US2164712A - Shingle - Google Patents

Shingle Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2164712A
US2164712A US166076A US16607637A US2164712A US 2164712 A US2164712 A US 2164712A US 166076 A US166076 A US 166076A US 16607637 A US16607637 A US 16607637A US 2164712 A US2164712 A US 2164712A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
shingles
shingle
body portion
asphalt
material
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US166076A
Inventor
Kirschbraun Lester
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Patent and Licensing Corp
Original Assignee
Patent and Licensing Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Patent and Licensing Corp filed Critical Patent and Licensing Corp
Priority to US166076A priority Critical patent/US2164712A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2164712A publication Critical patent/US2164712A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04DROOF COVERINGS; SKY-LIGHTS; GUTTERS; ROOF-WORKING TOOLS
    • E04D1/00Roof covering by making use of tiles, slates, shingles, or other small roofing elements
    • E04D1/28Roofing elements comprising two or more layers, e.g. for insulation

Description

July 4, 1939 KRSCHBRAUN 2,164,112

SHINGLE Filed Sept. 28, 1937 ATTORNEY Patented July 4, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT, OFFICE SHINGLE Application September 28, 1937, Serial No. 166,076

2 Claims.

My present invention relates to composition roofing shingles of the type in which the ma'jor portion of the shingle body is composed of a plastic material that is capable of setting to a more 5 or less hardened condition. More particularly, the invention is concerned with mastic shingles of this type adapted to be laid ina manner that permits the major portion of their areas to be exposed to the Weather.

Mastic shingles of conventional construction generally comprise a hardened plastic body composed of bituminous material such as asphalt or like waterproofing substance, mixed with fiber of any suitable character and hardening fillers,

such as nely divided solids, as for example, clay,

talc, crushed slate, slate dust and the like, the body portion being faced on one or both sides with a sheet of fibrous waterproof material such as asphalt impregnated felt. Shingles of this type exhibit numerous advantages over those composed of asphalt coated flbrous felt, due to their relative rigidity, massive and pleasing appearance and increased resistance to raising from the roof or side wall when exposed to the weather. The hardened plastic compositions are, however, comparatively heavy and costly and accordingly the shingles heretofore prepared therefrom when laid in the manner conventionally employed, i. e. in successive courses with each course overlapping preceding courses to such an extent as to require in excess of 200 square feet of material to cover 100 square feet of roof area, the amount of material thus required makes for relatively heavy Weight and high cost of the finished roof. It has heretofore been proposed to reduce the weight and cost lof the roof by laying mastic shingles with less than' the conventional overlap between successive courses and with the greater proportion of their area exposed. The proposed practice has, in most instances, required the use of a Waterproof underlayment, such as a layer of asphalt saturated felt or the like, beneath the shingles to make up for the loss in weather proofness resulting from the reduction in headlap. The use of such underlayment, though effective for its intended function, requires additional steps in the roof construction and hence does not provide a wholly satisfactory solution to the problem here involved.

The object of the present invention is to provide mastic shingles employing a hardened plastic composition of the type referred to above as their major constituent, the shingles being so constructed that they may be readily laid with the major portion of their area exposed, without (Cl. 10S-8) detracting from the weather-resistant characteristics of the roof and without necessitating the use of any underlayment.

This object is attained according to the present invention by the provision of a shingle com- 5 prlsing a hardened plastic body portion and a reinforicng facing sheet secured to the upper face of the body portion and extending from one lateral edge thereof. Shingles of this construction are, in accordance with the invention, laid 10 in successive courses according to a modification of the so-called "Dutch lap" method, with the extending portions of the facing sheets of all of the shingles of a course projecting in the same direction and each extension overlapping the 15 facing sheet of a coursewise adjacent shingle, the body portions of adjacent shingles lying in edge- Wise contiguous relationship. Shingles constructed according to the present invention and laid in this manner present the advantage that the amount of overlap between shingles` of successive courses may be reduced to a relatively small fraction of the transverse dimension of the shingle. For example, as little as 20% of the width of each shingle may be employed as overlap inasmuch as the joints between coursewise adjacent shingles are, in each instance, covered by the extension of the facing sheet of an adjacent shingle. The exposure of such relatively large portions of the shingles, as compared with the proportionate exposure provided by the laying of conventional shingles according to regular practice, represents a considerable saving in the number of units required t'o cover a given area of surface, thus reducing the cost of material and labor required for covering the roof. Furthermore, the time and labor for the laying of the roof is substantially reduced as compared to roofs in which an underlayment is required. A roof laid from the shingles of, and in accordance with, the present invention presents an appearance similiar to one laid in the Dutch lap manner except that the butt edges present an enhanced thickness due to the contrast vbetween the combined thicknesses of the body portion and facing sheet exposed at the butt edges of the shingles and the lesser thickness of the facing sheet appearing at the lateral edges of each shingle.

'I'he invention will be more fully understood and further advantages and objects thereof will become apparent when reference is made to the detailed description which is to follow and to the accompanying drawing in which Figure 1 is a perspective View of a shingle embodying the present invention;

Figure 2 is a perspective view of a portion of a roof laid with the shingles of Fig. 1;

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken on the line 3--3 of Fig. 2, and

Figure 4 is a. perspective View of a fastening clip which may be employed with the shingles of Fig. 1.

Referring to the drawing and particularly to Fig. 1, there is illustrated a shingle I0 constructed accordingto the present invention and comprising a mastic body portion II and a facing sheet I2. The mastic body portion is preferably formed of a suitable hardened plastic material composed of bituminous material such as asphalt or like waterproofing substance mixed with fiber of any suitable character and hardening fillers such as finely divided solids, as, for example, clay, talc, crushed slate, rslate dust, cork, cork dust and the like. A convenient souce of raw material that may be employed to form such composition resides in scrap roofing that accumulates in the manufacture of felted, fibrous asphaltic prepared roong. Since the latter is generally composed of asphalt constituting the waterproofing medium, fibrous material constituting the base, and mineral grit constituting the surfacing, scrap roong of this nature in most instances is admirably suited for the purpose of this invention but, if desired, there may be combined therewith further quantities of asphalt and llers to'vary the consistency and composition of the mixtures for the formation of the plastic mass as required in actual practice. The mastic asphalt composition here contemplated and containing fiber and mineral material admixed as described above, is practically non-fluid at elevated temperatures, greatly in excess of the melting point of the asphalt contained therein, and assumes a substantially rigid condition at normal temperatures.

The facing sheet I2 is secured to the upper surface of the mastic body portion II by any suitable adhesive means which preferably comprises the asphaltic constituent of the body portion. The facing sheet I2 extends from the butt edge to the upper edge of the body portion. In the other dimension of the body portion, the facing sheet I2 extends from one lateral edge of the body portion to a distance beyond the other lateral edge thereof to form a lateral extension or lapping portion I3. The extension I3 may be made of any suitable width to insure a weatherresistant construction when the shingles are laid, and preferably comprises from one-sixth to onethird of the Width of the sheet I2. A thin layer II of the plastic of which the body is composed preferably covers the underface of the extension I3. rial impregnated with a suitable Waterproofing material and carrying a weather-resistant coating and/or surfacing on its exposed surface. Such sheet preferably consists of an asphalt saturated felt carrying a coating I4 of a high meltpoint asphalt applied in a molten state or a layer deposited from an emulsion of asphalt-in water which contains a suitable quantity, say an amount equal to the emulsion, of a weighting and rigidifying material such as Portland cement. A suitable surfacing material I5 such as crushed slate, crushed slag or the like of any desired color is partially embedded in the coating I4. The sheet I2 serves not only to provide the lapping portion I3 but also to reinforce the body portion The facing sheet I2 is a fibrous mate-v against distortion and to resist sloughing and pulling away of the same from the nails when the shingle is laid and subjected to solar heat. The facing sheet furthermore provides the shingle with a decorative nish by virtue of the mineral grit I5 carried by the facing sheet. An additional reinforcement for the body portion may be provided, if desired, this comprising a backing sheet I6 secured to the lower face of the body portion. The backing sheet I6 also preferably comprises an asphalt saturated felt or the like. Materials other than asphalt saturated felt may, however, be employed for the backing sheet I6, such for example, as ordinary kraft paper, saturated with asphalt or other waterproofing material.

A roof covering in accordance with the present invention may have the shingles thereof laid either in a left-to-right or right-to-left direction by properly positioning the shingles so that the extensions or lapping portions I3,lie to the left or right respectively of the shingle body portion. In the construction of a roof covering with the shingles laid in the left-to-right direction, as illustrated in Fig. 2, each successive shingle I0 of a course is adjusted so that its lapping portion I3 is on the left and overlaps the face of the next shingle to the left thereof in the course, and the left transverse edge of its body portion lies contiguous to the right hand edge of the body portion of the shingle to the left thereof. Nails or the like 20 are driven through the shingles adjacent the upper left hand corner thereof and each shingle, as it is laid, is also nailed as at 20 adjacent the lower right hand corner thereof in the area to be overlapped by the extension I3 of the adjacent shingle to the right. 'Ihe lower left hand corners of the shingles may be secured in any suitable manner, the securing means preferably comprising clips or staples which may take the form of the clip 2| as disclosed in Fig. 4. The clip 2| of Fig. 4 is applied by inserting the arm 22 thereof between a shingle and the shingle of a preceding course overlapped thereby, until the shank 23 thereof lies closely adjacent the butt edge of the overlapping shingle. The upper arm 24 of the clip is. then bent downwardly to lie on the surface of the shingle and the extending prong 25 driven into the shingle by a hammer blow or the like. The thin layer I'I of the plastic material on the under-surface of the extension of each shingle serves as a sealing and packing medium to insure a weather-resistant joint between coursewise adjacent shingles.

Subsequent courses of shingles are laid in a similar manner to that described above, any desired amount of head lap being employed. As illustrated in Fig. 2, the relative overlap between successive courses may be but 20% or less of the transverse dimension of the shingles due to the fact that the joints between coursewise adjacent shingles are covered by the lapping portions I3. The shingles of the subsequent courses in the left-to-right application shown in Fig. 2 are so laid that the right edge of the body portion of each shingle abuts against the upper part of the left edge of the extension I3 of the shingle to the right thereof in the next lower course and the left edge of its body portion is superposed over the left edge of the extension I3 of a shingle immediately therebelow in the next lower course, as clearly shown in Fig'. 2. The relationship between the overlapping portions of coursewise adjacent shingles and shinglesv of successive courses is illustrated cross-sectionally in Fig. 3. As can be observed from this view, the joints between adjacent shingles |A of the underlying course are protected by the extension I 3A and are staggered with respect to the joint between shingles IUB of the overlying course. The joint between the shingle IIJB of the overlying course is in turn protected by the extension ISB. As will readily be observed, this construction provides an overlapping weather-resistant joint structure.

As previously stated, the roof illustrated in Fig. 2 and described in the preceding paragraph has the shingles laid thereon in a left-to-right direction. However, the shingles may be laid in the right-to-left direction, if desired. In this event the shingles are reversed so that their extensions are on the right and each course is started at the right hand edge of the roof.

In the production of the shingles of the present invention, a homogeneous plastic mass of bituminous material such as asphalt of say 14) to 280 F. melt-point and hardening fillers is formed, the mixture 4being Worked up and brought to the desired consistency in any suitable form of kneading mechanism. As heretofore stated, prepared asphalt roofing scrap may be employed for thisl purpose and combined, if desired, with further quantities of the bituminous material, fiber and other fillers such as slate dust, talc, mica and the like to impart to the final plastic the desired rigidity and strength. 'I'he plastic material, prepared in this manner, may be fed While at an elevated temperature from a suitable storage supply in a continuous flow between an opposing pair of co-operating forming rolls, suitably constructed to provide one or more plastice ribbons of the desired shingle body Widths, simultaneously with the feeding of a sheet of the facing material l2 between the surface of one of the rolls and the plastic mass and a sheet of the backing material I6, if desired, between the surface of the other roll and the plastic mass. The sheet 0f the facing material l2 is of such width as to extend past one edge of each of the.

plastic ribbons. As the sheets and plastic material are pressed together at the nip of the forming rolls, they become adhesively secured together by the asphaltic constituent of the plastic material and a small amount of the plastic extends from the mass and forms a thin layer on the underface of the extending portion of the facing sheet to provide the mastic layer Il (see Fig. 1). 'Ihe facing sheet may comprise an asphalted saturated felt previously coated with an asphalt and surfaced with a mineral grit or the coating and surfacing for the facing sheet may be applied thereto subsequently to the laminating of the sheet to the mastic body strips. The plastic body strips with the facing material laminated to one surface thereof and the backing material laminated to the other surface, if desired, are then cut on at suitable intervals to provide the shingle elements as disclosed in Fig. 1.

Having thus described my invention in full detail, it will be apparent that thesedetails need not be strictly adhered to and that various changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the scope thereof as defined in the appended claims.

What I claim is:

l. A roof covering comprising partially overlapping courses of shingles each of said shingles comprising a body portion of hardened plastic material and a sheet of asphalt saturated and coated mineral surfaced felt affixed to the upper face of the body portion and extending beyond one lateral edge thereof to form a lapping portion, the butt edge and the other lateral edge of the body 'portion of each shingle being coterminous with the corresponding edges of the sheet aflixed thereto the lapping portion of each shingle of a course overlapping an adjacent shingle of the course with the body portions of adjacent shingles lying in edgewise contiguous relationship and a thin layer of the plastic material lying between each of said overlapping portions and the underlying shingle.

2. A roof covering comprising partially overlapping courses of shingles, each of said shingles comprising a body portion of hardened plastic material and a sheet of asphalt saturated mineral surfaced felt affixed to the upper face of the body portion and extending beyond one lateral edge thereof to form a lapping portion, the butt edge and the other lateral edge of the body portion of each shingle being coterminous with the corresponding 4edges of the sheet affixed thereto the lapping portion of each shingle of a course overlapping an adjacent shingle of a course with the body portions of adjacent shingles lying in edgewise contiguous relationship and the` lower portions of the body portions of the shingles of an overlapping course resting on the surfaces of corresponding shingles 0f. the underlying course, whereby the shingles have three overlapped corners and one corner 4exposed and means securing the exposed corner to an underlying shingle of the same course.

LESTER HRSCHBRAUN.

US166076A 1937-09-28 1937-09-28 Shingle Expired - Lifetime US2164712A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US166076A US2164712A (en) 1937-09-28 1937-09-28 Shingle

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US166076A US2164712A (en) 1937-09-28 1937-09-28 Shingle

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2164712A true US2164712A (en) 1939-07-04

Family

ID=22601726

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US166076A Expired - Lifetime US2164712A (en) 1937-09-28 1937-09-28 Shingle

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2164712A (en)

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3111787A (en) * 1960-12-16 1963-11-26 Koppers Co Inc Sandwich roofing element
DE2647100A1 (en) * 1976-02-06 1977-08-11 Hans Gantner Insulation under roof
US4050209A (en) * 1975-05-01 1977-09-27 Shakertown Corporation Prefabricated shingle panels
US4102107A (en) * 1970-06-22 1978-07-25 Shakertown Corporation Prefabricated shingle panels
US5634314A (en) * 1994-08-03 1997-06-03 Tommy Wayne Hollis Trim clip for siding
US5636490A (en) * 1996-03-28 1997-06-10 Stocksieker; Richard Roof system
US5642596A (en) * 1993-04-22 1997-07-01 Waddington; Richard Shingle roofing assembly
US6619006B1 (en) * 1999-09-21 2003-09-16 Muneyasu Shirota Roofing shingle
US20130031864A1 (en) * 2011-08-04 2013-02-07 Schools Zachary S Roofing tile system and method
US20130239495A1 (en) * 2012-03-14 2013-09-19 Frank Pao Roofing Installation System
US20130247496A1 (en) * 2010-11-30 2013-09-26 Cupa Innovacion, S.L.U. Cover for roofs and facades

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3111787A (en) * 1960-12-16 1963-11-26 Koppers Co Inc Sandwich roofing element
US4102107A (en) * 1970-06-22 1978-07-25 Shakertown Corporation Prefabricated shingle panels
US4050209A (en) * 1975-05-01 1977-09-27 Shakertown Corporation Prefabricated shingle panels
DE2647100A1 (en) * 1976-02-06 1977-08-11 Hans Gantner Insulation under roof
US5642596A (en) * 1993-04-22 1997-07-01 Waddington; Richard Shingle roofing assembly
US5634314A (en) * 1994-08-03 1997-06-03 Tommy Wayne Hollis Trim clip for siding
US5636490A (en) * 1996-03-28 1997-06-10 Stocksieker; Richard Roof system
US6619006B1 (en) * 1999-09-21 2003-09-16 Muneyasu Shirota Roofing shingle
US20130247496A1 (en) * 2010-11-30 2013-09-26 Cupa Innovacion, S.L.U. Cover for roofs and facades
US20130031864A1 (en) * 2011-08-04 2013-02-07 Schools Zachary S Roofing tile system and method
US20130239495A1 (en) * 2012-03-14 2013-09-19 Frank Pao Roofing Installation System

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2863405A (en) Asphalt shingle with sealing elements
US6936329B2 (en) Fastener-free composite roofing product
CA2216027C (en) Composite roofing members having improved dimensional stability and related methods
DE3020641C2 (en)
US9434131B2 (en) Building panel having a foam backed fiber cement substrate
US6112492A (en) Shingle having ribs and cavity on its underside
US20060096213A1 (en) Prefabricated multi-layer roofing panel and system
US6990779B2 (en) Roofing system and roofing shingles
US6510664B2 (en) Multi-layered shingle
US2264546A (en) Surface covering and assembly thereof
US5711126A (en) Resinous angled shingles for roof ridge lines
US4856251A (en) Self-gauging, anti-ice damming, double sealed shingle system
US4680909A (en) Roofing system
US3763605A (en) Roofing system and method of application
US4386981A (en) Method of waterproofing roofs and the like
US3979867A (en) Nailable foam faced board
US4226069A (en) Shingle simulating strip material
US6014847A (en) Laminated roofing shingle having staggered shadow lines and method of making the same
US20030032356A1 (en) Roofing composite
US6148578A (en) Slate and interlayment roof and a method of preparing the same
US5037685A (en) Vinyl shingle roofing product
US9021760B2 (en) Laminated roofing shingle system and shingles for use therein
US20070039274A1 (en) Roofing shingle including sheet as headlap
US2252539A (en) Method of making corner members
US7765763B2 (en) Pleated roofing membrane and roofing shingle system