US2137474A - Warm air furnace - Google Patents

Warm air furnace Download PDF

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Publication number
US2137474A
US2137474A US50191A US5019135A US2137474A US 2137474 A US2137474 A US 2137474A US 50191 A US50191 A US 50191A US 5019135 A US5019135 A US 5019135A US 2137474 A US2137474 A US 2137474A
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Prior art keywords
opening
edges
bricks
furnace
fire
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Expired - Lifetime
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US50191A
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Rudolph W Menk
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Rudolph W Menk
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24HFLUID HEATERS, e.g. WATER OR AIR HEATERS, HAVING HEAT-GENERATING MEANS, e.g. HEAT PUMPS, IN GENERAL
    • F24H3/00Air heaters
    • F24H3/008Air heaters using solid fuel
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24HFLUID HEATERS, e.g. WATER OR AIR HEATERS, HAVING HEAT-GENERATING MEANS, e.g. HEAT PUMPS, IN GENERAL
    • F24H9/00Details
    • F24H9/18Arrangement or mounting of grates or heating means
    • F24H9/1854Arrangement or mounting of grates or heating means for air heaters
    • F24H9/1877Arrangement or mounting of combustion heating means, e.g. grates or burners
    • F24H9/1881Arrangement or mounting of combustion heating means, e.g. grates or burners using fluid fuel

Description

-- qiz Nov. 22, 193. R. W. MENK 2,137,474
WARM AIR FURNACE Filed No 16, 1955 2 sheets-sheet 1 Nqv. 22, 1938. R w MENK 2,137,474
WARM AIR FURNACE Filed Nov. 16, 1935 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IgIIIlIIIIIAVA'III J'IllI/IIIIIIIIJIIATI R000; PH IVK Patented Nov. 22, 1938 TED STATES PATENT OFFICE." f
WARM AIR FURNACE Rudolph w. Menk, Joliet, 111. Application November 16,1935, Serial No. 50,191 3 cl ims. (01. 1 26- 99) My invention relates to heating appliances, and has more -specific reference to warm or hotair furnaces for the heating of houses, or other apartments. M a
One of the principal objects of my invention is toprovide a furnacethat is fabricated almost entirely of sheet metal plates that are joined together preferably by Welding to provide tight- 1y sealed joints that effectively prevent escape of air and gas from the structure. -When :constructed in the aforesaid manner the cost of pro- ,duction is substantially reduced, as is also the Weight of the furnace, and by means of the novel construction and arrangement of the component parts the efficiency of the. heating apparatus is considerably increased. 1
Other objects of my invention are to provide a furnace that is novel in construction; is dependable in use; is capable of being readily assembled when being manufactured, and also when being installed or erected in a house; and is effective in performing the functions for which itis designed. Further objects and advantages of my furnace will be obvious to persons skilled in the art after the construction'and operation thereof is understood from the following detailed :de-
scription.
I prefer to accomplish all of the objects of my invention, and to practice the same in substantially the manner hereinafter fully described and as more particularly pointed out in the-appended claims. In connection with this description reference is made to the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification.
fInthe drawings: Q Figure 1 is a Vertical axial section of my heat-- ing furnace, theview being made on the plane of line l--I of Figure2. g Figure 2 an elevation looking at the rear of the furnace body, the outer casing being shown in dotted lines. Figure 3 is a horizontal section taken online 3- 43 of Figure 1, looking down in the direction of the arrows.
Figure 4 is a vertical section on line 4-4 of Figure 1, looking towards the front ofthe furnace in the direction of the arrows i Figure 5 is a detail'view showing the manner of installing or removing the fire-brick.
The drawings, which are more or less schematic, are for the purpose of disclosing a typical or preferred form in which my furnace may be constructed; and in said drawings like reference characters identify like parts appearing in the different views.
The body of the furnace is preferably entirely surrounded or enclosed within an outer shell or casing 5 which is made of the usual gauge of sheet-metal, and in the present instance the casing is conveniently made rectangular in shape: with rounded corners. There is a tapered bonnet at the topof the casing which is provided with discharge openings for egress of the heated air to the distributor pipes (not shown) and at the rear, near the bottom of. the casing there is an inlet opening thatis connected to: a return-air conduit or pipe 6. At the front of the casing there is a panel 1 that is provided with a feed openingand door 8 and an ash-pitopening and door 9, both of which doors are provided with air or draft control dampers.
The furnace body within the casing 5'is a cylindrical unitarystructure formed from plates of sheet-metal of much heavier gauge than the gauge of the sheet-metal used in the casing, and this body is of simple and 'novel construction. {The main portion of this bodyis a sheet metal cylinder or shell l0 standing upright to dispose ,its (axis vertical and it. is supported above and spaced from the floor by L-shaped feet I I that are welded to the outer .face of the body or shell.'
The upperand lower ends of the cylindric body 10 are closed by outwardly bulged or bellied shaped furnace body is provided having a domeshaped top and an inverted dome-shaped bottom. A feed opening is made in the front wall of the cylindric, body It! alining with the feed opening and door 8 in the panel and rectangular shaped horizontal and vertical walls connect the corresponding edges of these alined openings to provide a suitable passageway l 4 from outside the casing 5 to the interior of the body where the combustion chamber is located. Another opening is made in the lower portion of the cylindric body it alining with the ash-pit opening and door 9 in the panel and rectangular shaped horizontal and vertical walls I5 connect the corresponding edges of these openings toprovide a suitable passageway leading to the interior of the ash-pit. 3 l
The fuel grates it of the rocker type extend across the lower portion of the body In in a horizontalplane above the top of the door 9 and divide the interior of said body into an upper combustion chamber H and a lower ash-pit I 8. The interior surface of that portion of the combustion chamber in which the fuel is placed and burned is faced: with fire-bricks L) that are supported upon an annular shelf 29 extending portions of the metal inwardly around the lower portion of the combustion chamber just above the plane of the grates, and said fire-brick are secured in position by metal clamps l9 that are bolted to the inside faces of the vertical plates forming the fuel passage-way I4. I
In order to rock or vibrate the grates a horizontally disposed shaker bar 2| extends from outside the casing into the ash-pit [8 where it is suitably connected to said grates, while the opposite or outer endof said shaker bar is pivotally connected to a vertically disposed operating handle 22. The portion of the shaker bar between the handle and the ash-pit is enclosed within a housing :1: having guide slots at each end on which'said bar is reciprocably disposed.
This arrangement prevents egress of dust and ashes out of the ash-pit during the operation of shaking the grates.
At the top of the combustion chamber the body or shell I!) is provided with a horizontally elongated opening 23 thatextends in an annular direction slightly less than half-way aroundthe rear segment of the body. In height,
extends from just above the top of the fire-brick l9 up to near the top of the cylindric metal plate forming the body or shell. A row of fire-bricks 24, having one or more this opening 23 openings therein, are placed ,in the opening 23. The cubical dimensions as well as the surface areas of these fire-bricks are greater than the corresponding dimensions of the adjacent wall. A heat-retaining body results from this arrangement in which the temperature is readily built up and retained even after the bed of fuel in the furnace has died down, and since said heat-retaining body has greater surface area and bulk than the normal area and bulk of the much thinner metal plate of the furnace wall the gases in passing this heat-retainer bodywill maintain their temperatures and combustion will continue and will not be retarded as thegases travel in their movement out of said chamber II. In addition to the foregoing, the fire-bricks afford protection to the edges of the metal wall which they overlap'at the opening, and they restrict the size of the outlet opening and divide the stream of comlzustion gases passing out'of the chamber, so that when combustion'has been retarded and the fire dies down this fire-brick heat-retaining body will continue to radiate heat. For the purpose of permitting the ready installation or removal of these fire-bricks their top and bottom edges are provided with channels or grooves 25 and 21 respectively, the former or top grooves being deeper than those in the, latter or bottom edges of the bricks.
Thus, the top of a brick is first engaged with the upper margin of the opening 23 and moved upward until the adjacent edge of the metal plate reaches the bottom of the groove 28, after which the lower edge of the brick may be moved into the opening in order to aline the bottom groove 21 with the lower edge of the opening and then lowered to its; proper position. This is detailed in Figure 5. The vertical edges of the fire-bricks are provided with rabbets 28 which permits overlapping of the edges of the adjacent bricks and also permits the end edges of the end bricks to overlap the vertical edges of the opening 23. The egress opening or openings 25 are made by molding the adjacent bricks in somewhat of a U-shape which is readily done by shell so that said radiator projects rearwardly from the upper portion of the body or shell as seen in Figures 1 and 3. At or adjacent its lower edge, the rear wall 39 is provided with a smoke outlet to which a sheet-metal stub or sleeve 3| is welded.
The top and bottom Walls 32 and 33, respectively, of the radiator consist of substantially rectangular horizontally disposed sheet-metal plates that are united by welding to the respective edges of the vertical walls 29 and 33, and the forward portions of these top and bottom walls have segmental or substantially semi-circular cut-out portions so that said edges will be shaped to fit against and be welded to the outer surface of the body Hi. It will be seen the upper segment of the smoke outlet is spaced a substantial distance below the horizontal plane of the lower edge of the opening or openings 25 in the fire-brick communicating into the combustion chamber, so that the hot products of combustion, after leaving the body or shell 10, must travel in a downward direction in the radiator before said products can escape to the chimney or other discharge flue.
In order to further retard movement of the hot products of combustion in their travel from the combustion chamber IT to the chimney, an
inverted V-shaped baffle 34 is installed within the radiator. This baffle preferably consists of a sheet metal plate that is bent intermediate its side edges to provide two inclined members 34 and 34 that slope downwardly from the bend which provides the apex 34 of the bafiie. By reference to Figures 1 and 2 it will be seen that the baffle is positioned so that the apex 34 there- ,so that elongated narrow passageways 35 are provided at the opposite side edges of the bafiie. The products'of combustion upon entering the rad1ator are divided by the battle, being compelled thereby to move towards the side walls 29 of the radiator and then practically reverse their direction of movement in passing around the opposite edges of the baffle before they can reach the smoke outlet. These circuituous paths tend to retard movement of the hot products of combustion with the result that said products remain a longer period of time in this novel radiator than in the case in radiators of ordinary construction. Another feature is that the fire-bricks 24 with their spaced openings to divide the hot products of combustion perform the function of a heat-retainer body and assist in maintaining a hot temperature in the radiator. Also it will be apparent that the furnace body, including the radiator, being fabricated from sheet-metal plates welded together, will become heated more rapidly than will become heated in less time than in other and similar types of warm-air furnaces.
What I claim is 1. A device of the kind described embodying furnace walls providing a combustion chamber, one of said walls having an opening, a radiator communicating with the combustion chamber through said opening, and firerbricks mounted in and surrounding said opening whereby to provide a heat-retainer body, the top and bottom edges of said bricks provided with seats receiving the wall edges at said opening whereby to mount said bricks and protect the edges of said opening.
2. A warm-air furnace embodying vertical and horizontal sheet-metal walls providing a combustion chamber, one of said walls having an opening, a sheet-metal radiator on the exterior of said walls and communicating with the combustion chamber through said opening, and fire-bricks mounted in said opening and surrounding the sheet-metal wall at the edges thereof, all of said bricks provided with edge seats to receive the edges of the wall at said opening whereby to mount said bricks and protect said wall edges, and certain of said bricks having a U-shaped body whereby to constrict the area of said opening.
3. A warm-air furnace embodying walls providing a combustion chamber having an outlet opening, a radiator communicating with said chamber through said opening, and fire-bricks mounted in and surrounding said opening, said bricks being of greater thickness than the Wall defining said opening whereby to provide a heatretainer body about said opening, certain edges of said bricks having longitudinal grooves receiving the edges of said wall at said opening whereby to protect said edges and afford means for mounting said bricks in said opening.
RUDOLPH W. MENK.
US50191A 1935-11-16 1935-11-16 Warm air furnace Expired - Lifetime US2137474A (en)

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