US2125906A - Artificial christmas tree - Google Patents

Artificial christmas tree Download PDF

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Publication number
US2125906A
US2125906A US7320636A US2125906A US 2125906 A US2125906 A US 2125906A US 7320636 A US7320636 A US 7320636A US 2125906 A US2125906 A US 2125906A
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Prior art keywords
hood
tube
rod
material
light
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Expired - Lifetime
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Jr John Frei
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GLOLITE Corp
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GLOLITE CORP
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47GHOUSEHOLD OR TABLE EQUIPMENT
    • A47G33/00Religious or ritual equipment in dwelling or for general use
    • A47G33/04Christmas trees
    • A47G33/06Artificial Christmas trees

Description

Aug 9 193 J. FREE, JR

I ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE Filed April 8, 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 a T M. w k a Aug. 9, 1938.

J. FRE l, JR

ARTIFICIRL CHRI STMAS TREE 2 SheetswSheet 2 Filed April 8, 1956 Patented Aug. 9, 1938 PATENT OFFICE 2,125,906 ARTIFICIAL cmusmas man John Frei, Jn, Chicago, Ill., assignor to The Gloiite Corporation, Chicago, 11]., a corporation of Illinois iApplication April 8,. 1936, Serial No. 713.206

4 Claims.

My invention relates to Christmas trees. Broadly, the present invention may be characterized as an improvement over the Illuminated artificial plant shown in my Patent No. 1,921,614, granted August 8, 1933.

More specifically, the invention consists in certain novel combinations and arrangements of parts, as will hereinafter be more fully set forth and claimed.

10 In describing this invention, reference is had to the accompanying drawings wherein I have illustrated the preferred physical embodiments of my nvention, and in which- Figure l is a front eievational view of a Christ- 5 mas tree embodying the principles of the present invention;

Figure 2 is an enlarged fragmentary view, partly in front elevation and partly in vertical section, of the device of Figure 1;

20 Figures 3, 4 and 5 are detail views of the means and certain of the steps in the method of securing light transmitting elements to the device of Figures 1 and 2;

Figure 6 is a fragmentary elevational view of 25 the foliage adapted to be employed in connection with the device of Figure 2.

Referring now in detail to Figures 1 to 5, inclusive, of the drawings, the Christmas tree of the present invention comprises a base I which, ex-

30 cept as hereinafter provided, may be of any suitable or preferred form. In the form shown in the drawings, the base is circular in configuration and it is preferably formed from substan-v tially opaque and non-heat conducting material,

such as porcelain or a quick-setting plaster, al-

though it may be formed of any other suitable or preferred material. This base is adapted to support a suitable source of light such, for example, as the electric light bulb II, the bulb being 40 received in a suitable socket (not shown) in the base. The bulb projects above the base and is supplied with current through the medium of electric cord l2.

In addition to supporting bulb ll,-the base also 45 supports a suitable light-confining hood II. This hood, in the broader aspects of the invention,

may be of any suitable orpreferred form. However, as the physical embodiment of the instant invention is shown as a Christmas tree, the hood 50 is, therefore, cone-shaped. Preferably the hood is formed of opaque material, suchas relatively .heavy cardboard, although any other suitable --material, opaque, translucent, or transparent,

a may be employed. As shown, the lower open end 55 of the hood seats onthe base, and with sides I of supporting surface ii of the base in contact with the inner surface of the wall of the hood. Sides H of the base are preferably inclined upwardly and inwardly to conform with the upwardly and inwardly inclined wall of the hood. 5 This permits of a wedging action between the hood and the base to position firmly the hood thereon. Vent openings I6 formed in base It, and vent openings ll formed in hood l3, permit free circulation of air through chamber I8 10 formed by the hoodand base, to thereby dissipate the heat from the light source.

Hood I3 is also provided with a plurality of bores I 9 for the reception of light transmitting elements in the form of glass rods 20. At one end these rods have a relatively snug fit in their respective bores l9, andthey project for a relati-vely short distance into chamber l8, being thereby placed in light-conducting communication with light source II. From such chamber the rods project outwardly from, and are inclined upwardly with respect to, the hood, and each terminates in an object to be illuminated. As shown, the rods projecting from the side wall of the hood are each provided with a pear-shaped 5 object 2|, simulating the flame of a candle, while the rod projecting axially from the top of the hood is provided with a star-shaped object 22. This star-shaped object is preferably formed on the rod in the manner set out in my co-pending application, Serial No. 13,208, filed April 8, 1936, for Light transmitting element and method. Also, certain of the rods preferably have that portion thereof which projects into chamber I 8 colored, as indicated .at 23, in the manner and for the purpose set out in my co-pending application, SerialNo. 55,174, filed December 19, 1935, for Colored ornamental light and method. When bulb II is illuminated, the light rays emanating therefrom will pass through the rods 20 and 40 illuminate the objects at the outer ends thereof.

If desired, dependence may be placed upon the relatively snug fit of the rods in their respective bores to secure the rods to the hood. It is preferred, however, to provide additional means to rigidly secure and brace the rods on the hood. Such means comprises a tube 25, preferably formed of an opaque material, such as relatively heavy cardboard. Any other suitable material, opaque, translucent or transparent, may be em ployed. The diameter of the 'tubeis such that rod 20 has a relatively snug fit therein, and it, has a length appreciably less than the length of the rod. when the rod and tube are inposition with respect to the hood, the tube embracesthe rod with its outer end abutting the object 2| of the rod, and with its inner end disposed in abutting contact with the outer surface a of the hood. An adhesive serves to bind the tube to the hood. Any suitableadhesive may be employed. I preferably, however, use tar, which may be applied in the manner shown in Figures 3 to 5, inclusive. To practice such method, I first take a rod and tube and insert the rod into the tube until its forward end abuts the object 2i. The opposite projecting end of the rod closely adjacent the end of the tube, is then held in contact with a tar wheel 25. supported and rotated in a tank 21 in any suitable or preferred manner, the tank being adapted to contain a quantity of tar 28 therein, which tar is maintained in a fluid or plastic condition by heat applied to tank 21 through the medium of burner 29. Rotation of the tar wheel will cause a ring of tar to be collected on a rod held in contact therewith and, when a sufilcient quantity of tar has been collected on the rod, the exposed end of the rod is then inserted into its bore in the hood until the inner end of the tube contacts the outer surface of the hood. This will cause a collar of tar 25-, which is still in a plastic condition, to be formed about tube 25, such collar also being disposed in contact with the outer surface of the hood. When the tar solidifies, upon cooling, it will effectively adhere to both the tube and the hood, and thereby rigidly secure the tube thereto. Formation of collar 28' by insertion of rod 20 into its bore in the hood will also cause a quantity of tar to be squeezedbetween the rod and the tube, thereby effectively securing the tube directly to the rod. The tube, being held rigid with respect to the hood, constitutes a reinforcement or bracing means for the rod. It

may here be stated that rod 20a, which supports object 22, is connected to the hood in a slightly different manner. merely seats on a washer ll disposed between the tube and the upper marginal edge 32 of the hood. This washer may be formed of cork, or any other suitable resilient material. Rod 20a is preferably of considerably greater length than rods 20, and it extends into hood ii for an appreciable distance. To properly brace the rod, therefore, a second washer, or annular member 22, is disposed internally of the hood and connected thereto as by a suitable adhesive 24. This washer may also conveniently be formed of cork, and it has a relatively tight fit with rod 204,. which it embraces. While no adhesive is employed between the washer 3i and the hood I3 and tube 25a, such washer could, of course,

be cemented toboth the hood and tube, if desired.

Hood II, in addition to its. functions of supporting rods 20 in light conducting communication with light source II, and confining the rays of light emanating from such source, also constitutes the body of the tree, while the rods 22 and tubes 25, in' addition to their functions as light transmitting elements and bracing means, respectively, form, in effect, the branches of the tree. Both the hood I! and tubes 25 are wrapped with a suitable material, known commercially as "Visca". to simulate the foliage of the tree. As shown in Figure 6, this'Visca" is composed of relatively thin and narrow strips of paper 25 which are confined, substantially centrally of their length, between a pair of braided wires 25. In wrapping the "Visca about the hood and tubes, a length of the material is first laid axially along the upper portion of the hood and along This tar wheel may be.

In this case, the tube 25a" as indicated at 28, and over the length of material 31 to thereby anchor such length of material below wrapping 38. The material is then wrapped about hood l3 untilthe first tube 25 is reached, at which point it is wrapped about tube 25 from the inner end to the outer end thereof, from whence it is again returned'to the hood. The remainder of the hood, and each of the tubes, is wound with the material in a like manner. The material extends around the hood to a point closely adjacent the marginal edge 40 thereof. From such point, the free end of the material is returned to one of the lowermost tubes 25. It will be apparent that, as the material extends from the outer end of tube 25 to the hood, the portion of material ll between such points will be spaced slightly from the hood. The free end of the material returned to the lowermost tube is, therefore, passed upwardly through such space, then around tube 25, and thence back to the portion ll of the material about which it is wrapped. This anchors the lower free end of the material.

While the rods 20 are conveniently formed of glass, any other material suitable for the purpose and capable of producing the desired results, may be employed. It will be understood, therefore, that the term glass, as used herein, is to be construed as meaning either glass proper or any other material equivalent to glass within the teaching of my invention as defined in the appended claims. g

Further, although preferred embodiments of my invention have been illustrated and described, by way of example, it will be obvious that changes may be made therein within the spirit and scope of the invention, and, therefore, I do not limit my invention to the forms thereof herein disclosed, except insofar as it may be so limited in the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. An illuminated artificial Christmas tree comprising in combination a hollow form in substantially the desired shape of the tree and constitut ing the body of the tree, a light source supported within said form, a plurality of'elongated light transmitting elements associated with said form, each of said elements having one end disposed in light conducting relationship with said light source and having an object to be illuminated at the opposite end thereof, a relatively opaque rigid tube enclosing each of said light transmitting elements and having one end abutting said object and the opposite end terminating exteriorly of and abutting said form, said tubes supporting said light transmitting elements upon said form and confining therein the rays of light passing therethrough to said obIect, and means securing said tubes to said-form.

2. An illuminated artificial Christmas tree comprising in combination a hollow form in substantially the desired shape of the tree and constituting the body of the tree, a light source supported within said form, a plurality of light transmitting elements comprising glass rods- ,associated with saidform, each of said rods havihgone end disposed in light conductingrelationship with said light source and having an object to be illuminated at the opposite end'thereof, an opaque rigid tube enclosing'each of said rods and having contact therewith for the full length of said rod, said me said tubes to said form.

3. An illuminated artificial Christmas tree comprising in combination a hollow form in substantially the desired shape of the tree and constituting the body oi the tree, a light source supported within said form, a plurality of light transmitting elements comprising glass rods associated with said form, each oi said rods having one end disposed in light conducting relationship with said light source, and having an object to be illuminated at the opposite end thereof; an opaque rigid tube enclosing each oi said rods and havin contact therewith tor the full length of said rod,

said tubes having one end abutting the object on said rod and the opposite end terminating exsupporting said light transmitting elements upon said form and confining therein the rays oi light passing therethrough to said object, and a collar of adhesive material carried by and embracirig said tubes and securing said tubes to said form.

4. An illuminated artificial Christmas tree comprising, in combination. a hollow form in substantially the desired shape of the tree and constituting the body of the tree, a light source supported within said form. a plurality of elongated light transmitting elements associated with said iorm. each of said elements having one end disposed in light conducting relationship with said light sourceand having an object to be illuminated at the opposite end thereof; an elongated relatively opaque rigid tube embracing each of said light transmitting elements," and means se-' curing one end of each of said tubes to said form.

said tubes supporting said light transmitting elements upon said iorm and confining therein the rays oi light passing therethrough to said object.

7 JOHN FREI, J..

US2125906A 1936-04-08 1936-04-08 Artificial christmas tree Expired - Lifetime US2125906A (en)

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2500899A (en) * 1946-06-28 1950-03-14 Frank E Leahan Animated display device
US2519690A (en) * 1947-07-10 1950-08-22 Raymond J Recktenwald Artificial christmas tree
US2558600A (en) * 1946-05-31 1951-06-26 Wilson Thomas Woodrow Illuminated lamp base
US2586791A (en) * 1950-03-16 1952-02-26 Dattilo Austin Artificial christmas tree
US2672551A (en) * 1949-06-09 1954-03-16 Douglas Aircraft Co Inc Self-lighted control operating member
US3392275A (en) * 1966-11-22 1968-07-09 Coro Inc Illuminated article of jewelry
US3465139A (en) * 1967-03-01 1969-09-02 Mard Continental Inc Internally illuminated artificial tree
US3634678A (en) * 1970-07-16 1972-01-11 Marvin Glass & Associates Design activity set
US4068118A (en) * 1976-09-29 1978-01-10 Carrington Lewis R Illuminated optical fiber display system

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2558600A (en) * 1946-05-31 1951-06-26 Wilson Thomas Woodrow Illuminated lamp base
US2500899A (en) * 1946-06-28 1950-03-14 Frank E Leahan Animated display device
US2519690A (en) * 1947-07-10 1950-08-22 Raymond J Recktenwald Artificial christmas tree
US2672551A (en) * 1949-06-09 1954-03-16 Douglas Aircraft Co Inc Self-lighted control operating member
US2586791A (en) * 1950-03-16 1952-02-26 Dattilo Austin Artificial christmas tree
US3392275A (en) * 1966-11-22 1968-07-09 Coro Inc Illuminated article of jewelry
US3465139A (en) * 1967-03-01 1969-09-02 Mard Continental Inc Internally illuminated artificial tree
US3634678A (en) * 1970-07-16 1972-01-11 Marvin Glass & Associates Design activity set
US4068118A (en) * 1976-09-29 1978-01-10 Carrington Lewis R Illuminated optical fiber display system

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