US2118821A - Combined merchandising container and toy - Google Patents

Combined merchandising container and toy Download PDF

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Publication number
US2118821A
US2118821A US3007035A US2118821A US 2118821 A US2118821 A US 2118821A US 3007035 A US3007035 A US 3007035A US 2118821 A US2118821 A US 2118821A
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Grant
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Prior art keywords
container
shown
end
boat
side
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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Inventor
William A Ringler
Original Assignee
William A Ringler
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H33/00Other toys
    • A63H33/16Models made by folding paper

Description

May 31, 1938. w. A. RINGLER COMBINED MBRCHANDISING CONTAINER AND TOY Filed July 6, 1955 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 ATTORNEYS I? INVENTOR fillz'airzlflzr gler May 31, 1938. w. A. RINGLER COMBINED MERCHANDISING CONTAINER AND TOY 5 Sheets-Sheet 2' Filed Jul 6, 1955 INVENTOR William H. fizzy/er May 31, 1938. w. A. RINGLER COMBINED MBRCHANDISING CONTAINER AND TOY Filed July 6, 1935 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 \NVENTOR 347g?! flifflgg/ff @124 ,6 91. ATTORNEYS May 31, 1938.

W.-A. RINGLER COMBINED MERCHANDISING CONTAINER AND TOY FiledJuly e, 1935 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 May 31, 1938. w. A. RINGLER COMBINED MERCHANDISING CONTAINER AND TQY Filed July 6, 1955 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patented May 31, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE William A. Ringler, Wayne, Pa. Application July 0, 1935, Serial No. 30,010

9 Claims. (01. 46-11) board, although other rnaterials wlgzh are resistappearance. The container is especially adapted for the packaging of food products relished by children, such as crackers, cookies, candies, nuts and cereals, but is equally adapted for the packaging of merchandise used by grownups. The 5 container can be inexpensively manufactured by automatic machinery and can be sold at low cost. The container is strong and sturdy and can be made to carry merchandise which is shown in the process of being transformed. into the hull of a boat;

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of the boat and sail as completely assembled from the blanks shown in Figs. 1 and 2;

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary longitudinal cross sectional view through the boat structure shown in Fig. 8, this view being taken on line 9-4 of Fig. 8;

Fig. 10 shows a blank from which a combined container and toy boat of somewhat modified construction may be formed;

Fig. 11 shows a blank which has been cut and scored to provide a sail of somewhat modified shape;

Fig. 12 is a perspective view of a container as it appears when completely assembled from the blank shown in Fig. 10, one end wall of the container being partially opened to more clearly illustrate the construction;

Fig. 13 is a perspective view of the container shown in Fig. 12 transformed into the hull of a boat, certain parts being broken away to more clearly illustrate the construction;

Fig. 14 is a fragmentary longitudinal cross sectional view through the boat structure shownjin Fig. 13, this view being taken on line "-44 of} Fig. 13;

Fig. 15is a perspective view of a sailboat as it appears when completely assembled from the blanks shown in Figs. 10 and 11;- r

Fig. 16shows a blank which has been cut and scored to provide a combined container and toy boatof further modified construction;

Fig. 1'7 is a perspective view ofa container in the process of assembly from the blank shown inFig.16; Fig. 18 is a fragmentary perspective view of the container shown in Fig. 17 with the top wall, about to be closed to seal the contents within;

Fig. 19 isa perspective view of the completely assembled container as it appears when packed with merchandise;

Fig. 20is a perspective view of the container" shown in Fig. 19 in the process of being transformed into a boat hull; i Fig. 21 is a fragmentary perspective view look ing into the interior of the fully assembled boat hull shown in Fig. 20;

Fig. 22 is a perspective view of the assembled boat hull shown in Fig. 20' with a sail applied; Fig..' 23 shows a blank from which may be I formed a toy boat which may or may not be used as a container for merchandise; I

d Fig. 24 is a fragmentary perspective view ofa toy boat in the process of assembly from the blank shown in Fig. 23;

Fig. 25 is a fragmentary perspective view oftheboat shown in Fig. 24 at a more advanced stage of assembly; and I V Fig. 26 is a fragmentary perspective view of the completely assembled boat formed from the blank shown in Fig. 23.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views of the draw-- ings and specification.

This invention is directed to the provision of a toy boat which can preferably be transformed from a practical container within which merchandis'e of various sorts maybe economically packaged, shipped and stored. The-toy'boat may be made in various shapes and variously decorated to resemble rowboats, canoes, sailboats, battleships, submarines and freight an'dpassenger vesselsof'various kinds. For purpose of illustration only there is shown in Figs, 1 to 8, inclusive,

one type of sailboat which can be transformed from a merchandising container preferablyformed from waterproofed paperboard material. The boat hull and container here illustrated is formed from the blank shown in Fig. 1 which may be suitably cut and scored on a large production basis by an automatic cutting and scoring machine from large sheets or rolls of material.

The blank is so out and scored as to provide a bottom wall I having side walls 2 and end walls 3 hinged thereto along the score lines a. The side walls 2 and end walls 3 are preferably joined together by bellows folds comprising triangular portions 5 and 6 all hinged together along the score lines a. 'I'he parts are so arranged that when the end walls 3 are raised upwardly into container form they will be inclined outwardly away from the bottom wall I, and the bellows folds will'be folded inwardly to lie against the inside face of the end walls 3.

The container shown in Figs. 4, 5 and 6 assembled from the blank'shown in Fig. l-is provided with side wall flaps I hinged to the side walls 2 along the-scoretlinesa. The side walls 2 may be providedwith endportions 4 and the side flaps 1-1separated' from the end portions 4 bythe ing along. the score lines a. When the blank is fillset-npgcondition to provide'a container, the

'side fiapsil and "the flap extensions Ill and H extend inwardly, as shown in Figs. 4 and 5, pro- 'i flhe 'raised end portion 4 may be provided with interlockingtabsl'and 8 .which extend inwardly, achtab bein'g provided with an interlocking hook portion ll: Each'of the end walls 3 may also gprdv'idedwithf an end fiap l2 hinged thereto alongthescore lines a. The end flaps l2 are folded inwardly 'either under the interlocking tabs-.8 and 8 as shown in Fig. 5, or over the inter- ,jlocking tabs as shown in Fig. 8. The end fiaps l2 -provide a raised platform or deck which enhances the appearance of the boat structure. The end flaps l2 may also be provided with extension flaps l3 hinged thereto along the score lines a which arefoldable inwardly, as shown in Fig. 6, when the container is closed, thus completely sealing the container. Merchandise of various kinds can be packed within the'container, shown in Figs. 5 and 6, the merchandise being fully protected and enclosed.

When the container is to be converted into a toy; boat, the side wall flaps 1 are folded inwardly to rest against the inside face of the side walls 2, as shown more particularly in Fig. 7. The extension fiaps l0 and II ,wfll then seat against the inside face of the bottom wall I, and may be held in the fiap Ill, into which the free edge of the fiap ll extends. The end flap extension I3 can then be folded into horizontal position, and held,

in this position by the locking friction which the bellows folds exert against the free edge of the tab extensions, as shown in Fig. 9. when assembled, the boat hull appears as shown in Fig. 8.

If a sailboat is desired, a blank 20 such as shown in Fig. 2, cut into theshape of, a sail, is provided. Parallel extending score lines a extend transversely across the blank, so that the differangles to catch the breeze, as shown in Fig. 8. The-score lines a also permit collapsed folding of the sail into the form shown in Fig. 3, so that it can be placed within the container, as shown in this position by providing a cut-out notch I! 'ent sections of the sail may be bent at various walls. The end flaps l2 and associated end flap assists in maintaining the flap extensions Ill and II in their proper position. An attractive sailboat such as shown in Fig. 8 is thus formed. The boat hull will float gracefully upon the water surface, and if made of waterproofed paperboard willnot become water-logged, due to the fact that the hull is made from a single blank of unpunctured paperboard. The boat structure may be decorated to resemble various types of boats, and can be given various shapes, as desired.

, There is shown in Fig. 10 a blank of paperboard material which has been cut and scored to provide a container which has a larger containing capacity than the container formed from the blank shown in Fig. 1. In the form here shown, side wall extensions 21 and 28 are hinged to the side flaps I along the score lines a, which are substantially continuous with .the top edge of the raised side wall portions 4. Stated in other words, the side flaps 1 are substantially equal in height to the side walls 2. Severable lines of perforations b define the side flaps 1 from the raised end portions 4. End portions25 and 25, hinged to the raised side wall portions 4 along the score lines a, are separable from thefiap extensions 21 and 28, along the lines of perforation b. v

The blank shown in Fig. 10 is assembled to form the container shown in Fig. 12, by raising the side walls 2 and end walls 3, and folding the bellows folds against the inside face of the end extensions l3 are then folded inwardly, and finally the side fiap extensions 21 and 28 are folded inwardly in overlapping relationship. The flaps 21 and 28 may be glued or otherwise secured together, providing a completely closed container having a substantially uniformly rectangular body-section with inclined or bevelled end walls. The flaps 21 and 28 may be made of the same width or of difierent widths, as desired. The container may be opened by withdrawing one of the end flaps l2 permitting withdrawal of the contents through one end of the container, as shown in Fig. 12. This container has considerablymore containing capacity than the container assembled in the form shown in Fig. 5.

In converting the container shown in Fig. 12 into a boat structure, the child tears through the perforations b. The child then folds the top sections 1 of the side walls inwardly against the inside face of the bottom side wall sections 2. The side flap extensions 21 and 28 are then expanded into flat form so as to seat against the inside face of the bottom wall. I, forming a complete boat hull of the form shown in Fig. 15. The end flap'extensions l3 are then rebent to lie against the inside face of the end wall flaps l2, and locked in this position by means of frictional contact with the bellows folds, as shown in Fig. 14.

The sail can be made of any desired shape or form. For purposes of illustration only, there is shown a sail 30 of somewhat modified shape, assembled with the boat hull shown in Fig. 15. The sail may be made from a single blank of paperboard material, as shown in Fig. 11, provided with the transverse score lines a, to permit collapsed folding of the sail, and to permit flexing of the sail sections along the score lines to more readily catch the breeze. The sail is secured in operative position by tearing through the lineof perforations-b in the side flaps I, and then inserting the securing tabs 2| through the slit thus made. The container herein shown is very economical to manufacture, and has substantially the merchandise-containing capacity of other cartons formed from paperboard material of equal area.

A container of somewhat modified form is shown in Figs. 17 to 22 inclusive, formed from the blank shown in Fig. 16. In this form, the fiap extension 28 is preferably made substantially equal in width to the width of the assembled container; and is provided with tuck-in flaps 31 hinged to the end portions 38 thereof, along the score lines a. The end flaps I2 are also provided with end extensions 38 having locking ears 39 which can be folded inwardly and inserted between the bellows folds and the end walls 3 of the container, as shown in Fig. 17. The end walls can thus be held in set-up position without further securing means.

When the side and end walls have been connected together as above-described, the merchandise is then packed therein, and the side wall extensions H1 and 28 are then'folded inwardly, and the tuck-in fiaps 31 inserted into the container, as shown in Fig. 19. A tubular sleeve 50, which may be formed of paperboard material, is then telescoped over the container, and the flap extension 28 which forms a closure for the container is securely held in place. The container may be opened by slipping off the tubular sleeve 50 and swinging open the flap extension 28.

When the container is to be converted into a boat hull, the merchandise is first removed and the lines of perforations b are severed so as to separate. the flap extensions HI and 28 from the respective end portions 35 and 36, and also to separate the side flaps 1 from the raised end portions 4 of the side walls. The side flaps 1 are then folded inwardly so as to lie against the inside face of the side walls 2, and the "side flap extensions l0 and 28 are positioned to lie flat against the inside face of the bottom wall. The side flap extension 28' is preferably of suflicient width to frictionally grip the turned-in side flap I, thus retaining the parts in assembled form. The end portions 36 and the tuck-in fiaps 31 will lie against the inside face of the end walls; as shown in Fig. 21. It will be noted that this transformable container may be held in assembled form by simpieinterlocking fiaps without the use of glue, or other securing means. A sail Ml of any desired form may be positioned within the boat hull and held in place by the tabs 21 inserted through the slits provided by tearing out the line of perforations cm the side flaps I.

In certain instances, it be desirable to provide a package shaped into the form of a boat hull, the goods being packed directly in the hull, and the whole wrapped in "Cellophane" or other wrapping. There is shown in Figs. 24 to 26, inclusive, a container structure which is shaped to resemble a boat hull, assembled from the blank shown in Fig. 23. In this form, the end flaps 45 fold inwardly against the inside face 'of the end walls 3, and are each provided with a foot portion 48 which rest against the inside face of the bottom wall of the container. Cut lines o separate the side wall flaps I from theside walls 2, permitting the side flaps l to fold inwardly against the inside face of the side walls. The side fiap extension 28, which is slightly wider than 4 V the inside width of the assembled container,- is preferably positioned over the--flap extension l0 and the foot portions 46 so as to provide a smooth large variety of different kinds of merchandise,

and when the contents have been removed can be used as or converted into a child's toy. The container may be economically manufactured, and, aside from its amusement qualities, provides an attractive and economical package for the packaging of merchandise.

While certain novel features of the invention have been disclosed and are pointed out in the annexed claims, it will be understood that various omissions, substitutions and changes may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A toy boat formed from a single blank of waterproofed paperboard material including a bottom wall, side walls, inclined end walls, bellows folds connecting said side and end walls presenting a substantially leak-proof body, and an end flap extending inwardly from one of said end walls providing a raised deck at one end of the boat.

2. A toy boat formed from a single blank of waterproofed paperboard material including bottom, side, and end walls, bellows folds connecting said side and end walls presenting a substantially leakproof hull, said side walls having raised end portions, and end flaps extending inwardly from said end walls substantially the width of said end portions providing a raised deck at each end of the boat.

3. A toy boat formed from paperboard material including a bottom wall, side walls having raised end portions, end walls inclined outwardly with respect to said bottom wall and extending substantially to the top edge of said raised end portions, tabs extending inwardly from said raised end portions, and end flaps extending in wardly from said end walls providing a raised deck at each end of'the boat.

4. A toy boat formed from a single blank of waterproofed material including a bottom wall, side walls having a reduced center portion and raised end portions, end walls inclined outwardly with respect to said bottom wall, bellows folds connecting said sides and end walls presenting a substantially leakproof hull, reinforcing side flaps extending from said side walls and positioned against the inside face thereof, and end flaps extending inwardly from said end a raised deck at each end of the hull.

5. A merchandising container transformable into a toy boat when the merchandise has been removed including, a bottom wall, side walls, end walls inclined outwardly with respect to said bottom wall, bellows folds connecting said side Walls providing.

and end walls providing a. substantially leakproof construction, and a top wall hinged to one of said side walls providing a closure for said container, said top wall being collapsible to lie against the inside face of the bottom wall when the container is transformed into a boat. I

6. A combined merchandise container and toy boat formed from a single blank of paperboard material comprising, a hull body adapted to contain merchandise, said hull body including a bottom wall, side walls, inclined end walls, bellows folds connecting said side and end walls presenting a substantially leakproof construction, and top wall flaps extending inwardly from said side walls providing a closure for the container, said top wall flaps being foldable inwardly to rest against the bottom wall when said container is transformed into a boat.

'7. A merchandise container transformable into a toy boat including, a hull body comprising a bottom wall, side walls, inclined end walls, bellows folds connecting said side and end walls presenting a substantially leakproof construction, and top wall flaps hinged to said side walls providing a closure for the container, said side walls each comprising a top section and a bottom section, said top section being foldable inwardly and downwardly against the inside face of its corresponding bottom section when the merchandise has been removed thereby effecting transformation of said container into a boat.

8. A merchandising container transformable into a toy boat when the merchandise has been removed including, a hull body adapted to contain merchandise and comprising a bottom wall, side walls, end walls inclined outwardly with respect to said bottom wall, means connecting together said bottom, side and end walls, said side walls each comprising a top section and a bottom section, said top section being foldable inwardly and downwardly against the inside face of its corresponding bottom section when transformation of said container into a boat is to be effected, top flaps extending inwardly from said side walls providing a closure for the container, said top flaps being adapted to rest against the insideface of the bottom wall to provide an open boat structure when the contents have been removed from the container 9. A merchandising container transformable into a toy boat including, a hull body comprising a bottom wall, side walls, inclined end walls, bellows folds connecting said side and end walls presenting a substantially leakproof construction, extensions hinged to said side walls, closure flaps hinged to said extensions, said ex.- tensions being foldable inwardly and downwardly against the inside face of its corresponding side wall when the merchandise has been removed thereby effecting transformation of said container into a boat, said top wall flaps then lying substantially flat against the inside face of said bottom wall.

WILLIAM A. RINGLER.

US2118821A 1935-07-06 1935-07-06 Combined merchandising container and toy Expired - Lifetime US2118821A (en)

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Cited By (40)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2525125A (en) * 1948-03-12 1950-10-10 Fibreboard Products Inc Cell type carton
US2527702A (en) * 1946-08-22 1950-10-31 Sutherland Paper Co Cellular carton
US2527701A (en) * 1946-08-02 1950-10-31 Sutherland Paper Co Cellular carton
US2758778A (en) * 1952-11-06 1956-08-14 Morris Paper Mills Window display carton
US2858013A (en) * 1956-12-04 1958-10-28 Continental Paper Company Carton
US2880923A (en) * 1956-05-07 1959-04-07 Evelyn S Levkoff Cartons
US2981407A (en) * 1959-02-27 1961-04-25 Vanant Company Inc Contour carton for wraparound windshields
US2984343A (en) * 1959-02-27 1961-05-16 Vanant Company Inc Carton for panoramic automobile glass
US3027061A (en) * 1960-04-12 1962-03-27 Waldorf Paper Products Co Angular containers
US3078028A (en) * 1961-01-23 1963-02-19 American Can Co Display carton
US3261535A (en) * 1965-02-08 1966-07-19 John L Krause Combined greeting card and greeting card holder
US3656256A (en) * 1970-05-22 1972-04-18 Container Corp Rocking cradle
US4180200A (en) * 1978-11-30 1979-12-25 Container Corporation Of America Lockable tray
US5141149A (en) * 1991-08-05 1992-08-25 Fulton J Scott Multiple use plant shipping and display container
US6095408A (en) * 1998-07-20 2000-08-01 Adaptec, Inc. One-piece multiple-compartment shipping and display box
US6578717B2 (en) 2001-09-29 2003-06-17 Thomas C. Pickett Economical desktop bookcase
US20090120825A1 (en) * 2007-11-13 2009-05-14 Marcille Faye Ruman Sustainability in personal care product sales
US20090120816A1 (en) * 2007-11-13 2009-05-14 Marcille Faye Ruman Sustainability in personal care product packaging
US20090120834A1 (en) * 2007-11-13 2009-05-14 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Sustainability in personal care product retailing
US20090197231A1 (en) * 2008-02-06 2009-08-06 Paula Mary Sosalla Toilet training using absorbent article packaging
US8783548B2 (en) * 2012-12-19 2014-07-22 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Sports car carton
USD751414S1 (en) 2014-10-06 2016-03-15 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD752450S1 (en) 2014-05-19 2016-03-29 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD752451S1 (en) 2014-10-06 2016-03-29 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD752449S1 (en) 2014-05-19 2016-03-29 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
US20160107791A1 (en) * 2014-10-16 2016-04-21 D&B Joint Ventures, LLC Collapsible party tray
USD763098S1 (en) 2015-01-14 2016-08-09 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD763099S1 (en) 2015-01-14 2016-08-09 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD763097S1 (en) 2014-10-06 2016-08-09 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD768003S1 (en) 2014-10-06 2016-10-04 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
US9469460B2 (en) 2014-05-19 2016-10-18 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle replica carton and method of forming the same
USD769379S1 (en) 2015-04-23 2016-10-18 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Expanding elephant
USD769987S1 (en) 2015-04-23 2016-10-25 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Expanding alligator
USD778169S1 (en) 2015-04-23 2017-02-07 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD789460S1 (en) 2015-04-23 2017-06-13 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Expanding lion
USD811235S1 (en) 2016-03-02 2018-02-27 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD811236S1 (en) 2016-03-02 2018-02-27 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD811892S1 (en) 2016-11-18 2018-03-06 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD823124S1 (en) 2016-11-18 2018-07-17 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD823123S1 (en) 2016-11-18 2018-07-17 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton

Cited By (41)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2527701A (en) * 1946-08-02 1950-10-31 Sutherland Paper Co Cellular carton
US2527702A (en) * 1946-08-22 1950-10-31 Sutherland Paper Co Cellular carton
US2525125A (en) * 1948-03-12 1950-10-10 Fibreboard Products Inc Cell type carton
US2758778A (en) * 1952-11-06 1956-08-14 Morris Paper Mills Window display carton
US2880923A (en) * 1956-05-07 1959-04-07 Evelyn S Levkoff Cartons
US2858013A (en) * 1956-12-04 1958-10-28 Continental Paper Company Carton
US2981407A (en) * 1959-02-27 1961-04-25 Vanant Company Inc Contour carton for wraparound windshields
US2984343A (en) * 1959-02-27 1961-05-16 Vanant Company Inc Carton for panoramic automobile glass
US3027061A (en) * 1960-04-12 1962-03-27 Waldorf Paper Products Co Angular containers
US3078028A (en) * 1961-01-23 1963-02-19 American Can Co Display carton
US3261535A (en) * 1965-02-08 1966-07-19 John L Krause Combined greeting card and greeting card holder
US3656256A (en) * 1970-05-22 1972-04-18 Container Corp Rocking cradle
US4180200A (en) * 1978-11-30 1979-12-25 Container Corporation Of America Lockable tray
US5141149A (en) * 1991-08-05 1992-08-25 Fulton J Scott Multiple use plant shipping and display container
US6095408A (en) * 1998-07-20 2000-08-01 Adaptec, Inc. One-piece multiple-compartment shipping and display box
US6237842B1 (en) 1998-07-20 2001-05-29 Adaptec, Inc. One-piece multiple-compartment shipping and display box
US6578717B2 (en) 2001-09-29 2003-06-17 Thomas C. Pickett Economical desktop bookcase
US20090120825A1 (en) * 2007-11-13 2009-05-14 Marcille Faye Ruman Sustainability in personal care product sales
US20090120816A1 (en) * 2007-11-13 2009-05-14 Marcille Faye Ruman Sustainability in personal care product packaging
US20090120834A1 (en) * 2007-11-13 2009-05-14 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Sustainability in personal care product retailing
US20090197231A1 (en) * 2008-02-06 2009-08-06 Paula Mary Sosalla Toilet training using absorbent article packaging
US8783548B2 (en) * 2012-12-19 2014-07-22 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Sports car carton
USD752449S1 (en) 2014-05-19 2016-03-29 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD752450S1 (en) 2014-05-19 2016-03-29 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
US9469460B2 (en) 2014-05-19 2016-10-18 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle replica carton and method of forming the same
USD751414S1 (en) 2014-10-06 2016-03-15 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD752451S1 (en) 2014-10-06 2016-03-29 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD763097S1 (en) 2014-10-06 2016-08-09 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD768003S1 (en) 2014-10-06 2016-10-04 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
US20160107791A1 (en) * 2014-10-16 2016-04-21 D&B Joint Ventures, LLC Collapsible party tray
USD763099S1 (en) 2015-01-14 2016-08-09 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD763098S1 (en) 2015-01-14 2016-08-09 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD778169S1 (en) 2015-04-23 2017-02-07 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD769379S1 (en) 2015-04-23 2016-10-18 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Expanding elephant
USD769987S1 (en) 2015-04-23 2016-10-25 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Expanding alligator
USD789460S1 (en) 2015-04-23 2017-06-13 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Expanding lion
USD811235S1 (en) 2016-03-02 2018-02-27 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD811236S1 (en) 2016-03-02 2018-02-27 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD823123S1 (en) 2016-11-18 2018-07-17 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD811892S1 (en) 2016-11-18 2018-03-06 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton
USD823124S1 (en) 2016-11-18 2018-07-17 Kid Stuff Marketing, Inc. Vehicle carton

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