US2152316A - Antenna - Google Patents

Antenna Download PDF

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Publication number
US2152316A
US2152316A US22079138A US2152316A US 2152316 A US2152316 A US 2152316A US 22079138 A US22079138 A US 22079138A US 2152316 A US2152316 A US 2152316A
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Prior art keywords
liquid
tube
antenna
rod
tubular member
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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Inventor
Kopanski Roman
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
WARD PRODUCTS CORP
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WARD PRODUCTS CORP
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Family has litigation

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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01QANTENNAS, i.e. RADIO AERIALS
    • H01Q1/00Details of, or arrangements associated with, antennas
    • H01Q1/08Means for collapsing antennas or parts thereof
    • H01Q1/10Telescopic elements

Description

March 28, 1939. R KOPANSK 2,152,316

ANTENNA Filed July 22, 1938 IN ENT R.

73 Rama 721 9007751! ATTORNEYS.

Patented Mar. 28, 1939 I PATENT OFFICE ANTENNA Roman Kopanski, Cleveland, Ohio, assignor to The Ward Products Corporation, Cleveland,

Ohio

Application July 22, 1938, Serial No. 220,791

Claims.

caused by the vibration from the movement and jarring of the automobile.

It is therefore the object of my invention to devise an antenna of thetype mentioned with means for preventing such objectionable rattle.

More specifically, it is my object to devise an adjustable telescoping form of antenna with means for preventing rattle regardless of th position to which it might be adjusted.

It is also the object of my.invention to devise a practical and economical means for preventing rattle in a telescopic form of antenna and, by the same means, to improve the radio reception.

Other objects will appear from the following description and claims when considered together with the accompanying drawing.

Fig. 1 is an elevation of my improved antenna;

Fig. 2 is a view taken on line 2-2 of Fig. 1; and

Fig. 3 is a view taken on line 3--3 of Fig, 2.

It is to be understood that the present form of disclosure is merely for purposes of illustration and that there may be devised various modifications therein without departing from the spirit of my invention as herein set forth and claimed.

Referring to the accompanying drawing, the antenna comprises the outer metal tube I, the inner metal tube 2 and the metal rod 3, all of which are arranged for telescopic adjustment.

The inner tube 2 is open at its inner end which is also bulged entirely thereabout, as indicated at 2 so as to provide uniform frictional engagement with the wall of the outer tube I. The inner tube 2 is also provided with the apertures 4 near the inner end thereof, for a purpose to be explained.

The rod 3 has its inner end portion bent so as to provide frictional engagement at the two points 5 and 6 with the wall of the inner tube 2.

Except for the frictional engagement at the inner ends of the tube 2 and the rod 3, as just 50 explained, these two members are otherwise spaced from each other and the inner tube 2 is otherwise spaced from the outer tube I.

The upper end of the outer tube I is provided with the'screw-threaded packing nut I and the packing or sealing washer 8, which eifect a sealed closure for this end of the outer tube I and also a sealed connection about the inner tube 2 which is adapted to slide therethrough.

Likewise, the upper end of theinner tube 2 is provided with the screw-threaded packing nut 3 and the packing or sealing washer Ill through whichv the rod 3 extends in the same manner as just explained.

As indicated in the drawing, practically the entire internal space of the antenna is filled with a liquid of a certain character, as will be explained. This liquid is applied through the open lower end of the outer tube I after the parts are all otherwise assembled and while in inverted fully telescoped position. When the lower end of the outer tube is closed by the screw plug I2, and thus the liquid is sealed within the antenna.

The antenna, as above described, is supported in the holding means I3 which may be attached to the automobile, with the necessary electrical connection as usual.

The liquid II may be glycerine, castor oil, mineral oil, motor oil or other liquids of similar character, it being essential that the liquid be capable of preventing clattering or rattling contact between the parts, as would otherwise result from vibration of the same set up by roughness of the road during motion of the automobile. Water, for instance, does not possess this property and is therefore not suited for this purpose, and the same thing is true of other liquids of like character.

As will be seen, the liquid practically fills the space between the tubes I and 2 and the rod 3 when they are in telescoped position. Then when tube 2 and rod 3 are extended to various positions, the liquid will still practically fill the space between the tube 2 and the rod 3 as well as the space between the tubes I and'2. If, for instance, the tube 2 and rod 3 should be raised together and left to occupy such position, with the rod 3 in telescoped position within the tube 2, a continuous concentric column of the liquid will still fill the space between the tube 2 and the rod 3, this column of liquid following with the tube 2 and the rod 3., As well as can be judged, this is due to capillary attraction or simply adhesion and cohesion.

Without excluding other theories in an attempt to explain how the liquid prevents rattle, this phenomenon is believed to be due to the pronounced surface or skin tension of the liquid. That is, the liquid possesses sufficient shock resistance or film strength not to break down under the strain of vibration of the parts; and thus there is prevented the objectionable metal-tometal clatter or rattle.

The packing washers 8 and Ill serve not only to seal the liquid against escape at these points, but the tube 2 and rod 3 are thereby kept free of the liquid outside of the tube I. These washers serve also as an additional means or preventing rattle at these points.

The opening at the inner end 01' the tube 2 and the apertures 4 permit passage of the liquid so as to facilitate adjustment of the antenna.

Thus, when the antenna is in telescoped or collapsed position or when in partially or fully extended position, the tubes i and 2 and the tube 2 and rod 3 are always separated by the liquid so as to prevent clattering between the parts, as would otherwise be caused by vibration.

As is quite evident, the medium adopted by me for preventing rattle is oi! a non-mechanical or non-metallic nature and there is nothing to get out of order. Furthermore, it is very inexpensive and can be applied in a very simple manner.

Incidentally, the presence of the liquid in the antenna will serve also as a means of clarifying the radio reception by eliminating foreign noises and static.

The same invention as herein disclosed can be embodied also in other devices. as for instance in a telescopic fishing rod.

What I claim is:

1. A radio antenna comprising a hollow metallic tubular member, a longitudinally extensible metallic member mounted within said tubular member, and a liquid oi comparatively high sur-- face tension within said tubular member and substantially and continuously filling the space between said members during all positions of the extensible member, whereby there will be prevented a rattling of the same in any adjusted position. a

2. A radio antenna comprising a hollow metaltubular member, a longitudinally extensible hollow metallic tubular member mounted within said first tubular member, a longitudinally aid justable metallic member mounted within said second tubular member, said members having means of continuously free communication throughout the entire space therebetween, and a liquid 01. comparatively high surface tension within said first tubular member and substantially filling the space between said members, whereby there will be prevented a rattling of the same.

3. A radio antenna comprising a hollow metallic tubular member, a longitudinally extensible hollow metallic tubular member mounted within said first tubular member, and having restricted contact with the inner surface thereof and being otherwise spaced therefrom, a longitudinally adjustable metallic member mounted within said second tubular member and having restricted contact with the inner surface thereof and being otherwise spaced therefrom, said members having means oi continuously free communication throughout the entire space therebetween, and a liquid of comparatively high surface tension within said first tubular member and substantially filling the space between said members, whereby there will be prevented a rattling of the same.

4. In a device of the class described, the combination of longitudinally telescopic metallic members, a liquid of comparatively high surface tension substantially and continuously filling the space therebetween during all positions of the members, and means for sealing the liquid therewithin, whereby there will be prevented a rattlinzg of the same,

5. A radio antenna comprising a hollow meta1- lic tubular member, a second metallic member extensibly rnciuitetii Within said tubular member, ase tension correto that of glycerine cub the spending approximate stantially and contii'iuously fillingble member, a therewithin, "w

US2152316A 1938-07-22 1938-07-22 Antenna Expired - Lifetime US2152316A (en)

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2491601A (en) * 1946-11-20 1949-12-20 Bernstein Irving Extensible car radio antenna
US2514167A (en) * 1945-05-28 1950-07-04 Shakespeare Products Co Radio antenna
US2520497A (en) * 1947-05-14 1950-08-29 Gabriel Co Contact for small diameter telescopic antennas
US2850305A (en) * 1954-02-19 1958-09-02 Cornell Dubilier Electric Extensible automobile aerials
US20030076291A1 (en) * 2001-10-24 2003-04-24 Hsi Kuang Ma Flat display with suspension device for use in a vehicle

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2514167A (en) * 1945-05-28 1950-07-04 Shakespeare Products Co Radio antenna
US2491601A (en) * 1946-11-20 1949-12-20 Bernstein Irving Extensible car radio antenna
US2520497A (en) * 1947-05-14 1950-08-29 Gabriel Co Contact for small diameter telescopic antennas
US2850305A (en) * 1954-02-19 1958-09-02 Cornell Dubilier Electric Extensible automobile aerials
US20030076291A1 (en) * 2001-10-24 2003-04-24 Hsi Kuang Ma Flat display with suspension device for use in a vehicle

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