US2224766A - Typewriting machine - Google Patents

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Publication number
US2224766A
US2224766A US148270A US14827037A US2224766A US 2224766 A US2224766 A US 2224766A US 148270 A US148270 A US 148270A US 14827037 A US14827037 A US 14827037A US 2224766 A US2224766 A US 2224766A
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Prior art keywords
carriage
ratchet
bar
lever
dog
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US148270A
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Ronald D Dodge
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International Business Machines Corp
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International Business Machines Corp
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41JTYPEWRITERS; SELECTIVE PRINTING MECHANISMS, e.g. INK-JET PRINTERS, THERMAL PRINTERS, i.e. MECHANISMS PRINTING OTHERWISE THAN FROM A FORME; CORRECTION OF TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
    • B41J19/00Character- or line-spacing mechanisms
    • B41J19/18Character-spacing or back-spacing mechanisms; Carriage return or release devices therefor
    • B41J19/20Positive-feed character-spacing mechanisms
    • B41J19/32Differential or variable-spacing arrangements

Description

8 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June l5, 1937 lNVENTOR 2- Dodge ATTORNEY' Dec. 10, 1940. R. D. DODGE TYPEWRITING MACHINE Filed June 15, 1937 8 Sheets-Sheet 3 7 INVENTOR Ema/d 2. 201(7? ATTORNEY Dec. 10, 1940. 2,224,766
R. D. DODGE TYPEWRITING MACHINE Filed June 15, 1937 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 IZ Zc 122d ATTORNEY Dec. 10, 1940.
R. D. DODGE TYPEWRITING MACHINE.
Filed June 15, 1937 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 mwd n m N 5 m m m W 0 a p;
D 10, 1940- R. D. DODGE TYPEWRITING MACHINE Filed June 15, 1937 8 SheetsSheet 6 INVENTOR farm/d 77. wedge ATTORNEY Dec. 10, 1940. R. D. DODGE 2 7 TYPEWRITING momma Filed June 15, 19:57 8 Sheets-Sheet 7 FIG.10.
1035 m FIG. 9. E a
2, FlG.i2.
' Pond/d. D. fiadge ATTO R N EY Dec. 10, 1940. R. n. DODGE TYP EWRITING MACHINE Filed June 15; 1937 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 INVENTOR Fo m/4 3. Dadg BY 9 24 ATTORNEY Patented Dec. 10, 1940 PATENT OFFICE 'rrrswnrmre momma Ronald D. Dodge, Rochester, N. Y., assignor to International Business Machines Corporation, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application June 15,1937, SerialNo. 148,270
9Claims.
This invention relates to typewriting machines.
The broad object of the present invention is'to provide an improved spacing mechanism for thecarriages of typewriting machines.
An object is to providean improved spacing mechanism which varies the spacing of the characters to correspond with their widths.
Another object is to provide a spacing mechanism in which means are provided to vary the spacing of the carriage in accordance with the widths of the upper case letters as well as the lower case letters.
An object is to provide means whereby Justification of typewritten copy may be accomplished.
{in object is to provide a novel indicating device for effecting justification of typewritten lines.
Further objects of the instant invention reside in any novel feature of construction or operation or novel combination of parts present in the embodiment, of the invention described and shown in the accompanying drawings and showing the escapement selecting mecha-' nism;
Fig. 5 is a vertical section on the line 5-5 in Fig. 4;
Fig. 6 is an enlarged side elevation of the right hand end of the carriage;
Fig. '7 is a vertical section on the line in Fig. 4; i
Fig. 8 is a rear elevation showing the tabulating mechanism in operated position;
Fig. 9 is a plan view of the justification indicator mechanism;
Fig. 10 is a detail view of a portion of the mechanism for operating the justification indicator;
Figs. 11 and 12 are diagrammatic views of the front paper guide and aligning scale;
Fig. 13 is a side elevation of the tabulator key;
Fig. 14 is a large scale detail view of part of the carriage release mechanism;
Fig. 15 is' a section on the linel5l5 in Fig. 14.
The drawings illustrate the present invention as applied to the International electric writin I machine formerly known as the "Electromatic. 6 However, it will be understood the invention is not limited in application to the specific machine selected for purposes of illustration but may be applied to other typewriters, whether manually or power operated. Since the International 10 electric writing machine is now well known in the art and fully described in patents coverin the various mechanisms comprising this machine,.only a very brief general description will be given of the machine such as will enable the 1 present invention to be understood.
The numeral ill in Fig. 1 designates the usual character keys on key levers l I pivoted on a rod I! which is supported by a cross frame I: rigidly mounted in the base ll. Rotatably mounted in the base I4 is the power roller l5 which is rotated in the direction of the arrow (Fig. 1) by means of a motor, not shown, by means of a worm drive I I (Fig. 2), the worm shaft "a. in Fig. 2 being connected to the motor by means of a suitable flexible connection. When the machine is in use the power roller i5 rotates continually.
Cooperating with the power roller ii are the cam units l6 which are pivotally mounted on rods I1 extending parallel with the power roller 15. There is a cam unit [6 associated with each of the key levers H and each cam unit is connected by a link l8 with a sub-lever I9 pivoted on rod l2. The sub-levers H are connected by links 20 to type bars 2| through the medium of toggles 22. The type bars 2| are pivoted in the usual wire segment 23 provided with a type guide 24 located in front of the platen 25. The platen is asusual rotatably mounted in the carriage 26 40 which is supported on front and rear rails 21 and 28, respectively, by means of suitable anti-friction roller trucks. Springs 29 connected to a curved spring anchoring member 30 and to toggles22 provide means for locking the toggles 45 in the normal position shown in Fig. 1.
When any character key Ill is depressed, its cam unit I6 is caused to operatively engage the power roller IS in a well known way thereby rocking the cam unit It clockwise or counter- 5 clockwise according to whether the operative cam unit is pivoted on the left hand or right hand rod I 1, respectively. The rocking of the cam unit causes its link l8 to be drawn downwardly, thereby rocking the corresponding sub-lever II in a s5 clockwise direction. This movement of the sublever l9, through the corresponding link 28 and toggle 22, causes the type bar associated with the selected key to rock in a counterclockwise direction to effect the impression of the type upon awork sheet wrapped around the platen 25. The type bar, near the end of its operative stroke, engages the usual universal bar 3| and causes the universal bar to move rearwardly and downwardly in Fig. 1.
The segment 23 is mounted in a frame 32 which forms part of the type basket. The type basket is movably mounted in the" framework of 15' the machine for case shifting movement in a well known way and normally occupies an elevated position shown in Fig. 1 for the typing of the lower case characters. The shift mechanism for drawing the type basket 32 downwardly topermit the printing of capital letters is described in Patent No. 1,945,097 and is partly shown 1 Fig. 4.
Secured to the back of the type basket frame 32 is a pair'of brackets like 33 c'onnected by toggle links 34 to the arms of toggle levers 35 secured on the ends of a shaft 36 journaled in the framework of the machine. Pivoted on the stud .31 is a three-armed lever 38 having two pins 38a,
38b engageable by the short arms of a T-shaped lever 39 which is pivotally mounted at 48 on one arm of a three-armed lever 4|. The lever 38 is connected by a link 42 to one arm of the toggle lever 35. 'The T lever 39 has a stud 43 projecting into a slot formed in an arm 44 comprising an extension of the shift key lever. One arm of lever4l has a link connection 45 to a cam unit, not shown, which is controlled by a shift key, also not shown.
When the shift key is depressed the T lever 39 is elevated to bring one of the short arms thereof to a position to the left of the pin 380., this movement taking place before the cam unit controlled by the shift key is operatively connected to the power roller l5. When the cam unit controlled by the shift key is operated, the link 45 is drawn downwardly thereby rocking lever 4| in a clockwise direction. This draws the T-lever39 to the right in Fig. 4. thereby, through the engagement of said T.-lever with the pin 38a, rocking the lever 38 clockwise. Through the link connection 42, the toggle levers 35 and shaft 36 are rocked in a counterclockwise direction, thereby bending the toggles comprising the links 34 and the arms of levers 35, causing the type basket to be drawn downwardly.
The mechanism briefly described above is old and well known in them't.
' The escapement mechanism is mounted in a frame casting 46 which is secured to the undersides of the front and rear rails 21, 28 (Figs. 1, 3, and 4). The frame 46 is formed with two parallel struts 46a (see Fig. 3) which support the escapement ratchets which are designated 48, 49, and 58. Sleeves like 5| are loose in aligned holes in the struts 46a and support the rod 52 on which the ratchets 48; 49, and 50 are rotatably mounted. Abutting the end of each sleeve 5| is a thrust washer 53 (Fig. 3) alongside of which are located balls 54 of a combination axial and radial thrust bearing of which the outer ball race 55a is integral with a spiral pinion 55 secured to a ratchet 56. The pinion .56 meshes constantly with a spiral rack 51 which is secured to the underside of the carriage 26.
The rear end of the pinion 55 is formed as a ball race (see Fig. 15) in cooperation with balls 68 located adjacent the hub' of the ratchet 49.
The pinion meshes with one of a pair of intermeshing pinions 6| rotatably mounted on brackets 62 carried by the ratchet wheel 49 while the other pinion 6| meshes with a pinion 63 which is secured to a pinion 64. The pinion 64 meshes with one of a similar pair of intermeshing pinions 65 mounted on brackets 66 carried by ratchet wheel 58, while the other pinion 65 meshes with a pinion 61.
Rotatably mounted on the pinion 61 is a ratchet wheel 68 (Figs. 3 and 15) which is of the same diameter as the ratchet 56 while secured to the pinion 67 is a ratchet 69 which is considerably larger in diameter than the ratchets 56, 68. The ratchets 56 and 69 are normally connected for driving purposes by means best shown in Figs. 14 and 15 comprising a dog 18 pivoted on a stud 1| fixedly mounted on the ratchet wheel 69. The dog 18 normally engages the teeth of the ratchet wheel 56 whereby the ratchet wheel 69 will be rotated in a counterclockwise direction (Fig. 14) whenever the ratchet wheel 56 is similarly rotated by movement of the carriage. The dog I0 is slotted to embrace a stud '12 carried by a member 13 also pivotally mounted on the stud H. The member 13 has a lug engaging a stud 14 secured to the side of ratchet wheel 68. A torsion spring 15, hooked over the end of stud 14 and lying in a groove formed in a collar 16 on the pinion 61 and also anchored to a stud TI (Fig. 7) on ratchet 69. normally tends to rotate the ratchet 68 in a counterclockwise direction (Fig. 14) or in a clockwise direction (Fig. 7) A spring 15a, anchored to studs 72 and 11, holds the tooth in dog 18 in engagement with the teeth of ratchet 56.
Movement of the carriage is effected, as usual in typewriting machines, by means of a spring drum 18 partly shown in Fig. 3 and shown in dotted lines in Fig. 6 on which drum is wound the tape 19 passing over a pulley 88 mounted on the rear rail 28 and thence to the right hand end of the rack 51 at which point the tape 19 is secured to the rack. Due to the constant tension produced in the tape 19 by the spring drum 18, the carriage 26 tends to move to the left. Thus the ratchet 56 tends to rotate the ratchet 69 and pinion 61 in a counterclockwise direction (Fig. 14) or clockwise in Fig. 7. This rotational tendency of the pinion 61 is communicated to the ratchet wheels 48, 49, and 58 (Fig. 3) through the train of connections comprising the pinions 68, 6|, 63, 64, 65. Normally, however, this rotational tendency has no effect so far as movement of the carriage is concerned because the ratchet wheels 48, 49, and 58 are restrained from rotation by means of the loose dogs 8| (Fig. 5) of the escapement mechanism.
.Reverse rotation of-the ratchet 69 and pinion 61 is prevented by means of a dog 82 (Fig. 7)
held by a spring 86. The bracket 85 is adjustably rotated on the stud 83 until the free end of said dog 82 engages one wall of a tooth in the ratchet 69 but does not quite touch the other wall of the adjacent tooth, the object being to silence the clicking noise which ordinarily is experienced with similar ratchet-and-pawl mechanisms due to the end of the dog striking the side of the next succeeding tooth after. riding over a given tooth.
It is desirable to be able to release the escapement mechanism from the carriage for the purpose of moving the carriage by hand, or when the carriage is to be returned by the usual power operated carriage return mechanism. For this purpose, there is provided release mechanism which is operated by the usual. carriage release levers 81 one of which is shown in Fig. 6,these levers being pivoted on studs 81a on the side plates of the carriage with the freeends of levers 81 adjacent the usual platen rotating knobs 88.
Each lever 81 abuts one endof acbail 89 pivotally mounted in the side plates of the carriage. When either of the levers 81 is depressed, the ball 89 is rocked clockwise in Fig. 6 thereby causing the rod 89 (Fig. '7 which forms part of the bail to move rearwardly oi the platen or forwardlyin Fig. '7. A lug 90 formed in a lever 9| (Figs. 1, 6. and '1) pivoted on the top surface of the rear rail 28 is thereby moved rearwardly of the platen. or forwardly in Fig. '7 whenever the ball 89 is moved by the release levers 81.
Mounted on a bracket 92 (Fig. 7) is a r lease dog 93 having a slot 93a embracin a stud94 carried by the bracket 92. A spring 85. anchor d to the lower end of the dog 93 and to the bracket 92, normallyliolds the lower end of said dog against a stop lug 92a formed in the bracket 92, with the stud 94' at the lower left hand end of the slot 93a. Inthis position of the dog 93, the
lower end thereof, which is in the plane of the ratchet 68, is held clear of said ratchet. Whenever the lever 9| is moved forwardly in Fi '7 by the rod 89 as a consequence of the operation of one of the release levers 81, the dog 93 is moved to the left in Fig. 7. Due to the inclination of the slot 930. the dog 93 is first caused to move downwardly into engagement with ratchet 68 and thereafter, by a clockwise pivotal ovement of said do on the stud 94'. the ratchet 68 is moved by doe 93 in a counterclockwise direction relati e to the ratchet 69 (Fi 7) or 61' the p n 14 on ratchet 68 with t e slot n lever 13, and the coonerat ornnf pin 12 with the lu on the do 0. the latter is lifted out of engagemerit with the teeth of ratchet 56 thereby p rrnitting said ratchet to be moved independently of the ratchet 69. Thus the carria e may be moved by hand or by the power operat d return mechanism without disturbin the escanement mechanism and without the escapement mechanism interfering -with the movement of the carriage. i
The dog 93 is operated automatically whenever the usual power operated return mechanism operates to return the carriage prior to writing a new line. In the Intemational electric writing machine, the carriage is returned by power mechanism very similar with the one described in Patent No. 1,753,450 under control of a carriage return key. This mechanism is not shown in the present case, because it is not directly involved in the operation of the invention claimed hereinafter. It will sufllce to say that when the carriage return key is depressed, a cam unit I60 (Fig. 2) controlled thereby is operative to straighten the toggle which engages the carriage return clutch and, through a chain of connections including a link 96 (Fig. '1), a bell crank 98, and a link 99, rocks a three-armed lever I pivoted at I0l to a plate I02 secured to the rear rail 28. The bracket 92 is secured to the plate I02.
The three-armed lever I00 controls the release of the carriage return clutch and, when operated as described, moves one arm of said lever |00a into the path of the left hand marginal stop |03a carried by the usual marginal stop rack I04 mounted on the carriage. Through thearm |00b and a link I05, which interconnects said arm |00b with the lever 9|, the dog 93 is operated to disengage the dog 10 from the ratchet 56. During a carriage return operation, the ratchet 56 rotates in aplo'cgwise direction (Fig. 14) whereby, if the dog 10 were not released by the connection including |05, a clicking noise would result which is undesirable as it makes the operation of the machine rather noisy. When the carriage approaches its left hand marginal position, the left hand marginal stop |03a strikes a cam surface I 000 in the arm |00a of lever I00 and rocks said lever I00 in a counterclockwise direction thereby through the links 96, 99 and bell crank 98 and for connections not shown disengaging the carriage return clutch, and also permitting dog 93 to become restored by spring 95 to the position shown in Fig. '7. A lug |02a formed in plate |02 is engaged by the left hand marginal stop |03a to arrest the carriage at the left hand marginal positions. This lug mm is also engaged by the right hand mar.- ginal stop I031) (Fig. 'I).
The ratchet wheels 48, 49, and 50 have teeth, 21, 36, and 21 respectively, whereby the amount of feeding movement imparted to the carriage may be varied. Due to the method of interconnecting the ratchet wheels by means of intermeshing pinions, the ratchet wheels 48 and 50 rotate in a direction opposite to the ratchet 49. Assuming for the moment that the ratchet Wheels 48 and 49 (Fig. 3) are fixed and immovable, the pinion 64 will be locked against rotation, therefore, if ratchet wheel 60 is now permitted to rotate one tooth space, one of the pinions 65 will roll around said pinion 64 and by rotating the other pinion 65 will permit the pinion 61 to rotate in the same direction as the ratchet Wheel 50 but twice as much as ratchet wheel 50. Similarly, if the ratchet wheels 48 and 50 are locked and the ratchet wheel 49 is permitted to move, one of the pinions 6| will roll around the pinion 60 and cause pinions 63, 64 to be rotated. The rotation of pinion 64 is communicated to pinion 61 through the intermeshing pinions 65. As in the case of ratchet wheel 50, pinion 61 rotates twice as much as ratchet wheel 49. However, when the ratchet wheels 49 and 50 are held and ratchet wheel 48 rotates, the same amount of movement will be communicated from the ratchet wheel 48 to the ratchet wheel 61 through the pinions 6|, 63, 64, 65 acting as idlers. It is possible, however, to permit the ratchet wheels 49, 49, and 50 to'rotate in combinations to produce an accumulative efiect upon the pinion 55 which, of course, will permit the carriage to move correspondingly.
Since the ratchet wheel 48 has twenty-seven teeth, the pinion 61 and hence the pinion 55 will be rotated 1 of a revolution whenever the ratchet wheel 48 rotates one tooth space. on the other hand. since the movement of the pinion 61 is twice that of the ratchet wheel 49 and the latter has thirty-six teeth, the pinions 61 and 56 will be rotated the equivalent of 5 of a revolution of the ratchet wheel 49. Likewise, the ratchet wheel 50 having twenty-seven teeth, pinions 61 and 65 will be rotated 6 of a revolution of the ratchet wheel 50. Reducing these fractions to a common denominator of 54, it will be seen that the moveinents of pinions 61 and 55 produced by the ratchet wheels 48, 49, 60 are 6 5 and 6 of a revolution per tooth space on the respective ratchet wheels. The gearing is so designed and the spacing of the teeth on their ratchet wheels has beenso selected that ratchet wheel 48 causes the carriage to move two units of spacing, ratchet wheel 49 three units of spacing and ratchet wheel 50 four units of spacing.
It is thus possible to secure 7 different spacings of the carriage which, in terms to units of carriage spacing, are as follows: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9. Thus the spacing of the carriage can be accommodated to seven different widths of letters if necessary. The means by which the escapement wheels 48, 49, 60 are selectively controlled will be described in the following paragraphs.
The rotation of the escapement ratchet wheels 48, 49, 60 is controlled by means of three dog rocker mechanisms which are selectively controlled by power operated selecting mechanism.
Figure 5 shows the dog rocker mechanism for the ratchet wheel 49. Each dog rocker mechanism includes a dog rocker plate I06 which is pivotally mounted on'vertically aligned conical studs I01 screwed into threaded holes in two parallel and horizontal portions 46b of the frame 46. The conical points of the studs are seated in conical holes in lugs formed in the dog rocker plate I06. Pivoted on a stud I08 carried by the rocker plate I06 is the usual loose escapement dog 8| mentioned hereinbefore which is actuated by a spring I09 so as to be urged in a counterclockwise direction (Fig. '7). The left hand end of the dog 8I engaging one of the teeth of the ratchet", however, is held in the position of Fig. 5 owing to the tension of the spring drum I8 (Fig-4) being greater than the tension of the spring I09 (Fig. 5) whereby the dog 8I is forced against a resilient stop IIOa mounted on an arm III which is rotatably secured to the side of the rocker plate I06 by meansof the'stud I08. The stud I08 has a shoulder on which the dog 8| is loose to permit the arm III to be secured to the plate I 06 without binding the dog. The upper left 1 hand portion of the arm III is provided with a bent-over lug against which bears an adjusting screw II2 carried by a lug formed in the rocker plate I06. By turning the screw H2 in one direction or another, the arm III may be rotatably adjusted about the stud I08 as a pivot. The dog rocker plate I06 (Fig. 3) is provided with a lug I06a which is substantially in horizontal alignment with the left end of the dog 8I but does not normally engage the teeth of the ratchet wheel 49.
When the rocker plate I06 is rocked in a are so spaced that the end of dog 8I assumes a position in horizontal alignment with the next lower tooth space of ratchet wheel 49.
When the plate I06 is restored to the position.
of Fig. 3, the end of dog 8I is moved into the path of the next lower tooth on ratchet wheel 49 before the lug I 06a clears the teeth in ratchet 49. when the lug I06a finally clears the teeth in the ratchet 49, the ratchet wheel 49 will be permitted to rotate in a counterclockwise direction (Fig. 5) the remainder of a tooth space, thereby bringing the end of dog 8| back against the resilient stop I Ia. Thus, by giving the plate I06 one complete oscillation the escapement ratchet 49 is permitted to turn one full tooth space.
The rocker plate I06 (Fig. is formed with a lug'I I4 which extends between two resilient stops I I5a, II 5b niounted on arms II 6a, I I6b,respective- 1y, which arms are pivoted in scissors fashion on one of the conical studs I01. The stops 5a, II5b being located on opposite sides of the lug II4, adjustably limit the oscillatory movements of the plate I06 on the 'studs I0'I as pivots.
Similar mechanism is provided for the other two ratchet wheels 48, 49 but, owing to the'fact that these two ratchet wheels rotate in a direction opposite to the ratchet wheel 49, the rocker The rocker plates I06 are selectively and combinationally operated through power mechanism controlled by the keys I0 which selecting mechanism now will be described.
Rigidly mounted on brackets I I8 (Figs. 1 and 2) secured to the lower edges of the sides of the base I4 is a rod II9 which issteadiedat its midpoint by extending through a slot in a bracket I20 (see Fig. 4 also) secured to the frame I2I which supports the case shift mechanism and the type basket by means not shown. Pivotally mounted on the rod II9 are selector bars I22 which extend forwardly and horizontally to points underneath the cam units I6. There is a selector bar I22 for each cam unit I6 and its key.
Since the cam units I6 are arranged in two rows on the opposite side of the power roller I5, the r bars I22 are made in two lengths which alternate on-the rod II9, the shorter bars I22 being inter-.
spersed with the longer bars. Each gof the selector bars I22 has a link connectionlIZS with an extension I24 formed as part of one of the side frames of the cams and release mechanism of the cam'units I6. Thus,whenever a cam unit is operated in consequence of the depression of any key I0, one of the selector bars I22 (Figs. 1 and 4) is rocked in a counterclockwise direction.
Theselector bars I22 are provided with one o: more lugs like I22a, I222), I22c I221 (Fig. 4) each designed to be engageable with one of three bails which selectively control the operation of the escapement mechanism. Each bail comprises a rod I25 mounted in side arms I26 (Figs. 2 and 4)"which are pivotally mounted on studs I21. These studs are carried by arms I28 the hubs of which are rigidly mounted on and near the ends of a shaft I29. This shaft is rotatably of the longer bars and adjacent the ends of the shorter bars by means of a comb I3I which is secured to the lower'edges of the base I4. Adjacent the rod II9, the bars I22 are guided by a comb I32 which is formed with side arms I32a attached to hubs fixedly mounted on the rod I I9 as best shown in Fig. 2. Pivotally mounted on the rod II9 near the center of the machine are three arms I 33, I 34, I 35 which. extend forwardly (Fig. 2) or to the right in Fig. 4 to overlie the rods I25. The arms I34, I35 are curved at their forward ends whereby bar I34 may be operated only by the central rod I25 and the bar I35 only by the right hand rod I 25. The end of the arm I33 is straight and is operated only by the left handrod I 25. It will be seen that each time one of the selector bars I22 is rocked in a counterclockwise direction (Fig. 4) one or more of the arms I33, I34, I 35 will be similarly rocked about rod III) as a pivot.
The clockwise restoring movement of the balls including the rods I25 and arms I26 is limited by means of two brackets I36, I31 (Fig. 2) secured to the inside face of the base II4. Each bracket I36, I31 extends horizontally underneath the arms I26 and is provided with a resilient facing I38 of material such as leather and each of the arms I26 is provided with a bent-over lug I26a resting on the top surface of the adjacent resilient facing I38. By the cooperation between the lugs I26a and the resilient facings I38, the rods I25 are held upwardly slightly clear of the lugs I22a whereby the clicking noise which would result if lugs I 26a were to directly strike the brackets I36, I31 is silenced.
Each of the levers I33, I34, I35 (Figs. 2 and 4) extends rearwardly of the rod I I9 and supports arms I39, I40, I4I which are pivoted on studs I42 carried by the arms I33, I34, I35, respectively. Each of the arms I39, I40, I has a bentover lug I43 which cooperates with the upper edge of the rear end of the corresponding levers I33, I34, I35 and these lugs are normally held in contact with said levers by means of torsion springs I44 interposed between pins carried by the arms I39, I40, I and pins carried by the levers I33, I34, I35. The levers I33, I34, I35 are urged in a clockwise direction by means of springs I 45 anchored to pins carried by said levers and ear formed in bracket I20. The arms I39, I40, I have link connections I46 to arms I41, I48, I49, respectively, which are pivotally mounted on the front sides of the rocker plates I06 of the several escapements. It is evident that when one or more of the levers I34, I35, I36 is rocked I in a counterclockwise direction (Fig. 4), one or more of the links I46 will be drawn downwardly thereby rocking the corresponding arms I41, I48, I49 downwardly, or clockwise in Fig. .5, which shows only the arm I48 for the middle escapement mechanism.
Secured to the rear end of frame 46 (Figs. 3
and 4) is a bracket I50 having a horizontal slot into which extends a stud I5I on a bar I52. This bar at its forward end (Figs. 3 and 4) is pivotally connected to a bell crank I 53 pivotally mounted on a bracket I53a secured to frame 46. The bell crank I53 has a link connection I54 to the movable frame including the universal bar 3|. pin carried by the .bar I52 and to a pin carried by the bracket I50 holds the bar .I52 to the retracted position shown in Fig. 4. In order to permit the bar I52 to move to the right in Fig. 4, or forwardly in Fig. 3, independently of the universal bar 3I, the link I54 has a slotted connection to the universal bar frame. The bar I52 through most of its length is L-shaped in vertical section and on the top surface of the horizontal portion of said bar there is secured three screw studs I56 located in the rear of and slightly below the ends of the arms I41, I48, I49, respectively, whereby the bar I52, if operated alone, will not affect any of the arms I41, I48, I49.
With the bails comprising rods I25, I26 in the position shown in Figs. 1, 2, and 4, depression of any key I causes the corresponding cam um't I6 to be rocked by the power roller I in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction, according to whether the cam unit is in the left hand or right hand row, respectively, thereby rocking the corresponding bar I22 in a counterclockwise direction and at the same time operating the corresponding type bar 2|. Through the intermediary of one or more of the lugs I22b, I22d, I22 the bar I 22 which corresponds to the key depressed will be rocked in a counterclockwise direction thereby similarly rotating one or more of the bails comprising .the rods I25, I26. One
A spring I55 anchored to a or more of the levers I33, I34, I and their corresponding arms I39, I40, MI is drawn downwardly thereby rocking the corresponding arms I41, I48, I49 downwardly or clockwise in Fig. 5
bringing the operated arms into the path of movement of the studs I56, this operation taking place before the operated type bar strikes the universal bar 3I. For example, the bar I22 .for the Q key I0, shown in front in Fig. 4, has a lug I22f whereby only the lever I 35 and arm I41 are operated.
When the type bar ultimately strikes the universal bar 3I, the latter is moved rearwardly or to the left in Fig. 4 thereby, through the link I54 rocking the bell crank I53 clockwise. This results in the bar I52 moving forwardly (Fig. 3) or to the right in Fig. 4.- Those of the arms I41, I48, I49 which have been drawn downwardly will be engaged [by the corresponding studs I56 and, as a result, the rocker plates I06 connected to said arms will be rocked counterclockwise in Fig. 3.
Upon the restoration of the type bar, the bar I 5.2 is restored by spring I to the position of Figs. 3 and 4, this operation taking place during the first part of the restoring movement of the type bar and is completed by the time the type bar has receded a short distance from the printing point. With continued restoring movement of the type bar, the bails comprising rods I25 and arms I26 and the operated levers and arms I33, I34, I35 and I39, I40, I4I, respectively, will be restored to the position of Fig. 4 thereby restoring the operated arms I41, I48, I49 to the position shown in Fig. 5. It will thus be seen that one or more of the escapement ratchets I48, I49, I50 will be operated with the result that the carriage will be permitted to move a distance depending uponthe spacing of the teeth in the selected ratchets I48, I49, I 50.
The description up to the present time has as- -lower case letter i.
printed. Many of the upper case letters of the alphabet are considerably wider than the corresponding lower case letters, particularly when type faces like those used in the printing of newspapers and'books is employed. Thus, the upper case L is considerably wider than the In order to take care of these differences in width between the upper and lower case characters, means is provided to shift the bails comprising the rods I25, I26 rearwardly of the machine or to the left in Figs. 1 and 4 to cause the rods I25 to register with lugs I22a, I22c, I22e on selector bars I22.
An arm I51 (Fig. 4) is secured to the shaft I29 and has a link connection I58 to an arm I59 secured to the shaft 36 which it will be re"- called is rocked counterclockwise each time the type basket 32 is drawn downwardly to the upper case position. Whenever the type basket is shifted to the upper case position, arm I59 is rocked counterclockwise thereby, through the link I58, rocking arm I51, the shaft I28, and the arms I28 in a clockwise direction. The,bails comprising arms I 25 and arms I26 are thus drawn rearwardly, or to the right in Fig. 4, to re-position the rods to register with lugs I22a, I220, I22e. In most cases the spacing of the charac-' ters is increased when the upper case characters are printed. However, this may not be invariably the case as the extreme left hand or rear row of keys (Fig. 1) often contains com'bi-- nations of characters such as parentheses and numerals which may require that the spacing be reduced for the characters printed within accompanying upper case shift movement.
It is desirable to make provision for back spacing the carriage under control of the usual backspace key. In ordinary typewriters, the amount of back-space movement is the same as the spac-. ing given each character but in the machine described herein the back-space mechanism causes the carriage to be reversely rotated only a small amount which is considerably less than the more common spacing of 1 6 of an inch per letter used in most of the machines now built for general .oflice use. The unit of spacing employed in the illustrative machine described herein for the purpose of proportioning the spacing of letters in accordance with their widths is an arbitrary unit of the order of '.022", although the smallest spacing given any printed character is twice this value. In other words, the smallest spacing of the carriage which may be accomplished by the escapement mechanism herein described is .044" 2 per character. However, for a purpose to be described hereinafter, the back-space mechanism is capable of reversally moving the carriage one unit of spacing or .022". Obviously, these figures are purely arbitrary and will depend upon the size of the type on the type bars. Thus, if smaller type were used, such as the elite size, the basic unit of spacing would obviously have to be smaller.
The back space key Ilia (Fig. 1) as well known in the art controls a cam unit I6a (Fig. 2) which, however, has a single lobe on its cam instead of a double lobe as is'the case with the cams in the cam units I5 operating the type bars. This cam unit is not shown in Fig. 1 but is connected by a link I8a to a bell crank I66 having a link connection I6I to one arm of a bell crank I52 (Fig. 1) pivoted on a stud I63 carriedby the rear rail 28. The' other arm of the bell crank has a link connection I54 to a bell crank I65 pivoted on a stud I65 carried by a bracket I61 secured to the frame 46. A back space feed dog I68 actuated by a spring I6! is pivoted on the other arm of hell crank I65 and has a bent-over lug which normally is clear of the teeth in ratchet 56. Normally the upper end of the dog I68 is held in engagement with an eccentric studi-III on bracket I61 by spring I66 which stud holds the dog I68 clear of the teeth in ratchet 68.
When the back space key Illa-is depressed, the single lobe cam unit I6a controlled thereby is caused to operatively engage the power roller I5 with the result that ball crank I is rotated clockwise drawing link I6I to the right in Fig. 1
, or rearwardly in Fig.7 thereby, through the bell crank 38, drawing link I64 to the left. The bell crank I is rocked clockwise drawing the lug in dog I68 in engagement with the teeth of ratchet 56 and thereafter rotating said ratchet in a counterclockwise direction (Fig. 7) or clockwise 1 I13 (see Fig. 4 also) which extends upwardly to one side of the plane of the lever I53 and has a pin I14 extending into the plane of lever I53. A spring I15 connected to the arm I13 and to a fixed part of the framework, holds the lever I13 in the position of Fig. 4. When the space bar is depressed, its cam unit I6b causes the lever to 1 which the link I6Ia is connected to rotate in a clockwise direction, as in the case of lever'l60 for the back space mechanism, thereby drawing link I6Ia toward the front of the machine in consequence of which the. arm I13 is rocked counterclockwise in Fig. 4 to first bring pin I14 in engagement with lever I53 and thereafter rock said lever in a clockwise direction. This causes the bar I52 to move to the right (Fig. 4). There is a selector bar I22a (Fig. 2) associated with the space bar cam unit I61; and this selector bar operates the bail I25, I26 which controls the arm I41 causing the latter to be drawn downwardly. It will be noted in Fig. 4 that the pin I14 under normal conditions is located far enough away such as is described herein is in the field of photo-lithography, that is, the preparation of lithographic plates' by photographing typewritten copy, the machine being used to prepare clear cut typewritten copy which is subsequently photographed on a lithographic stone or suitable sensitized plate. This plate is treated by a suitable process-to make it capable of use as a printing plate. These processes require that very clear and sharp impressions be produced by the types as frequently the typewritten master sheet, as it may be called, must be enlarged and this has the effect, when an inked textile ribbon is used in the typewriter, of enlarging the ordinarily unnoticeable defects in the printed characters which are caused by the weave of the ribbon and inequalities in the inking of the ribbon. In
the preparation of master sheets for the photothe carbon ribbon produces sharper and more solid impressions than the textile ribbon usually employed in typewriters for general ofiice work. The carbon ribbon is usually used but once and is thrown away.
through the usual ribbon guide in front of the platen (see Fig. 6), to a curved guide I11 provided with guiding lugs I11-a. at each end there of. The ribbon which in Fig. 6 is led diagonally downwardly from the guide I11 to a guide I18 15 having guide lugs I18a. The ribbon then passes between two feed rollers I19, I80 and thence diagonally downwardly over a bracket I8I which is designed to be used'as a tearing knife for occasionally breaking off the ribbon after it has 20 passed through the feed rollers I19, I18, the severed portions of the ribbon being thrown away.
The lower feed roller I is rotatably mounted on one end ofa shaft .I82 journaled on a bracket I83 secured to the side of the base I4.
The upper feed roller I19 is rotatablymounted on a stud I84 mounted at the mid-point of a release lever I85 which is pivoted at I86 to a stud carried by the bracket I83. A torsion spring I81, wound around the stud- I88 and hooked over the edge of the lever I85, urges said lever in a counterclockwise direction to constantly engage the roller I19 with roller I80. In order to insure that the relatively narrow ribbon I11 will remain in its proper position between the two 85 feed rollers I 19, I80, the upper feed roller I19 is flanged so as to project on each side of the ribbon and feed roller I80 and prevents the ribbon from slipping off the feed roller I80.
The shaft I82 extends through the base I4 0 and is journaled in a lug formed in a bracket I834 (Figs. 3 and 4) secured to the frame 46 which supports the escapement mechanism. A
bevel gear I82a secured to shaft I82 meshes with a similar bevel gear 182?) secured to a 45 short shaft I82c extending at right angles to the shaft I82 and journaled in lugs formed inthe frame I83a'. A large gear I 82d is secured to the shaft I820 and meshes with pinion 81. In consequence of the train of gearing just de- 50 scribed, the shaft I82 is rotated in a counterclockwise direction when the escapement mechanism is operative whereby the carbon ribbon I18 willbe fed an extent depending upon the width of the character typed. However, when 55 the carriage is released from the escapement mechanism as is the case when the carriage is tabulated by hand or reurned by power, the carbon ribbon will not be fed owing to the fact that the pinion 61 is disconnected from the 50 carriage by the operation of the carriage release mechanism shown in Figs. 14 and 15. Thus waste of the ribbon is eliminated.
It is desirable to provide tabulating mechanism to facilitate the typing of data in tabular 05 form. Owing to the fact that the spacing mechanism causes the carriage to move variable extents commensurate with the width of the character typed and is based upon considerably smaller units of spacing than is usual in ma- 70 chines designed for general oflice use, the ordinary type of typewriter tabulator is not practical and would not operate reliably owing to the difficulties which would be experienced in attempting to use a tabular rackwith tooth spac- 78 ings of a size commensurate with the unit of spacing. One reason why the usual tabulating mechanism would not operate satisfactorily is that it is usually necessary to provide rebound traps for preventing rebound of the carriage when the column stops strike the tabular stop,
would not be allowed for the rebound trap to take effect.
The tabulating mechanism is shown in Figs.
-8 and 13. The usual marginal release key I88 of the International electric writing machine is herein employed to operate the tabular stop lever. This key (Fig. 13) is slidably mounted in brackets I89, I90 and its rear or left hand end 2 0 I (Fig.13) abuts a lug formed in one arm of a bell crank I9I which bell' crank, is urged in a clockwise direction (Fig. 13) by a spring I92 anchored to the bracket I90. A pin I93 is carried by the key I88 to limit the restoring movement of said key. The other arm of the bell crank I9I has a hole into which projects the narrowed portion I94a. of the tabular lever I94 which is pivoted on a stud I95 (Fig. 8) carried by a bracket I96 secured to the rear rail 28. Also pivoted on the stud I95 is a tabular stop arm I91 having its right hand end turned upwardly at I91a into the path of the column stop I98 on column fstop rack I99. The lever I94 has a pin 200 projecting through a slot formed in the lever I91 which pin is interconnected by a spring 20I with a pin I91b carried by the lever I91. The bell crank I9I (Figs. 8 and 13 is mounted on a bracket 202 secured to the rear rail 28 which bracket has a stud 203 screwed therein having an eccentric shoulder 2034; in the plane of the bell crank I9I. Shoulder 203a acts as an adjustable stop to limit clockwise movement of bell crank I9I when the key I88 is pushed to the left in Fig. 13.
I When it is desired to tabulate the carriage, the key I88 is pushed to the left (Fig. 13) thereby rocking the bell crank I9I in a clockwise direction against the tension of spring I92. This causes the right hand end (Fig. 8) of the lever I94 to be elevated to bring the upper portion ma into the path of the column stop I98 carried by the bar I99 as in Fig. 13. With the parts operated by the key I88 being held in this position, one of the carriage release levers 81 (Fig.
. 8) is depressed to disengage the carriage from the escapement mechanism and the carriage is allowed to move to the right (Fig. 8) until the stop arm I91 wipes past the desired column stop I98 and snaps to the position shown in Fig.13.
- brought to a position to type the correction after erasing the erroneous character. In Figs.
11 and 12 is shown parts of the usual front paper guide 204 which is located at the printing point on each side of the type guide for the purpose of keeping the type from fouling or embossing the paper as would happen if the paper should bulge away from the platen. A .portion of the paper guide is cut away at 204a to provide a vertical straight edge for the purpose of positioning the ca riage after an error has been erased. When an error is committed in typing a letter, the letter is erased and after erasure the carriage is moved by hand to position the right hand side of the next adjacent letter on the left in alignment with the straight portion 204a as shown in Fig. 11, which illustrates the use of the letter X to realign the carriage after erasure. Thereafter, the space bar is operated four times which causes the carriage to space sufiiciently far to the left to bring the letter used for a basis for realigning the carriage to the position of Fig. 12. Thereafter, depression of the proper key to correct the error will cause the correct letter to appear in its proper position to the right of the letter used as a basis for alignment and such letter will be typed with the proper spacing.
In Figs. 11 and 12, the center line of the type guide is indicated by the vertical broken line. This line lies in a plane which passes through the longitudinal axes of the type bars when in printing position. In the present machine, the characters on the types are not centered with respect to the longitudinal axis of the type bars but are offset more to the right than to the left with reference to the center line in Figs. 11 and 12 as shown by the letter M in Fig. 12. One portion of all the characters is offset to the left (Fig. 12) a constant distance but the other portions of the letters are offset variable extents to the right of the center line depending upon the respective widths of the letters. For this reason, it is impractical to attempt to realign the carriage after inadvertently moving same or after making an erasure by centering one of the adjacerit letters by means of the type guide as is usually the case in machines forv general office work. The escapement mechanism is designed to space the letters so that the right hand portions of the letters always take a position a predetermined distance to the left of the center line which distance is slightly greater than the extent to which every letter is offset to the left.
In the preparation of typewritten master sheets for the photo-offset andother processes, it is highly desirable that the right hand margin of the typewritten matter be straight in order to have the printed sheets produced by the plates appear like printed matter printed from justified type. In order to facilitate the justification of the typewritten matter in the preparation of the master sheets, a justification indicator and signal device is provided. This device is shown in Figs. 1, 9, and 10. Mounted on the rear rail 28 near the right hand end thereof is a bracket 205 (Fig. 10) which slidably supports a rod 206, This rod has a short arm 201 secured thereto which is in the path of movement of the right hand marginal stop l03b whereby said marginal stop will engage the arm 201 as the carriage moves to the left in writing a line. The left hand end of the rod 206 is pivotally connected to one arm of a bell crank 208 (Fig. 9) on a stud 209 carried by an extension l02a formed in the plate I02. The other arm of the bell crank 208 has a link connection 2|0 with a lever 2| lpivoted at 2l2 to a bracket 2l3 mounted on the base ll. The other arm of the lever 2 has a link connection M4 to a slide 2l5 which is guided by a strip 2? secured to one side of a bar 2" mounted on the front cover plate 2! (Fig. 1). The slide MS has its ends 2l 5a formed with lugs which loosely extend around the edges of the strip 2l6 so as to guide the slot 2l5 for a longi: tudinal movement of the bar 2I'l. One face of the bar 211 is inclined so as to be at right angles to the line of sight of a person using the machine and is graduated as shown in Fig. 9 to correspond with successive points .022" apart in the movement of the carriage. In other words, the spacing of the graduations on the bar- 211 corresponds to the spacings which are given the carriage by the back space mechanism. The slide 215 has a portion 2I5b which extends over the surface of the bar 2|! and is provided with an index line.
When the carriage in its movement reaches a position which is 31 units of spacing short of the right hand marginal position, the arm 201 (Fig. 10) will be engaged by the marginal stop l03b whereby with further movement of the carriage to the left, the rod 206 will be similarly moved, rocking the bell crank 208 in a. clockwise direction (Fig. 9). This produces a corresponding movement of the lever 21!, owing to the link connection 2l0, with the result that the slide 215, after the carriage has 'come within thirty-one units of spacing of the left hand margin, moves to the right of the zero position, that is, is ten units of spacing short of the marginal position, a lug 209a. of insulating material mounted on the lever 208 operates the central member 2l9 of three contact elements insulatably mounted on a bracket 220 of insulating material carried by the rear rail 28 to cause all three of the contact members to make contact. This causes a buzzer, not shown, to operate to indicate that the carriage has come within ten spaces of the right hand marginal position and thereby warns the operator to take care ,to finish, if possible, the next word within the ten space zone between the right hand marginal position and the position in which the buzzer operates, or to split the word to avoid having thetypewritten line extend'beyond the right hand marginal position. It may sometimes be necessary to type beyond the marginal position and, because of this possibility, the scale on the bar 211 is continued for ten units to the left of the zero position in Fig. 9.
In order to produce a justified typewritten master sheet, it is desirable to first type the material in draft form on cheap paper taking care to terminate each line as close as possible to the right hand marginal position, that is, the zero position on the scale. As each line is completed in typing the draft, the operator notes the position of the index line with relation to the bar 2|! and at the end of each line types the number of units the completed line is short of 'or beyond the zero or right-hand marginal position The draft copy thus obtained is. now re-typed,
on a sheet of high grade paper suitable for photo reproduction. Before retyping each line,-the op- ;erator first notes how. many units of spacing the or letters standing 'alonaas well as words, the
v 2,224,766 operator counts the number of spaces between to move eight units of spacing. remembering that the space bar causes the carriage to move four units of spacing when operated. The operator, after typing the first word, depresses the.
back space key three times which back spaces the carriage three units. The effect produced by these operations is to cause the first two words to be separated by five units 01' spacing. If these operations are repeated after each word of the first line, five units of spacing will likewise be produced between the remaining words. Thus, for the seven words of the first line, six additional spaces will have been inserted causing the first line to terminate at the right-hand margin. In other words, after the first line has been retyped, the slide 2|5 should occupy the zero position of bar 2". By, similar manipulation of the space bar and back space key, the spacing between words may be varied by small increments to cause each line to terminate fiush with the margin.
If, in the illustrative case, the line terminated beyond the marginal position, whereby the slide 2 i5 indicates six units of spacing beyond the marginal position, it would be necessary to operate the space bar once after typing each word and then operate the back space key once whereby the words comprising the first line would be spaced apart three units of spacing instead of five. In the event that it is not possible to evenly space the words of a line to bring the line fiush with the right hand margin, as for instance, in the event that the line terminated three units of spacing short of the margin instead of six, the extra space produced by operating the space bar twice and then the back space key three times .would be produced between only four of the words and the remaining words would receive the same spacing as in typing the first draft. I
In some cases, it may be necessary to insert ,or remove one or two spaces between two words owing to the fact that some letters are considerably wider than other and even though the line may be nearly flush with the margin, the width of the last letter typed may cause the last word of the line to extend beyond the marginal position to such an extent as to be noticeable with reference to a preceding or following line which terminates flush with tration, the lower case letter 1" is very considerably narrower than the lower case letter m," and the diflerence is sogreat that if two successive lines terminated with the letters 1 and m, respectively, the margin would be noticeably ragged in the justified copy owing to the letter m" being offset to the right an extent suflicient to be noticeable. In this case in retyping the first copy a unit may be subtracted between two words whereby the letter m will not, in the final draft, project beyond the mar-.
ginal line so noticeably. While this procedure may-not be absolutely necessary to produce a good appearing master sheet for production of a the margin. As an illus-,
printing plate, it will enhance the appearance of the final draft and make the sheets printed by the plate look more like they had been produced from justified type set by hand or from type produced by type casting machines such as thefIntertype or Linotype.
While there has been shown and described and pointed out the fundamental novel'features of the invention as applied to a single embodiment it will be understood that various omissions and substitutions and changes in the form and details of the deviceillustrated and in its operation may be made by those skilled in the art without departing' from the spirit otthe invention. It is the intention, therefore, to be limited only asindicated'by the scope of thefollowing claims.
What is claimed is:
1. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a carriage, a plurality ot-escapement mechanisms, means interconnecting said escapement mechanisms whereby they may be operated singly or in combination to produce an acculative effect on the carriage, typing means, power means to operate-the typing means, a series of key levers for selectively controlling the operation of the typing means by the power means, selecting means operated by the power means concurrently with theoperation of the typing means; means common to the escapeso I ment mechanisms for operating the escapement mechanisms, and normally inefiecti e means rendered eflective by the selecting meansfor coupling the escapement mechanisms to the operating means combinationally.
2. In amachine of the class described, the
combination of a carriage, a plurality of escapement ratchets, differential gearing interconnect ing the escapement ratchetswitheach other and with the carriage; a plurality of dog rockers,
one for each escapement ratchet; dogs on said rockers for controlling the rotation of the ratchets, a plurality of arms each mounted on one oi! the dog rockers, a common operating member, typing means, keys forycontrolling the typing means, and selecting meanscontrolled by the keys for operatively engaging the arms with the conunon operating member combinationally;
' 3. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a carriage, typing a series of type bars, a continually operating power roller common to all the type bars, cam units each connected to a'type bar and adapted to be selectively engaged with the power roller to operate the type bar, keys for selectively engaging the cam units with the power roller, 9. series oi? selector bars each associated with a key and having a connection to the corresponding cam unit whereby the selector bars are operated each time the corresponding cam unit is operated, a series of escapement mechanisms with means interconnecting said escapement mechanisms and said carriage, means common to the escapement mechanisms and normally disengaged therefrom for operating said escapement mechanisms, means individual to each escapement mechanism for coupling the escapement mechanisms to the operating means, and
means for operating the; coupling means in different combinations under control of the selecmechanisms operative to feed the carriage varimeans comprising able extents, typing means, means to operate the combination with a carriage, a series of escape ment ratchets, difierential gearing interconnecting said ratchets and said carriage, a plurality of dog rockers each associated with one of said ratchets and having escapement dogs, typing means, keys for controlling the typing means, a universal bar operated by the typing means, a slide common to the dog rockers and having a connection to the universal bar whereby said slide is moved longitudinally each time a character is typed; interponents, each pivotally mounted on one of said rockers and movable into engagement with said slide; selector mechanism for moving said interponents into engagement with said slide for operation thereby, and power means controlled by said keys for operating the selector means each time the character is typed.
6. In combination, a carriage, type bars, means to variably space the carriage according to the widths of the characters typed including a plurality of selectable escapements, selecting means for combinationally selecting the escapements for operation, character keys, power means controlled by said keys for operating the selecting means and type bars, and means controlled by the selecting means and operated by the type 40 bars for operating the selected escapements.
'1. In a machine of the class described, typing means, a carriage for a record sheet; selectively operable elements, each representing a character, for controlling the operation of the typing means,
45 each element when operated causing a character to be typed by the typing means; means controlled by said elements for operating the typing means; variable feed mechanism for the carriage including a series of feed controlling elements, each being operable to cause a predetermined feed of the carriage, and operable singly or in various combinations to produce a plurality of different feeds of the carriage greater in number than the number of feed controlling elements; means connecting the feed mechanism to the carriage, a common operating member with which said feed controlling elements are engageable, and means controlled by the selectively operablea elements 'for engaging the feed controlling elements with the common operating member.
8. In a machine of the class described, typing means, a carriage for a record sheet, selectively operable members representing characters for controlling the operation of the typing means,
feed mechanism, each element being operable to cause a predetermined feed of the carriage and operable either singly or in various combinations to produce a plurality of difierent feeds of the carriage greater in number than the number of operable elements; means connecting the feed mechanism to the carriage; means common to said operable elements for operating one or more of said elements, said elements being selectively operatively engageable with the common operating means; and control means intermediate the selectively operable members and the feed controlling elements for selectively and combinationally engaging the latter with the common operating means whenever one of the selectively operable members is actuated.
9. In a machine of the class described, typing means, a carriage for a record sheet; selectively operable elements for controlling the operation of the typing means, each element representing a character and, when operated, causing the typing means to print such character; means controlled by the selectively operable elements for operating the typing means; variable feed mechanism for the carriage including a series of feed controlling elements, each, when operated, causing the carriage to be fed a predetermined amount, said feed controlling elements being normally idle and operable singly or in various combinations to cause the carriage to be fed a plurality of different extents; means to connect the feed mechanism to the carriage, means common to said feed controlling elements for operating the latter to effect a feed of the carriage, a second RONALD D. DODGE.
US148270A 1937-06-15 1937-06-15 Typewriting machine Expired - Lifetime US2224766A (en)

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FR839227D FR839227A (en) 1937-06-15
BE428467D BE428467A (en) 1937-06-15
US148270A US2224766A (en) 1937-06-15 1937-06-15 Typewriting machine
GB1258538A GB504774A (en) 1937-06-15 1938-04-27 Improvements in or relating to typewriting machines
CH205194D CH205194A (en) 1937-06-15 1938-06-07 Typewriter.

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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2435933A (en) * 1942-02-20 1948-02-10 Rock Ola Mfg Corp Coin control and credit register mechanism
US2477702A (en) * 1944-07-08 1949-08-02 Coxhead Ralph C Corp Backspacing mechanism
US2527213A (en) * 1947-04-24 1950-10-24 Royal Typewriter Co Inc Variable spacing mechanism for typewriting or like machines
US2697502A (en) * 1951-12-15 1954-12-21 Underwood Corp Uniform impression typing mechanism
US2734614A (en) * 1956-02-14 Proportional ribbon feed mechanism
US2788881A (en) * 1955-01-06 1957-04-16 Ibm Justifier indicator
US2811235A (en) * 1955-11-10 1957-10-29 Underwood Corp Machine for typing a tape record and a proof sheet simultaneously
DE969421C (en) * 1951-03-08 1958-05-29 Adlerwerke Kleyer Ag H Full-text booking engine
US2905307A (en) * 1957-03-29 1959-09-22 Hazeltine Research Inc Typewriter carriage position indicator
US2930471A (en) * 1957-12-17 1960-03-29 Sperry Rand Corp Automatic position indicator
US3401783A (en) * 1965-12-30 1968-09-17 Ibm Proportional ribbon feed mechanism
US3444979A (en) * 1965-06-09 1969-05-20 Olivetti & Co Spa Ribbon feeding device for a variable spacing typewriter

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2862595A (en) * 1954-10-18 1958-12-02 Underwood Corp Proportional letter-feed mechanism for typewriters or the like

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2734614A (en) * 1956-02-14 Proportional ribbon feed mechanism
US2435933A (en) * 1942-02-20 1948-02-10 Rock Ola Mfg Corp Coin control and credit register mechanism
US2477702A (en) * 1944-07-08 1949-08-02 Coxhead Ralph C Corp Backspacing mechanism
US2527213A (en) * 1947-04-24 1950-10-24 Royal Typewriter Co Inc Variable spacing mechanism for typewriting or like machines
DE969421C (en) * 1951-03-08 1958-05-29 Adlerwerke Kleyer Ag H Full-text booking engine
US2697502A (en) * 1951-12-15 1954-12-21 Underwood Corp Uniform impression typing mechanism
US2788881A (en) * 1955-01-06 1957-04-16 Ibm Justifier indicator
US2811235A (en) * 1955-11-10 1957-10-29 Underwood Corp Machine for typing a tape record and a proof sheet simultaneously
US2905307A (en) * 1957-03-29 1959-09-22 Hazeltine Research Inc Typewriter carriage position indicator
US2930471A (en) * 1957-12-17 1960-03-29 Sperry Rand Corp Automatic position indicator
US3444979A (en) * 1965-06-09 1969-05-20 Olivetti & Co Spa Ribbon feeding device for a variable spacing typewriter
US3401783A (en) * 1965-12-30 1968-09-17 Ibm Proportional ribbon feed mechanism

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CH205194A (en) 1939-06-15
FR839227A (en) 1939-03-29
GB504774A (en) 1939-05-01

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