a carriage tab stop strikes abutment I90, the latter moves to the right slightly (Fig. 8) and the dash pot cushions the action, the spring 2H6 being tensioned. When the abutment is pulled down by the slide 583, as above explained, the spring 2H3 moves the slide M3 to the left and moves the abutment under the active tab stop.
Control of tebulating mechanism for skip tabulation In addition to controlling various calculating functions of the machine, such as above described, another function of the machine that may be automatically controlled is the tabulation of the carriage, that is, columnar printing.
The conditioning of the tabulating mechanism is controlled by the sensing member 4d (Figs. 3 and 10). The rear end-of the arm 52 to which the sensing member 49 is connected extends under one arm of a bell crank 222 best shown in Fig. 3. This bell crank is connected to a link 223 which is slidable on a stud 22d and provided with a downwardly extending projection 225 adapted to engage a slide 225 which is similar to the slide 92 shown in Muller Patent No. l,9a2,2l6. Referring to Fig. 8, the slide 226 is yieldingly connected by a spring 2211 to another slide 228 having a cam end 229 adapted to engage a cam notch in the abutment H0. The arrangement is such that when slide 228 is moved to the right in Fig. 8, it earns the abutment B downward out of the path of the tab stops. When the slide 226 is moved to the right in Fig. 8, it is latched in this position by a latch 23d that engages over a stud 23f! in slide 226. This latch may be released by an extra long tab stop ltd-L (Fig. 8) which engages a pass-by pawl 232 on latch 230 and moves it to released position.
When the sensing member 69 is moved down it rocks bell crank 222 clockwise in Fig. 3 which moves link 223 and slide 226- the right. This sets the skip-tab mechanism as above explained.
From the above. it will be clear that when the sensing member 49 is allowed to move downward by the indexing means in a predetermined column of the carriage, the tabulating mechanism will be conditioned to skip a predetermined number of columns, the return of the tabulating mechanism to normal depending upon the location of the long tab stop ltd-=1.
Automatic control of repeat machine operations Another function, or operation, of the machine that is automatically CODtlOllGdJS the number of cycles through which the machine will go without any attention on the part of the operator.
These repeat machine operations are con.- trolled by the sensing member 519 (Fig. 4) which is connected at its upper end to an arm 2% fixed to a shaft 24! pivotally supported on the back plate of the machine. This shaft has another arm 242 fixed to it and extending upwardly as shown most clearly in Fig. l. The arm 242 has a stud 243 on its upper end positioned over one end of the lever 24d fixed to a shaft 245. Another arm 246 is fixed to the shaft 246 and the upper end of arm 246 has a yielding connection through spring 241 with a slide 248, said spring 241 also serving to urge arm 246 counterclock= wise. The slide 248 is urged to the left, as shown in Fig. v1, by spring 2471. The spring 24? is connected to a lug projecting from the upper edge 01' the slide 248 and to an extension of lever 246 were above the stud entering the slot in slide 248 so that the spring urges the lever 246 clockwise which urges the slide 248 forwardly. This slide controls the repeat operations of the machine in a manner which is described in detail in Patent No. 1, 97,774 and which will be only briefly described here.
When the slide 246 is moved to the right as viewed in Fig. 1, it is positioned under a stud 250 on an arm 25! which is thereby prevented from rocking to its full extent in a clockwise direction. The limited movement of the arm. 25! prevents a pas-by pawl 252 on its end from acting on a stud 253 on the end of a pivoted lever 254 which is normally rocked near the end 0! a cycle of operation of the machine to release depressed keys and engage a slide 255 to release the motor bar which has been latched by a latch 256. When the pass-by pawl 252 is prevented from acting as just mentioned, the keys will not be released and the motor bar will remain de-= pressed to cause the machine to take another cycle of operation.
In positions of the indexing means where the sensing member 50 is not allowed to move downward, the repeat slide 248 remains in the position of Fig. 1 and the machine is conditioned to be given only a single cycle of operation. If, however, in a predetermined column, the sensing member 50 is allowed to drop, the arms 24!?) It will be recalled that the motor control link 83 is normally latched against movement by the lever latch eon (Fig. l), and this latch is returned to normal at the end of each cycle of machine operation. Means must be provided to disable this latch for repeat operations. Reierring to Fig. 4, it will be recalled that the latch 715 is controlled by the link 93 which, in turn, is moved by the bell crank 90-92. When the link $8 is moved upwardly from the position of Fig. 4, the bell crank 80-92 is moved to release latch l5 whereupon the ball 55 moves down and this releases certain parts that release the latch lever which moves out oi the path of link to. When the ball 55 is restored to normal during the machine cycle, the latch EBB is restored to normal to block link Referring to Fig. l the bell-crank lever 963-92 carries a pass-by pawl 26%? adapted to be engaged by one arm 268 of a yoke 262 pivoted at 2%. "This yoke has another arm 28% engaging a shaft 265 carried by arms 268 fixed to one of the main drive shafm I46 of the machine. The shaft M6 is first rocked clockwise from the position of Fig. 4 and then returned counterclockwise during a cycle of machine opemtion. The yoke 2% is normally prevented from moving by means of a latch 266 having a lateral lug 269 engaging over a projection .219 on the yoke the latch being urged counterclockwise as viewed in Fig. l by a spring 2' During a normal operation of the ma chine, as the shaft I46 rocks clockwise, the shaft 266 moves away from the arm 2613, but the yoke 262 does not move because it is held by the latch 26'. However, when the machine is conditioned for repeat operations, it will be recalled that the sensing member W is moved downwardly which rocks the shaft 241 counterclockwise. Thisshaft carries a projection 213 adapted to engage a stud 2' on the latch. 268 in such a way that, when the sensing member 50 moves downwardly, the latch 268 is moved to a position to release yoke 262. Accordingly, during that cycle of machine operation, the yoke 262 will be rocked counterclockwise by its spring 215. During this movement, the arm 26l will pass the pass-by pawl 260 but, during the return movement of the yoke, caused by the return movement of shaft 265, the arm 264 will engage the pass-by pawl 260 and rock the bell crank 90--82 clockwise to enable it to move to a position to grasp latch 15. The bell crank 9092 can be rocked clockwise by arm 26! even though link 88 is held upward by the latched-down motor bar. This is due to the stud and slot connection between said bell crank and thelink 88. When said bell crank is rocked by the arm 26!, the action is only momentary, after which arm 26! passes over pawl 200 and releases the bell crank, whereupon the spring 89, which was tensioned by the clockwise rocking of bell crank 3092, rocks said bell crank counterclockwise, thereby pulling the link 93 to the right (Fig. 4) and releasing the latch 15. This permits bail 55 to move down a second time to release the sensing members. In other words, near the end of the machine cycle, the general operating means of the machine, that is, the main shaft I46 with its arm 266, causes a release of the bail 55 to enable the sensing members to move to sensing position again and to disable latch I00 for the motor control link 83 so that the latter may move upward to cause a repeat operation of the machine.
It is not desired under any circumstances to cause a repeat operation of the machine until after the paper carriage has reached the column intended for such operation. An interlock has been provided to prevent this.
Referring to Fig. 3, the machine is provided, as previously explained, with a dash pot cushion 2ll for the tabulating mechanism as described in detail in Muller Patent No. 1,942,216. When one of the tab stops I85 strikes the abutment I90, the latter is moved to the right as viewed in Fig. 3 against the cushioning action of the dash pot above mentioned. When the abutment is disengaged from the active tab stop, the spring 2H5 (Fig. 3) which is connected to lever 2 that, in turn, is connected to the link 213 (Fig. 8) which carries the abutment, moves the abutment to the left in Fig.8.
The link 2 I3 is provided with an extension 280 (Fig. 8) which engages the upper end of a pawl 28| pivoted at 282 and urged counterclockwise by a spring 283. The lower end of this pawl is adapted to move over the end of one armof the bell crank 30-92 (Fig. 4) that controls the release of the latch 15 which controls the release of bail 55 that controls the release of the latch I00 for the motor control link 83.
When a tab stop is against the abutment I90, the pawl 28! is rocked clockwise out of alignment with the lever 80, but, when the abutment is released of the tab stop, the link 2l3 moves to the left and swings the pawl 28| counterclockwise. The pawl cannot move over the lever immediately because the lever is still in its upward position, but the pawl moves against the side of the lever ready for action. As soon as the lever is moved downwardly, as it is during the latter part of thecycle of machine operation, the pawl 28! moves over the lever to prevent upward movement of it to release the latch 15 until the carriage reaches the column it is to occupy whereupon the tab stop engages the abutment I90 and the movement of the latter to the right (Fig. 8) swings the pawl 28| clockwise out of position, thereby releasing the lever 90 which immediately moves to release the latch I5, thereby releasing the motor control link to permit it to give the machine a second cycle of operation.
From the descriptions just given, it will, therefore, be apparent that the repeat machine operations can be controlled automatically in the same manner as other functions of the machine through its sensing member 50, suitable interlocks and controls being provided to insure that the operation will take place properly.
Special control of carriage When the machine is conditioned for and operated to perform a certain sample of work to be presently described, the paper carriage is caused to return automatically after a repeat operation of the machine.
Referring to Fig. 1, the machine is provided with a special motor bar 300. One arm of a bell crank 30| pivotally carried on the stem 29'! of the special motor bar 300 has a slotted end engaging a stud 293 on the lever 80 with which the regular motor bar is connected. The other arm of the bell crank 30l cooperates with a fixed stud 302. When the main motor bar is depressed alone, the lower arm of the bell crank 30! is rocked to a position over the stud 302 and prevents subsequent depression of the special motor bar 300 while the regular motor bar remains depressed. When the special motor bar 300 is depressed, a hook 238 on the stem of said motor bar engaging over the stud 299 causes the regular motor bar also to be depressed and latched down by the latch 250. The lower arm of the bell crank simultaneously moves down behind the stud 302 and, in cooperation with said stud, holds the special motor bar 300 down while the regular motor bar H remains down. The stem of the special motor bar is connected to one arm of a bell crank 303 urged clockwise as viewed in Fig. 1 by a spring 304. The other arm of this bell crank is positioned over a stud 305 on one arm of a three-arm member 308 pivoted at 301 and urged clockwise by a spring 308. The upper arm of this three-arm member contacts a stud 303 on a plate 3I0 connected to the drive shaft 3 which is first rocked counterclockwise from the position of Fig. 1 during a machine cycle and then returned clockwise. The lower arm of the three-arm member 306 carries a stud 312 adapted to cooperate with a pass-by pawl Ill pivoted on one arm of a pivoted bell crank lever 3 [4.
When the special bar 300 is depressed, the bell crank 303 is rocked counterclockwise which frees the stud 305 and allows the three-arm member 306 to move clockwise under the urge of its spring 308 as the stud 309 is rocked counterclockwise during the machine cycle. During this movement of the three-armed lever, the stud 3|! passes the pawl 3I3. Upon the return or counterclockwise movement of the three-armed lever 306, caused by the engagement of the stud 300 with it, the stud 3l2 engages the pass-by pawl M3 and rocks the bell crank 3H clockwise.
The bell crank 3 is connected at its lower end to a link 3l5 which, in turn, is connected to an arm 318 fixed to a shaft 3". This shaft carrles another arm 3l8 connected to one end of a lever 3E9 pivoted at 323. The rear end of this lever is connected to a link 32!! which, when the bell crank 3% is moved clockwise as above explained, is pulled downwardly.
Referring to Fig. 9, when the link 32H is pulled downward, it moves a slide 322 downward which releases a pivoted latch 323. Latch 323 releases a slide 324 which is thereupon moved upwardly by a spring 325 to rock a lever 326 clockwise about its pivot 32! to throw in the carriage return clutch 328. The carriage return mechanism is thus automatically conditioned during the return stroke of the machine to return the carriage toward its original position. This return movement continues until a cam 336 on the carriage engages a stud 33l on the slide 326 and moves it downwardly to rock the lever 326 counter clockwise to disengage the carriage return clutch.
Accordingly, if, at any time, the operator depresses the special motor bar 306, the paper carriage will be automatically returned toward normal and stopped in a predetermined column depending upon the location of the cam 333.
When the special motor bar 303 is depressed while the paper carriage is in a columnar position where it conditions the machine for an automatic repeat operation the above described parts are conditioned differently than above stated. It will be remembered that the carriage conditions the machine for an automatic repeat cycle by rocking the lever 246 (Fig. 1) clockwise. Connected to the lower end of this lever is a link 340 which, in turn, is connected to a pivoted latch 34I having a lateral lug on its end adapted to move under the upper arm of the three-armed lever 306.
Thus, if the special motor bar 300 is depressed while the carriage is in a columnar position where it conditions the machine for an automatic repeat operation following the cycle initiated while the carriage is in said position, the return mechanism is disabled and remains disabled as long as the machine remains in automatic repeat cycle condition. However, when the carriage comes to rest in the column where the last automatic repeat cycle is to be performed, that is, a columnar position immediately preceding one where a cycle must be initiated manually, the lever 246 and slide 248 return to normal and the carriage return mechanism will operate automatically at the end of said automatic repeat cycle of the machine.
Accordingly, even though the special motor bar 300 is depressed in the No. I column, the three-armed lever 306 cannot rock clockwise under the urge of its spring 308 and the carriage return mechanism is not conditioned for operation. In the No. I column, the machine is also conditioned to automatically skip to the No. 3 column and, since the repeat mechanism is conditioned for operation in No. I column, the carriage will move to its No. 3 column after the cycle in column No. I, and the machine will then be automatically given a cycle of operation in column 3. In this column, the repeat mechanism is not conditioned for operation, and hence the above-mentioned special control of the carriage return mechanism becomes operative so that, after the repeat operation in the N0. 3 column, the carriage is automatically returned to the No. 2 column. In the latter column the repeat mechanism is not active but the skip tab mechanism is. The machine is given a cycle in column 2 by depressing the regular motor bar and, after the cycle, the machine stops and the carriage tabulates to its No. Al column, column 3 being skipped. An adjustment of a long stop l85L such that it will cause the carriage to be arrested in column 3 when it skips from column l to column 3 but-not when it tabulates after an operation in column 2 is obtainable by virtue of the movement which the abutment E90 is permitted before it arrests the carriage after it has been engaged by a tab stop 685. Said long stop l85L can be so positioned that when the carriage is at rest in column 2 said long stop will be to the right of the latchpawl 232 as viewed in Fig. 2, but it will operate on the pawl 232 to trip the latch just too late to arrest the carriage in column 2 but quite early enough to arrest the carriage in column 3 when the carriage moves from column B with the skip-tab mechanism in skipping condition.
Normalizing features It is possible to normalize both the tabulating mechanism and the repeat mechanism together, or to normalize the repeat mechanism separately.
Referring to Fig. 1, a normalizing key 350 is mounted on the keyboard, the key being latched in the usual manner after being depressed. The stem 35I of this key is slidably mounted on a stud 352 and the stem has a rear projection 353 carrying a stud 354 which, when the keyis depressed, rocks a pivoted lever 355 (Fig. 3) clockwise. The center of this lever is connected to a link 356 which has a bent end 35'! (Fig. 8) that disables the tabulating pawl I92. In other words, when the normalizing key 350 is depressed, the tabulatlng pawl I92 is disabled so that the tabulating mechanism will not be operated during a cycle of machine operation.
The stem 35I of the normalizing key also has a forward projection 360 adapted to engage a stud 36I on a lever 362 pivoted on the stud 352. The rear end of this lever carries a stud 363 adapted to engage the arm 244 connected to the shaft 245 that controls the repeat lever or arm 246. When the normalizing key 350 is depressed, the leyer 362 is rocked counterclockwise, which rocks the repeat lever 246 counterclockwise, or prevents clockwise movement of it, so that repeat machine operations are prevented.
When it is desired to normalize the repeat mechanism only, another normalizing key 310 is depressed, this key being also latched after being depressed. The lower endof the stem of this Sample of work A sample of work of which the machine is capable is shown in Fig. 11. For this work the machine is conditioned and functions as follows:
In the No. I columnar position of the carriage, the special motor bar 300 depressed. The sensing member for the main register is allowed to.move downward, upon downward movement of the regular motor bar, to non-add the main regist r, The sensing members for the multiple essence registers do not move and these registers remain in "non-add condition. The sensing member for the tabulating mechanism is allowed to move downward to condition the tabulating mechanism to cause the carriage to skip the No. 2 column. The sensing member for repeat machine operations is allowed to move down to condition the machine for repeat operations. The machine is given a cycle of operation during which the item that is entered on the amount keys is printed but not entered in any 01 the registers. During the latter part of this cycle, the carriage automatically moves to its No. 3 column, column No. 2 being skipped.
When the carriage arrives at its No. 3 column. it is automatically given a cycle of operation owins to the fact that the repeat machine mechanism has been conditioned as lust explained. This cycle does not start, however, until after the carriage has reached this position, owing to the interlock previously described. In this position of the carriage, the sensing member-"for the main register is allowed to move to condition the latter for subtraction so that the item is subtracted from this register, and the sensing members for the multiple registers are allowed to move to the "add position so that the item is added in each of the latter registers. The repeat machine operation sensing member is not moved, with the result that a third operation of the machine will not take place. Accordingly, during this second cycle of operation, the item will be subtracted from the main register, it will be added in each oi the multiple registers, and, at the end of the operation, the carriage will be automatically returned to its No. 2 column, a cam m (Fig. 9) being provided to arrest the carriage in this position.
The machine then stops, whereupon the operator makes another entry on the amount keys, after which he depresses the regular motor bar. In this position of the carriage, the sensing member tor the main register is allowed to move to non-add the latter and the sensing members for the multiple registers do not move so that no addition occurs in either of them. The sensing member controlling the tahulating mechanism is conditioned to cause the carriage to skip the No. 3 column. At the end oi the cycle oi-operation. the carriage automatically moves in its No. 4 column. The sensing member for the repeat operations is allowed to move in column 2 and then continues to move in columns 0 and I so that the machine operates automatically in columns 4, Q and I, after which it is automatically returned to the right, viewing the machine from the front, and machine operations stop. In columns 4 and I all the registers are non-added,
while in column i all of them in "add condition.
The above operations are particularly useful in connection with certain types of public utility billing where certain of the items are to be repeated, but it is to be understood that the machine can be conditioned for many other types or work by varying the controls heretofore described.
It is to be understood that the construction shown is for purposes of illustration only and that variations may be made in it without departing irom the spirit and scope oi the invention as defined by the appended claims. The claims on the broad subject matter 01' the sensing type of automatic controls have been transferred to my copending application Serial No. 51,263, flied No vember 23, 1935.
I claim:
1. A machine of the class described havin means for giving it cycles of operation, a traveling paper carriage, a tabulating mechanism for controlling the columnar positioning of said car- 'riage, means for operating said tabulating mechanism to cause it to release said carriage early in a cycle of operation of said machine, holding means other than said tabulating mechanism for holding said carriage against movement when so released, function conditioning means for said machine movable. to active position and restorable to normal, means for restoring said function conditioning means to normal later during the cycle of machine operation, and means operated by said restoring means for moving said carriage holding means to release said carriage at the time said tunction'conditioning means is restored to normal.
2. A calculating machine of the class described having calculating mechanism, means for giving said machine cycles of operation, a traveling paper carriage normally movable from column to column across the machine as an incident to each machine cycle, a tabulating mechanism controlling said movements of said carriage, function-indexing means indexed automatically in accordance with the position of said carriage, a plurality of function-controlling devices normally out 01' engagementwith said indexing means but automatically movable into engagement there- .with sumciently prior to operation of the calculating mechanism of said machine to control the functions of said machine during the machine cycle, means for operating said tabulating mechanism to release said paper carriage for movement early in the machine cycle, holding means operated automatically as said function-controlling devices are moved into engagement with said indexing means to temporarily hold said carriage against movement, and means operating during said machine cycle to restore said function-controlling devices to their normal position out of engagement with said indexing means and to also release said carriage holding means to thereby enable said carriage to move to its next position without interference irom said function-controlling devices.
3. A calculating machine of the class described having means for giving it cycles of operation, a paper carriage normally movable in one direction from one columnar position to the next adjacent position as an incident to each machine cycle, carriage-return means for returning said carriage in the opposite direction, control means operable in predetermined positions of said carriage, means conditioned by operation of said control means for causing said carriage return means automatically to return the carriage in the opposite direction during the machine cycle.eftected after operation oi. said control means, re peat means automatically conditioned in at least one of said predetermined carriage positions to cause said cycling means to give the machine an automatic cycle when the carriage reaches a subsequent columnar position and'to hold said control means, when operated in the said predetermined carriage position, in operated condition until said automatic cycle is eflected, and means rendered effective by saidrepeat means, when the latter is so conditioned, to prevent operation or said carriage return means until said automatic cycle is performed in said subsequent carriage position.
4. A calculating machine of the class described having means for giving it cycles of operation, a travelling paper carriage, tabulating mechanism normally controlling said carriage to cause it to move from one column to the next adjacent column during the latter part of a machine cycle, indexing means indexed in accordance with the columnar positions of said carriage, skip-tab mechanism for conditioning said tabulating mechanism to cause said carriage to skip predetermined columns, sensing means operable to sense said indexing means, and means for causing said sensing means to sense said indexing means at the beginning of a machine cycle to condition said skip-ta mechanism to enable said carriage, when the tabulating mechanism operates, to skip to a predetermined column in the latter part of said machine cycle. I
5. A calculating machine of the class described having means for giving it cycles of operation, a travelling paper carriage, tabulating mecha-- nism normally controlling said carriage to cause it to move from one'column to the next adjacent column during the latter part of a machine cycle, indexing means indexed automatically in accordance with the columnar positions of said carriage, a skip-tab mechanism for conditioning said tabulating mechanism to cause said carriage to skip predetermined columns, sensing means adapted to be moved into sensing engagement with said indexing means, means for causing said sensing means to sense said indexing means for a given machine cycle to condition said skiptab mechanism to release said carriage for movement, and holding means conditioned automatically as said sensing means is moved to sensing position to temporarily hold said carriage against movement, said holding means being automatically released as said sensing means is moved out of sensing engagement with said indexing means to thereby enable said carriage to skip to a predetermined column.
ROBERT L. MULLER.
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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2637493A (en) * 1950-08-29 1953-05-05 Wittenmyer Carlos Automatic printing apparatus for calculating machines
US2809782A (en) * 1957-10-15 fleming
US3318520A (en) * 1964-04-11 1967-05-09 Olivetti & Co Spa Program control device for an adding or accounting machine
US3350004A (en) * 1967-10-31 Program control device for an office machine

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2809782A (en) * 1957-10-15 fleming
US3350004A (en) * 1967-10-31 Program control device for an office machine
US2637493A (en) * 1950-08-29 1953-05-05 Wittenmyer Carlos Automatic printing apparatus for calculating machines
US3318520A (en) * 1964-04-11 1967-05-09 Olivetti & Co Spa Program control device for an adding or accounting machine

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