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US2134974A
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US
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Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
framework
form
fingers
material
invention
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Expired - Lifetime
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Hurwitz Nelson
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Hurwitz Nelson
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H3/00Dolls
    • A63H3/04Dolls with deformable framework
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47FSPECIAL FURNITURE, FITTINGS, OR ACCESSORIES FOR SHOPS, STOREHOUSES, BARS, RESTAURANTS OR THE LIKE; PAYING COUNTERS
    • A47F8/00Dummies, busts or the like, e.g. for displaying garments

Description

Novl, 1938. N HURwl-rz 2,134,974

DI SPLAY FORM Filed Aug. 31, 1937 nventor Nelson Hwrwiz Gttorneg Patented Nov. 1, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 9 Claims.'

This invention relates to forms simulating animate objects, and more particularly to forms of this character which are adjustable to various positions.

In display advertising, it has long been the practice to employ manikins or other similar forms for displaying the merchandise. Forms of this character are generally made of wax, plaster of Paris, and the like, and usually are of rigid 10 construction. In cases where it has been found desirable to provide these forms with adjustable parts, such as the limbs of a human form, for example, the parts have been made movable by means of ball-and-socket or other similar joints, all of which are limited in the manner of adjustment and, at best, can be adjusted only within definite limits. Moreover repeated operation of these joint connections eventually causes them to Wear out, thus rendering the form unfit for further use unless repaired.

There are many articles of merchandise, particularly small items, which need be eiectively displayed by only a. portion of such forms. For example, a form simulating the human hand may be employed to hold the article being advertised and thus bring it before the eyes of the purchasing public| in an attractive manner. Obviously, since different articles of merchandise which may be so displayed vary in shape and size over a wide range, it is necessary that the fingers of the form be made adjustable to accommodate a large variety of such articles. In some cases, also, it is highly desirable, if not almost imperative, that the ngers of the form be enabled to` grasp the article to be displayed in order to retain it in place properly, especially for a continued period. So far as I am aware, none of the forms heretofore in use have been constructed to serve effectively in this manner.

The primary object of my invention is to provide an improved form simulating an animate object parts of which may be readily adjusted to any desired position and which will remain in such position indefinitely when adjusted thereto.

More specifically, it is an object of my invention to provide an improved Vform simulating the human hand, the fingers of which may be readily adjusted to any desired position, which may be either natural and customary, or which may beA unusual.

Another object of my invention is to provide an improved form as aforesaid which is readily adjustable to grasp and retain an article of merchandise for display purposes.

Il Still another object of my invention is to provide an improved form simulating a human limb the digits of which may be adjusted to any grotesque or other unusual posture.

A further object of my invention is to provide an improved form of the type set forth the joints of which are not subject to appreciable Wear even after long continued use.

It is also an object of my invention to provide an improved form of the type described which may be suitably embodied in a toy as well as inaw display figure, which is simple, yet rugged, in construction and highly efficient in use, and which is inexpensive of manufacture.

In accordance with my invention, I make the display form or toy of a moldable material which l is flexible when it becomes set and mold it about a skeleton framework constructed of wire or the like. The wire framework is also flexible and preferably stiffer than the material of which the display form is made, but it is not resilient so that, while it will readily yield to banding in any direction, it will not itself spring back to its original shape. Thus, the form may be adjusted to any desired position which it will thereafter retain.

In the case of a form simulating the human hand, for example, the Wire framework extends into the fingers whereby each finger may be bent or twisted at any point along its entire length and to any extent desired quite independently of any other finger. It will be seen, therefore, that each of the fingers may be individually bent to some unusual and unnatural or grotesque shape, the form thereby attracting attention because it is so unusual. By bending the forenger and as many of the other fingers as may be necessary into suitable relation with the thumb, an article of merchandise can be readily grasped by the hand and held inplace for display purposes, particularly where the wire framework is quite stiff. When applied to a toy, such as a doll, a bird, a

. dog, or some other animal, the several parts thereof may be readily adjusted to, and will remain in, a number of positions dependent upon the ingenuity of the child to afford considerable amusement as well as to be of educational value.

The novel features that I consider characteristic of my invention are set forth with partcularity in the appended claims. The invention itself, however, both as to its organization and method of operation, together with additional objects and advantages thereof, will best be understood from the following description of several embodiments thereof, when read in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which Figure 1 is a view, partly in section, of one form 55 of Amy invention as applied to a display form simulating the human hand,

Figure 2 is a similar view of a slight modification thereof,

Figure 3 is plan view of a modified form of skeleton framework constructed in accordance with my invention, and

Figure 4 is a view showing my invention applied to a bird.

Referring more particularly to the drawing, wherein similar reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout, there is shown, in Fig. 1, a display device I in the form of a human hand showing a suitably weighted supporting base 3 and including the five fingers 5, 1, 9, I I and I3. The form I is molded of any suitable base material I5, such as suitably sized latex, synthetic resins, gelatinous substances, or the like, and which, when set, is flexible and preferably feels like human flesh to the touch. The base material I5 is molded around a skeleton framework I1 of non-resilient but flexible metal wire, such as lead, brass, copper, or the like, the wire I1 being entirely embedded in the base material I5 and being preferably stiffer than the latter. The skeleton framework I1 is originally shaped to represent the human hand and has portions thereof extending into each of the fingers through substantially the entire length thereof. as more clearly shown in the modifications of my invention illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3. Preferably, the framework I1 is first dipped into the material of which the form is made and the coating thereon \is allowed to dry and set, after which the coat'd framework is placed in the mold and the base material I5 is poured around it in well known manner, the molded hand being removed from the mold when the material I 5 has set. 'I'he hand I may thereafter be covered, as by spraying, dipping, painting, etc., with a layer I9 which simulates human skin, and the fingers may be suitably finished with finger nails 2|, if desired.

A hand simulating display device thus formed may be easily adjusted to suit various needs. Since the wire I1 can be bent in any direction and extends substantially entirely through each of the fingers, it is obvious that the individual fingers may be bent or twisted at any desired points in their lengths as if provided with an infinite number of universal joints. This permits bending the individual fingers into unusual or grotesque postures. By way of illustration, the little finger I3 has been shown bent forwardly and downwardly, and twisted slightly toward the edge 23 of the palm; the ring finger II has been shown bent backward and slightly toward the forefinger 1, as if it were double jointed; and the middle finger 9 has been shown bent forwardly about 90 and then twisted toward the little finger I3 to assume a position in front of the rearwardly bent ring finger I I. Obviously, the fingers may be adjusted to many other positions in all of which they will be retained by the non-resilient wire framework I1 until adjusted to another position.

Within the range of universal adjustment permitted by the fingers of the display hand constructed according to my invention, it is also possible to bring the fingers and thumb into such relation that the articles of merchandise to be displayed thereby are firmly grasped and held up before the eyes of the purchasing public. For an illustration, I have shown the forefinger 'I and the thumb 5 adjusted to firmly grasp a cigarette 25. By selecting a relatively stiff wire for the framework I1 and bringing the forefinger I and the thumb 5 into sufficiently close relation, considerable pressure will be applied to the cigarette 25, as seen from the depressed portion 21 thereof, whereby the cigarette or other article to be displayed will be held in place very firmly.

In the modification of my invention shown in Fig. 2, the hand I is shown holding a telephone receiver 3| in a natural posture, and the distribution of the skeleton wire framework I1 is shown in detail. In place of a solid wire framework, as in Fig, 1, however. the framework I1 is made up of a multiplicity of individual strands twisted together into a single strand. A framework of this sort is preferable in some cases, since it lends itself more easily to twisting and bending.

In Fig. 3, I have shown a further modification of my invention wherein another type of framework is employed. A solid block of metal 4I may be bored to receive a plurality of wire or strip elements 43 of which those embedded in the fingers have alternate sections 45 thereof fiattened out while the remaining and shorter sections 41 of the elements 43 are retained in their original wire form. Preferably, the alternate sections 41 correspond to the knuckles of the human hand and the fiattened sections 45 extend between the knuckles. Since the sections 45 are wider than the sections 41, it will be obvious that they are stiffer transversely of the fingers, or in the plane of the paper, than are the sections 41. On the other hand, in a plane normal to that of the paper, the flattened sections 45 are more flexible than the sections 41. Also, the relatively thin, wide sections 45 are much more easily subject to twisting, or to the influence of a torsional force ten-ding to distort them. This modification of my invention, therefore, enables many unusual adjustments not so easily possible with the frameworks previously described, and it will retain the fingers in any position of adjustment.

As heretofore indicated, my present invention is applicable not only to display devices, but to many other devices, such as toys. An example of a toy constructed according to my invention is the ostrich 5I shown in Fig. 4. The body, including neck, tail and legs, may be molded as above described about a suitable framework 53. This construction permits bending or twisting the long neck of the ostrich to many different positions, and adjusting the legs thereof to sitting, standing, running, orl any other posture, either natural or unnatural, as may be desired. In the case of other animals, such as an elephant, for example, the wire framework may be formed to extend through the trunk, tail and ears, as well as the legs and neck, all these parts being rendered adjustable thereby in the manner heretofore described. Also, in the case of a human form, such as a doll or a display figure, it will be obvious that the framework may be arranged to extend through the feet and toes as well as the hands and fingers, whereby all digits of each of the limbs of the body are rendered adjustable. Similarly, the framework may extend through the arms, legs, ears, lips, nose, hips, trunk, and any other part of the body to produce unusual and interesting effects. Other changes, both in the materials of the base I5 and the frameworks I1 and 53, as well as in the structure and location of the framework will, no doubt, readily suggest themselves to those skilled in the art. I therefore desire that my invention shall not be limited except insofar as is made necessary by the prior art and by the spirit of the appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

l. In a figure simulating an animate object, f

the combination of a flexible base material formed to the shape of said object, and a skeleton framework representing said object embedded in said base material, said framework being made of a flexible material having greater stiffness than said base material and being non-resilient whereby it will retain the parts of said object in any position of adjustment, and said framework being formed at least in part of individual, unitary metal strips having alternate sections of relatively greater and lesser fiexibility in apredetermined direction.

2. In a figure simulating an animate object, the combination of a flexible base material formed to the shape of said object, and a skeleton framework representing said object embedded in said base material, said framework being made of a flexible material having greater stiffness than said base material and being non-resilient whereby it will retain the parts of said object in any position of adjustment, and said framework being formed at least in part of metal strips having alternate sections of relatively greater and lesser flexibility in a predetermined plane, said sections of relatively greater flexibility in said'plane being stiier than the other alternate sections in a plane normal to said first named plane.

3. In a figure simulating an animate object, the combination of a flexible base material formed to the shape of said object, and a skeleton framework representing said object embedded in said base material, said framework being made of a flexible material having greater stiffness than said base material and being non-resilient whereby it will retain the parts of said object in any position of adjustment, and said framework being formed at least in part of individual, unitary metal strips having alternate sections which yield more easily under the infiuence of a torsional force than the remaining alternate sections thereof.

4. A display form simulating the human hand, said form being made of a flexible base material and including the five individual lingers, and a skeleton framework embedded in said base material, said framework being made of exible metal having greater stiffness than said base material, and said framework having portions formed of alternate sections of relatively greater and lesser fiexibility extending into each of the fingers throughout substantially the entire length thereof whereby said fingers may be individually bent anywhere along their lengths and in any desired direction, said framework being nonresilient and serving to retain said fingers in any position of adjustment.

5. A display form according to claim 4 characterized in that said framework is made of metal wire, and characterized further in that those portions of said wire which extend into the fingers are fiattened at spaced points therealong whereby to provide said alternate sections of relatively greater and lesser flexibility in a predetermined plane.

6. A display form according to claim 4 characterized in that said framework is made of metal wire, and characterized further in that those portions of said wire which extend into the fingers are flattened at spaced points therealong, said attened portions being relatively stiff transversely of the fingers.

7. A display form according to claim 4 characterized in that said framework is made of metal Wire, and characterized further in that those portions of said wire which extend into the fingers are flattened at spaced points therealong, said flattened portions being located at points interplurality of assembled, individual, unitary elements having alternate sections of relatively greater and lesser flexibility.

NELSON HURWITZ.

US2134974A 1937-08-31 1937-08-31 Display form Expired - Lifetime US2134974A (en)

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Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2453604A (en) * 1945-04-07 1948-11-09 Tenenbaum Adele Method of making prosthetic articles
US3200515A (en) * 1962-05-29 1965-08-17 Penny A Daigre Taxidermy
US3284947A (en) * 1965-05-17 1966-11-15 Frank L Dahl Adjustable doll having degassed malleable core
US3325939A (en) * 1966-11-21 1967-06-20 Mattel Inc Adjustable figure toy having improved armature means
US4280695A (en) * 1980-02-11 1981-07-28 Stenehjem Jerome C Product for simulating a human body part
FR2493168A1 (en) * 1980-11-05 1982-05-07 Kader Ind Cy Ltd Leg assembly for model figure or doll - comprises linked pair of bendable sheet metal inserts, embedded in moulded plastics
EP0370418A2 (en) * 1988-11-23 1990-05-30 Paride Lanza Miniature vehicle with deformable coachwork
WO1990010482A1 (en) * 1989-03-13 1990-09-20 Mattel, Inc. Posable figure with continuous skin
US5017173A (en) * 1989-10-19 1991-05-21 Mattel, Inc. Torsional joint skeleton for poseable figure
US5083732A (en) * 1987-08-12 1992-01-28 Akamine Horace S Flexible baby bottle holding animal
US5125169A (en) * 1991-06-14 1992-06-30 Protonaut, Inc. Glove drying apparatus and method
EP0566799A1 (en) * 1992-04-24 1993-10-27 Kabushiki Kaisha Toy Box Doll
US5432991A (en) * 1990-10-26 1995-07-18 Godleski; Peter J. Method of making a display
WO1996034211A1 (en) * 1995-04-26 1996-10-31 Petrus Antonius Besselink Transformable structure
US20040002279A1 (en) * 2002-05-31 2004-01-01 Wittenberg Mark S. Flexible dolls and posable action figures
US6942107B2 (en) * 1999-07-02 2005-09-13 Gjerstrup Trading A/S Glove holding member for supporting protective gloves for transportation and/or cleaning
US20070259597A1 (en) * 2006-04-03 2007-11-08 Tak Ko Wong Soft toy or doll
US7530876B1 (en) * 2006-12-12 2009-05-12 Wimberly Greg E Noise generating novelty apparatus
DE102012106595A1 (en) 2011-07-20 2013-01-24 Mattel, Inc. Flexible toy figure with armature
US20130118045A1 (en) * 2008-07-24 2013-05-16 Joe M. Sample Over-Sized Three-Dimensional Positionable Hand Structures
US20160236111A1 (en) * 2015-02-18 2016-08-18 OctoGrip, LLC Multi-appendage device for holding, gripping, or suspending an object
USD774309S1 (en) * 2014-02-07 2016-12-20 Robin Brenner Toothbrush

Cited By (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2453604A (en) * 1945-04-07 1948-11-09 Tenenbaum Adele Method of making prosthetic articles
US3200515A (en) * 1962-05-29 1965-08-17 Penny A Daigre Taxidermy
US3284947A (en) * 1965-05-17 1966-11-15 Frank L Dahl Adjustable doll having degassed malleable core
US3325939A (en) * 1966-11-21 1967-06-20 Mattel Inc Adjustable figure toy having improved armature means
US4280695A (en) * 1980-02-11 1981-07-28 Stenehjem Jerome C Product for simulating a human body part
FR2493168A1 (en) * 1980-11-05 1982-05-07 Kader Ind Cy Ltd Leg assembly for model figure or doll - comprises linked pair of bendable sheet metal inserts, embedded in moulded plastics
US5083732A (en) * 1987-08-12 1992-01-28 Akamine Horace S Flexible baby bottle holding animal
EP0370418A2 (en) * 1988-11-23 1990-05-30 Paride Lanza Miniature vehicle with deformable coachwork
EP0370418A3 (en) * 1988-11-23 1990-10-31 Paride Lanza Miniature vehicle with deformable coachwork
WO1990010482A1 (en) * 1989-03-13 1990-09-20 Mattel, Inc. Posable figure with continuous skin
US5017173A (en) * 1989-10-19 1991-05-21 Mattel, Inc. Torsional joint skeleton for poseable figure
US5432991A (en) * 1990-10-26 1995-07-18 Godleski; Peter J. Method of making a display
US5125169A (en) * 1991-06-14 1992-06-30 Protonaut, Inc. Glove drying apparatus and method
EP0566799A1 (en) * 1992-04-24 1993-10-27 Kabushiki Kaisha Toy Box Doll
WO1996034211A1 (en) * 1995-04-26 1996-10-31 Petrus Antonius Besselink Transformable structure
US6942107B2 (en) * 1999-07-02 2005-09-13 Gjerstrup Trading A/S Glove holding member for supporting protective gloves for transportation and/or cleaning
US20040002279A1 (en) * 2002-05-31 2004-01-01 Wittenberg Mark S. Flexible dolls and posable action figures
US6800016B2 (en) 2002-05-31 2004-10-05 Mattel, Inc. Flexible dolls and posable action figures
US20050037686A1 (en) * 2002-05-31 2005-02-17 Wittenberg Mark S. Flexible dolls and posable action figures
US7479054B2 (en) 2002-05-31 2009-01-20 Mattel, Inc. Flexible dolls and posable action figures
US20070259597A1 (en) * 2006-04-03 2007-11-08 Tak Ko Wong Soft toy or doll
US7841921B2 (en) * 2006-04-03 2010-11-30 T.K. Wong & Associates Ltd. Soft toy or doll
US7530876B1 (en) * 2006-12-12 2009-05-12 Wimberly Greg E Noise generating novelty apparatus
US20130118045A1 (en) * 2008-07-24 2013-05-16 Joe M. Sample Over-Sized Three-Dimensional Positionable Hand Structures
DE102012106595A1 (en) 2011-07-20 2013-01-24 Mattel, Inc. Flexible toy figure with armature
US9028292B2 (en) 2011-07-20 2015-05-12 Mattel, Inc. Flexible toy figure with armature
USD774309S1 (en) * 2014-02-07 2016-12-20 Robin Brenner Toothbrush
US20160236111A1 (en) * 2015-02-18 2016-08-18 OctoGrip, LLC Multi-appendage device for holding, gripping, or suspending an object

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