US2107090A - Water pump - Google Patents

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US2107090A
US2107090A US1195A US119535A US2107090A US 2107090 A US2107090 A US 2107090A US 1195 A US1195 A US 1195A US 119535 A US119535 A US 119535A US 2107090 A US2107090 A US 2107090A
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impeller
chamber
axis
end
pump
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US1195A
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Benjamin A Swennes
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Borg-Warner Corp
BorgWarner Inc
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BorgWarner Inc
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04DNON-POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04D33/00Non-positive-displacement pumps with other than pure rotation, e.g. of oscillating type
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/18Mechanical movements
    • Y10T74/1836Rotary to rotary
    • Y10T74/18384Crank, lever, and crank

Description

Feb. 1, 1938. B. A. SWENNES WATER PUMP Filed Jan. 10, 1935 A A Z534, I 37.

j a v Z0 13 7 "mm l s 3 8 msmgiiLkLlI/l/Im Patented Feb. I, 1938 UNITED STATES WATER. PUMP Benjamin A. Swennes, Rockford, Ill., assignor to'Borg-Warner Corporation, Chicago, 11]., a

corporation of Illinois Application January 10, 1935, Serial No.-1,19 5

23 Claims.

This invention relates to pumps generally and more particularly a water pump for automobile engines.

- which operates more easily and, consequently,

with much less wear, by reason of the mounting of the impeller directly upon the end of the nutator, thus eliminating the impeller bearing and the bearing connecting the nutator and impeller, and correspondingly reducing power consumption and wear of parts.

The pump impeller in accordance with the present invention is in the form of a frusto-conical swash plate of the proper diameter in relation to the diameter of the impeller chamber that is concentric with the axis of nutation of the impeller, so that very little clearance is left between the impeller and the walls of the chamber in operation, experiment having shown a decided increase in output with reduction in the clearance. The outlet from the impeller chamber can be radial but the inlet is preferably in front of the impeller and on the axis of nutation,

The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which- Fig. 1 is a vertical section through a portion of an automobile engine block showing a pump thereon made in accordance with my invention;

Fig. 2 is a cross-section on the line 22 of Figure 1 looking toward the impeller as indicated by the arrows;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary sectional detail of the nutator bearing showing a modified or alternative construction, and

Fig. 4 is a section corresponding to a portion of Figure 1 but showing a further modification in the nutator mounting.

Similar reference numerals are applied to corresponding parts throughout these views.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, the numeral 5 designates a head on an engine block 6 having a pump housing I bolted on the front end thereof as at 8. The pump housing has a radial, upwardly extending-neck 9 for discharge of water adapted for connection in the usual way with the automobile radiator. Now, in accordance with the disclosure in my earlier application, the fan pulley I is mounted on a stub shaft ll received in a bearing l2 provided in the outer end of the housing 1 in communication with the oil chamber l3, and a drive disk l4 provided on the inner end of the shaft II has a hole if provided therein to receive the ball-shaped end l8 of the non-rotatable wobble shaft or nutator H. In other words, the shaft ll instead of extending through a suitable stufllng box into the impeller chamber I8 to operate an impeller therein terminates in the oil chamber l3 where it is operatively connected with the front end of the nutator I1, and the latter extends through a partition I9 into the impeller chamber I8 to operate the impeller 20. Any lubricant finding its way along the shaft H through the bearing I2 from the oil chamber I3 is trapped by the retainer l2 which is mounted snugly on the cylindrical end of the pump housing, as shown. In that way loss of lubricant is reduced to a minimum and the oil chamber when partially filled at the time of assembly should not require any refilling, although, of course, an oil filler plug or cup may be provided on the housing directly behind the fan pulley if so desired. The nutator IT has a ball-shaped enlargement 2| intermediate its ends universally fulcrumed in a socket or bearing 22 at the center of the partition IS. The latter separates the oil chamber from the impeller chamber and is made in two parts arranged to be assembled on the ballportion 2| from opposite sides and to be fastened by screws, as at 23, in the housing I. Recesses 24 are provided in the two halves of the partition to accommodate a leather or felt washer 25 to retain lubricant and thus protect the boot 26 from too free contact with the oil while also assuring lubrication of the ball portion 2| by the lubricant retained in the washer, even though the oil level in the chamber J3 might be low. The boot or sleeve 26 is preferably, though not necessarily, molded in one piece of rubber, and more particularly a synthetic thermo-plastic rubber material such as thiokol, derived from the inter-action of compounds of olefins with soluble polysulfide, which is unaffected by oil and does not suffer any ill effects if subjected to the action of hot water and anti-freeze solutions. However, any other flexible material suitable for the present purpose 5 may be employed. The boot constitutes a seal to prevent access of water from the impeller chamber Hi to the bearing 22. The boot 26 is made small enough at one end 21 to fit tightly on the reduced portion 28 of the nutator, and is arranged to be compressed against the shoulder 28 on the nutator when the nut 30 threaded on the end of the nutator is tightened to clamp the impeller 20 in place. The other end of the boot is of larger diameter and has an enlarged rim ll arranged to be stretched to pass over the neck 32 to flt in the annular recess II thereon and provide a water-tight joint. A small boot is preferred to a larger diaphragm because it can be provided at much lower cost, and oflers less resistance to the motion of the nutator.

In'operation, assuming that the pulley III has a ian belt working thereon, the rotation of the disk ll causes the nutator l'l to have circular oscillation or what is known as nutating motion, that is, the forward end of the nutator moves in a circle, and this circular motion results in a corresponding circular motion of the rear end of the nutator. The nutator merely fulcrums universally intermediate its ends in the bearing 22; it does not revolve. Consequently, the problem'oi preventing leakage is greatly simplified; the boot 26 need only hug the nutator and the partition is tightly enough to provide a static seal as distinguished from the old rotary type shaft seals. The seal is not only simpler to make but much more effective and really positive. When the oil chamber I3 is filled to the level of the lower portion of the bearing I! there is ample lubrication for the shaft II and nutator H for smooth and quiet operation with minimum wear.

The impeller 20 is in the form of a frusto-conical swash plate, the periphery 34 of which remains parallel with the inside wall 35 of the impeller chamber I! in the nutating motion of the impeller, as indicated in dotted lines in Figure 1. Very little clearance is left between the periphery of the impeller and the inside wall of the chamber. Experiment showed a decided increase in the pumps output upon reduction in the clearance. For example, whereas one gallon per minute was secured with a clearance, 2.86 gallons per minute was secured with a .015" clearance. The impeller chamber I. has a partition I! as its front wall and a plate 3! as its back wall, the plate being fastened in place between the cylinder head 5 and pump housing I as shown. A center hole 31 provided in the plate-"l6 serves as a water inlet for the chamber ll. The hole is preferably small in relation to the diameter of the circle described by the impeller. For example, a 1" diameter was found to give the good results above referred to with a pump in which the impeller described a circle of a 1%" diameter. When the diameter of the hole 31 was reduced to a 15/16" diameter, less water was pumped, and on the other hand, when the diameter was increased to 1%", very little output was secured as compared with the output stated above. The output of 2.86 gallons per minute compares very favorably with the output of pumps in common use today and operated at similar speeds; one of the most widely used pumps has an output of only .468 gallon per minute. In the event the output of the present pump is more than is desired, it is obvious that one may regulate its performance by simply changing to a different sized hole at 31. Thus the same pump may be used on 'diflerent engines having different requirements as to. pump ratings, by merely employing diiferent plates II with the proper sized holes 81. While I have shown an oifset in the plate 36 to provide operating clearance for the impeller 2|, it should be understood that a plain plate may be employed by simply setting the bearing 22 farther forward relative to the plate.

The operation of the special impeller herein disclosed is not understood well enough to make it proper to offer a definite theory of operation. Apparently when the impeller 20 is in the uppermost position shown in Figs. 1 and 2, in which it more or less seals of! the outlet 38 in the neck 9, there is a crescent-shaped slug of water below the impeller which in the nutating motion of the impeller, in which it describes a circle, moving in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 2, is displaced in the direction of the arrow from the impeller chamber i8 into the neck 9, more water being at the same time drawn in continuously through the inlet 31 to take the place of the water displaced. There is no perceptible pulsation but instead a fairly steady flow in the operation of the pump at substantially constant speed.

The construction disclosed in Fig. 3 shows a partition lS-a in connection with a nutator I I4 in which a longitudinal slot or keyway 39 is provided in the ball portion 2Ia for reception of a roller 40 carried on a radial pin ll mounted between the halves of the partition l9a. This is to positively prevent turning of the nutator. I have found, however, that there is actually little or no tendency for the nutator to turn, whatever turning moment is given by reason of friction of the ball I 6 in the hole I5 is counteracted apparently by an opposite moment given the impeller 20 by the skin friction of the water in the impeller chamber it against the periphery of the impeller.

In Fig. 4 a diaphragm 26-41 is shown in lieu of the partition l9 and boot 26 serving both as a support for the nutator l1--b and as a seal, the diaphragm being clamped at its center on a shoulder 29-41 on the nutator as at 3la for a water-tight seal, and being clamped at its periphery in the housing la of the pump by means of a ring 3l--a for another water-tight seal. The diaphragm may be of rubber, leather, or metal-in fact, any flexible material suitable for the purpose.

It is believed the foregoing description conveys a good understanding of all of the objects and advantages of my invention. While reference has been made to the special adaptability of my invention to use on automobile engines, it will, of course, be understood that the same is applicable to pumps generally, whether it be for the pumping of water or any other liquid or fluid medium. The appended claims have, therefore, been drawn so as to cover all legitimate modifications and adaptations.

I claim:

1. In an automobile engine water circulating pump, means providing an impeller chamber, means providing an oil chamber for lubricating oil, a drive shaft extending into the oil chamber through a bearing communicating therewith for lubrication, a partition separating the two chambers and having a bearing supplied with lubricant from the oil chambena wabble shaft universally fulcrumed intermediate its ends in the bearing on the partition and pivotaliy connected at one end to said drive shaft at a certain radius relative to the axis of rotation of the latter whereby movement is arranged to be communicated to that end of said shaft in a circle to produce 007-, responding movement of the other end, and an impeller on the other end of said shaft in the impeller chamber, "the circular movement of 75 I aioaoeo such other end of the shaft imparting a planetary movement to said impeller.

2. In a water circulating pump for an automobile engine, the combination of a fan pulley shaft supported in spaced relation to a water circulating passage of the engine, a vibratory spindle extending from the fan shaft to said passage and disposed at an angle to the axis of the shaft and pivotally connected at one end to said shaft at a certain radius measured from the axis of the latter, an impeller in the water circulating passage carried on the other end of said spindle, means supporting the spindle intermediate its ends for universal fulcrum motion, said other end of the spindle imparting a planetary movement to said impeller.

3. In a water circulating pump for an automobile engine. the combination with the water circulating passage of the engine, of a housing adapted to be secured to the engine in communication with said passage, a fan pulley shaft supported in said housing, a partition in said housing between the shaft and the passage, said partition having a central bearing, a wabble shaft universally fulcrumed intermediate its ends in said bearing and extending rearwardly from the partition and forwardly from the partition to the fan shaft and pivotally connected thereto for vibratory motion c'irclewise at both ends, and an impeller on the rear end of said wabble shaft and adapted to be'planetated by said wabble shaft coincidental with such circle-wise motion.

4. In a pump, the combination of an impeller chamber, a rotary driven shaft outside the impeller chamber, a supporting bearing for said shaft, a partition between the bearing and impeller chamber, a non-rotating wabble member universally fulcrumed on the partition intermediate its ends and swiveled at its forward end on the drive shaft at a predetermined radius with respect to its axis of rotation, and a fluid impeller mounted on the other end of said wabble member at a predetermined radius with respect to the aforesaid axis of rotation, said impeller being planetated in a circular path about such axis incident to rotation of said shaft.

5. In a device of the class described, a housing having an outer bearing, an impeller chamber, a partition between the impeller chamber and the outer bearing in said housing forming an oil chamber therein, said partition having a second bearing coaxial with but axially spaced from the outer bearing, a pulley shaft received in the outer bearing and carrying a drive pulley on the outer end and a drive member on the inner end, an impeller disposed in the impeller chamber, a wabble shaft mounted for circular oscillation in the second bearing and projecting into the oil chamber for pivotal connection with the drive member and into the impeller chamber for support of the impeller directly thereon, whereby to planetate said impeller in'a circular path.

6. A device as set forth in claim 5 including means for preventing rotation of the wabble shaft relative to the partition in the circular oscillation thereof.

7. In a pump, the combination of an impeller chamber and a lubricating chamber, a driving shaft supported in a bearing communicating with the lubricating chamber for lubrication of said bearing, an impeller in the impeller chamber, a non-rotating wabble memberdisposed at an angle to the driving shaft and pivotally connected therewith at a predetermined radius with respect to the axis of rotation thereof at one end,

said shaft causing circular oscillation of the ends of said wabble member incident to. rotation of said shaft, said impeller being mounted directly on the other end of said wabble member and given a circular planetary movementby the wabble member while said member is oscillating.

8. In an automobile construction, the combination with an engine head having a water circulating passage therein and an impeller chamber communicating therewith, a rotary pulley ft s pported in mal vspeced relation with respect to the impeller chamber, a non-rotatins nutating element supported for circular oscillation at a point between the. impeller chamber andshaft and connected at one end with said shaft whereby to have circular oscillation without turning, and an. impeller mounted directly upon the other end of said member in the impeller chamber, said impeller being given a planetary movement by said member during such oscillation of the member.

9. In a pump, a housing having a substantially circular impeller chamber therein, a nutating shaft projecting into the impeller chamber substantially from the center of one end and arranged to be operated so that the inner end describes a clrcle'in the housing, and an impeller carried on the end of said shaft for planetary motion in the housing, saidhousing having an inlet for admission of fluid to the other end of said chamber substantially centrally thereof, and an outletfor fluid in the side wall of said chamber.

10. In a pump, a housing having a substantially circular impeller-chamber therein, a pump chamber, said housing having an inlet for admission of fluid to the other end of said chamber substantially centrally thereof, and an outlet for fluid in the side wall of said chamber.

11. A pump as set forth in claim 10 wherein the impeller is tapered so as to have the .full periphery thereof disposed substantially parallel to the side walls of the impeller chamber in all positions occupied by said impeller in the normal operation thereof.

12. In a pump, a housing having a substantially circular impeller chamber therein, a pump shaft projecting into the impeller chamber substantially from the center of one end and arranged to be operated so that the inner end de-v scribes a circle in the housing, an impeller car ried on the end of said shaft for planetary motion in the housing, and a flexible seal member having a fluid-tight connection at one point with the shaft between the impeller and the end wall of said chamber and having a fluid-tight connection at another point with said end wall to pre-' vent loss of fluid from the impeller chamber while allowing freedom of circular movement of said shaft, said housing having an inlet for admission of fluid to the other end of said chamber substantially centrally thereof, and an outlet for fluid in the side wall of said chamber. a

13. A pump comprising a fluid circulating chamber having opposed spaced apart walls, one

exteriorly of said chamber, a tiltable disk-like impeller member having a central section .con-

nected with the interior end section, said disklike impeller being in a plane at substantially right angles to the longitudinal axis of said nutating member, and means for impartingiorce to the exterior end of said nutating member to cause circular vibration of each oi the end sections thereof and tilting movement of said impeller member.

14. A pump comprising a, fluid. circulating chamber having an intake opening. a support member having an anchorage spaced axially of said opening interiorly or said chamber, a vibrating member having a section secured in such anchorage and an end section extending in the general direction of the chamber opening, said anchorage permitting oi said vibrator member being vibrated with said end section describing a closed path about the perpendicular axis of the opening, a tiltable disk-like member having a central section secured to the end of said vibrator member and disposed in a plane substantially perpendicular to a line defined by said central section and the anchorage in said support member, and means energizable to cause vibration oi said vibrator-member and tilting movement of the disk-like member thereon.

15. A pump comprising a fluid circulating chamber having an intake opening, a vibrator stem anchored at a point substantially coincident with the perpendicular axisoi said opening interiorly or said chamber, said stemhaving an end extending in the general direction oi such opening from said anchorage and said anchorage permitting of vibration oi said stem in a manner pursuant to which the end thereof describes a closed path about the axis of the opening while the anchored section thereof remains substantially coincident with such axis, a tiltable, disk-like impeller member upon the end 01' said stem and having a central section in operative connection therewith, the disk-like member being disposed in' a plane substantially perpendicular to the stem, and means energizable to cause such vibration oi the stem and tilting movement of the impeller connected therewith.

16. A pump comprising a fluid circulating chamber having a wall with an intake opening therein, a disk-like impeller member in said chamber, and means for imparting a bodily motion to said disk in a closed path circumscribing the axis of said opening and in a plane parallel to said wall concurrently to tilting said member whereby said member is carried about the interior oi the chamber in a manner causing adjacent peripheral edge sections to be successively displaced a maximum distance from said wall and at a maximum distance radially from the axis of such opening while diametrically opposite edge sections are successively carried to a minimum distance from said wall and a minimum dis-' tance radially from said axis.

17. A pump having an axis and comprising a fluid circulating chamber having an intake opening registering with such axis, a disk-like impeller member in said chamber, said member being disposed with its center spaced from the pump axis andangularlytheretosothattheprincipalaxis peller so that the axis thereof continually coincides with such point on the pump axis.

18. A pump comprising a fluid circulating chamber having a cylindrical side wall and an end wall having a central intake opening, a disklike impeller in said chamber, said impeller having a bevelled peripheral edge and being disposed with its center spaced laterally from the longitudinal axis of said chamber and tilted so that the principal axis of the impeller intersects the chamber axis at a point more removed from the intake opening inwardly oi the chamber than said impeller, and means for moving said impeller bodily in a closed path about the opening axis while constantly changing the tilting angle oi the impeller in a manner causing the principal axis thereof to continually intersect said point of the chamber axis, and the bevel at the edge of the impeller being at such an angle that the overchanging edge section nearest the cylindrical wall is in parallelism with such wall. I

19. A pump comprising a fluid circulating chamber having an axis, side walls extending in general parallelism ,with such axis and an end wall containing an intake opening in substantial registry with such axis, a substantially flat impeller member in said chamber, said impeller being disposed eccentrically of said chamber axis and angularly thereto, said impeller having a normal axis, the impeller being disposed at such an angle to the chamber axis as to cause the impeller axis to intersect the chamber axisat a point more removed from the intake opening inwardly of said chamber than the impeller, and means for planetating said impeller about the chamber axis while changing the angularity of the impeller to said chamber axisv in a manner causing the impeller axis to continually coincide with said point on the chamber axis, said plan-- etating means further causing adjacent peripheral edge sections or said impeller to be brought successively into close proximity with the chamber side walls during such planetary movement.

20. A pump comprising a fluid circulating chamber having an axis and a fluid intake passage in substantial alinement with such axis, a substantially flat impeller member disposed in said chamber eccentrically of such axis, a face of said impeller being dished and exposed in the general direction 01' such intake passage, said impeller having an axis normal thereto and being disposed angularly to the chamber axis in a manner causing the impeller axis to intersect the chamber axis at a point inwardly of said chamber with respect to the intake passage, and nutating means operable to eflfect a planetary movement to said impeller about the chamber axis while maintaining the intersection 01' such axes at said point.

21. In a centrifugal pump, a planetary impeller comprising a substantially flat member, and means for planetating said member to impart rotary movement to fluid in said pump, such planetation being through a closed path within a plane disposed at a slight angle with respect to said flat member and said means serving also to constantly wabble said member in a manner substantially preserving the size oi such angle.

22. In a pump, a pump housing having a wall containing an intake opening, an impeller in said housing, said impeller being free oi fluid passages 75 therein, said impeller having a face disposed opposite to said opening and inclined with respect to the axis thereof, and means for planetating said member in a closed path about such axis while constantly tilting said impeller to preserve the inclined relation thereof with respect to such axis.

23. In a centrifugal pump, a fluid passage, a planetary impeller having a face disposed at a slight angle to a plane extending transversely of the side walls of such passage, said impeller being mounted in a manner permitting passage of fluid between its edge and said side walls, and means for planetating said impeller in such plane while constantly tilting said impeller to maintain an angle between such face and'such plane.

BENJAMIN A. SWENNES.

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Cited By (39)

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US2439262A (en) * 1944-10-26 1948-04-06 John R Nalbach Power-operated mechanism
US2462023A (en) * 1945-11-02 1949-02-15 Radio Frequency Lab Inc Seal nut
US2466327A (en) * 1944-05-19 1949-04-05 Interval Instr Inc Damping device
US2546365A (en) * 1947-04-25 1951-03-27 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Pneumatic operating clutch device
US2548555A (en) * 1945-07-02 1951-04-10 Bendix Aviat Corp Device for introducing motion into sealed casings
US2583777A (en) * 1944-08-23 1952-01-29 Duriron Co Shaft seal
US2636444A (en) * 1949-08-10 1953-04-28 Salgues Albert Wobbling disk pump
US2645111A (en) * 1947-11-05 1953-07-14 Whirlpool Co Wobble plate laundry machine
US2692507A (en) * 1950-04-28 1954-10-26 Steensen Sverre Johan Arrangement for the transmission of circular movement for compressors
US2693764A (en) * 1953-05-07 1954-11-09 Richard T Cornelius Wabble pump
US2725754A (en) * 1951-11-26 1955-12-06 Munro Robert Hermetically-sealed shaft couplings
US2736267A (en) * 1956-02-28 mosbacher
US2759427A (en) * 1953-03-06 1956-08-21 John H Holstein Centrifugal pump
US2766733A (en) * 1953-07-31 1956-10-16 Gulf Research Development Co Nutating disc meter for corrosive and abrasive solid laden liquid
US2773453A (en) * 1952-09-12 1956-12-11 Gemeinhardt William Rotary pumps
US2862451A (en) * 1956-07-16 1958-12-02 John H Holstein Centrifugal pump
US2956503A (en) * 1956-02-15 1960-10-18 Neidl Georg Rotary pumps, particularly for delivery of sewage, thick slurries and the like liquids
US3097609A (en) * 1959-10-23 1963-07-16 Fmc Corp Rag guard for positive displacement pumps
US3155407A (en) * 1961-05-26 1964-11-03 Ehrenreich & Cie A Ball and socket joints
DE1260314B (en) * 1959-10-23 1968-02-01 Fmc Corp Pump with suction chamber on the drive side
US3378286A (en) * 1966-08-02 1968-04-16 Messrs A Ehrenreich & Cie Ball joints
DE1296888B (en) * 1965-09-17 1969-06-04 Ehrenreich & Cie A Bellows-type seal for universally movable joints, in particular ball joints
US3702938A (en) * 1970-04-17 1972-11-14 Petroles Cie Francaise Electric generator drive
US4683763A (en) * 1986-05-20 1987-08-04 Huntington Mechanical Laboratories, Inc. Rotary motion feed-through apparatus
US5044882A (en) * 1988-11-30 1991-09-03 Ube Industries, Ltd. Precessional centrifugal pump
US5178515A (en) * 1989-05-22 1993-01-12 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Medical pump
US5411378A (en) * 1992-09-08 1995-05-02 Sipin; Anatole J. Orbiting fluid pump
US5607285A (en) * 1994-06-08 1997-03-04 Carl Freudenberg Pump drive apparatus
US5785491A (en) * 1995-06-29 1998-07-28 Aisin Seiki Kabushiki Kaisha Liquid pump having a driving unit and a driven unit with a resilient seal therebetween
US6506012B2 (en) * 2001-05-18 2003-01-14 Alan D. Tuck, Jr. Nutating centrifugal pump
US20070022872A1 (en) * 2003-06-18 2007-02-01 Lynn William H Hybrid nutating pump
US20070128051A1 (en) * 2005-12-07 2007-06-07 Lynn William H Hybrid nutating pump
US20100101407A1 (en) * 2007-03-21 2010-04-29 William Harry Lynn Hybrid nutating pump with anti-rotation feature
US20100215500A1 (en) * 2009-02-24 2010-08-26 Dyson Technology Limited Rotor assembly
US20100215491A1 (en) * 2009-02-24 2010-08-26 Dyson Technology Limited Rotor assembly
WO2010066210A3 (en) * 2008-12-10 2010-11-04 Czech Technical University In Prague, Faculty Of Civil Engineering Rolling fluid pump
US8864460B2 (en) 2011-08-26 2014-10-21 Dyson Technology Limited Bearing assembly
US20160305530A1 (en) * 2015-04-17 2016-10-20 Aktiebolaget Skf Sheave for guiding rope in an industrial machine
WO2018158112A1 (en) * 2017-03-03 2018-09-07 Robert Bosch Gmbh Pump assembly

Cited By (50)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2736267A (en) * 1956-02-28 mosbacher
US2466327A (en) * 1944-05-19 1949-04-05 Interval Instr Inc Damping device
US2583777A (en) * 1944-08-23 1952-01-29 Duriron Co Shaft seal
US2439262A (en) * 1944-10-26 1948-04-06 John R Nalbach Power-operated mechanism
US2548555A (en) * 1945-07-02 1951-04-10 Bendix Aviat Corp Device for introducing motion into sealed casings
US2462023A (en) * 1945-11-02 1949-02-15 Radio Frequency Lab Inc Seal nut
US2546365A (en) * 1947-04-25 1951-03-27 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Pneumatic operating clutch device
US2645111A (en) * 1947-11-05 1953-07-14 Whirlpool Co Wobble plate laundry machine
US2636444A (en) * 1949-08-10 1953-04-28 Salgues Albert Wobbling disk pump
US2692507A (en) * 1950-04-28 1954-10-26 Steensen Sverre Johan Arrangement for the transmission of circular movement for compressors
US2725754A (en) * 1951-11-26 1955-12-06 Munro Robert Hermetically-sealed shaft couplings
US2773453A (en) * 1952-09-12 1956-12-11 Gemeinhardt William Rotary pumps
US2759427A (en) * 1953-03-06 1956-08-21 John H Holstein Centrifugal pump
US2693764A (en) * 1953-05-07 1954-11-09 Richard T Cornelius Wabble pump
US2766733A (en) * 1953-07-31 1956-10-16 Gulf Research Development Co Nutating disc meter for corrosive and abrasive solid laden liquid
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