US2192599A - Multiplying machine - Google Patents

Multiplying machine Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2192599A
US2192599A US82082A US8208236A US2192599A US 2192599 A US2192599 A US 2192599A US 82082 A US82082 A US 82082A US 8208236 A US8208236 A US 8208236A US 2192599 A US2192599 A US 2192599A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
contacts
magnet
cycle
accumulator
card
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US82082A
Inventor
Lang William
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
International Business Machines Corp
Original Assignee
International Business Machines Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US487341XA priority Critical
Application filed by International Business Machines Corp filed Critical International Business Machines Corp
Priority to US82082A priority patent/US2192599A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2192599A publication Critical patent/US2192599A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F7/00Methods or arrangements for processing data by operating upon the order or content of the data handled
    • G06F7/38Methods or arrangements for performing computations using exclusively denominational number representation, e.g. using binary, ternary, decimal representation
    • G06F7/46Methods or arrangements for performing computations using exclusively denominational number representation, e.g. using binary, ternary, decimal representation using electromechanical counter-type accumulators
    • G06F7/462Multiplying; dividing
    • G06F7/467Multiplying; dividing by using preset multiples of the multiplicand or the divisor

Description

March 5, 1940.
W. LANG MULTIPLYING MACHINE Filed May 27, 1935 8 sheets-sheet 1" 'ATTORNEY March 5, 1940. w, LANG 2,192,599
MULTIPLYING MACHINE Filed May 27, 193e 8 sheets-sheet 2 March 5, 1940. w LANG MULTIPLYING MACHINE 8 sheets-sheet s Filed May 27, 1936 INVENTOR CRS March 5, 1940. w. LANG 2,192,599
MULT IPLYING MACHINE Filed May 27, 1936 8 lShee'Ls--Sheet 4 CYCLES ACCMC. Acci (x3) Acc.2 (n) 461:."9 {x5} 1. READ MP. 2. ENTER Mc. 642- 642) 642) 642) 9.10 2o 9D -p 642 D 642 642 64j- 1264 .1264) 1264) 41T 2n an 642 1264 1264 .642 1926 9210 9210l 6. 2T i `642 1o. Prawn@ RESET F|G,3, 642x104=66766 CYCLES ACCME. ACC?? (x.) 41:6#2 (x0) Accs (x4) 1. READ MP 2. ENTER MC 64 2 642 0 0 o 64 2 9. an 64 2D 64 2 64 2 O O O 1 2 84) 4 3o 1264 642 642 00o 256e 5. 1G l :642
, 642 642 00o 66766 6. 2G l-*-= 000 7 PmNrm RESET 11-1VENTOR 6M/27 TTORNEY March 5, 194:10.
W. LAN G MULTIPLYING MACHINE Filed May 27, 1936 FIGB.
8. Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR ATTO R N EY March 5, 1940. w LANG 2,192,599
MULTIPLYING MACHINE Filed May 27, 193e s sheets-sheet s ATTORNEY March 5, 1940. w. LANG 2,192,599
' MULTIPLYING MACHINE Filed lMaly 27, 195e 8 sheets-sheet 7 Plas.
MC MP o o o I I l 2 2 O 2 5 5 s O 6 6 O 6 1 'I 7 O o s a s s s INVENTOR BY g ATTORNEY March 5, 1940. W LANG '2,192,599
MULTIPLYING' MACHINE Filed May 27, 1956 s sheets-sheet 8 A vF'IGJI.A
ATTORNEY Patented Mar. 5, 1940 UNITEDV sTA'rEs PATENT VOi-'Fics MULTIPLYING MACHINE William Lang, New York, N.` Y., assigner to International Business Machines Corporation, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application May 27, 1936, serial No. 82,082
The present invention has for one of its objects the provision of an improved type of multiplying machine in which the method of computation, technically known as duplation, is employed. By this method, a multiplicand is repeatedly 'doubled to build up the product. y
A further 'object of the present invention re` sides in the provision of a multiplying accounting machine adapted to effect multiplication by i'lrst eiiecting a separate setting of the multiplicand for each denominational order of lthe multiplier and thereafter automatically raising each entry to the product of the multiplicand times the associated multiplier digit, so there will be a setting of a number of sub-products, each representing the multiplicand times a digit of the multiplier. 'Ihese sub-products are thereafter gathered or added together to produce the final product. A further object of the invention is to provide 25-mechanism wherein the number of operations required to obtain the several sub-products varies according to the value of the multiplier.
A further object of the present invention re-` sides in the provision of a machine in which the construction is simplified and improved for ease of assembly and maintenance.
A further object of the invention is to provide a machine in which a plurality of accumulators are provided and in which the entries may be repeatedly doubled and in which the number of repetitions for eachaccumulator is variable.
Various other objects and advantages of the invention will be obvious from the following particular description of two forms of mechanism embodying the invention or from an inspection of the accompanying drawings; and the inventionl also constitutes certain new and useful features r of construction and combination of parts hereinr after set forth and claimed.
In the drawings:
Figs. l, la, and 1b, taken together and arranged verticallyin the order named, show the wiring diagram of the electric circuits of the machine. ,o Fig. 2 is a view showing the manner in which a typical computation is performed by the machine.
Fig. 3 ls a view showing a further example and the manner of its computation as performed by 55 the machine.
' represents three times the multiplicand.
Fig. 4 is a. view showing the driving mechanism for feeding the record cards.
Fig. 5 is a view showing the card advancing and analyzing mechanism. 1
Fig. 6 is a view showing the accumulator resetting mechanism.
Fig. 7 is an isometric view showing one order of the accumulator mechanism.
Fig. 8 is atiming chart showing the timing of the electrical devices of the machine.
Fig. 9 is a sectional view of the printing mechanism.
Fig. 10 is a view of a controlling record card in which multiplicand and multiplier factors are f perforated. I
Fig. 1l is a portion of the circuit showing a y modied arrangement.
Fig. 12 is a' further portion of the circuit showing a modified arrangement.
Before describing the construction of the machine to which the present invention is shown applied, the general principles under which the machine operates and the general mode of opera tion will be set forth.
According to the present invention the machine carries out multiplication in the following manner. The record card bearing the two factors to be multiplied is first advanced to pass two analyzing stations. At the first station the multiplier factor is read to determine the number of computing cycles requred for the problem. At the second station the multiplicand is analyzed and this factor is entered into as many separate accumulators as there are possible positions in the multiplier. In addition, a further entry is made into a so-called MC accumulator. This entry is represented diagrammatically in Fig. 2 where 642 represents the multiplicand and 375 represents the multiplier. Under the column heated Cycles, it is indicated that during the first cycle the multiplier is read. On the line indicated Enter MC it is seen that the value 642 is entered into the four accumulatqrs. In the following computing cycles, it is the object to increase the initial entry of 642 in ACC#1 to 1926, which In ACC#2 it is desired to increase the multiplicand to 4494, which is seven times the multiplicand; and in ACC#3, it is the object to increase the entry to 3210, which is five times the multiplicand.
This raising of the initial entry in each accumulator to the desired. sub-product is brought about by what will hereinafter be termed doubling operations and transfer operations.
A doubling operation is represented in Fig. 2 by the curved arrows pointed downwardly to the next line, indicating that the amount in the accumulator is added to itself or doubled. A transfer operation is indicated by an arrow extending from the amount in the MC accumulator to one of the other three accumulators, indicating that the amount standing in the accumulator MC has been added to such other accumulator.
In ACC#1 the sub-product of three times the multiplicand is obtained by doubling the initial entry once and transferring from the MC accumulator once. In ACC#2 the sub-product of seven times the multiplicand is obtained by doubling the entry twice and transferring the amount in the MC accumulator three times in succession; and the sub-product in ACC#3 is obtained by doubling twice and transferring once.
The following table summarizes the manner in which the sub-product of a multiplicand times any of the digits is obtained in the machine:
TABLE I 3rd cycle 4th cycle 5th cycle 6th cycle 7th cycle Transfer Transfer.
l ido. Transfer (Disable entering) According to Table I the maximum number of cycles required to obtain the, several subproducts is ve and if the multiplier digit contains a 7. digit, five cycles will be taken by the machine to obtainV the several sub-products. If
the multiplier factor containsa digit 5'but no 6, 7, or 9, then the sub-products will be obtained in three cycles, and if the highest digit in the multiplier factor were 2, a single cycle would suffice to obtain the sub-products.
In Fig. 3 is shown a problem in winch the multiplier factor is 104 andY it will be observed that ACC#1 is to compute a sub-product of the multiplicand times one; ACC#2 the multiplicand times zero; and ACC#3 the multiplicand times four.
In Table I it will be observed that four times 'the munipncand is obtained 'by doubling twice so that only two computing cycles are required to Vobtain such sub-products and after the douv sion for the correct denominational allocation.-
This operation or adding these amounts together will hereinafter be termed gathering to dis(n tinguish over the aforementioned-transfer opera# tions.
Thus, the amount in ACT/#1 is entered into ACC#3 during the eighth cycle and during the' ninth cycle the amount in ACC#2 is entered into ACC#3, giving a total or nal product of 240,750, which, during the subsequent cycle, is printed on a suitable record and all of the accumulators are then reset to zero.
The accounting machine to which the present invention is shown as applied, so far vas the mechanical construction is concerned, is similar to the machine shown and described in Patent No. 1,976,617, granted October 9, 1934, to C. D. Lake and G. F. Daly, to which reference may be had for a fuller description of the general operation of the various units and the manner of drive. There are certain diierences in the present construction over the machine shown in the above Card feeding mechanism The card feeding mechanism shown in Figs. 4 and 5 is exactly similar to that shown and described in the patent referred to, except that provision is made in the form of a clutching device for interrupting the card picker operations without stopping the accumulating drive mechanism. In Fig. 4, I0 represents the drive shaft of the machine which may b e directly connected or detachahly coupled to a suitable driving motor.
In Fig. 5, the analyzing brushes are indicated at UB yand LB and the record cards R are successively advanced by picker II to a rst pair of feed rollers I2 which serve to advance the cards tofurther pairs of feed rollers I3 which advance the cards to pass the upper and lower brushes in succession. The shafts upon which rollers I3 are mounted are provided with gears I4 at their extremities and arranged as shown in Fig. 4 to be driven through gearing I5 from gear I6 on the drive shaft I0. It is thus seen that the rollers .I3 are in constant rotation. From one of the gears I5 a gear I1 is driven through an idler I8, which gear I1 is freely mounted upon a shaft I9. Secured on shaft I9 is a gear 20 Which vserves to drive the picker mechanism and the rst pair of feed rollers I2. Also secured on shaft I9 is a clutch arm 2| carrying a spring-pressed dog 22, which dog and arm are Anormally latched in the position shown by latching armature 23 pivoted at 24 and controlled by a magnet 25.
Energization of magnet 25 Will release dog 22 for engagement with driving element 26 which is secured to the constantly running gear I 'I so that gear 20 will be driven for onefrevolution during which the picker I I will advance the record card from the magazine to rollers I2 which feed it to the dotted line position indicated in Fig. 5,
where the leading edge of the card is beneath the brushes UTB.
At each brush station, there is provided a pair of card lever contacts designated UCL .and LCL, which are operated by the usual card levers to close as the record card passes the station and to remain open unless a card is present. During the doubling, transferring, gathering, and product printing cycles, magnet '25 is deenergized and card feeding will, of course, not take place during such cycles. i
that shown and described in the patent referred y l to and the description thereof will accordingly be limited to a brief explanation of its manner of operation. The drive shaft 21 (Fig. 7) is directly geared to the main shaft I8 in Fig. 4 so that it is in operationas long as the driving motor of the machine functions ,and the driving ratio is such that shaft 21 makes one revolution for each card vfeeding cycle of the machine. The shaft 21 has slidably mounted thereon but keyed for rotation therewith a clutch element 28, one for each denominational order of the accumulator. 'Ihe element 28 is provided with a groove in which fits the end of a short arm of a lever 28 which is pivoted as shown and provided with a block 88 normally held as in Fig. 7 by armature latch 8| of adding magnet 82.
A leaf spring 88 bears against the extremity of the longer arm of lever 28 and moves the same in a counterclockwise direction upon release of block 88 by armature 8l. This movement will bring clutching member 88 into engagement with cooperating teeth 84 integral with a gear85 loosely mounted on shaft 21. Gear 85, when thus coupled to shaft 21, will rotate a gear 88 which meshes f therewith and` will displace the accumulator index wheel 81. The rearward extremity of member 28 is adapted to be engaged by a flnger'88 toward the end of the cycle for the purpose of disengaging clutching element 28 from teeth 84 and relatching block 80 on armature 8l Briefly summarizing the adding operation, the
.magnet 82 may be energized at various points in the cycle of the machine depending upon the location of a perforation in a column of the card analyzed by the lower brushes LB. This energization may take place in response to a perforation in any of the index point positions from 9 to l, inclusive. A perforation in the 9 index point position will trip theclutch element 28 nine steps before linger 88 is operated to declutch it and a perforation in the 1 index point position will trip the clutch element 28 before it is declutched by the finger 88. Each step Qf clutching engagement corresponds to a tenth of a revolution of the accumulator index wheel 81 so that a 9 hole will cause it to move nine-tenths of a revolution and the 1 hole will cause it to move` one-tenth of a revolution. The manner in which circuits through the lower brushes LB control the operation of magnet 82 will be set forth in connection with the explanationof the circuit diagram. Suitable carry mechanism between the several orders of the accumulator mechanism are provided.. and these are exactly similar to that shown in the Patent No. 1,976,617 so that illustration thereof is omitted.
Readout mechanism Also driven by gear 85 (Fig. 7) is a gear 85.
Since the ratio of gears 88 and 85 is 2:1, the former will turn through a half revolution for each revolution of the latter. Carried by and insulated from gear 88 is a pair of electrically connected brushes 48 one of which cooperates v successively with ten conducting segments 4I,
"48 will be in contact with the 8 segment 4I and type elements.
Vthe other brush will be in contact with the arcuate strip 42. The positioning of the brushes 48 provides a convenient electrical readout mechanism for controlling doubling, transferring, gathering, and product printing operations, and the electrical circuits involved in these functions will be more fully explained in connection with the circuit diagram.
Printing mechanism The printing mechanism is shown in Fig. 9 where the usual so-called listing shaft 48 carries a clutch driving element 44. 'Ihe shaft 48 has direct driving connection with the constantly running shaft i8 (Fig. 4) so that clutch driving element 44 may rotate continuously. 'Ihe listing cam 45 is freely carried on the shaft 48 and provided with` a spring-pressed clutching dog 48 adapted for engagement with the driving' element 44. Dog 48 is normally held out of engagement by arm 41 controlled by magnet 48.
Energization of magnet 48 will permit cam 45 to rotate with the listing shaft 48 and follower arm 48 will 'cause oscillation of rocker shaft 58 to which are secured arms link-connected to the reciprocating crosshead 52 so that for each revolution of cam 45, crosshead 52 will be moved upwardly and then downagain to its initial position. Slidingly mounted in the crosshead are type bars 58 spring urged into movement with the crosshead as it'rlses. As type bar 58 moves upwardly, ratchet teeth 54 successively pass the nose of stopping pawl 55 as the type elements 58 successively pass printing position opposite platen 51.
Energization of printing magnet 58 as the type bar moves upwardly will draw call wire 58 toward the right to rock the latch 80 out of engagement with stopping pawl 55 whereby the nose of the latter will engage one of the teeth 54 and interrupt further upward movement of the type bar. Before the crosshead 52 moves downwardly, the usual printing hammers are tripped to take an impression from the lselected Accumulator resetting mechanism Referring to Fig. 6, shaft 8l carries a gear 82 at its extremity which is in engagement with gear 88 mounted upon reset shaft 84`. Gear 88 of which there is one for each accumulator may be selectively coupled to the resetting shaft 84 in the well known manner more fully explained in the patent above referred to. At the extremity of shaft 84 is a gear 85 which is adapted to be driven by an intermittent gear 86 which is secured to shaft 81. Also fixed to shaft 81 is an arm 88 which carries spring-pressed clutch dog 88 normally held in the position shown in Fig. 6 by a latching arm 18 supported by armature shaft 1I .of magnet armature 12. Energization of magnet 18 will release dog 88 for engagement with clutch driving element 14. Element 14 is integral with a gear 15 which meshes with a gear 18 secured upon constantly running shaft 48. y
With this arrangement, driving element 14 is in constant rotation and whenever it is desired to eiiect resetting of the accumulators, magnet 13 is energized to provide a connection between the element 'I4 and the resetting shaft 64.
General explanation of the circuit diagram The wiring diagram of the electric circuits of the machine is shown in Figs. 1, 1a and 1b, wherein the various cam controlled contact devices are diagramatically shown and suitably labelled L, CR or TP for identification. The cams prexed L operate only during the card. feed cycle. rI'he cams prefixed TP operate only during the total print and reset cycle, while there prefixed CR and the emitters prexed E are an constant operation. The timing of these con,- tact devices is shown in the timing diagram (Fig. 8) to which reference may be made for the actual time in the cycle of operations during which they function.
In this gure the dark lines represent the period during which the cam contacts are closed. Due to the numerous circuit connections involved in the present arrangement, it has not been advisable in all instances to show the relay magnets and their associated contacts in close proximity to one another. For purposes of clarity in the wiring arrangement, the relay contact points are shown in the circuits which they control and their relay magnets are dotted adjacent thereto. Further, the different contacts are designated with the same reference character as the controlling magnet, followed by a numeral. The complete circuitv diagram will now be described in detail and the various operations will be set forth in the order of their occurrence.
For each record card there will be a number of cycles determined by the value of the multiplier digits. Of these cycles for each card there will be iirst, two cycles during which the card is moved to pass the upper and lower brushes in succession. Following this will be a variable number of,y doubling and transfer cycles, after which will follow two so-called gathering cycles, and then the product printing and resetting cycle, thus making five invariable cycles, plus from one to ve variable cycles for each computation. During each of the two card feeding cycles, the cam contacts operate in accordance with the timing'shown in the left hand third of the diagram of Fig. 8. During each of the doubling and transfer cycles and also during each of the gathering cycles, the operation is in accordance with the central third of Fig. 8. During the product printing and resetting cycle the operation is in accordance with` the right hand third of the4 diagram. For a card having a problem requiring but one variable cycle, therey fore, there will be two card feed cycles (with cam timing as in the first third of Fig. 8), three cycles of doubling and gathering (as in the second third of Fig. 8) and a final cycle of printing (as in the last third of Fig. 8).
Starting cycles.-Referring to Fig.' 1, the switch. I1 is rst closed to connect the motor M between the mainlines and 90. With the motor M in operation, the several constantly rotating shafts and the CR cams and emitter brushes commence rotation. At the very commencement of operai tions, the brush of emitter E4 (Fig V1) is permitted to make a number of turns before the start key is operated. This is for the purpose of eiectiug a preliminary set-up of the relays generally designatedC near the bottom of Fig. 1;
yemitter EI, the 1 that is, during the first turn when the brush is on the g segment, a circuit is traceable from line 80 through wire 89, brush of emitter E4, segment y, Wire 9|, relay magnet C, and then serially through the contacts IBI, 2BI, 3BI, 4BI,y 513|, GBI, wire 84 to line 90. Relay C closes its contacts CI to provide a holding circuit through wire 85 and also closes its contacts C2 and C3. During the next cycle, when the `brush of emitter E4 is on the f segment, a circuit is traceable through contacts C3, relay magnet IC and thence serially through the contacts IBI to 6BI to line 90. On the third cycle,'when the brush of the emitter is on the segment e, the circuit is traceable through contacts IC3, relay magnet 2C, then in series through contacts 2BI6BI to line S0. In this manner the relay magnets C to 6C are energized in turn and a holding circuit is provided to maintain them energized. This is the condition in which they are shown in Fig. 1 in readiness for the depression of the start key. Depression of the start key to close contacts 'I8 will cause energize.- tion of the card feed clutch magnet 25 and the card picker mechanism will operate to feed the rst card from the magazine to the first pair of rollers I2.
At the end of this cycle, the card will be at the dotted line position shown in Fig. 5. A second depression of the start key 'I8 will again energize magnet 25 and the first card R will advance to pass the upper brushes UB While the second card is advanced by the picker II.
As the brushes UB traverse the multiplier field of the card, circuits will be completed through the perforations representing the multiplier factor. It may be here explained that in the circuit diagram, suiiicient mechanism has been shown to handle a three place multiplier and. a three place multiplicand. This has been done to obviate the repetition of similar parts.
As the index point positions 9, 8, 7, etc., are successively sensed by the brushes, the brush of emitter EI contacts the segments thereof in the order 9, 8, 7, etc. During the sensing of the positions 9 to 1, inclusive, cam contacts LI are closed and during the sensing of the zeroipositions, contacts L2 are closed and contacts LI are open. Assuming, for example, a. perforation in the l index point position, a circuit will be completed from line 80 to cam contacts CRB, card lever contacts UCLI, nection 19, cam contacts LI, wire SI, brush of segment of emitter EI, wire 82, relay magnet IB, wire 83, to line 90. It will be observed that with the contacts LI closed, a circuit through any of the brushes UB in the multiplier field will complete a circuit through the wire 8| and that as many relay magnets IB, 2B, etc. may be .energized as there are different significant gures in the multiplier factor. The function of these relay magnets is to control the number of variable cycles which the machine is to perform and the controlling is in accordance with Table I above.
During the analysis of the zero positions, circuits will be completed through those positions in which zeros occur, which are traceable from line 80, contacts CRB, UCLI, brush UB, plugconnection 19, contacts L2 (contacts LI are openat this time), relay magnets IA, 2A or 3A, wire 83 to line 90. Relay magnet IA will close its contacts IAI to provide a holding circuit extending from line 80, cam contacts L3, contacts IAI, magnet IA, wire 83, to line SII. 'I'he function of the magbrush UB, plug connets IA, 2A and 3A is to suppress the entry into 75 accumulators in those orders which are associated with columns in which zero is present in the multiplier factor.
Cycle controlling circuits- At the bottom of Fig. 1 is shown a group of relays designated C, IC, 2C, etc., which determine the number of variable cycles which are to be performed. 'Ihese relays are normally energized through circuits of which the following for magnet C is representative: This circuit follows from line 90, wire 84, serially through contacts GBI, 5BI, to IBI, magnet C, contacts CI, wire 85, to line 80. This initially setup circuit is prepared, when cards are fed through the machine in succession, during the last computation and the manner in which it is set up when the machine is first started has already been explained.
Energization of any magnet IB to 6B will shift its contacts from the position shown and will interrupt the just traced holding circuit at such point to deenergize the related magnets C to 6C and all magnets of lower order. For example, if magnet 6B were energized in response to the analysis of a '7 perforation, contacts SBI would open momentarily and all the magnets C to 8C would be deenergized. If magnet 3B were the highest order magnet in its group to be energized, it would open its contacts 3BI and cause deenergization of magnets C, IC, 2C and 3C while magnets 4C, 5C, and 6C remain energized.
Energization of any of the B magnets will close a pair of contacts IB2 to 6B2, as the case may be, to establish a circuit from line 90, wire 84, contacts 8B2, for example, wire 86, a relay magnet Y, wire 81, resistance 88, to line 88. Relay magnet Y closes its contacts YI which provide a holding circuit from line 90, contacts YI, magnet Y, wire 81, resistance 88, to line 80 and this holding circuit is maintained until the C magnets which have been deenergized are again set up in the manner which will now be explained. It may here be explained that the magnet Y, upon energization, opens a pair of contacts Y2 in the upper part of Fig. 1, before cam contacts CR3 in series therewith are closed. Thus, during the cycle in whlchsthe recordv card passes'the upper brushes, theB magnets are selectively energized and the contacts of any one thereof will cause energization of magnet Y which in turn, by openbrush and segment g, wire 9|, relay magnet C,
contacts IBI to SBI (which contacts are now closed), wire 84, to line 90. Energization of magnet C will close its contacts CI, C2, and C3. Contacts CI set up the holding circuit for magnet C and contacts C3 connect the next magnet IC in circuit with the commutator segment f. During the next vfollowing cycle, the emitter brush will 4complete a circuit through the segment f and contacts C3 to energize relay magnet IC, which in turn will close its contacts ICI, IC2, and ICB, providing a holding circuitA and also connecting the next higher magnet 2C to the commutator segment e.
If it be assumed that one of the multiplier digits sensed by the upper brushes is 7 and that such analysis caused momentary energization of relay magnet 8B, all of the magnets C to 6C Would have been deenergized and the emitter E4 would thereafter successively reenergize the C magnets, one in each of the series of successive cycles. The C magnet is energized during vthe latter part of the same cycle in which the card passes the upper brushes and the multiplier is sensed. The IC magnet is energized in the next cycle during which the card passes the lower brushes and the multiplicand factor is sensed. The remaining magnets 2C to 8C are energized in the following cycles and in order.
When all the C magnets are energized, a circuit is traceable from line 80, resistance 88, contacts C2, IC2, 2C2, etc., to 8C2, contacts YI, to line 90. This circuit through resistance 88 short circuits the relay Y, causing it to become deenergized. Deenergization of magnet Y will cause the machine to automatically enter upon the so-called gathering cycles of operation.
If sensing of the multiplier factor resulted in deenergization of only the rst three magnets C, IC and 2C, then this short circuit will be completed after three cycles of operation, that is, after these magnets have been reenergized in succession.
In Fig. 1 are shown contacts Y2, which, upon denergization of magnet Y will close to complete a circuit from line 80, upper card lever contacts UCL2, relay magnet IG, contacts Y2, cam contacts CRS, contacts P3, contacts 2Gi to line 88. Magnet IG will close its contacts IG5`to provide a holding circuitfrom line 98, cam contacts CRI, contacts IGS, magnet IG, card lever contacts UCLZ, which are closed due to the presence of a card at the upper brush station, to vline 80. Magnet IG controls gathering operations which will be explained in detail later. During such operations, cam contacts CRS close. These contacts are timed to close momentarily and open again before cam contacts CR3 close. A circuit is thereby established which is traceable from line SII, contacts CR5, relay contacts P2, contacts IGS, relay magnet 2G, to line 88. Magnet 2G closes its contacts 2G5 to provide a holding circuit through cam contacts CRS and at the same time opening of contacts 2GI prevents reenergization of the magnet IG.
Magnet 2G controls gathering operations during the second gathering cyclek and during this cycle cam contacts CRT close momentarily to establish a circuit from line 90, contacts CR'I, relay contacts 2G8. relay magnet P, to line 88. Magnet P will close its contact PI to provide a holding circuit through cam contacts 'I'P4 and the consequent opening of contacts P2 and P3 will prevent further energization of the magnets IG or 2G.
The magnet P controls the total printing circuits as will be explained and in addition closes a pair of contacts P4 at the top of Fig. 1 which will complete the circuit through the print cam clutch magnet 48 and the reset clutch magnet 'I8 to initiate a cycle of operation of these mechanisms. During the total printing cycle, during which the TP cams operate, contacts TF3 close to energize the card feed clutch magnet 25 after the accumulators have been cleared and the next following card will proceed to pass the upper brushes.
Entering circuits-The manner in which the amounts are entered into the accumulators will now be explained andthe control circuits traced.
It has been pointed out that as the card traverses the upper brushes during the first card feed cycle, magnets IB to 6B are energized to determine the number of cycles required for the card sensed. It may be mentioned at this point that for each card passing through the machine, there are two card feed cycles, the first card feed cycle being that in which the card traverses the upper brushes and the second being the cycle in which it traverses the lower brushes. As is common in other multiplying and statistical machines generally, when the machine is first started, there is an additional feeding cycle required to bring the very rst card into position in readiness to pass the analyzing brushes so that at the very commencement of operations there are in fact three vcard feeding cycles but that for the succeeding cards only two take place, because as the first card passes the upper brushes, the next succeeding card is advanced from the hopper to a position in readiness to pass the upper brushes when computations have been completed under control of the rst card. To avoid confusion, therefore, first card feed cycle designates the cycle in which the card passes the upper brushes and second card feed cycle designates the cycle in which the card passes the lower brushes. As the card continues downwardly to pass the lower brushes LB during the second card feed cycle, the multiplicand amount is entered into the four accumulators MC, #1, #2, and #3. The entering circuits are traceable (Fig. lb) from line 90, through cam contacts CR9, card lever contacts LCL, lower brush LB, and through plug connection 9| to socket 92 and adding magnet 32 of accumulator MC. From socket 92 of accumulator MC, connections 93 are made as shown to sockets 94 which have connections with relay contacts |A2, 2A2, and 3A2, as indicated.
Between these contacts and the sockets 92 of these three accumulators are contacts H2 plug connected as shown. The contacts H2 are provided to prevent undesirable back circuits and are controlled by relay magnet H, shown in Fig. 1. 'I'he operation is as follows:
- As the cardmoves to pass the upper brushes, the relay magnet H is deenergized and contacts H2 are open. Toward the end of this first cycle, the cam contacts L4 close to energize the relay H thereby closing its contacts HI to establish a holding circuit through cam contacts CRI. The contacts CRI maintain magnet H energized through that portion of the next following cycle during which the card traverses the lower brushes so that at such time the contacts H2 are closed and they are open at all other times.
As explained above, the relay magnets |A, 2A, and 3A (Fig. 1) are energized in response to the presence of zeros in the multiplier factor. Thus, if the units order of the multiplier were zero, magnet 3a would have been energized and its contacts 3A2 consequently opened so that ACC#3 would receive no entry from the brushes LB.
Doubling circuits.-When an amount is to be read out of one of the accumulators and reentered therein to effect doubling of the amount, a plug connection 95 (Fig. 1b) is made between the plug socket 96 of that accumulator and relay contacts ID2, and a further plug connection 91 is made from the contacts ID2 to socket 92 of the same accumulator.
Upon closure of contacts ID2, a circuit is traceable as follows: from line 90, wire 98, emitter E2, through wires 99, readout segments 4|, brushes 40, common strip 42, socket 96, connection 95,
contacts ID2, connection 91, socket 92, adding magnet 32, to line 80. The adding magnet 32 of the accumulator will thus be energized at the time determined by the position of the readout brush 42 in the related order.
Transferring circuits.-When it is desired to transfer an amount from the MC accumulator to any of the others, the connection |00 is made from the readout socket 96 to the contacts IT2, 2'I2 and 3T2 and further connection |0| is made to extend toward the adding magnet 32. Thus, with contacts IT2 closed, for example, a circuit will extend from line 90, wire 98, emitter E2, wires 99, segments 4I, brushes 40, readout strip 42, socket 96, connection |00, contacts IT2, connections |0| and 91 to socket 92, and thence through magnet 32 to line 80. The magnet 32 of ACC#1 will thus be energized in accordance with the amount standing on accumulator MC.
Gathering circuits.-When itI is desired to gather the sub-products from ACC#1 and ACC#2 linto ACC#3, a plug connection |02 is made to contacts |G2 and a connection |03 is made to contacts 2G2. Further connections |04 and |05 are made from these contacts to sockets 92 of ACC#3 in the proper denominational positions. When contacts |G2 are closed, the gathering circuit which is similar to the above described transferring circuit will follow from the common strip 42 in the units order of ACC#1 through connection |02, contacts IGZ, connections |04, socket 92 of the hundreds order of ACC#3 and thence through magnet 32 in that order to line If contacts 2G2 are closed, a similar circuit is traceable from the readout strip 42 in the units order of ACC#2 through connection |03, contacts 2G2, connection |05 to the socket 93 in the tens order of ACC#3 and thence through the adding magnet 32 of that order.
Product printing circuits.-When the final product is to be printed, contacts P5 are closed and through plug connections |06 and |01 made thereto, circuits may be traced from the readout strip 42 in the units order of ACC#3, through connection |06, contacts P5, connection |01, printing magnet 50, to line 00.
The above describes briefly the manner in which the different circuits are completed and in Fig. 1b has been shown the plug connections for a single order of each of the accumulators. It4 will be understood that similar connections are made in the other positions. It remains now to explain the manner in which the sequence of operations is determined so that the doubling,
transferring and gathering circuits take place in proper order for the different problems.
Circuit selecting mechanism Referring to Table I, it will be noted that for each of the accumulators #1, #2, and #3,v the number of doubling and transferring cycles will depend upon the value of the multiplier digit associated with that accumulator. For example, if
the multiplier digit associated with ACC#1 were ,Y
9, it would be necessary to cause such accumulator to double itself three times and to receive the amount in the MC accumulator by transferring once. The mechanism shown in Fig. la is designed to predetermine and bring.I
about the proper type and number of doubling and transfer cycles required for each of the digits.
Referring now to Fig. 1a, for each of the accumulators there is provided an emitter IE3, 2E3, or 3E3, provided with eight segments to a plug socket |98 through relay contacts H9 traversed by the constantly rotating emitter brush'. the common ring of each emitter is wired (which are controlled by relay H) from which socket plug'connection |99 is made to the socket LCL, lower brush LB, connection |99, socket |98,
contacts H9, the emitter segment corresponding to the 'perforation sensed, wire II9, magnet K, wire II|, to line 89. Magnet K will close its contacts KI to provide a holding circuit from line 99, wire III, magnet K, contacts KI, wire ||2, cam contacts TPI, wire II3, to line 99. Thus, for the example of Fig. 2, where the multiplier is 375, the magnet K would be energized through the emitter IE9; the l'f magnet K would be energized through its emitter 2E3; and the 9" magnet K would be energized through the emitter 9E3, and these magnets would remain energized throughout the subsequent calculating cycles, and until th'e commencement of the total printing cycle, at which time contacts 'I'PI open. Magnets K also cause closure of relay contacts `K2V and K8 through which the doubling and transfer circuit controlling relay magnets D and T are energized. These contacts K2 and K9 of each order of the multiplier are connected' by wires Ill to a group of vertical wires I|5 through each of which wires current is passed in succession during successive cycles. A separate group of wires I I5 is provided for each multiplier order.
Specifically, the first wire II5 to the leftof each group of wires is connected to one side of vline during the third cycle of operation. The
next wire is rendered live during the fourth cycle; the next line,v during the fifth cycle; and so on,
and only so many of the wires II5 are rendered live as are necessary for the solution of the problem.
I'he manner of connection between the wires III and II5 is in accordance with Table I. For
example, in the 9 position, the doublingl magnet ID is connected to three successive lines I|5 -so that doubling will take place in three successive cycles. The transfer magnet IT is con.- nected to the fourth line and will be energized to eil'ect a transfer after the three doubling cycles have taken place. In the 8" position it will be seen that there are no K3 contacts and only K2 Stepping of the relay will advance the arms II1 fromthe 1to the 2 position, which they occupy during the second cycle wherein the card passes the lower brushes and entries are made into the several accumulators, and during such cycle also the relay magnets K are set up in accordance with the value -of the multiplier.
Near the end of this second cycle, magnet |29 is again energized andthe arms III are advanced to the 3 position where they bridge the segments II8 inthat position and the common arcuate strips |23. Thus during the next succeeding or third cycle, a circuit is traceable from line 99, through contacts 2G6, IGS, P6, then branching through the three strips- |29, the wipers of ,arms II'I, segments IIS, the first wire ||5 in each group. From these Wires II5 the circuit will continue according to the setting of the K2 and K3 contacts to effect either doubling or transferring operations separately for each of the accumulators I, #2, or #3.
For each cycle of operation the arms II'I are advanced to connect the next wires 'I I5 to the line and this goes on until the cycle controlling magnets C have all been reenergized, at which time, as explained above, the magnet Y is short circuited and as a consequence its contacts Y5 (Fig. la) open, thus preventing further stepping of the arm II'I. Also, as explained above, upon deenergization of magnet Y, the gathering magnet IG (Fig. 1) is energized. 'I'his magnet also controls the contacts |G2 (Fig. 1b) to complete the gathering circuits and thereafter the second gathering magnet 2G is energized to control the contacts 2G2 of Fig.'1b to effect a further gathering, and following this the magnet P is energized to close contacts P5 of Fig. 1b to perm printing circuits to be completed.
During these gathering and printing cycles, one of the contacts P8, IGS and 2GB (Fig. la) is open to prevent any energization of the D or T magnets through lines II5. During the ultimate printing cycle, cam contacts TP2 (Fig. la) close to energize reset magnet |22 so that the arm I I1 may return to its initial position.
It will be observed that where a multiplier digit is unity, that. none of the K magnets related to that order are energized/so that no doubling or transferring takes place for that accumulator. The same is true where the multiplier digit is zero and that in addition the initial entry for the related accumulator is suppressed.
tion will now be reviewed with particular refcontacts are provided which are connected to the first three wires. I I5 to bring about doubling in three successive cycles.
The lines II5 of each group are connected to a set of commutator. segments |I6 of a stepping relay whose contact arms I'I'I are secured to a spring-biased lever `I I8 which is advanced through pawl and ratchet II9 under control of a magnet |29. The ratchet is held in position. by a retaining. pawl I2| which is controlled by releasing magnet I22. The operation is'such that during the ilrst cycle in which theA card passes the upper brush station and the cycle controlling magnets C are set up to energize relay magnet Y (Fig. l), the related contacts YS (Fig. la)l are closed so that near the end of this cycle, contacts CB2 will complete a circuit from'line 99, contacts Y5, contacts CB2, stepping magnet |29, contacts P8, IGS, 2GB to line 99.
erence to the problem of Fig. 2 to point out the sequence of operations. When the machine is first started, switch 11 is closed and. motor M is placed in operation, so that the constantly running CR cams and emitters function. The brush of emitter E4 will make a number of revolutions during which the relay magnets C-6C will be energized in succession and holding circuits will maintain them energized. The start key is then 'depressed to bring about a.` preliminary card feeding'cycle which advances the first record card to the position designated R in Fig. 5. During this cycle, the relay magnet H is energized, but
this has no effect during this cycle.
First car'd feed cycle- The start key is now operated `a. second time to energize the card feed clutch magnet 25. so that the card now passes the upper bush UB. As the card traverses the brushes the, MP amount is sensed and circuits through contacts LI are completed to energize the magnets IB-SB in accordance with the value of the MP digits. With particular reference to Fig. 2, this is the cycle designated I in such iigure and where the multiplier factor is 3'55, as in the example, the highest order magnet 6B is energized. At the time the contacts Li are open and contacts L2 close so that relay magnets IA-3A may be energized if Os are present. The energization of magnet 5B has causedmagnet Y to become energized and a holding circuit provided therefor. During this same cycle, when the brush of emitter E4 reaches its segment g, the relay magnet C is energized and held. The magnet Y opens its contact Y2 to prevent energization in the gathering magnet IG when contacts CRS close later in the cycle, and a further pair of contacts YB are closed to commence the operation of the stepping relay.
Second card feed cycle- During this cycle, the card passes the lower brushes and circuits are completed to enter the MC amount into each of the accumulators through the now closed contacts H2 and at the same time the MP amount is entered into the K relays through the contacts H3. For the example of Fig.' 2, therefore, accumulators MC, I, 2 and. 3 each receive the amount 642 and through the emitters IE3, 2E3 and 3E3, the 3, I and 5 relay magnets K of the three sets of relays respectively are energized and held to represent the setting of the MP amount 375. During this cycle, when the brush of emitter E4 is at the f segment, relay IC is picked up and the stepping relay advanced to the 3 position.
Third cuela-During this cycle the relay magnets ID, 2D, and 3D are energized and close their respective contacts ID2, 2D2, 3D2 through which circuits are completed from the readout devices of the accumulators Nos. l, 2 and 3 to their related adding magnets, whereby the amount in each of these accumulators is doubled as indicated along line 3 of Fig. 2. During this cycle relay magnet 2C is energized.
Fourth cycle- During this fourth cycle, the relay magnets IT, 2D and 3D are energized, causing a transfer from the MC accumulator to accumulator No. i and further doubling of the amounts in accumulators No. 2 and No. 3. Duringthis cycle the relay magnet C3 is energized.
Fifth cycle.-During this cycle the relay magnets 2T and 3T are energized, causing the amount in the MC accumulator to be concurrently transferred to the No. 2 and No. 3 accumulators. During this cycle relay magnet C4 is energized.
Sixth mola-During this cycle the relay mag net 2T alone is energized and a single transfer is effected from the MC accumulator to accumulator No. 2. Also, during the cycle relay magnet C5 is energized.
from accumulator MC to accumulator No. 2 re- 1 peated. During this cycle, when the brush of emitter E4 is at the a segment, a circuit is completed to energize relay magnet 8C, which energization completes the series circuit through the contacts C2 and 5C2,`causing deenergization of the relay magnet Y and consequent closure of its contacts Y2 so that, when contacts CR3 close at the end of the cycle, relay magnet IG is energized and a holding circuit established for it through contacts CR, which maintains the relay energized throughout the entering portion of the next cycle.
Eighth @cla-With magnet IG energized, its
alcance l contacts IGZ direct entries from accumulator No. I to accumulator No. 3 to effect the first gathering operation represented along line 8 of Fig. 2. During this cycle contacts CRE close and magnet 2G will be energized and held through contacts CRS.
Ninth cycle- During this cycle the amount in accumulator No. 2 is transferred to accumulator No. 3 so that the latter now contains the complete product. During this cycle the cam contacts CRT close to energize relay magnet P whose contacts P4 energize the printand reset clutch magnets and contacts P5 connect the readout device of accumulator No. 3 to the type bar magnets 58 so that during this cycle the amount standing in accumulator No. 3 is printed and all the accumulators are then zeroized. Toward the end of the total printing cycle,` cam contacts TF3 close .to energize the card feed clutch magnet, and operations are now repeated upon the second card in the same manner beginning with the operations identified above as rst card feed cycle.
Modification A modified form of the arrangement is shown is Fig. 11 whereby the total number of cycles required to effect multiplication is less than that for the main form. 'I'his is brought about by re-arranging the order in which doublingand transferring cycles for certain of the digits take place, and may be readily understood from an inspection of the following table:
TABLE II MP digit 3rd cycle 4th cycle 5th cycle 6th cycle 9 Double... Double Double Transfer.
...do do Trausfer do Do. 6 .do ...do
Double Transfer- 4 do Transfen. 2
1 0 (Disable entering) form the sub-product of 6 is obtained by the doubling operations followed by two transfer operations, and '7 by two doubling operations followed by three transfer operations. In the modified form, the 6 is obtained by a. single i doubling operation followed. by a transfer oper- Seventh cycle.-During the seventh cycle relay A magnet 2T is again energized and the transfer ation and then a second doubling operation, while the '7 is obtained by a` doubling operation followed by a transfer and then a doubling and then a second transfer operation. In this manner, a cycle of operation is saved when these digits are a part of the multiplier and the number of relays in the cycle control mechanism may be reduced.
Fig. l2 shows the modified arrangement of the circuits extending from the emitter EI and it will be noted that the relays 6B and 6C are dispensed with. The emitter segments 5, 6 and a control the relay 4B while the segments 'I and 9 control the segment 5B. In Fig. 11 the sets of lines II5 now have each onlyY four separate wires extending to segments I I6 which arearranged concentricaily about the common conductor In.
It will beobserved that a doubling operation occurs in the third cycle in all cases except where the multiplier digit is 1 or 0. This fact permits the elimination of a number of relay contacts K2 and K3 by providing a pair of contacts Ka which, are normally closed as shown in Fig. 11 so that during the third cycle the doubling magnet ID is energized through a circuit extending from the 3 wire H5 to the lowermost wire IIB, contacts Ka, magnet ID, to line 80. 'I'his circuit will cause the initial doubling operation to take place. It will be observed that. the relay K corresponding tothe multiplier digit 2 is omitted and another relay substituted therefor which is wired to the and 1 segments of the emitter IEB. The presence of a 0 or a "1 will energize this lower- ,most relay K to open the contacts Ka so that the doubling circuit is not completed for these digits.
` While there has been shown anddescribed and pointed out the fundamental novel features ofc*- the invention as applied to two modifications, it
will be understood` that various omissions and substitutions and changes in the form anddetails of the device illustrated and in its operation may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the invention. It is theintention therefore to be limited only as indicated by the scope of the following claims'.
What is claimed is as follows 1. In a machine of the class described, an accumulator, entering means therefor, means for controlling said entering means to' enter an initial amount into the accumulator,'means settable by the accumulator to represent the amount standing therein, means including said settable means for controlling said entering means to enter into the accumulator the amount standing on the settable means to double the amount therein, means for rendering said last named f means effective, mechanism selectively settable in accordance with the value of a digit, cyclically operating control means, and means operated by said control means and said selectively settable means jointly for causing the operation of said rendering means, once or a plurality of times in succession, to effect doubling of said initially entered amount or repeated doubling thereof in accordance withl the setting of said mechanism.
2. In a machine of the class described, record sensing means, a pair of accumlators, entering means for each, means for controlling said entering means to enter an initial amount in each accumulator, means for each accumulator settable thereby to represent the amount standing therein, means including the settable means of one accumulator for controlling the entering means of the same accumulator to enter therein the amount standingon its settable means to double the amount therein, means for lrendering said last 'named means effective, means including the settable means of the second accumulator for controlling the entering means of the first accumulator to enter therein the amount standing on the settable means of the second accumulator to `thereby transfer the amount in the second accumlator to the first accumulator, means for rendering said last named means effective, mechanism selectively settable in accordance with the value of a record card perforation, cyclically operating control means, means operated by said control means and said selectively settable means jointly for causing the operation of the first named rendering means, once or a plurality of times in succession to effect doubling of the amount in the first accumulator or repeated doubling thereof in accordance with the selective setting of said mechanism, and further means operated, after the operation of said last named means and by said control means and said selectively settable means jointly, for causing the operation of the second named rendering means once or a plurality of times in succession to effect transferring or repeated transferring of the amount in the second accumulator to the rst accumulator in accordance with the selective setting of said mechanism.
3. In a machine-of the class described, a entry receiving device, an accumulator, means for effecting the entry of a like amount in each, means for reading out the amount in the accumulator and reentering the same to effect doubling of the amount therein, means for transferring the amount in the entry receiving device to said accumulator, means settable in accord- Aance with the value of a digit and arranged to determine, foreach digit set up, a sequence of operations for said doubling means and said transferring means to increase the initial amount in said accumulator to an amount representing the initial amount times the value of the digit set in said settable means, cyclically operating control means, means controlled by said control means'and part of said settable means for effecting the operation of said doubling means in accordance with the digit vset up, and further means controlled by said control means and another part of said settable means for effecting the operation of said transferring means in accordance with the digit set up.
4.` The invention set forth in claim 3 in which the means settable in accordance with the Value of a digit is arranged to determine a sequence times the digit, or the highest multiple of the amount obtainable by doubling and which is less than the product, followed by one or more transferring operations to further increase said highest doubled multiples to the product of the amount times the digit.
5. The invention set forth in claim 3 in which the means settable in accordance with the value of a digit is arranged to determine the sequence of doubling and transferring operations so that for any digit set up there. will be a maximum of five successive operations with doubling operations preceding transferring operations.
6. The invention set forth in claim 3 in which the means settable in accordance with the value of a digitvis arranged to determine the sequence of doubling and transferring operations with interchanged order of doubling and transferring operations so that for any digit set up there will be a maximum of four successive operations.
7. In a multiplying machine, a pair of accumulators, entering means for each accumulator, means for causing said entering means to enter a multip;lcand factor in each accumulator, readout mechanism for each accumulator, separate connecting means for connecting the readout mechanism of one of said accumulators to the entering means of the other accumulator, further connecting means for connecting the readout mechanism of said other accumulator to its related entering means, a relay for rendering said first named connecting means eective, a second relay for rendering the second named connecting means effective, a device settable to represent any multiplier digit greater than I, a cyclically operating mechanism, circuit connections completed through said relays under joint control of said device and said mechanism in accordance with the setting of said device, to render said connections eflective in a predetermined sequence, an emitter coordinated with said cyclically operating mechanism for eecting transferring of the amounts standing in said readout mechanisms, through the connections rendered effective by the relays, to the said other accumulator whereby upon operation of the entering means the multiplicand factor entered therein will be increased to an amount representing the product of thel factor by the multiplier digit.
8. In a multiplying machine, an entry receiving device, a plurality of accumulators, entering means for said device and for each of said accumulators, a readout device for said entry receiving device and for each accumulator, transferring connections between the readout device of said entry receiving device and the entering means of each accumulator, doubling connections for each accumulator between the readout device of each accumulator and the related entering means thereof, means for causing said entering means to initially enter a multiplicand amount into said entry receiving device and the same amount into each accumulator, means for causing the I amounts standing in the several readout devices to be transmitted to the several entering means through said connections, a multiplier set up device for each accumulator, each settable to represent a multiplier digit greater than I, means for each accumulator for completing its related transferring connections, means for each accumulator for completing its related doubling connections, a cyclically operable control means for each multiplier set up device, means jointly controlled by each control means and its related multiplier set up device for causing completion of the related doubling and transferring connections in accordance with the digit set up and in a predetermined sequence to raise the amount initially entered in the related accumulator to the product of said amount by the multiplier digit, each of said control means operating ccncurrently whereby products will be formed concurrently in all the accumulators.
9. The invention set forth in claim 8 in which transmitting means including connections are provided between the readout device of one accumulator and the entering means of another, together with means for completing said connections when all the productsv have been obtained,
said transmitting means thereupon causing the amuse product in said one accumulator to be transmitted to said other accumulator.
10. The invention set forth in claim 8 in which a further accumulator and entering means therefor are provided and in which transmitting means including connections are provided between the readout devices of each of the iirst named accumulators and the entering means of said further accumulator, together with means for completing the transmitting connections from each readout device in turn when all the products have been obtained, said transmitting means causing the product in each accumulator to Ybe transmitted in turn to said further accumulator.
11. In a machine of the class described, means for sensing Ia record card for perforations representing a multiplier amount, means for sensing said card for perforations representing a multiplicand amount, a plurality of accumulators, one for each possible digital position of the multiplier,
.-entering means for each accumulator, connections between said second named sensing means and the entering means of each accumulator for enabling the multiplicand to be entered from said card into each accumulator, means controlled by said ilrst named sensing means for ascertaining the digital positions in which significant multiplier digits occur, and means controlled thereby for rendering said connections ineffective to enter the multiplicand in accumulators whose related multiplier digital positions do not Ycontain a significant digit.
12. In a machine of the class described, an accumulator, entering means therefor, a settable device, means for entering an amount therein,
means for causing said entering means to enter a like amount in said accumulator and in said device, me'ans for reading out the amount in said accumulator and reentering the same therein to effect doubling ofthe said amount, controlling means therefor to render said doubling means effective, means for transferring the amount in said settable device to said accumulator, controlling means therefor to render said transferring means eilective, means settable to represent certain digits, cyclically operated control means and devices controlled by said settable means and said control means jointly and in accordance with the digit represented for selectively causing the control means for the doubling means to operate once or a plurality of times andfor thereafter selectively causing the control means for the transferring means to operate once -or a plurality of times whereby the amount initially entered in the accumulator will be increased to the product of said amount by the digit represented on said settable means.
WILLIAM LANG.4
US82082A 1935-12-21 1936-05-27 Multiplying machine Expired - Lifetime US2192599A (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US487341XA true 1935-12-21 1935-12-21
US82082A US2192599A (en) 1935-12-21 1936-05-27 Multiplying machine

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US82082A US2192599A (en) 1935-12-21 1936-05-27 Multiplying machine

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2192599A true US2192599A (en) 1940-03-05

Family

ID=21956164

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US82082A Expired - Lifetime US2192599A (en) 1935-12-21 1936-05-27 Multiplying machine

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (1) US2192599A (en)
DE (1) DE657267C (en)
FR (1) FR48378E (en)
GB (1) GB487341A (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2722375A (en) * 1950-12-29 1955-11-01 Cie Des Machines Bull Sa Paris Multiplying devices for accounting machines

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE975966C (en) * 1949-06-29 1963-01-03 Zuse K G Calculating machine for performing arithmetic operations

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2722375A (en) * 1950-12-29 1955-11-01 Cie Des Machines Bull Sa Paris Multiplying devices for accounting machines

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
FR48378E (en) 1938-02-08
DE657267C (en) 1938-03-04
GB487341A (en) 1938-06-20

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2228330A (en) Calculating machine
US2166928A (en) Multiplying machine
US2090103A (en) Record controlled and record making accounting machine
US2192599A (en) Multiplying machine
US2174683A (en) Accounting apparatus
US2192612A (en) Multiplying machine
US2191567A (en) Calculating machine
US2359616A (en) Accounting machine
US2350499A (en) Multiplying machine
US2213565A (en) Multiplying machine
US2375332A (en) Record controlled accounting machine
US2195850A (en) Multiplying machine
US2304495A (en) Multiplying machine
US1982020A (en) Tabulating machine
US2165325A (en) Accounting machine
US2181999A (en) Printing mechanism
US2045435A (en) Record controlled and record making accounting machine
US2375275A (en) Record controlled accounting machine
US2461438A (en) Record controlled accounting machine
US2126666A (en) Multiplying machine
US2126621A (en) Tabulating machine
US2244262A (en) Record posting machine
US2264622A (en) Record controlled multiplying machine
US2066764A (en) Tabulating machine
US2104542A (en) Automatic punching machine