US2136282A - Process of treating waxes - Google Patents

Process of treating waxes Download PDF

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US2136282A
US2136282A US3314835A US2136282A US 2136282 A US2136282 A US 2136282A US 3314835 A US3314835 A US 3314835A US 2136282 A US2136282 A US 2136282A
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amorphous
pressure
chamber
material
melted
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Dickinson Henry Randel
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Dickinson Henry Randel
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08LCOMPOSITIONS OF MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS
    • C08L91/00Compositions of oils, fats or waxes; Compositions of derivatives thereof
    • C08L91/06Waxes
    • C08L91/08Mineral waxes

Description

NOV. 8, 1938. H. R. D|CK|N50N 2,136,282

PROCESS OF TREATING WAXES Filed July 25, 1955 sup/u Y TEM/P5 RA TIJRE CoA/MOL AuracM/E ,2 do G aLLzcr/a/V z 0 /8 PMF CMM A/ rf )Z3 /M .s [muws/olv C50/4.41664 .aa l

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Patented N ov. .8, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE aiaazsz PaocEssoF TaaA'rnvG wAxas Henry Rande! Dickinson. Grand aspra., Mien. Appucsun .my ze? nass, serial No. 33,148

9 Claims.

This invention is a process for imparting amorphous lcharacteristics to normally. crystallineV waxes. One of the objects of the invention is to so unite and commingle crystalline wax with an amorphous material, as to provide a homogeneous mass possessing marked 'amorphous characteristics. A further object is to regulate the homogenizing process in such manner as to 10 control the hardness, plasticity and/or melting point of homogenized waxes.

The invention will be hereinafter fully set forth and particularly pointed out in the claims. In the accompanying drawing, the gure is a diagrammatic view illustrating an apparatus for carrying out the invention, with parts shown in section.

In carrying out the invention, amorphous .and crystalline waxes are mixed together, and the mixture subjected to high pressure by fluid or mechanical means, while in a state of fusion. The pressure employed is relatively high, preferably ranging from 10 pounds per square inch tov Vmaterially increased and is highly useful for the;

purpose of rendering paper transparent. In addition to the foregoing, the plasticity of the wax so blended and treated with pressure ris materially increased or changed.

Referring tothe drawing, III indicates a melting tank which communicates with an autoclave4 II of standard type, by means of a pipe I2, con-- trolled by a suitable valve I5. A second melting 40 kettle or supply tank I4 is also connected with the autoclave I I by means of a pipe I5, controlled by a valve I5. The autoclave II may be of any suitable or desired structure 'provided with the usual steam heating jacket I1, and with an in- 45 ternal agitator I8, which may be rotated in suitable manner (not shown). The heating temperature of the steam jacket is controlled by means of a temperature control device diagrammatically indicated at I9, and controlling a .i0 shut-off valve 20 in the steam-supply line, in accordance with variations of -temperature within the autoclave. Connected with the autoclave II below the liquid level, by means of a pipe 2I is an air or fluidv pump or compressor 22, of any de- 55 sired construction.

(ci. 19e-11) Leading from the bottom of the autoclave'is an outlet pipe 25, to which is connected a pipe 24, which discharges into the inner passage of a nozzle N having an outer air pressure passagetl controlled 'by valve 52, and leading to the atmos- 5 phere, which discharges into an expansion chamber 25. The chamber is also provided with a drain'connection 25, controlled by a valve 21, the outlet pipe 23 being controlled by a `valve 28. 'Ihe expansion chamber 25 is connected with 10 a suitable collection tank 29 by means of a pipe 30, as shown. r

In operation, a crystalline wax such as paraffn, is melted within the kettle I0, and the amorphous material, Vsuch as ozocerite wax, asphalt, 15 or the like, is melted within the tank I4. When the two materials reach the desired melted state, the respective valves I3 and I6 are opened, and the twomaterials, while in the melted state, flow into the autoclave II, through the respective 20 pipes I2 and I5, being intimately mixed and commingled by means of the agitator I 8, in an 'obvious manner. It is to be understood, of course, that the steam jacket of the autoclave maintains the molten condition of the mixed 25 materials. During the agitation step, compressed air or other pressure uid is pumped or supplied into the autoclave by the compressor 22, whereby the melted mixture within the autoclave is tpermeated with air and subjected to a very high 30 degree of pressure, preferably ranging .from 10 pounds per square inch'to 10,000 pounds per square inch, according to the results desired. In other words, the higher the pressure, the more complete the process. After the mixing and pressure steps have been completed, the materials will A have become intermingled and homogenized into an amorphous mass permeated with air, and may then be drawn oiI from the autoclave through the pipes 23 and 24 into the 40 expansion chamber 25. The sudden reduction of pressure as the mixture is admitted to the expansion chamber results in a somewhat explosive action which produces the ilnal complete dissemination of the mixture within itself. The mass is collectedv in chamber 25, the air escapes through the line 30, and the mass is drawn oil.' through pipe 26 and valve 21 into a suitable receptacle (not shown), in which the mass is allowed to cool and solidify. If it should be desired to separate the mixture into ilne particles,V the valve 21 is closed and the -valve 32 is opened, whereupon the pressure will cause the mixture to be discharged through pipe 24 into the expansion chamber 25 with sumcient velocity to 55 draw in air through the passage Ii, thereby breaking the mixture up into extremely ne, hard particles, which are sciently cooled by the air drawn in to maintain their individuality. After the pulverizing oi' the mixture. there is still sufiicient pressure, or an exhauster may he used, to force the nely divided particles into a coilection tank 29, where the material may be stored as long as desired.

It is to be understood that although parailin wav, ozocerite wax and/or asphalt have been mentioned as examples of materials to be blended, the invention is not limited to these particular substances. For instance, non-solvent oils, liquids or fats of any suitable characteristics may be blended with either of the original waxes before being subjected tothe stages of the process or in the process, and the entire mass, after processing, will be rendered amorphous and so completely homogenized that the oil, liquid or fat will resist separation from the waxes. By thus mixing oils, liquids or fats, "amorphous waxes and crystalline waxes, full control may be had over the nnal product with respect to the characteristics of plasticity, hardness and reactions to heat and chemicals.

The advantages of the invention will be readily understood by those skilled in the art to which the invention belongs. For instance, by means of the process above described, crystalline waxes are made to simulate amorphous waxes, and rendered capable of the same uses and fabrication treatments as amorphous waxes. Another advantage is that any desired hardness, plasticity and/or reaction to heat and chemicals is obtainable. The use of this process will also render more amorphous. rubbery or flexible a mixture of crystalline wax with asphaltum or bitumen.

Having thus explained the nature of the invention and described an operative manner of constructing and using the same, although without attempting to set forth all of the forms in which it may be made, or all of the forms of its use, what is claimed is:- l

1. The process of mixing crystalline wax and amorphous material comprising mechanically mixing melted crystalline waxand melted amorphous material within a closed chamber, and independently introducing a compressible fluid into said chamber during the mixing stage and maintaining said uid under high pressure until the melted ingredients of the melted mixture are completely homogenized by the pressure of said ilui/d and assume distinctly amorphous characteristics.

2. The process of mixing crystalline wax'and amorphous material comprising separately melting crystalline wax andthe amorphous material, causing the melted materials to intermingle within a closed chamber while in their melted state and independently introducing a compressible iiuid into said closed chamber during the mixing stage, said uid being maintained under high pressure until the melted ingredients of the mixture are completely homogenized by the pressure of said iluid and assume distinctly amorphous characteristics.

3. The process of mixing crystalline wax and amorphous material comprising feeding a stream ot crystalline wax and a separate stream of melted amorphous material to a closed container, maintaining said wax and amorphous material in a melted condition and mechanically mixing them within the container while in a molten state, and independently introducing a compresaction of a compressible fluid maintained under high pressure Within said chamber, and suddenly reducing the pressure upon the mixture.

5. 'Ihe process of mixing crystalline wax and amorphous material comprising melting said crystalline wax and said amorphous material and commingling them within said closed chamber While in the melted state, and independently introducing a compressible fluid Ainto said chamber during the melting stage, and maintaining said compressible fluid under high pressure within said chamber until the melted ingredients of the mixture are completely homogenized by the pressure of said fluid and assume distinctly amorphous characteristics, discharging the homogenized material from the closed chamber, and suddenly releasing the pressure thereon as the homogenized material is so discharged.

6. The process of mixing crystalline wax and amorphous material comprising melting said crystalline wax and said amorphous material and commingling them Within said closed chamber while in the melted state, and independently introducing a compressible uid into said chamber during the melting stage, and maintaining said compressible uid under high pressure within said chamber until the melted ingredients of the mixture are completely homogenized by the pressure of said iluid and assume distinctly amorphous characteristics, and while said homogenized mixture is still in a melted state, discharging the same into a space which is normally maintained at a much lower pressure than the pressure in the iirst mentioned chamber.

7. The process of mixing crystalline wax and amorphous material comprising melting said crystalline wax and said amorphous material and commingling them within said closed chamber while in the melted state, and independently introducing a compressible fluid into said chamber during the melting stage, and maintaining said compressible fluid under high pressure within said chamber until the melted ingredients of the mixture are completely homogenized by the pressure of said iluid and assume distinctly amorphous characteristics, and atomizing the melted homogenized material at a temperature sutilciently low for the atomized particlesy to maintain individuality.

8. The process of mixing crystalline wax and amorphous material comprising mixing said wax and said amorphous material within a closed chamber while in a melted state, adding oil to the melted mixture while contained within said chamber, and independently introducing a compressible fluid into said chamber during the melting stage and maintaining said fluid under high pressure until the ingredients of the mixture are completely homogenized by the pressure of said fluid and assume distinctly amorphous characteristics, and suddenly reducing said pressure at the end of the mixing stage.

9. The process of mixing crystalline waxV and amorphous material comprising melting said crystalline wax and said amorphous material and commingling them within said closed chamamorphous characteristics, withdrawing the homogenized material from the closed chamberV while in a melted state and under said pressure, and pulverizing the withdrawn material by discharging it into a lower pressure atmosphere while in a melted state and in such manner as to suddenly relieve the material of lsaid high pressure.

HENRY RANDEL DICKINSON.

US2136282A 1935-07-25 1935-07-25 Process of treating waxes Expired - Lifetime US2136282A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2535604A (en) * 1947-09-06 1950-12-26 Shell Dev Process of preparing wax compositions
US4002706A (en) * 1974-02-25 1977-01-11 Dirk Jacobus Pretorius Wax and wax blends

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2535604A (en) * 1947-09-06 1950-12-26 Shell Dev Process of preparing wax compositions
US4002706A (en) * 1974-02-25 1977-01-11 Dirk Jacobus Pretorius Wax and wax blends

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