US2167393A - Pneumatic drilling method and means - Google Patents

Pneumatic drilling method and means Download PDF

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US2167393A
US2167393A US715534A US71553434A US2167393A US 2167393 A US2167393 A US 2167393A US 715534 A US715534 A US 715534A US 71553434 A US71553434 A US 71553434A US 2167393 A US2167393 A US 2167393A
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drill
air
bit
well
cuttings
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David J Muncy
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B49/00Testing the nature of borehole walls; Formation testing; Methods or apparatus for obtaining samples of soil or well fluids, specially adapted to earth drilling or wells
    • E21B49/02Testing the nature of borehole walls; Formation testing; Methods or apparatus for obtaining samples of soil or well fluids, specially adapted to earth drilling or wells by mechanically taking samples of the soil
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B49/00Testing the nature of borehole walls; Formation testing; Methods or apparatus for obtaining samples of soil or well fluids, specially adapted to earth drilling or wells
    • E21B49/005Testing the nature of borehole walls or the formation by using drilling mud or cutting data

Description

Ju y25,1939. D. J. MUVNCY 2,167,393

PNEUMATIC DRILLING METHOD AND MEANS Original Filed March 14, 1934 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 i 6 Am v July 25, 1939. D. J. MUNCY v I 2,167,393

PNEUMATIC DRILLING METHOD AND MEANS 7 Original Filed March l4, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented July 25, 1939 v David J. Muncy, Amarillo, Tex.

Application March 14, 1934, Serial. No. 715,534 Renewed July 26, 1938 This invention relates to the art of boring and drilling, particularly to core drilling and sample taking for mineral testing and other geological tests where a bore of relatively smalldiameter is cut to considerable depth. a

The primary object of the invention is to provide a dual system of dry sample taking, where in addition to the core, the cuttings from around the core are pneumatically conveyed to the top of the well and collected in a receptacle for visual inspection. By the use of air or gas as the compressable fluid conveyer none of the material cut is dissolved, so that the entire sample is collected. Further by the use of compressed air or gas 16; it is possible to get dry samples of soluble formations, where it. would be impossible to collect a solid sample by using water as a circulating medium, as in sample taking in potash, saltor other soluble materials. I

An object of the invention is the provision of a method of drilling or boring whereby the cut material is pneumatically conveyed, as cut, away from the point or cutting and is discharged from the top of the well.

Another object is the provision of a method and apparatus for boring or drilling wherein material is removed as it is cut, by the application of penumatic pressure acting to float the cut material from the well on a compressible fluid col- 30 umn discharging at the well head.

A further object is the provision, in well drilling apparatus, of pneumatically controlled means for selectively regulating the weight of a drill rod upon a cutting tool carried thereby, at its point of cutting.

. A still further object is the provision of a method and means for pneumatically removing material from a bore as it is cut, and for arranging the removed material in column form in transparent receptacle means approximating the dimension of the bore being cut, thus enabling visual inspection of thecuttings as work progresses.

Other objects will be apparent from the de- 45 scription.

way valve arrangement used in connection with the auxiliary device shown in Figure 3.

In the drawings, wherein like reference characters have been used throughout to designate like parts, and with particular reference to Figure 1, I0 represents the usual rotary for driving a rotating drill provided with suitable drive means (not shown), and II, designates the usual derrick platform. Reference numeral l2 designates the usual well casing having a packed con- 10 nection [3 with a rotating hollow slip'sleeve I4. The slip sleeve I has a packed connection l'l at its upper end with a drill stem [8 concentrically arranged within the slip sleeve and clutched thereto by a clutch l6. The stem I8 is connected in the usual manner to the regular swivel block I5. The swivel block supports the drill stem. from the usual derrick (not shown) in the manner common in such structures. From the lower portion of the slip sleeve ll the smaller drill stem or pipe l8 extends, and upon the lower'end of the same there is threaded or otherwise attached, a core barrel l9a which carries a drill'bit I! having toothed cutters 20. .Within the core barrel 19a and the drill bit l9, which are hollow, is the usual core shell or core catcher" 80. which is so arranged that aspace III is provided between the inner periphery of the drill l9 and the outer periphery of the core shell 80. It will be apparent that the shell 80 extends downwardly approximately as far as do" the drill teeth 20 so as to prevent the escape of any substantial amount of air from the bore into the central portion of the core shell. The shell 80 is also closed at its upper end but it is to be noted that the space 8| is continued and leads into the interior of the drill stem. This is more or less conventional in core shells of this sort audit is not my intention to limit myself to this particular form, as it may well appear that other casings for this purpose 0 i bits, and other parts. In fact, it is not necessary that a rotary drill be used, as my invention will operate equally well with other forms of, drills, such as the spudding type or any method by which material is loosened or broken away.from the cutting means.

' A pipe 2| is suitably connected to the casing I2. below the packed connection l3 and leads to a low pressure blower B which is located upon the platform II and which is capable of forcing a com-'- paratively low pressure head of air, through the upipe 2| and into the casing l2 for a purpose to be described later. A motor M or other suitable source of power, serves to operate the blower.

Above the swivel block l5, instead of the usual gooseneck, I have provided a T-joint 22 having arms 22a and 22b and also a valve 23 in the arm 22b and a second valve 24 in the other arm 22a. A flexible conduit 25 leads from the arm 22a. to the intake 26a. of a centrifugal gravity separator 28- which is suitably supported, as at 3|, at one side of the platform II. The separator 26 may have a window 21 on one side wall thereof and is provided on its top wall with an air exhaust 28 and on its bottom with a funnel-like outlet 29 for the cuttings or samples which are discharged therefrom into a relatively tall and narrow receptacle 30 which has a dimension approximating that of the bore being cut by the drill and which is formed of transparent material. In practice it may be advisable to use an impervious walled receptacle of similar size and shape, but in that event windows would be provided so that the various strata could be observed as they are deposited.

In operation, the drill is rotated in the usual manner and the valve 23 in the arm 22b of the T-joint 22 is closed. The valve 24 in the opposite arm is operated and the motor M and low pressure blower B are started. Air under comparatively low pressure is pumped into the casing |2 by way of the pipe 2|. By reason of the packed connection between the casing l2 and the slip sleeve I4 and the packed connection between the sleeve l4 and the inner tube or drill stem I8, the air is forced in a downward direction as indicated by the arrows. The air at this pressure has an extremely high velocity and passes through the interstices between the teeth 28 of the drill l9, into the space 8| between the casing 80 and the inner periphery of the drill l9 and up through the stem l8. The velocity of the air is so great that it carriers or floats the small bits of cut material up the space 8| and stem or tube N as fast as they are separated from the parent material. In this way there is no opportunity for relative large masses of material to accumulate and clog the device, and as the air can get into the space 8| and stem i8 only through the interstices between the teeth 25, the air current literally blows the cut material away from the teeth 20 as fast as it is cut. It will also be apparent that the stream of air passing around the drill bit and through the interstices of the bit teeth will have a cooling effect upon the bit and will serve to cool the same and prevent the damage incident to overheating. The air current, carrying the cut material, continues up the pipe i8, passes through the valve 24 in the T-joint 22, through the conduit 25 and. into the centrifugal separator 26 by way of the intake 2611,. Within the separator, the cuttings fall by gravity through the funnel-like outlet 29 intothe transparent receptacle 30 while air escapes through the exhaust 28. As the receptacle 30 has dimensions approximating those of thebore of the well or core, the various strata, o, w. :r, y and z are deposited therein in layers or strata approximating the thickness in which they actually appear in the material through which the drill is passing. Although it is, of course, apparent that they are deposited in the receptacle 3B in the inverse order of their appearance in the soil. When a receptacle is filled, it is .a simple matter to stop the operation of the drill and motor M, remove the receptacle and substitute-a new one therefor. Or, by means of a two-way outlet in the receptacle 30, receptacles could be switched without stopping the drill. In this way, the operators of the rig have a continuous picture of the various strata and, also, the objectional features of hydraulic sample taking, such, for instance, as the dissolving of minerals in the solution, are eliminated. With this objection done away with, it is possible also, to make an absolutely accurate analysis of the various soil and rock formations which are being drilled. While I have shown a centrifugal separator, any other type of pneumatic separator that would perform the operation described might serve my purpose as well.

It will be noted that a second motor M is located adjacent the motor M. This motor M operates a high pressure air compressor C which compresses air into a high pressure tank 32. Numerous conduit connections 34' and a connection 34 are located on the tank 32 and those connections 34' may be used for various purposes in the carrying on of the work. The connection 34, however, has connected to it a flexible conduit 33 which leads to the upper end of the drill stem l8 by way of the arm 22b and valve 23 of the T-joint 22. As stated before, this valve 23 is normally closed when the usual sample taking operation is being performed. However, it occasionally occurs that the drill will become clogged with gummy material, mud or the like and the air current will thereby be prevented from passing through the interstices between the drill teeth and upward in the space .8| and pipe l8. When this occurs, the drilling apparatus need not be stopped but the valve 24 closed and the motor M is stopped. The valve 23 in the T-joint 22 is opened and air under high pressure is forced down through the pipe I8 and outwardly through the interstices between the drill teeth 20, and upwardly through the clogged mass therearound. The resulting pressure excess is relieved by a valve 2|a' in the pipe 2|. This serves to sufficiently loosen up the clogging material so that the valve 23 may again be shut off, the valve 24 opened, and the motor M started again. Thus, it is apparent that whenever the drill bit becomes clogged it is a very simple matter to perform the above back blowing operation, and continue with the sample taking without loss of valuable time or stopping the drill. This is far superior in both time and efficiency to present methods of cleaning the drill, and making it unnecessary to remove the entire drill string and drill.

Figure 3 shows an accessory device which is used in connection with my sample taking invention. It frequently happens that in taking samples from a short distance below the surface when a short drill string is being used that the weight of the string is insuflicient to cause the drill bit to bite into the material and cut thesame. Various methods have been tried to overcome this but I have devised an extremely simple and affective method and structure that is designed to be used in conjunction with my particular sample taking mechanism.

The mechanism by which I accomplish this consists of a doubly flanged collar 50 which is removably secured to the slip sleeve I4 around the means 49 which tightly grip the sleeve l4. A double yoke having arms 5Ia is carried by the collar 50 and carries means 53 centrally of the arms for engaging the flanges of the collar. Connecting rods 55 are pivotally secured as at 52 to the ends of the stems of the yoke 5| and my pistons 56 on their free ends. Thepistohs .56 work in twin pneumaticcylinders 54 by means of air; from the highpressure tank 32. A conduit 51 leads fromone' of the. connections 3| on the high pressure tank 32 to a pressure reducing valve 58'. A pipe Sta-leads from the valve ports 69 and 68 respectively.

58' and connects withapipe 59 by means of a T-joint 581). ,Two way valves 60 and 6| (see'Flg- 'ure 4) on either side ofthe T-joint 58b, regulate the airfsupply tothe cylinders 54. A pipe 59a leads fromthe 'valvejil. and 'isprovided with branches 62- and 63 each of which leads to the upper portion of one of the cylinders 54. In like a manner, a pipe 59b leads from the valve GI! and supplies airto the lower portions of the cylinders by means of branches and B5. The

valves and GI are-also provided with exhaust The operation of the device is as follows:

When the valves are' in the position shown in Figure 4, air followingthesdirection of the 'arrows, passes through the' valve GI and into the upper portions of thecylinders 54. This forces the pistons downwardly and, of course, carries with it the yoke 5|, collar 50, slip sleeve ll, drill stem I8, and causes the drill bit It! to engage the surface to be. cut with enough pressure to overcome the hardness of the material. Air in the lower portions of the pylinders is exhausted through the branches 65 and 64 of the pipe 5% and escapes through the exhaust port 69 of the valve which is open when the valve is'in the position shown.

It frequently happens, however, that it becomes desirable to reverse this operation just described. This occurs when the converse condition is true and the drill is cutting into the material too rapidly owing either to the softness of the same or because, when the drill is'working' some distance under ground, the weight of the drill string is so great that too much pressure is exerted upon the drill. v necessary to reverse the position'of the valves 60 and BI. Thus, when the former is opened and readily apparent that these'last described operations may go on without interrupting the sample taking for, I contemplate providing a high pressure tank 32 capable of taking care of both the back blowing and the weight relieving operation at once should an occasion arise when both must be carried on at the same time. For instance, in back blowing, it is desirable to raise the drill string slightly before the valve 23 is opened.

It will, thus, be seen that I have provided a device which is capable of a high degree of performance and which, at the same time is simple in construction and efiicient and economical in operation.

While I have described and shown what now appears to be the preferred form of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise structure shown and described. I It is my belief that my device is susceptible of other expressions and, modifications thereof and other embodiments without departure from the spirit of the invention and scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed is:

1. The method of drilling a well which comprises theadvancing of a drill-bit into the for- Whenthis occurs, it is only.

mation, forcing a stream of air downwardly to I the bit and upwardly to the surface to remove the cuttings from the well,- separating the cuttings from the stream of air and depositing them into atransparent receptacle thereby enabling visual inspection as drilling proceeds.

' 2. The method of drilling a well which comprises the advancing of a drill bit into the formation on the lower end of a hollow drill stem, forcing a stream of air downwardly outside the drill-stem to the bit and upwardly to thesurface, within the drill stem to remove the cuttings from the wed-separating the cuttings from the stream of air, discharging them into a transparent receptacle, thereby enabling visual inspection as drilling proceeds.

,3. A well drilling apparatus in combination, comprising a hollow drill stem, a drill-bit on the end thereof, means for operating said drill stem and bit, .means for forcing a stream of air into the well downwardly to the bit and upwardly to the surface to remove the cuttings from the well, a separator connected to the discharge outlet for separating the cuttings from the stream of air and a transparent receptacle into which the cuttings are discharged from the separator.

4. A well drilling apparatus in combination, comprising a hollow drill stem, a drill bit on the end thereof, m'eansfor operating said drill stem and bit, means for forcing a stream of air downwardly outside of said drill stem to the bit and upwardly within the hollow drill stem to the surface to remove the cuttings from the well, a separator connected to the discharge outlet for separating the cuttings from the stream of air and a transparent receptacle into which the cuttings are discharged from the separator.

5. A geological sample taking apparatus in combination, comprising a hollow drill stem, a drill bit V on the end thereof with a core barrel attached inside and concentrically with the hollow drill stem by means of any suitable swivel, means for operating said drill stem and bit, means for forcing a stream of air into the well downwardly to the bit and upwardly to the surface to remove the cuttings from the well,'a separator connected with the discharge outlet for separating the cuttings from the stream of air, means for inspecting the contents of the separator while in operation,

and a transparent,receptacle into which the cuttings are discharged from the separator.

6. A geological sample taking apparatus in combination, comprising a hollow drill stem, a core bit attached thereto, a core barrel of smaller diameter than the internal diameter of the drill stem, attached inside of and concentrically with the hollow drill stem by means of a suitable swivel, means for operating said drill stemand bit, means for forcing a stream of air into the well downwardly to the bit and upwardly through v the opening between the external wall of the core barrel and the internal ,wall of the hollow drill stem to the surface to remove the cuttings from Y tings from the well, and discharge same at any desired point.

8- A well drilling apparatus in combination, comprising a hollow tube, means for lowering the said tube into the well bore, means for lowering a drilling tool through said tube with a drill bit thereon and means for operating said drilling tool independently of said tube, means for lowering said tube in the well as drilling proceeds to keep the lower end of same near the drilling tool, and means for forcing stream of air into the well downwardly outside ofthe hollow tube to the lower end thereof, and upwardly through the hollow tube to the surface to remove the cuttings from the well.

9. A geological sampletaking apparatus in combination for taking two samples simultaneously, comprising a hollow drill stem and bit with core barrel attached inside concentrically with the hollow drill stem, means for operating said drill stem and bit, means for forcing a stream of air into the well downwardly to the bit and upwardly through the hollow drill stem to the surface to remove the cuttings from the well, a separator connected with the discharge outlet for separating out the cuttings from the stream of air, and means for inspecting the cuttings while the core is being taken, and pneumatic sustaining means to regulate the weight-0n said coring tool while drilling.

10. A geological sample taking apparatus in combination, comprising a hollow drill stem and bit, a core barrel attached therein, means to operate said drill stem and coring tool, means for forcing air under pressure down the outside of said drill stem to the bit, and back through said drill stem and bit to the surface to remove the cuttings from the well, a separator connected to the discharge outlet to separate the cuttings from the air stream, means for inspecting the cuttings while in operation, and a receptacle into which the cuttings are discharged from the separator and means for temporarily reversing the air stream downwardly through the drill rod.

11. The pneumatic method of taking two geo logical samples simultaneously in'a core drilling operation: Comprises advancing a core drill into the formation, forcing a stream of air downwardly outside of the drill stem to the bit and upwardly within the drill stem to remove the cuttings from the well, separating the cuttings from the stream of air, discharging them into a transparent receptacle, thus enabling visual inspection, as drilling proceeds, giving an index to the core being taken.

DAVID J. MUNCY.

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Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2609182A (en) * 1946-11-23 1952-09-02 Arutunoff Armais Apparatus for drilling deep wells
US2738163A (en) * 1953-08-21 1956-03-13 Atlantic Refining Co Rotary drilling method
US2771776A (en) * 1954-04-30 1956-11-27 American Oil Co Catalyst sampling system
US2803436A (en) * 1953-03-23 1957-08-20 Wallace D Mceachern Rock bit
US2963785A (en) * 1959-02-02 1960-12-13 Titanium Metals Corp Sampling apparatus
US2973820A (en) * 1954-12-20 1961-03-07 Separator Ab Mineral and rock sampling unit
DE1160218B (en) * 1958-07-21 1963-12-27 Walter Jansky Tank & Appbau Means for withdrawing from a container Fluessigkeitsproben
US3273401A (en) * 1964-05-14 1966-09-20 Cargill Inc Probe sampler
US3291229A (en) * 1963-11-04 1966-12-13 Spencer Webb Drilling and coring apparatus and method
US3323604A (en) * 1964-08-28 1967-06-06 Homer I Henderson Coring drill
US3360061A (en) * 1964-10-08 1967-12-26 Otis Eng Co Large well bore drilling apparatus
US3500943A (en) * 1968-06-20 1970-03-17 Shell Oil Co Pressurized well drilling system
US3528514A (en) * 1968-10-23 1970-09-15 Westinghouse Air Brake Co Rock drilling apparatus
US3811518A (en) * 1972-07-24 1974-05-21 Bus Rx Inc Method of and apparatus for collecting cuttings from a drilled hole
US3887020A (en) * 1971-04-07 1975-06-03 John D Chaffin Apparatus for geological drilling and coring
US3968845A (en) * 1973-01-15 1976-07-13 Chaffin John D Apparatus and method for geological drilling and coring
US4332301A (en) * 1979-04-27 1982-06-01 Jonell Per Olof Method and a machine of obtaining samples from the ground to determine its composition
US4754655A (en) * 1987-03-16 1988-07-05 Parker Iii Frank M Apparatus and method for sampling hazardous material
US4796697A (en) * 1987-07-08 1989-01-10 Ayres Robert N Slip stream device
US4896726A (en) * 1987-07-08 1990-01-30 Ayres Robert N Slip stream device
US5211062A (en) * 1991-10-01 1993-05-18 Intersystems, Inc. Chip sampling device
US5246074A (en) * 1991-09-05 1993-09-21 Baker Hughes Incorporated Slip stream device with adjustable choke, and method of choking a fluid flow path
US5320188A (en) * 1990-09-05 1994-06-14 England J Richard Underground mining system
US20040104030A1 (en) * 2002-07-19 2004-06-03 Livingstone James I. Reverse circulation clean out system for low pressure gas wells
US20040184887A1 (en) * 2000-10-20 2004-09-23 Wathen Boyd J Methods and compositions for reducing dust and erosion of earth surfaces
US6845657B2 (en) * 2002-03-28 2005-01-25 Harrison R. Cooper Systems, Inc. Apparatus for sampling drill hole cuttings
WO2008010174A2 (en) * 2006-07-19 2008-01-24 Petrus Christiaan Gouws Dust particle catcher for a drilling apparatus
EP2392768A1 (en) * 2010-06-07 2011-12-07 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Method and device for increasing the yield from a mineral deposit
US8955917B2 (en) 2010-06-07 2015-02-17 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Method and apparatus for increasing the yield in a deposit
US9069093B2 (en) 2010-06-07 2015-06-30 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Method and apparatus for determining the local spatial extent of the phase of valuable mineral in a rock
WO2018053326A1 (en) * 2016-09-16 2018-03-22 Carnes Sr William Wesley Air storage system

Cited By (40)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2609182A (en) * 1946-11-23 1952-09-02 Arutunoff Armais Apparatus for drilling deep wells
US2803436A (en) * 1953-03-23 1957-08-20 Wallace D Mceachern Rock bit
US2738163A (en) * 1953-08-21 1956-03-13 Atlantic Refining Co Rotary drilling method
US2771776A (en) * 1954-04-30 1956-11-27 American Oil Co Catalyst sampling system
US2973820A (en) * 1954-12-20 1961-03-07 Separator Ab Mineral and rock sampling unit
DE1160218B (en) * 1958-07-21 1963-12-27 Walter Jansky Tank & Appbau Means for withdrawing from a container Fluessigkeitsproben
US2963785A (en) * 1959-02-02 1960-12-13 Titanium Metals Corp Sampling apparatus
US3291229A (en) * 1963-11-04 1966-12-13 Spencer Webb Drilling and coring apparatus and method
US3273401A (en) * 1964-05-14 1966-09-20 Cargill Inc Probe sampler
US3323604A (en) * 1964-08-28 1967-06-06 Homer I Henderson Coring drill
US3360061A (en) * 1964-10-08 1967-12-26 Otis Eng Co Large well bore drilling apparatus
US3500943A (en) * 1968-06-20 1970-03-17 Shell Oil Co Pressurized well drilling system
US3528514A (en) * 1968-10-23 1970-09-15 Westinghouse Air Brake Co Rock drilling apparatus
US3887020A (en) * 1971-04-07 1975-06-03 John D Chaffin Apparatus for geological drilling and coring
US3811518A (en) * 1972-07-24 1974-05-21 Bus Rx Inc Method of and apparatus for collecting cuttings from a drilled hole
US3968845A (en) * 1973-01-15 1976-07-13 Chaffin John D Apparatus and method for geological drilling and coring
US4332301A (en) * 1979-04-27 1982-06-01 Jonell Per Olof Method and a machine of obtaining samples from the ground to determine its composition
US4754655A (en) * 1987-03-16 1988-07-05 Parker Iii Frank M Apparatus and method for sampling hazardous material
US4796697A (en) * 1987-07-08 1989-01-10 Ayres Robert N Slip stream device
US4896726A (en) * 1987-07-08 1990-01-30 Ayres Robert N Slip stream device
US5320188A (en) * 1990-09-05 1994-06-14 England J Richard Underground mining system
US5246074A (en) * 1991-09-05 1993-09-21 Baker Hughes Incorporated Slip stream device with adjustable choke, and method of choking a fluid flow path
US5211062A (en) * 1991-10-01 1993-05-18 Intersystems, Inc. Chip sampling device
US20040184887A1 (en) * 2000-10-20 2004-09-23 Wathen Boyd J Methods and compositions for reducing dust and erosion of earth surfaces
US6845657B2 (en) * 2002-03-28 2005-01-25 Harrison R. Cooper Systems, Inc. Apparatus for sampling drill hole cuttings
US7090018B2 (en) * 2002-07-19 2006-08-15 Presgsol Ltd. Reverse circulation clean out system for low pressure gas wells
US20040104030A1 (en) * 2002-07-19 2004-06-03 Livingstone James I. Reverse circulation clean out system for low pressure gas wells
US8336401B2 (en) 2006-07-19 2012-12-25 Petrus Christiaan Gouws Dust catcher and sampler for use with a mining drilling apparatus
WO2008010174A2 (en) * 2006-07-19 2008-01-24 Petrus Christiaan Gouws Dust particle catcher for a drilling apparatus
WO2008010174A3 (en) * 2006-07-19 2008-03-20 Petrus Christiaan Gouws Dust particle catcher for a drilling apparatus
US20100032211A1 (en) * 2006-07-19 2010-02-11 Petrus Christiaan Gouws Drilling apparatus for use in mining
AU2007274619B2 (en) * 2006-07-19 2013-10-24 Petrus Christiaan Gouws Dust particle catcher for a drilling apparatus
WO2011154168A1 (en) * 2010-06-07 2011-12-15 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Method and apparatus for increasing the yield in a deposit
EP2392768A1 (en) * 2010-06-07 2011-12-07 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Method and device for increasing the yield from a mineral deposit
US8955918B2 (en) 2010-06-07 2015-02-17 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Method and apparatus for increasing the yield in a deposit
US8955917B2 (en) 2010-06-07 2015-02-17 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Method and apparatus for increasing the yield in a deposit
US9069093B2 (en) 2010-06-07 2015-06-30 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Method and apparatus for determining the local spatial extent of the phase of valuable mineral in a rock
WO2018053326A1 (en) * 2016-09-16 2018-03-22 Carnes Sr William Wesley Air storage system
US20180128068A1 (en) * 2016-09-16 2018-05-10 William Wesley Carnes, SR. Air Storage System
US10550653B2 (en) * 2016-09-16 2020-02-04 William Wesley Carnes, SR. Air storage system

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