US2114543A - Harness motion for looms - Google Patents

Harness motion for looms Download PDF

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US2114543A
US2114543A US162174A US16217437A US2114543A US 2114543 A US2114543 A US 2114543A US 162174 A US162174 A US 162174A US 16217437 A US16217437 A US 16217437A US 2114543 A US2114543 A US 2114543A
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bars
hook
bar
actuating
harness
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US162174A
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Carl F Schlegel
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SCHIEGEL MANUFACTURING Co
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SCHIEGEL Manufacturing Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03CSHEDDING MECHANISMS; PATTERN CARDS OR CHAINS; PUNCHING OF CARDS; DESIGNING PATTERNS
    • D03C1/00Dobbies
    • D03C1/02Single-lift dobbies, i.e. dobbies in which the same draw-knife or equivalent operates for every pick
    • D03C1/04Open-shed single-lift dobbies

Description

April 19, 19380 c. F. SCHLEGEL 2,114,543
HARNESS MOTION FOR LOOMS Filed Sept. 2, 1937 5 Sheets-Sheet l ULJULJLJLJUUULIUU 1 VB TOR.
BY Em /Z is ATTORNEYS April 19, 1938. v c. F. SCHLEGEL HARNESS MOTION FOR LOOMS Filed Sept. 2, 1957 5 Sheets-$heet 2 41's ATTORNEYS April 19, 1938 0 c. F. SCHLEGEL HARNESS MOTION FOR LOOMS Filed Sept. 2, 1957 5 Sheets-=Shet 5 Apfi'fi 11%, W35, c. ESCHLEGEL HARNESS MOTION FOR LOOMS Filed Sept. 2, 1937 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 2.5 A TTORNEYS Patented Apr. 19, 1938 warren stares 2,lit,543
PATENT HARNESS MOTION FOR LOOMS Application September 2, 1937, Serial No. lfiZJM 9 Claims.
This invention relates to looms and more particularly to high speed looms.
An object of the invention is the provision of an improved and more satisfactory harness motion for such looms.
Another object is the provision of a harness motion which will operate reliably and effectively at high speed, to produce an even or smooth shed.
Still another object is the provision of such a harness motion which is relatively simple, easy to construct, and sturdy in operation, so that it is not likely to get out of order.
To these and other ends the invention resides in certain improvements and combinations of parts, all as will be hereinafter more fully described, the novel features being pointed out in the claims at the end of the specification.
In the drawings:
Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic side elevation of a loom with the harness motion of the present invention applied thereto, showing the parts in one position, with no shed formed in the warp strands;
Fig. 2 is a front elevation of the harness frames and associated parts;
Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. l with the parts in a different position, forming a shed in the warp strands;
Fig. 4 is a side elevation of the mechanism for operating certain parts of the harness motion;
Fig. 5 is a side view of the principal parts of the harness motion, in a position corresponding to that of Fig. 1;
Fig. 6 a vertical section taken substantially on the line 6-6 of Fig. 5;
Fig. '7 is a view similar to Fig. 5 illustrating the parts in a position corresponding to that of Fig. 3;
Fig. 8 is a plan of part of the mechanism shown in Fig. '7;
Fig. 9 is an end view of the chain'drum and pattern chain thereon;
Fig. 10 is a perspective view of one of the latches for latching certain operating parts of the harness motion to each other, and
Fig. 11 is a rear elevation of the main parts of the harness motion.
The same reference numerals throughout the Several views indicate the same parts.
The parts or" the loom other than the harness motion may constructed in any known way, and the present invention is independent of the construction that may be selected for such parts of the loom, so that the loom need not be described in It include frame parts I l (Figs. 1 and 3) carrying suitable means for supplying warp strands l 3 which are led upwardly, over a roller it, and then forwardly as at l? to form the warp of the fabric being woven. The completed fabric is led forwardly and downwardly over a breast roll If! to pulling rolls ill and is then wound up on any suitable cloth roll. The weft or fillingis laid across the warp strands by any suitable known means, such as by the needle 23, if a needle loom or shuttleless loom is employed, or by any suitable shuttle if a loom of the shuttle type is employed. Since the harness motion of the present invention is well adapted for work at high speed, it may be used advantageously on needle looms, most of which operate at high speed, but it may also be employed, of course, on lower speed looms, such as looms employing conventional shuttles.
The warp strands l'l pass through the hedclles 25 (Fig. 2) secured to the heddle frames or harness frames 27!, and these harness frames 2i are 20 raised or lowered from the neutral positions shown in Fig. 1, to form the shed as shown in Fig. 3, by means of the harness motion which forms the presentinvention.
Near the front of the loom and below the breast roll 89 is a transverse shaft ti on which are pivotally mounted a series of hell crank levers, one for each of theharness frames 23. bell crank lever has a downwardly extending arm 33 and a rearwardly extending arm 35, and the downwardly extending arm 33 is provided with arcuate guiding flanges 3i projecting laterally at each side of the arm 33 for contact or substantial contact with the similar flanges of the adjacent bell crank levers, as shown in Fig. 11, to hold the levers against side sway or tilting, while nevertheless permitting each lever to oscillate about its shaft 3i independently of the other levers.
The rearwardly extending arm 35 of each bell crank lever is connected by a link 39 with its associated one of the harness frames 271. In order to form a smooth or even shed, it is apparent that those harness frames Fill which are farther from the roll It should be moved upwardly or downwardly to a greater extent than those harness frames which are closer to the breast roll. This is easily accomplished by the present mechanism, for the harness frames which are farther from the breast roll iii are connected by the links 39 to their respective bell crank arms 35 at points farther from the shaft 3i. Hence, if all of the bell cranks be oscillated to the same uniform angular extent, those harness frames which are toward the rear of the loom will be given a greater throw or range of travel than those harness frames closer toward the front of the loom, with the result; that the shed produced in the warp strands will be approximately uniform and even, as shown diagrammatically in Fig. 3.
The frame of the loom is provided with suitable horizontal guideways 43, and in these guideways are mounted two actuating bars extending transversely of the loom, the front one of which bars is designated by the numeral and the rear one of which is designated 41. These bars lie substantially in a common plane, and are reciprocated forwardly and rearwardly, toward and away from each other, in this common plane, by suitable mechanism such as that shown for example in Figs. 1, 3, and 4. A rotating shaft 5!, which may be the main drive shaft of the loom or which may be driven in timed sequence with the main drive shaft, is provided with two eccentrics and 51 set at 180 to each other. The eccentric strap embracing the eccentric 55 is connected by a link 59 to a lever 6| fixed to a transverse shaft 63, while the eccentric strap on the other eccentric 51 is similarly connected by a link 65 to a lever 61 fixed to a transverse shaft 69.
The shaft 63 extends across the machine and is provided with two arms H extending upwardly therefrom, at opposite sides of the machine, the upper end of each arm having a slot for engaging a pin 73 on the end of the actuating bar 45. One of the arms H at one side of the machine may be integral with the arm (ii, if desired. Similarly, the other cross shaft 69 is provided with two upwardly extending arms l5 at opposite sides of the machine (one of which may be integral with the arm 61) which have slots engaging pins Ti on the ends of the other actuating bar 41. With this arrangement rotation of the shaft 5| will move the front actuating bar 45 rearwardly and the rear actuating bar 4'! forwardly, so that the two bars approach each other, during half of each complete revolution of the shaft 5|, and then during the other half of such revolution the front actuating bar 45 will be moved forwardly and the rear actuating bar 47 will be moved rearwardly, shifting the bars away from each other. Thus the two actuating bars will be reciprocated back and forth, toward and away from each other, always remaining substantially in a common plane and substantially parallel to each other.
The forward actuating bar 45 is provided on its upper surface, and near its forward edge, with a transverse groove 8! having an undercut rear edge as shown in Figs. 5 and '7, while the rear actuating bar 41 has a similar transverse groove 83 on its upper surface near its rear edge, the forward edge or wall of which transverse groove is undercut.
To the bottom of the arm 33 of each bell crank lever is pivotally connected, at 85, what may be termed a hook bar 8?, extending both forwardly and rearwardly from the pivot 85, in the direction of travel of the actuating bars 45 and 41. The rear arm of the bar 81 is somewhat longer than the forward arm thereof, as shown in Fig. 5. Each arm, at its extremity, is provided with a downwardly extending hook, the forward one being indicated at 89 and the rear hook being shown at 9!. These hooks 89 and 9| are so placed that they are alined with the transverse grooves 8! and 83 of the actuating bars 45 and ll, whenever the bell crank 33 is in its central or neutral position and when the actuating bars 45 and 41 are in their positions closest to each other. The pivot 85 is at such an elevation with respect to the horizontal plane in which the actuating bars 45 and 41 move, that the hooks 89 and 9| cannot both be engaged in the respective grooves BI and 83 at the same time, but either hook alone may be depressed into its corresponding groove when the parts are in proper position, and this will raise the other hook at the other end of the bar 81 out of engagement with the othertransverse groove. Thus each bar 87 may be hooked to either one of the actuating bars 45 and 41, but cannot be hooked to both of them at once.
Extending transversely across the loom, at an elevation somewhat above the actuating bars 45 and 4'! and the hook bars 81, are two stationary bars 93 and 95, respectively. The bar 95 supports a transverse pivot shaft 91 on which are pivoted a series of forwardly and downwardly extending fingers 99, one overlying each of the hook bars 8'! and riding on the top thereof. Suitable springs Iill press downwardly on the fingers 99 with a substantial pressure, so that these arms in turn, constantly press downwardly with substantial force on the rear ends of the arms 81. Hence, in the absence of a superior force producing an upward thrust on the rear ends of the hook bars 81, the rear ends of all of these hook bars will be depressed by the springs lill and fingers 99, and the hooks 9| will be engaged in the groove 83 of the actuating bar 41, so that the hook bars 87 will be hooked to the actuating bar 41 and will move backwardly and forwardly with the actuating bar. 47 moves rearwardly from the position shown in Fig. 5 to the position shown in Fig. 7 this will draw rearwardly on the hook bars 8'! which are hooked to the actuating bar, which will cause rearward movement of the bell crank arms 33 and upward movement of the bell crank arms 35, raising the harness frames 21 connected to those bell cranks.
In order to raise the rear ends of the hook bars 81 whenever required, to unhook them from the actuating bar 41 and hook them tothe actuating bar 45, there may be provided a pattern chain shaft I05 carrying a chain drum Hi1 having end flanges H19. A pattern chain, which may be of suitable known construction, runs over this drum, the cross pins l I I of the chain being connected to each other by links H3, and the pins being received in notches H5 in the end flanges me, so that as the drum rotates, the chain cannot slip on the drum but will be fed around with it. The cross pins HI carry tubular members of different diameters, the larger ones Ill of which may be denoted as risers and the smaller ones H9 may be called sinkers. These risers and sinkers are arranged in any desired manner or sequence on the pins III, to produce the desired pattern in the fabric being woven. The pattern chain may, as usual, be of any desired length. When the pattern is simple, it may be a relatively short chain extending tightly around the periphery of the drum I01, I59, as shown in Fig. 5, or it may be a longer chain as shown in Fig. 9, having a portion hanging loosely down below the drum.
The chain drum is driven with a step by step motion in timed sequence with the operation of the actuating bars 45 and 4'! and with the other parts of the loom. For instance, the shaft 5! on which the eccentrics 55 and 57 are mounted, may be provided with a driving crank l2! and a lock- When the actuating bar ing disk I23, both cooperating with a Geneva member I25 in known manner, to turn this Geneva member step by step, one step for each revolution of the shaft 5I. A sprocket I21 secured to the Geneva member I25 may drive a chain E25 which runs around a sprocket I3I on v the chain drum shaft I05, thus turning the drum in proper timed sequence to the operation of the other parts.
The shaft I55 is so placed with relation to the horizontal plane in which the actuating bars 45 and ll operate, that when a sinker H9 is brought into position beneath one of the hook bars 81, it does not interfere with the tendency of the spring IElI to depress the rear end of this hook bar, and consequently, whenever a sinker is brought into effective position beneath one of the hook bars, the rear end of the hook bar will be depressed and the hook 9| thereon will be engaged with the slot 83 on the actuating bar M. Whenever one of the risers II! is brought into effective position beneath one of the hook bars 87, the size of this riser is such that it will press upwardly on the under side of the hook bar and raise the rear end of the hook bar against the force of the spring IUI, moving the hook BI upwardly out of the groove 83 and depressing the hook 89 into the groove BI of the forward actuating bar 45, thus hooking this particular hook bar 87 to the forward actuating bar J5 and unhooking it from the rear actuating bar 41. y
. The driving mechanism for driving the pattern chain is so timed with respect to the movements of the bars 45 and 41, that a new cross pin III of the chain moves to the uppermost position at the top of the drum I at or substantially at the instant that the forward actuating bar 45 reaches its rearmost position and the rear actuating bar 41 reaches its most forward position, these being the positions shown in Fig. 5.
Since the hooks 89 and 9| have undercut sides to cooperate with the undercut rear and front walls, respectively, of the grooves ill and 83, they will be held effectively in hooked relationship to the actuating bars during the travel thereof, with little danger of accidental disengagement so long as either of the bars 45 and t! exerts a substantial pull on the bar 8?. When the bars 45 and i! begin to move toward each other, however, there is no longer a pull on the inclined or undercut faces of the hooks, and the bars 81 may become disengaged from the actuating bars, especially from the bar 45, since the springs IBI are constantly tending to producesuch disengagement. Hence, it may be desirable to employ latches to latch the hooks positively in the grooves BI and 83, such latches being especially desirable in connection with the groove 8| on the bar 45.
Such latches may be of the form best shown in Figs. 5, '7, and 10. The forward actuating bar 55 is provided with a transverse pivot shaft I45 on which is pivoted aseries of latch members I41, one of which is arranged directly opposite the front end of each of the hook bars ill. These latch members I4? are located in slots or cut-out portions of an upstanding flange I49 at the front edge of the bar 45, which flange serves to guide the latches M7 laterally and prevent lateral displacement thereof. Leaf springs II are secured to the underside of the bar 45 as by means of rivets or screws I53, and extend up the forward sides of the latches I41, constantly tending to shift the upper ends of the latches rearwardly to the effective latching position illustrated in Fig.
'7, in which a ledge or shoulder I55 on each latch overlies the upper forward corner of its associated hook bar 87 and prevents the hook 89 of this hook bar from rising upwardly out of the groove 8|. A sharp angular lower rear corner 554 on each latch I41 contacts with the horizontal portion of the spring I5I near the rivets or screws I53 to limit movement of the latch in an effective latching direction. As the bar 55 moves rearwardly, and just before it reaches. the rearward limit of its travel, the upper end of each latch member Ml strikes against the stationary cross bar 93, which tilts the upper ends of all of these latch members I41 forwardly and releases the latches as shown in Fig. 5, so that the forward ends of any hook bars 81 which are hooked into the groove 8| may be released therefrom, and so that any hook bars not already hooked into the groove 8| but which should now be hooked thereinto, may be depressed into the groove 8| without interference from the latches. Then, as the actuating bar 415 moves forwardly at the beginning of its next cycle of travel, the upper ends of all of the latches I4"! will ride out from under the stationary bar 93 and the springs I5I will immediately move all of these latches to effective latching position as shown in Fig. '7, so that they will latch the forward ends of all of the hook bars 81 which have been hooked to the actuating bar 45.
Similar latch means are provided on the rear actuating bar 3?, for cooperation with the rear ends of the hook bars 81. The latch means on the bar ll may be identical with the latch means on the bar 45, although faced, of course, in the opposite direction. and the parts on the latch bar 5? are designated by the same reference numerals I 45 to I 53 used for the corresponding parts on the bar 45, with the addition of the letter a to each such reference numeral. The latches Mia on the actuating bar (ll are operated by the stationary cross bar 95 in the same way in which the latches M? on the bar 45 are operated by the stationary bar 93.
It is seen that this harness mechanism is well adapted to high speed operation, because the hook bars 87 are positively latched to the actuating bars 45 with which they are engaged from time to time, without any possibility of accidental disengagement therefrom. No matter how fast the bars 45 and 47 may move backwardly and forwardly in their reciprocating cycles, the hook bars til cannot become accidentally disengaged therefrom, but are engaged with and disengaged from the respective actuating bars only in accordance with the requirements of the weaving pattern as determined by the risers and sinkers on the pattern chain. Gravity is not relied upon for engagement or disengagement of the hook bars 8'! at any stage of the operating cycles, which is another reason why this mechanism is well adapted to high speed operation. The spring IIlI can be made sufficiently strong to disengage the hooks 89 from the bar 45 and engage the hooks 9| with the bar 51 in a minimum of time, while the reverse engagement (that is, disengagement of the hooks 9| and engagement of the hooks 89) is likewise accomplished in a minimum of time by the positive upward force produced by the risers on the pattern chain coming into engagement with the under side of the hook bars (ll. In addition to having these features which promote rapid operation to meet the requirements of a high speed loom, this harness motion is also of relatively simple and sturdy construction, so
that it is easy to maintain in proper operative condition, and not likely to get out of order.
The operation of each part of the construction has been individually described, but a brief review of the entire operation will now be given. Assume that the parts are in what may be termed the neutral position shown in Fig. 1, with the forward actuating bar 45 at the rear end of its path of travel and with the rear actuating bar 41 at the forward end of its path of travel. The bell cranks 33, 35 and the harness frames 21 are all in a central or neutral position, and the latches l i'l and Mla are all unlatched, by reason of the fact that they are now beneath the stationary bars 93 and 95. The hook bars 8'! will be in positions determined by the risers and sinkers on that pin ill of the pattern chain which is now at the top of the chain drum, directly beneath the hook levers 81. That is, any hook lever Bl which is directly over a riser will have its rear end raised thereby and its forward end will be depressed so that the hook 89 will be in the groove iii of the forward actuating bar 45. This is the position shown in Fig. 5 with respect to the hook bar 3'! which is closest to the eye of the observer.
Any hook bar 8'! which is directly over a sinker I it of the pattern chain will not be raised at its rear end, and consequently the spring llll of this hook bar 8'! (aided to some extent by gravity) will cause the rear end of this hook bar to be depressed, engaging the hook 9l thereof with the groove 83 of the rear actuating bar 47, and raising the front hook 89 thereof out of engagement with the front actuating bar 45. This is the condition shown in Fig. 5 with respect to that one of the hook bars 81 which is farthest from the eye of the observer.
The bars 65 and 41 now move away from each other. The hook bar 81 closest to the eye of the observer, being hooked to the forward actuating bar 45, will be drawn forwardly by the forward motion of the bar 45, which will pull forwardly on the connected bell crank arm 33, pulling downwardly on the bell crank arm 35, and lowering the harness frame 21 connected to this bell crank. During the early part of this forward travel of the actuating bar 45, the latches Ml will ride out from under the stationary bar 93 and all of the latches will be moved to effective position over the forward ends of those hook bars 81 which are hooked to the actuating bars :25, preventing accidental disengagement.
At the same time that the actuating bar 45 moves forwardly, the other actuating bar ll will move rearwardly. All of the hook bars 81 which have been hooked to the rear actuating bar i! will thus be drawn rearwardly by this actuating bar, which will move their connected bell crank arms rearwardly, and move the connected bell crank arms 35 upwardly, raising the corresponding harness frames 2?. Near the beginning of this rearward movement, the latches 147a will become effective to latch the rear ends of the hook bars 81 against accidental disengagement, just as in the case of the latches Ml. The positions of the parts when the forward and rear actuating bars 45 and 41 are near their extreme forward and rear positions, respectively, are shown in Figs. 3 and '7.
The forward motion of certain of the harness frames 2'! and downward movement of the other harness frames, produced as above described, forms a shed in the warp strands ll, as shown in Fig. 3. If the loom is a needle loom, the needle 2.3 now lays the weft or filling strands through the shed, or if the loom is a shuttle loom, the shuttle does the same. The usual reed or batten now beats up the newly laid weft strands, and the bar 45 moves rearwardly and the bar 41 moves forwardly again, to their neutral or initial positions shown in Figs. 1 and 5, and just before they reach these neutral positions, the latches l4"! and Mia are tripped or unlatched by contact with the bars 93 and 95, so that by the time the neutral positions of the bars 45 and 4? are reached, the hook bars 8'! are free to be unhooked and rehooked according to any desired pattern. Substantially at the same time that the neutral positions of the bars 35 and 41 are reached, the Geneva member I is turned one step to bring a fresh cross bar ll! of the pattern chain into cooperating relation to the hook bars 81. The risers and sinkers Ill and H9 on this fresh cross bar ill will now control the hook bars 81 during the next cycle of operation. Some of the hook bars 8"! which have been hooked to one of the actuating bars may remain hooked to this same actuating bar during the next cycle of operation, and some or all of the hook bars may be shifted to hook them to the other actuating bar than the one to which they were hooked during the previous cycle, all as determined by the risers and sinkers on the pattern chain, and in accordance with the particular pattern which it is desired to weave. The bars 65 and 41 then move away from each other again, carrying with them the hook bars it! which are respectively hooked thereto, and the cycle of operation is repeated ad infinitum.
In the embodiment of the invention above described as a preferred example, two actuating bars 45 and t! are employed, one of which serves to move the harness frames upwardly and the other of which moves them downwardly. Those skilled in the art will readily appreciate that if it is required to move the harness frames in only one direction from their neutral position, instead of two directions, then one of the actuating bars can be omitted, and the remaining parts would act in substantially the same way above described. With only a single actuating bar, the risers on the pattern chain would either disconnect the hook bars from or connect them to the single actuating bar (depending upon which of the two bars wasomitted) and when anyhook bar was connected to the actuating bar, the corresponding harness frame would be raised or lowered, as the case may be, whereas a hook bar not connected to the actuating bar would not produce any movement of the corresponding harness frame.
While one embodiment of the invention has been disclosed, it is to be understood that the inventive idea may be carried out in a number of ways. This application is therefore not to be limited to the precise details described, but is intended to cover all variations and modifications thereof falling within the spirit of the invention or the scope of the appended claims.
I claim:
1. Loom harness motion including two actuating bars each having hook receiving recess means therein, means for moving said bars toward and away from each other, a plurality of hook bars each having hook means for entering the recess means in and thereby becoming operatively engaged with either of said actuating bars, so that when one of said hook bars is engaged with one of said actuating bars it will be moved thereby in one direction during part of an operating cycle and when engaged with the other of said actuating bars it will be moved thereby in an opposite direction during the same part of an operating cycle, latch means mounted on and movable bodily with each of said actuating bars for latching said hook bars to the respective actuating bars with which they are engaged, movable pattern chain means for determining with which of said actuating bars each of said hook bars will engage from time to time, a plurality of harness frames, and means operatively connecting said hook bars to said harness frames to move said harness frames by movement of said hook bars.
2. Loom harness motion including an actuating member having hook receiving recess means therein, means for moving said actuating member back and forth through a cycle of operation, a plurality of hook bars each having hook means for entering and withdrawing from the recess means in said actuating member and thereby becoming operatively engaged therewith and disengaged therefrom, movable pattern chain means for controlling engagement of said hook bars with and disengagement thereof from said actuating member, latch means for positively holding in effective engagement with said actuating member during part of the operating cycle those hook bars which have theretofore been engaged with said actuating member, a plurality of harness frames, and means operatively connecting said hook bars to said harness frames to move said harness frames by movement of said hook bars.
3. Loom harness motion including an actuating bar, means for moving said actuating bar back and forth through a cycle of operation, a hook bar extending in a direction generally transverse to said actuating bar, cooperating hook means on said hook bar and said actuating bar for detachably connecting said hook bar to said actuating bar to be moved thereby, latch means mounted on and movable bodily with one of said bars for latching said two bars to each other to prevent disconnection thereof, means for rendersaid latch means ineffective during a part of each cycle of operation of said actuating bar, pattern chain means cooperating with said hook bar during said part of each cycle of operation to determine whether said hook bar shall be connected to or disconnected from said actuating bar during the next cycle of operation, a harness frame, and means operatively connecting said harness frame to said hook bar to be moved thereby.
4. Loom harness motion including an actuating bar, means for moving said actuating bar back and forth through a cycle of operation, a hook bar extending in a direction generally transverse to said actuating bar, cooperating hook means on said hook bar and said actuating bar for detachably connecting said hook bar to said actuating bar to be moved thereby, latch means mounted on and movable bodily with one of said bars for latching said'two bars to each other to prevent disconnection thereof, means for rendering said latch means ineffective during a part of each cycle of operation of said actuating bar, spring means tending to connect said hook bar to said actuating bar during said part of each cycle of operation, a movable pattern chain having risers thereon, means for moving a fresh portion of said chain into cooperative relation to said hook bar during said part of each cycle of operation, said chain being so placed with respect to said hook bar that a riser on the portion of said chain moved into cooperative relation to said hook bar will contact with said hook bar and disconnect it from said actuating bar or hold it disconnected if it were previously disconnected therefrom, a harness frame, and means operatively connecting said harness frame to said hook bar to be moved thereby.
5. Loom harness motion including two actuating bars mounted for movement toward and away from each other, means for moving both of said bars concomitantly toward and way from each other, a plurality of hook bars each extending in a general direction from one of said actuating bars to the other, means pivotally mounting each of said hook bars for oscillation about an axis intermediate its length, cooperating hook means on said hook bars and actuating bars for detachably connecting each hook bar to either of said actuating bars to be moved thereby, said axis of oscillation of each hook bar being so placed that movement of each hook bar into connecting engagement with either one of said actuating bars disconnects it from the other of said actuating bars, a plurality of latches mounted on each actuating bar, one for each of said hook bars, each latch being movable from an ineffective unlatchedposition to an effective latched position in which it holds its associated hook bar, if connected-with the actuating bar on which the latch is mounted, against disconnection therefrom, means for holding each of said latches in unlatched position during a part of an operating cycle of movement of said actuating bars, pattern control means effective during said part of an operating cycle while said latches are unlatched, for causing shifting of said hook bars into'connecting engagement with either selected one'of said actuating bars in accordance with the requirements of the pattern to be woven, means for holding each of said latches in effective latched position during substantially the rest of said operating cycle of movement, a plurality of harness frames, and means operatively connecting each of said hook bars to one of said harness frames to move each harness frame in one direction or the other by the movements of the connected hook bar.
6. A construction as set forth in claim 5, in which said means for holding said latches in effective latched position comprises spring means constantly tending to hold said latches in said position, and in which said means for holding said latches in unlatched position comprises members for engaging said latches at a predetermined point in said operating cycle to unlatch said latches against the force of said spring means.
7, Loom harness motion including two actuating bars mounted for movement toward and away from each other, means for moving both of said bars concomitantly toward and away from each other, a shaft spaced from said actuating bars, a plurality of bell crank levers mounted on said shaft, each of said levers having an arm extending in a general direction toward said actuating bars, a plurality of hook bars each extending in a general direction from one of said actuating bars to the other, each of said hook bars being pivotally mounted adjacent the end of said arm of one of said bell crank levers for s cillation about an axis intermediate the length of said hook bar, cooperating hook means on said hook bars and actuating bars for detachably connecting each hook bar to either of said actuating bars to be moved thereby, said axis of oscillation of each book bar being so placed that movement of each hook bar into connecting engagement with either one of said actuating bars disconnects it from the other of said actuating bars, spring means constantly tending to engage each hook bar with one of said actuating bars and disengage it from the other actuating bar, a pattern chain having a plurality of sections, each section being adapted to carry one or more protruding portions in accordance with the requirements of the pattern to be woven, means for moving said pattern chain in timed relation with said actuating bars to bring a fresh section of said chain into cooperative relation to said hook bars at a predetermined time in each cycle of movement of said actuating bars, said chain being so placed with relation to said hook bars that any of said protruding portions on the section of chain newly brought into cooperative relation to said hook bars will contact directly with those hook bars corresponding to said protruding portions and move such hook bars against the action of said spring means to disengage such hook bars from said one of said actuating bars and engage them with said other actuating bar, unless they are already thus engaged, a plurality of harness frames, and means operatively connecting each of said bell crank levers to one of said harness frames to move the harness frames in accordance with movement of the hook bars.
8. Loom construction including a main frame, breast means adjacent the front of said frame, a plurality of harness frames mounted on said main frame rearwardly of said breast means for upward and downward movement relatively to said main frame, a shaft extending transversely of said main frame at an elevation below said breast means, a plurality of bell cranks mounted for oscillation on said shaft, each of said bell cranks including an arm extending downwardly from said shaft and another arm extending rearwardly from said shaft, means operatively connecting the rearwardly extending arm of each bell crank to one of said harness frames, a bar pivotally connected to the downwardly extending arm of each of said bell cranks, an actuating member extending transversely of said main frame and movable rearwardly and forwardly adjacent all of said bars and approximately in a horizontal plane, pattern controlling chain means including risers for contacting directly with said bars to shift said bars to connect any of said bars to or disconnect them from said actuating member from time to time according to the requirements of the pattern to be woven, said actuating member imparting movement to any of said bars which are operatively connected thereto and thus causing movement of the corresponding harness frames, and pivoted latch means carried by said actuating member for positively latching to said member, during part of the movement thereof, those of said bars which are connected thereto.
9. Loom construction including a main frame, breast means adjacent the front of said frame, a plurality of harness frames mounted on said main frame rearwardly of said breast means for upward and downward movement relatively to said main frame, a shaft extending transversely of said main frame at an elevation below said breast means, a plurality of bell cranks mounted for oscillation on said shaft, each of said bell cranks including an arm extending downwardly from said shaft and another arm extending rearwardly from said shaft, means operatively connecting the rearwardly extending arm of each bell crank to one of said harness frames, lateral flanges on said downwardly extending arms of said bell cranks at points spaced substantially below said shaft for sliding engagement with the flanges of adjacent bell cranks to hold said downwardly extending arms against lateral movement with respect to each other, and means for causing movement of said downwardly extending arms in accordance with the requirements of the pattern to be woven, to cause corresponding movement of the associated harness frames.
CARL F. SCHLEGEL.
US162174A 1937-09-02 1937-09-02 Harness motion for looms Expired - Lifetime US2114543A (en)

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2815772A (en) * 1955-08-29 1957-12-10 Mohasco Ind Inc Heddle control mechanism

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2815772A (en) * 1955-08-29 1957-12-10 Mohasco Ind Inc Heddle control mechanism

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