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US2152012A - Reinforced fabric strip and method of making - Google Patents

Reinforced fabric strip and method of making Download PDF

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US2152012A
US2152012A US11428936A US2152012A US 2152012 A US2152012 A US 2152012A US 11428936 A US11428936 A US 11428936A US 2152012 A US2152012 A US 2152012A
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fabric
adhesive
strip
webbing
reinforcing
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Charles M Albion
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Providence Braid Co
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    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S524/00Synthetic resins or natural rubbers -- part of the class 520 series
    • Y10S524/925Natural rubber compositions having nonreactive materials, i.e. NRM, other than: carbon, silicon dioxide, glass titanium dioxide, water, hydrocarbon or halohydrocarbon
    • Y10S524/926Natural rubber compositions having nonreactive materials, i.e. NRM, other than: carbon, silicon dioxide, glass titanium dioxide, water, hydrocarbon or halohydrocarbon with water as NRM, exemplified

Description

March 28, 1939. c. M. ALBION" 2,152,012

' REINFORCED FABRICSTRIP AND METHODOF MAKING -Filed Dec. 4; 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 1110672362 Charts; in. dzbion affor gs March 28, .1939. c. M. ALBION RETNFORCED FABRIC STRIP AND METHOD OF MAKTNG Filed Dec 4, 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 lrzvezyifiw (Charis/s m (M17507; y aimm,

Patented Mar. 28, 1939 PATENT OFFICE REINFORCED FABRIC STRIP AND METHOD OF MAKING Charles M. Albion, Dorchester, Mass, assignor to I Providence Braid 00., Pawtucket, R. I., a corporation of Rhode Island Application December 4, 1936, Serial No. 114,289

9' Claims.

This invention relates to an improved reinforced fabric, and to a novel method of producing the same. The invention is applicable to various uses requiring reinforcement in or along any part of a fabric web or strip such, for example, as in the formation of selvage edges on bias-cut fabrics where, in further processing the fabric, it is necessary to grip the edges thereof in holding the fabric to width and shape. The novel strip of the invention is particularly applicable to a reinforcing material as, for example, reinforcing tape used in the manufacture of shoes and reinforcing fabric strip used in the manufacture of insoles for shoes.

In the manufacture of shoes the insole, which forms the anchoring medium between the shoe upper and the outsole, must be relatively strong to support the stitching and/or other anchoring means connecting these parts. It has been found that economy of material can be effected by using a thinner insole reinforced by suitable fabric, such as gem duck, bonded thereto. Such fabric has heretofore been employed in strip form and has been bonded to the insoles by the application of adhesive coatings to the strips. The strips are cut from relatively wide webbing and it has been sought to'prevent raveling of the edges thereof, as by coating the webbing in accordance with Patent No. 1,830,428 or by spraying the cut edges with an adhesive in accordance with Patent No. 1,962,- 053. The former is expensive both in the amount of adhesive required and in the coating treatment and furthermore seals the strip against breathing, and the latter is of limited value since the adhesive is applied only to the extreme cut edges of the strip while in tightly rolled condition.

One aspect of my invention contemplates the production of an improved reinforcing strip wherein not only are the edge portions thereof prevented from raveling but wherein the treated portion or portions of the fabric are bonded into relatively strong and substantial units. In accordance with my invention this result is accomplished through the use of an adhesive which readily penetrates into and through the fabric treated. An adhesive of this nature is disclosed in my prior application Ser. No. 68,065 filed March 10, 1936 which has now been merged into my copending application Ser. No. 133,269, filed March 26, 1937, the molecular particles in this adhesive being broken down into such small units that they readily penetrate into and through the fabric. Reference to this copending application may be had for a full and complete description of such adhesive.

Briefly described, this adhesive primarily comprises a basic composition of latex with a par tially hydrogenated naphthaline or its equivalent, a hydrogenated product of phenol or its equivalent, and a wetting agent. The preferred ingredients of the basic composition are tetrahydronaphthaline (CmHiz), hexahydrophenol (CsHnOH) and sulfonated castor oil. Tetrahydronaphthaline is the product of partial hydrogenation o f naphthaline. It is a solvent of rub.- ber and in its composition with the other ingredients has an important function in making the composition quickly adhesive.

Hexahydrophenol is the hydrogenated product of phenol. It is a solvent and plasticizer of rubber and seems to cause a precipitation of rubber on the fibers of leather and other materials to which the -cement is applied, when the liquid content of the cement has been largely absorbed, and to produce a tougher and stronger bond after drying of the rubber. It is a stabilizer andhomogenizer' of the cement composition, preventing separation of theemulsion under temperature changes. It is also a preservative and degreasing agent, making the cement applicable to greasy or oily materials. In itself it is insoluble in water, but when combined with the sulfonated castor oil or equivalent emulsifier it is readily emulsifiable in latex.

sulfonated castor oil is a wetting agent in the composition, causing more rapid penetration of the water of the composition into the pores and interstices of the goods, and a sufiicient penetration of rubber to cause strong interlocking of the cement with the fibers. The rapid dispersion of the water speeds up the drying of the rubber content of the adhesive.

The proportional contents of these ingredients are relatively small. The following is an illustrativeexample of the proportions sufficient to produce one gallon (128 fluid ounces) of the cement:

Ounces Normal latex 38% to 40% rubber content 116 Tetrahydronaphthaline 4 Hexahydrophenol 2 sulfonated ca'stor oil 75% (63% fat content) 6 The contents of tetrahydronaphthaline, hexahydrophenol and sulfonated castor oil are first mixed together. They are self emulsifying with one another and produce a smooth homogeneous mixture. This mixture is then mixed with the latex by adding and briefly stirring.

The specific ingredients hereinbefore named. although claimed as the preferred substances for my purposes, are not the only ones which can be employed to produce cements having substantially similar properties to those of the cement above defined. For instance, I may use other wetting agents than sulfonated castor oil, depending on the qualities needed for adapting the cement to different materials. In producing a cement indicated for use with different classes of fabric or porous goods, I select as the wetting out ingredients substances which have the property of reducing the surface tension of the material treated and are respectively best suited to the specific fabrics or goods in question. In place of tetrahydronaphthaline I may use partially hydrogenated products of other compounds having a similar chemical structure to naphthaline. In place of "hexahydrophenol I may use other cyclic alcohols which have similar chemical and mechanical properties in the cement composition.

By the addition to the basic composition of other ingredients, I may alter the properties of the cement as, for instance, by making it permanently tacky. Soya bean oil and so-called nondrying oils. of the same classification have that effect. So also do compounds represented by methyl hexalin ester of adipic acid, which is chemically hexahydrocresol with the chemical structure CsHroCHaOI-I.

The reinforcing strips of my invention are made from relatively wide webbing and, in making very narrow reinforcing strips or tape especially useful in shoemaking, the webbing may be treated over its entire area with the adhesive, the webbing being thereafter cut into strips of the desired width. The adhesive penetrating into the fabric bondsthe same into a unit throughout its thickness and the strips formed therefrom are likewise bonded into units of superior strength with their cut edge portions firmly secured against raveling. Furthermore, such treatment not only serves to bond the fabric into a unit adapted to receive and hold stitching but also forms a bonding medium for a further adhesive which may be subsequently applied.

The strips most commonly used in reinforcing soles are of a width making the treatmentof the entire area of the webbing undesirable from a standpoint of economy. In accordance with my invention, such strips are formed by treating the webbing with the adhesive in independent and relatively spaced bands along parallel lines extending longitudinally of the webbing and through said bands, and thereafter severing the webbing along said lines in the area of the treated bands. Thus strips are produced having the severed edge portions thereof adhesively treated therethrough in a manner bonding these portions each into a unit mass and preventing raveling thereof, the intermediate portion of the strip being left untreated and therefore air-porous. Such edge portions form substantial selvages along the strips and these selvages may be rendered more prominent by the addition of a suitable coloring ingredient to the adhesive.

Another feature of the invention, particularly applicable to strips which are treated over their entire areas, is that while the penetrating adhesive bonds the fabric into a unit, it does not form a sealing coating over the strips. The adhesive treatments heretofore employed in making reinforcing fabric strips have coated rather than penetrated into the fabric and such coating has sealed the fabric against breathing. It is well known that rubber and like materials which prevent breathing in footwear cause sweating and like unhealthy irritation of the feet. It is particularly pointed out that fabric treated in accordance with my invention is not surfacesealed but is air-porous whereby permitting breathing when used in the construction of shoes.

These and other features of the invention will be best understood and appreciated from the following description of preferred embodiments thereof selected for purposes of illustration and shown in the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 illustrates, in elevation and in section, an adhesive treating and shearing apparatus employed in making fabric reinforcing strips in accordance with my invention,

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a fabric webbing being treated in accordance with my invention,

Fig. 3 illustrates a roll of the improved reinforcing strip,

Fig. 4 is an enlarged plan view of the adhesive treating portion of the apparatus shown in Fig. 1,

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken on line 5-5 of Fig. 4,

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary front elevation thereof,

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of a fabric webbing being treated to form relatively narrow reinforcing tape.

In Fig. 3, I have illustrated a roll ll] of fabric reinforcing strip l2 constructed in accordance with my invention, the manner of making this strip being briefly illustrated in Fig. 2. A relatively wide fabric webbing i4 is treated with adhesive along independent and parallel bands 15 extending longitudinally of the webbing, these bands being spaced apart distances corresponding to the width of the strips to be produced. During the treatment the webbing is moved continuously and the treated portion thereof is passed to rotary knives l6 which are spaced apart distances corresponding to the bands It. The knives sever the webbing through the intermediate portion of each band whereby leaving each strip l2 with unitary selvage edges formed by the bonding together of the fabric with the adhesive which has penetrated entirely therethrough.

Referring more particularly to Fig. 1, l8 indicates a roll of fabric webbing I4 arranged to be drawn into and through an adhesive treating apparatus A and from thence to be passed to and through a shearing apparatus B which cuts the webbing into strips l2. The apparatus A is more particularly illustrated in Figs. 46 of the drawings.

The adhesive applying apparatus A comprises a body portion 2| within which'is a reservoir 22. Adhesive is supplied to the reservoir from bottles 24 in communication at 25 and 26 with the reservoir, supports 28 being provided for maintaining the bottles in vertical position. A shaft 30 supportedin the end walls of the body 2! extends longitudinally through the central portion of the reservoir and is provided with wheels 32 thereon extending down into the lowermost well of the reservoir. The wheels are adjustable along the shaft to the desired spacing, the spacing between each two adjacent wheels corresponding to the width of strip it is desired to produce.

The webbing I4 is passed from the roll l8 into the body 2| and beneath a long roller 33. From thence the webbing passes over a bar 34, over and in contact with the wheels 32, beneath a long roller 36 upwardly and over a scraper bar 31,

in accordance with my over a long roller 38, and from thence to the shearing apparatus B. ;A handle 40 is provided on the shaft 30 whereby to rotate the wheels 32 when initially threading the webbing through the apparatus. When the machine is in operation, the shearing apparatus B draws the webbing from the roll l8 and through the apparatus A. The webbing is held taut as it passes beneath the roller 33 and over the bar '34 and the webbing is held in contact with the wheels 32 by a loosely mounted roller 42 resting by its own weight on the wheels. I

The webbing i4 is held in taut condition as it passes beneath the roller 33 and over the bar 34. The roller 42 presses the webbing infirm contact with the wheels 32 whereby rotating the wheels and carrying adhesive from the reservoir to the webbing. The roller 38 rests by its own weight on and causes a firm contact of the webbing with the scraper bar 31 whereby scraping off any excess adhesive and leaving the treatment uniform in the bands IS. The webbing then passes about the roller 38 and over guiding rolls 44-49 to the shearing knives l6.

Each shearing knife I6 is carried on a bar 50 pivoted to a block 52 supported on and adjustable along a bar 54. The webbing is sheared by the knife acting against a roll 56 and springs 58 serve to hold the knives in proper shearing contact with this roll. The knives are set to shear the webbing midway through the bands l5 and the strips thus produced are rolled up at 60. It will be noted that the webbing is also treated andsheared along its two longitudinal edges whereby the two outside strips are cut to the desired uniform width.

It will now be apparent that I have produced a fabric reinforcing strip having its longitudinal edge portions adhesively treated throughout'the thickness thereof in a manner reinforcing and preventing raveling of such portions, the treatment in effect producing strong selvage edges on the strips. When the strip is rolled into the roll II) the overlapping selvage edges slightly cohere whereby maintaining the strip tightly rolled and providing a suitable and desirable resistance to the unrolling thereof when using the strip. The solid and relatively heavy roller illustrated as resting on the roll 60 of strip fabric in Fig. 1 is adapted to press the adjacent convolutions of fabric into firm contact whereby the treated edge portions are made to cohere for the purpose described. A touch of color is also preferably added to the adhesive whereby providing selvages of a shade contrasting to that of the intermediate portion of the strip.

While the reinforced selvage edges produced invention are useful in the production of reinforcing strips of the nature andfor the purpose herein described, it will be understood that the invention is by no means limited to such use. Another valuable use which may be mentioned, by way of example, relates to the processing or where, due' to the tendency of'such fabrics to curl and pull out of shape, it is necessary to grip the fabric along its edges as it is being treated whereby to hold the fabric to width and shape. The reinforcing of the edge portions of such fabric in accordance with my invention provides strong selvage edges which may be thus gripped and the necessary pulling of the fabric effected without damaging the fabric at its edges.

In Fig. '7 I have illustrated the manufacture of relatively narrow reinforcing strip or tape in in use.

treating of bias-cut fabrics accordance with my invention. In this case the fabric web I0 is treated throughout its entire area with the said adhesive whereby binding and reinforcing the fabric throughout its thickness into a unit. The resulting fabric is then severed longitudinally along spaced and parallel lines 12 in a manner producing relatively narrow strips or tape 14 each of which is a reinforced and nonraveled and non-raveling unit particularly adapted to hold stitches or bond to another surface It will be apparent that such tape is relatively inexpensive to produce and is particularly well adapted to use in the manufacture of shoes or other products. Furthermore,- strips formedin this manner with a non-sealing ad hesive are air-porous whereby breathing may take place therethrough, it being apparent that certain uses of the strip may make such breathing an important consideration.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is:

1. A fabric reinforcing strip having non-raveling edges cut on the biasand having the edge portions for a uniform and substantial distance inwardly 0f the cut edges pretreated therethrough with a penetrating adhesive comprising rubber latex with minor content of a rubber solvent of theequivaleri't of partially hydrogenated naphthaline, a plasticizer of the equivalent of a hydrogenated product of phenol, and a wetting agent, the adhesive preventing raveling of the cut'edges and bonding each edge portion into a reinforced unit, the pretreated edge portions being in spaced relation.

2. A roll of fabric reinforcing strip, comprising a strip of relatively heavy fabric having cut. and non-raveled edges and having the edge portions for a uniform and substantial distance inwardly of the cut edges pretreated therethrough with a penetrating adhesive comprising rubber latex with minor content of the equivalent of a hydrogenated product of phenol and a wetting agent, the adhesive bonding each edge portion of the strip into a non-raveling and reinforced unit and causing the adjacent treated surfaces to cohere lightly in the roll and thereby normally maintain the strip tightly rolled.

3. A method of making fabric reinforcing strips with selvage edges which consists of treating a web of fabric with a penetrating adhesive in independent and relatively spaced bands along parallel lines extending longitudinally of the web and through said bands, said adhesive comprising rubber latex with a minor content of a rubber solvent of the equivalent of partially hydrogenated naphthaline, a plasticizer of the equivalent of a hydrogenated product of phenol, and a wetting agent, and severing the web along said lines intermediately through said bands whereby producing strips having the severed edge portions thereof adhesively treated therethrough in a manner reinforcing and preventing raveling of said portions, thelongitudinal edge portions or the web being als treated with said adhesive.

' therethrough in a manner reinforcing and preventing raveling of said portions, and winding the strips into rolls with the adjacent edge portions thereof in contact while said portions are in condition to cohere.

5. A fabric reinforcing strip of gem duck or the like having cut and non-raveled edges and having the edge portions for a uniform and substantial distance inwardly of the cut edges pretreated therethrough with a penetrating adhesive comprising rubber latex with minor content of a rubber solvent, a plasticizer from the hexahydrophenol and hexahydrocresol group, and a wetting agent, the adhesive preventing raveling of the cut edges and bonding each edge portion into a reinforced unit, and the pretreated edge portions being in spaced relation.

6. A relatively heavy and strong fabric reinforcing strip having the edge portions thereof for a substantial distance inwardly of the strip pretreated with a penetrating adhesive forming said edge portions throughout the thickness of the fabric into substantially unitary and nonraveling selvages, said adhesive comprising rubber latex with minor content of a rubber solvent of the equivalent of partially hydrogenated naphthaline, a plasticizer of the equivalent of a hydrogenated product of phenol, and a wetting agent.

7. A fabric reinforcing strip having the edge portions thereof for a uniform and substantial distance inwardly of the strip pretreated with a colored adhesive forming said edge portions into substantially unitary and non-raveling se1- vages of uniform width and of a color contrasting to that of the intermediate portion of the strip, said adhesive comprising a composition of rubber latex with minor contents of tetrahydronaphthaline, hexahydrophenol, and sulfonated castor oil.

8. A fabric reinforcing strip having cut and non-raveled edges and pretreated over its entire area and through its thickness with a penetrating adhesive comprising rubber latex with minor content of tetrahydronaphthaline, hexahydrophenol, and a suitable wetting agent, the adhesive preventing raveling of the cut edges and bonding the strip into a reinforced unit.

9. A fabric reinforcing strip pretreated entirely through its thickness with a penetrating and non-surface-sealing adhesive comprising rubber latex with minor content of a rubber solvent, a plasticizer from the hexahydrophenol and hexahydrocresol group, and a wetting agent, the adhesive bonding the treated fabric into an airporous unit and forming a bonding medium for a further adhesive.

CHARLES M. ALBION.

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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2477403A (en) * 1944-11-24 1949-07-26 Owens Corning Fiberglass Corp Surgical bandage
US2614523A (en) * 1949-12-22 1952-10-21 Gummed Products Company Gummed tape serving and moistening mechanism
US2653888A (en) * 1949-02-24 1953-09-29 Polaroid Corp Method of forming container blanks
US2653830A (en) * 1948-08-10 1953-09-29 Columbia Ribbon & Carbon Manifolding
US2755196A (en) * 1952-08-01 1956-07-17 William M Scholl Method of making adhesive tape with clear margins
US2822286A (en) * 1953-09-21 1958-02-04 Clarence W Vogt Method for slitting tapes and displacing adhesive
US2854352A (en) * 1954-03-31 1958-09-30 Huber Karl High temperature adhesive tape
US2879176A (en) * 1950-12-09 1959-03-24 Reeves Soundcraft Corp Method of applying a magnetic sound track stripe to a film
US3025196A (en) * 1958-02-06 1962-03-13 Kimberly Clark Co Apparatus for forming an edge reinforced non-woven web
US4910066A (en) * 1988-10-26 1990-03-20 Mri Management Resoures, Inc. Reinforced paper and method for making the same
US5217790A (en) * 1987-09-09 1993-06-08 Stanpac Inc. Elongate strip for the production of sealing members for containers
US5514442A (en) * 1987-09-09 1996-05-07 Stanpac, Inc. Sealing member for a container

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2477403A (en) * 1944-11-24 1949-07-26 Owens Corning Fiberglass Corp Surgical bandage
US2653830A (en) * 1948-08-10 1953-09-29 Columbia Ribbon & Carbon Manifolding
US2653888A (en) * 1949-02-24 1953-09-29 Polaroid Corp Method of forming container blanks
US2614523A (en) * 1949-12-22 1952-10-21 Gummed Products Company Gummed tape serving and moistening mechanism
US2879176A (en) * 1950-12-09 1959-03-24 Reeves Soundcraft Corp Method of applying a magnetic sound track stripe to a film
US2755196A (en) * 1952-08-01 1956-07-17 William M Scholl Method of making adhesive tape with clear margins
US2822286A (en) * 1953-09-21 1958-02-04 Clarence W Vogt Method for slitting tapes and displacing adhesive
US2854352A (en) * 1954-03-31 1958-09-30 Huber Karl High temperature adhesive tape
US3025196A (en) * 1958-02-06 1962-03-13 Kimberly Clark Co Apparatus for forming an edge reinforced non-woven web
US5217790A (en) * 1987-09-09 1993-06-08 Stanpac Inc. Elongate strip for the production of sealing members for containers
US5514442A (en) * 1987-09-09 1996-05-07 Stanpac, Inc. Sealing member for a container
US4910066A (en) * 1988-10-26 1990-03-20 Mri Management Resoures, Inc. Reinforced paper and method for making the same

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