US2203405A - Sand classifier - Google Patents

Sand classifier Download PDF

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Publication number
US2203405A
US2203405A US213382A US21338238A US2203405A US 2203405 A US2203405 A US 2203405A US 213382 A US213382 A US 213382A US 21338238 A US21338238 A US 21338238A US 2203405 A US2203405 A US 2203405A
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Prior art keywords
sand
receptacle
basin
screen
machine
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Expired - Lifetime
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US213382A
Inventor
Irving M Clicquennoi
Hugo W Weimer
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Walter E Lippmann
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B22CASTING; POWDER METALLURGY
    • B22CFOUNDRY MOULDING
    • B22C5/00Machines or devices specially designed for dressing or handling the mould material so far as specially adapted for that purpose
    • B22C5/06Machines or devices specially designed for dressing or handling the mould material so far as specially adapted for that purpose by sieving or magnetic separating

Description

June 4, 194 l. M. CLICQUENNOI ET'AL SAND CLASSIFIER 2 shee'Es-sheet Filed June 13, 1938 INVENTORS 7% 014242 ,Wmw

ATToRNEYl June 4, 1940. CLICQUENNOI ET AL 2,203,405

SAND CLASSIFIER Filed June 15, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Kw, 777 I INVENT RS ATTORNEYPSA Patented June 4, 1940 I groans PATENT orrics I SAND CLASSIFIER" W Irving M. Clicquennoi and Hugo W. Weimer,

Milwaukee, Wis., assignors to Walter E. Lippe mann, doing business as Lippmann. Engineering Works Application June 13, 1938, Serial No. 213,382 I 1 Claim. (01. 209-44) This invention relates generally to improvements in the art of treating granular material, and relates more particularly to improvements in the construction and operation of mechanism for 5 washing, dehydrating and classifying materials such as sand or the like.

A general object of our invention is to provide an improved'sand classifier which is adapted to thoroughly cleanse the granules and to separate the same into accurate grades.

in the construction of concrete structures, it has been found essential in order to produce structures having maximum strength and durability,-to utilize ingredients of the highest qual- 16 ity. While considerable attention has heretofore been given to the production of high quality cement, and efforts have been made to thoroughly 'Wash'sand which was to be used in concrete work, not a great deal of attention has been 20 ipaid to the matter of grading the sand ingredient used in concrete work of different types. We have discovered that while the removal of foreign substances such as silt is important, it is also important that the sand particles be zsaaccurately graded as to size for various classes of concrete construction. fine graded sand has been found desirable as an ingredient in one type of concrete mixture, while medium size graded sand is more desirable in an- 30:.Ollh6l' type of mixture, and coarse graded sand is still more desirable in other types of concrete.

It is therefore a more specific object of our present invention, to provide an improved mode of accurately and commercially classifying mixed 35 :sand particles, while at the same time thoroughly Cleansing the sand.

Another specific object of the invention is to provide a new and useful sand classifier having enormous capacity and operable with minimum power consumptionto effectively separate sand particles into accurately segregated grades.

A further specific object of the present invention is to provide an extremely simple and durable sand washing, grading and dehydrating ma- 45 :chine whichis highly efficient in use.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following detailed description, and some of the 1 For example, verystructing andof operating sand washingfdehydrating and grading machines built in accordance with the improvement, may be had by referring to the drawings accompanying and forming a part of thisspdification wherein like ref- 5 erence characters designate the same or similarparts in thevarious Views.

Fig. l is a somewhat diagrammatic central longitudinal vertical section through a multiple deck sand washer, classifier and dehydrator; 10

Fig. 2 is a' transverse vertical section through the machine of Fig. 1, taken along the line 2.2;

Fig. '3 is a more diagrammatic longitudinal section through a modified typeof the improved apparatus;

Fig. 4 is a similarly diagrammatic longitudinal section through another modified type of our apparatus;

Fig. 5 is'a top view of another commercial em bodiment of our invention; v 20 Fig. 6 is a central longitudinal vertical section through thje machine of Fig. 5; y

Fig. '7, is a transverse vertical section through the apparatus of Figs. 5 and 6, the section having been taken, along the line l'l of Fig. 6; and

Fig. 8 is an end View of the machine of Figs.

5, 6 and 7 looking toward the sand discharge end.

While our invention has been shown and described herein as being ,especially applicable to machines for washing, classifying and dehydrating mixed sand, 'it is not intended to thereby unnecessarily restrict the scope.

Referring to the drawings and particularly to Figs. 1 and 2, the improved washing, classifying and dehydrating machine shown therein, comprises in general a main support or frame 9 supported or suspended in any suitable manner; an auxiliary frame Ill suspended from the main frame 9 by means of four parallel'inclined links I l and by coilsprings I2 coacting with inclined 40 guide rods 13; actuating mechanisminterposed between the corresponding ends of the frames 9; l0 and adapted to vibrate the auxiliary frame 10 relative to the mainframe 9; a receptacle l4 attached to and movable with the frame ill and having a liquid or" water basin IS in the lower portion thereof several superimposed upper screen decks' l6, l1 disposed within the upper portion of 'the vibratory receptacle l4; and a plurality of superimposed lower inclined screens l8, I9, 20 confined within the lower portions of the receptacle l4 and extending into the liquid basin l5.

The lower frame 9 may be either rigidly or resiliently supported or suspended in any suitable I manner, and the auxiliary frame Ill is U-shaped and coacts only with the opposite sides and with the driving end of the receptacle I4. The links II are swingably attached to both of the frames 9, H] by means of pins 2I, and these links extend upwardly and forwardly relative to the receptacle. The inclined guide rods I3 have their upper ends rigidly attached to the auxiliary frame I0, and extend upwardly and rearwardly substantially perpendicular to the links II. The cushioning springs I2 embrace the lower ends of the rods l3, and coact at their lower ends with sockets 22 secured to the main frame 9, and at their upper ends with collars 23 secured to the rods I3. These coil springs I2 are not essential and may be omitted or replaced by any other type of resilient means.

The actuating mechanism for vibrating the auxiliary frame III relative to the main frame 9, comprises a horizontal drive shaft 24 rotatable in bearings 25 carried by the main frame 9 and having an eccentric portion 26; a belt drive 21 for imparting rotation to the shaft 24; one or more vertical rods 28 rigidly attached to the aux iliary frame I0 and depending therefrom; and one or more blocks 29 slidable along the rods 28 and coacting with the eccentric portion 26. The driving assemblage is preferably such that rapid rotation of the shaft 24 will impart rapid vibratory movement to the receptacle l4, and the amplitude of vibration is preferably quite small.

The receptacle I4 is entirely open at its rear end, and has a gradually inclined bottom 30 which may be lined with screening or other material providing a roughened surface, and the inclination of the bottom 30 causes the liquid basin I5 to gradually increase in depth proceeding toward the front of the machine. The uppermost screen deck I6 is approximately horizontal and has relatively large screening perforations,

and this screen deck isadapted to receive the raw mixed material from a supply chute 3|, and is also subjected to liquid spray jets directly from nozzles 32. The other upper screen deck I1 is disposed parallel to the top screen deck I6 but has smaller screening openings therein, and

both of the upper decks I6, I'I terminate at the The lower rear open end of the receptacle I4. inclined screens I8, I9, 20 are disposed substantially parallel to the inclined bottom 30 of the receptacle I4, and the upper inclined screen I8 has coarser mesh than the intermediate screen I9, while the screen I9 has coarser mesh than the lowermost screen 20. As previously indicated, the forward ends of the screens IB, I9, 2|] are immersed in the liquid of the basin I5, and the rear discharge ends thereof terminate at the open end of the receptacle I4. It is to be noted that the delivery ends of all of the screens l6,

l1, I8, I9, 20 are staggered or out of vertical alinement, so that independent material conveying chutes may be associated with the several screen ends to convey the several grades away from the machine; and in this machine, excess liquid from the basin I5 together with silt and other foreign matter, are discharged directlyfrom the upper, end of the inclined bottom 30.

During normal use of the sand washing, grading and dehydrating machine of Figs. 1 and 2,

the driving shaft 24 is being constantly rotated to cause the eccentric portion 26 to move the blocks 29 in a manner to rapidly vibrate the receptacle I4 and its contents upon the suspension links I I and springs l2. While the receptacle :I4 is thus vibrating, it is being guided to move admitted material which are too large to pass through the screen deck I6, are urged therealong by the vibration,and are promptly delivered from the machine; and the remainder of the material is deposited upon the screen deck II, where the second grade of oversize particles is separated and removed. The mixed finer particles are delivered from the lower deckI'I together with the liquid, directly into the vibrating basin I5 where the heavier sand and silt particles descend toward the upper inclined grading screen I8.

Due to the. vibration of the basin I5 and of the screens I8, I9, 20 disposed therein, the descending sand particles as well as the screens, are

subjected to thorough washing and flushing action. The coarse grade sand particles which are deposited upon the upper screen I8 within the basin I5, are conveyed upwardly therealong by the vibratory movement and are ultimately removed from the basin and discharged from the rear open end of the machine, while the finer sand particles and silt are subjected successively to the washing and grading action of the lower inclined screens I9, 20 so as to separate two addi-' tional grades of clean sand. The silt and other heavier foreign matter which is removed from the sand, is eventually deposited upon the roughened bottom 30 and is conveyed upwardly along l this bottom by the vibration, being finally discharged'from the rear open end of the receptacle I4 together with the excess liquid and the floating dirt or foreign substances. ner, the mixed sand particles are thoroughly washed, accurately graded, thoroughly dehydrated, and finally delivered from the constantly vibrating receptacle I4.

In this man- In Fig. 3, we have shown diagrammatically, a machine of simplified construction wherein the 1 upper coarse screen decks have been omitted entirely, and in which the lower grading screens have also been obviated. In this machine, the receptacle I4 is of modified construction, but

the suspension and driving mechanisms may be the same as in Figs. 1 and 2. The receptacle I 4' has a modified bottom 30', the inclined rear portion of which is preferably roughened and extends from beneath the basin I5 to a point considerably above this basin at the extreme rear end of the machine. The side of the receptacle I4 is provided with a liquid overflow 3| for the basin I5, and such an overflow may be provided at each side of the basin. When this modified machine is operating normally, the mixture of sand and water is deposited into the basin I5 near the front end of the receptacle I4, and due to the constant vibration of the receptacle and of the liquid in the basin, the sand is thoroughly washed while travelling through this turbulent liquid and over the horizontal portion they are gradually elevated and removed from the liquid, being eventually discharged from the rear open end of the receptacle I4. The excess liquid together with the floating foreign substances, are constantly discharged through the overflow 3|, and with this modified structure no independent grades of sand are produced.

In Fig. 4 we have illustrated another slightly modified type of machine similar to that of Fig. 3

but having a single coarse orscalping screen deck 32therein, The operation of this second modified separating machine is quite similar to that of Fig. 3, but the screen deck 32 functions to initially remove oversize particles from the admitted material.

Referring to the commercial machine shown in Figs. to 8 inclusive, this device again embodies the principle of washing and grading within a vibrating liquid basin, after the coarser materials have been removed from the raw material. This further modified and improved sand classifier comprises in general a main support or frame 39 which may be mounted or suspended in any suitable manner; an upper coarse screen support 40 movably suspended from the main frame 39 by means of levers 4| which are swingably suspended from cross rods 42 which are supported in bearings 43 carried by the frame 39; a receptacle 44 swingably suspended from the lower ends of the levers 4| and having a liquid basin 45 therein; upper and lower coarse screen decks 46, 41 carried by the support 40 above the basin 45; and lower inclined fine screens 48, ,49, 50 removably confined within the receptacle 44 and extending into the liquid basin 45.

The main frame 39 is of rigid U-shaped formation, and is open at the center so that the receptacle 44 may be vibrated without obstruction, and the screen support 49 is located entirely above the main frame 39 and is vibratable simultaneously with but oppositely of the receptacle 44. Stationary apron plates 5| may be suspended from the rods 42 at the opposite sides of the support 40 and receptacle 44 so as to insure proper delivery of material from the former to the latter. The bottom 52 of the receptacle 44 is inclined upwardly and rearwardly, and the lowermost portion of the basin 45 is preferably provided with a drain pipe 53. The rear end of the receptacle 44 is open, and the lower fine screens 48, 49, 50 are superimposed and are of successively diminishing length in order to facilitate delivery of the several grades of sand to independent final delivery chutes.

The actuating mechanism for vibrating the screen support 49 and the receptacle 44, comprises a horizontal drive shaft 54 rotatable in adjustable bearings 55 carried by the main frame 39 and having an eccentric portion 56; a driving pulley 51 for imparting rotation to the shaft 54; and a connecting rod 58 coacting with the eccentric shaft portion 56 and with a pivot pin 59 carried by the front end of the support 4|) and by the upper ends of the front levers 4|. The driving arrangement is such that when the shaft 54 is rotated rapidly the eccentric portion 56 acting through the connecting rod 58 will impart rapid vibration to the screen support 40 and will simultaneously impart similar but opposite vibration to the receptacle 44 through the levers 4|.

During normal operation of the further improved commercial washing, grading and dehydrating machine of Figs. 5 to 8 inclusive, the upper support 40 and the receptacle 44 are being constantly vibrated by the revolving shaft, and liquid is being delivered to the upper screen deck 46 from the nozzles 32. The mixed material may then be delivered onto the forward end of the upper deck 46 and is'subjectedv to the washing action of the jets. The oversize particles are separated from the finer material by the screen deck 46 and are delivered from the machine at the rear endof this deck, while the finer material and liquid pass through the upper deck and are deposited upon the coarse screening deck 41. This deck '41 separates the second grade of oversize particles, and deposits the fine particles and liquid into the vibrating liquid basin 45. In the basin 45 the heavier sand particles descend upon the upper inclined screen 48 where the coarser sand grade is removed from the finer particles and is elevated out of the basin by the vibrating screen 48, being finally discharged from the upper rear end thereof. The material which passes through the screen 48 is deposited upon the intermediate inclined screen 49 which separates the second grade of sand and removes the same from the basin 45 and delivers it from the rear end of the machine. The fine particles which pass through the screen 49 are deposited upon the lower screen 50 where the fine sand grade is separated from the silt, and is removed from the basin 45 and discharged from the rear of the receptacle 44. The silt and other very fine solid particles which pass through the lower screen 59, are deposited upon the vibrating roughened inclined bottom 52 and are ultimately delivered from the rear end of the receptacle 44 together with the excess liquid and floating foreign material. In this manner, the several grades of solids are quickly and accurately separated, thoroughly washed, dehydrated, and delivered from the machine. The opposite vibration of the upper support 4|] and receptacle 44, tends to eliminate undesirable vibration of the main frame 39, and the screens 48, 49, 50 of this machine are readily removable to permit cleansing and drainage of the basin 45.

From the foregoing detailed description it will be apparent that our invention provides a simple and compact sand classifier which is adapted to rapidly and effectively wash, grade and dehydrate the sand particles. The provision of a vibrating liquid basin. within which the washing and grading is effected, is an important feature of our present invention, and the dehydration is automatically effected by the inclination of the separating screens which elevate the separated grades out of the liquid basin and thereafter permit drainage of liquid prior to final delivery of the product from the machine. The disposition of the fine grading screens beneath the surface of the liquid within the vibrating basin, not only insures more accurate grading, but also prevents clogging of the screens, and these screens may be made readily removable for cleaning purposes. It is also preferable to construct these separating machines so that the grading screens will be vibrated in the general direction of their inclination in order to enhance the conveying action, it is also desirable to roughen the bottom of the receptacle in any suitable manner in order to insure most effective discharge of the silt and other foreign matter. Our improved classifying machine has proven highly successful in actual use, and produces separated grades of sand which are accurate as to size and which are thoroughly cleansed and therefore especially adapted for use in concrete Work.

It should be understood that it is not desired to limit our invention to the exact details of construction or to the precise mode of operation,

herein shown and described, for various modistantly immersed in said basin, means for de-'- livering granular material to the deepest por,

tion of said basin above the upper of said screens, 1

and means for vibrating said. receptacle and screens in the general direction of the inclination of said bottom.

IRVING M. CLICQUENNOI. HUGO W. WEIMER.

US213382A 1938-06-13 1938-06-13 Sand classifier Expired - Lifetime US2203405A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2750043A (en) * 1952-03-21 1956-06-12 Thompson Lee Lavere Vibrator screens for screening rotary drilling mud
US5896997A (en) * 1994-03-14 1999-04-27 A.J. Mines, Inc. Dynamic mining system comprising hydrated multiple recovery sites and related methods
US20050006503A1 (en) * 2001-04-09 2005-01-13 Loomans-V.D. Anker Natasja Anouk Process for size classifying ammonium sulfate crystals which are present in a suspension
US9860391B1 (en) 2003-03-07 2018-01-02 Wai Wu Method and system for matching entities in an auction

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2750043A (en) * 1952-03-21 1956-06-12 Thompson Lee Lavere Vibrator screens for screening rotary drilling mud
US5896997A (en) * 1994-03-14 1999-04-27 A.J. Mines, Inc. Dynamic mining system comprising hydrated multiple recovery sites and related methods
US20050006503A1 (en) * 2001-04-09 2005-01-13 Loomans-V.D. Anker Natasja Anouk Process for size classifying ammonium sulfate crystals which are present in a suspension
US7380671B2 (en) * 2001-04-09 2008-06-03 Dsm Ip Assets B.V. Process for size classifying ammonium sulfate crystals which are present in a suspension
US9860391B1 (en) 2003-03-07 2018-01-02 Wai Wu Method and system for matching entities in an auction

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