US2099055A - Flexible bottle - Google Patents

Flexible bottle Download PDF

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Publication number
US2099055A
US2099055A US49977130A US2099055A US 2099055 A US2099055 A US 2099055A US 49977130 A US49977130 A US 49977130A US 2099055 A US2099055 A US 2099055A
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Prior art keywords
bottle
portion
plastic material
wall
formed
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Enoch T Ferngren
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Plax Corp
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Plax Corp
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C41/00Shaping by coating a mould, core or other substrate, i.e. by depositing material and stripping-off the shaped article; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C41/34Component parts, details or accessories; Auxiliary operations
    • B29C41/50Shaping under special conditions, e.g. vacuum
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C65/00Joining or sealing of preformed parts, e.g. welding of plastics materials; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C65/56Joining or sealing of preformed parts, e.g. welding of plastics materials; Apparatus therefor using mechanical means or mechanical connections, e.g. form-fits
    • B29C65/567Joining or sealing of preformed parts, e.g. welding of plastics materials; Apparatus therefor using mechanical means or mechanical connections, e.g. form-fits using a tamping or a swaging operation, i.e. at least partially deforming the edge or the rim of a first part to be joined to clamp a second part to be joined
    • B29C65/568Joining or sealing of preformed parts, e.g. welding of plastics materials; Apparatus therefor using mechanical means or mechanical connections, e.g. form-fits using a tamping or a swaging operation, i.e. at least partially deforming the edge or the rim of a first part to be joined to clamp a second part to be joined using a swaging operation, i.e. totally deforming the edge or the rim of a first part to be joined to clamp a second part to be joined
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C66/00General aspects of processes or apparatus for joining preformed parts
    • B29C66/01General aspects dealing with the joint area or with the area to be joined
    • B29C66/05Particular design of joint configurations
    • B29C66/10Particular design of joint configurations particular design of the joint cross-sections
    • B29C66/13Single flanged joints; Fin-type joints; Single hem joints; Edge joints; Interpenetrating fingered joints; Other specific particular designs of joint cross-sections not provided for in groups B29C66/11 - B29C66/12
    • B29C66/131Single flanged joints, i.e. one of the parts to be joined being rigid and flanged in the joint area
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C66/00General aspects of processes or apparatus for joining preformed parts
    • B29C66/50General aspects of joining tubular articles; General aspects of joining long products, i.e. bars or profiled elements; General aspects of joining single elements to tubular articles, hollow articles or bars; General aspects of joining several hollow-preforms to form hollow or tubular articles
    • B29C66/51Joining tubular articles, profiled elements or bars; Joining single elements to tubular articles, hollow articles or bars; Joining several hollow-preforms to form hollow or tubular articles
    • B29C66/54Joining several hollow-preforms, e.g. half-shells, to form hollow articles, e.g. for making balls, containers; Joining several hollow-preforms, e.g. half-cylinders, to form tubular articles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C66/00General aspects of processes or apparatus for joining preformed parts
    • B29C66/50General aspects of joining tubular articles; General aspects of joining long products, i.e. bars or profiled elements; General aspects of joining single elements to tubular articles, hollow articles or bars; General aspects of joining several hollow-preforms to form hollow or tubular articles
    • B29C66/51Joining tubular articles, profiled elements or bars; Joining single elements to tubular articles, hollow articles or bars; Joining several hollow-preforms to form hollow or tubular articles
    • B29C66/54Joining several hollow-preforms, e.g. half-shells, to form hollow articles, e.g. for making balls, containers; Joining several hollow-preforms, e.g. half-cylinders, to form tubular articles
    • B29C66/543Joining several hollow-preforms, e.g. half-shells, to form hollow articles, e.g. for making balls, containers; Joining several hollow-preforms, e.g. half-cylinders, to form tubular articles joining more than two hollow-preforms to form said hollow articles
    • B29C66/5432Joining several hollow-preforms, e.g. half-shells, to form hollow articles, e.g. for making balls, containers; Joining several hollow-preforms, e.g. half-cylinders, to form tubular articles joining more than two hollow-preforms to form said hollow articles joining hollow covers and hollow bottoms to open ends of container bodies
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D11/00Containers having bodies formed by interconnecting or uniting two or more rigid, or substantially rigid, components made wholly or mainly of plastics material
    • B65D11/02Containers having bodies formed by interconnecting or uniting two or more rigid, or substantially rigid, components made wholly or mainly of plastics material of curved cross-section
    • B65D11/04Bottles or similar containers with necks or like restricted apertures designed for pouring contents
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C66/00General aspects of processes or apparatus for joining preformed parts
    • B29C66/80General aspects of machine operations or constructions and parts thereof
    • B29C66/83General aspects of machine operations or constructions and parts thereof characterised by the movement of the joining or pressing tools
    • B29C66/836Moving relative to and tangentially to the parts to be joined, e.g. transversely to the displacement of the parts to be joined, e.g. using a X-Y table
    • B29C66/8362Rollers, cylinders or drums moving relative to and tangentially to the parts to be joined
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S264/00Plastic and nonmetallic article shaping or treating: processes
    • Y10S264/76Processes of uniting two or more parts

Description

Nov. 16, 1937'.- E T FERNGREN 2,099,055

FLEXIBLE BOTTLE Original Filed'Dec. 3., 1930 4 Sheets-Sheet l E. T. FERNGREN 2,099,055

FLEXIBLE BOTTLE Original Filed Dec. 3. 1930 44 Sheets-Sheet 2 Nov. 16, 1937.

/NVE/VTOR 720% W7' NovVlG, 1937. E T FERNGREN 2,099,055

FLEXIBLE BOTTLE original Filed Dec. 5. 1930 4 Smets-sheet 3 NOV- 15, 19.37- E. T. FERNGREN 2,099,055

FLEXIBLE BOTTLE Original Filed Dec. 3. 1930 4 Sheets-Sheet 4l .SURFACE LEVEL 63 l' cur OFF `Patented Nov. 16, 1937 UNITED s'rATa-:s

PATENT OFFICE mmm; Bo'r'rLa Enoch T. Ferngren, Jackson Heights, Long Island, N. Y., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Plax Corporation, Hartford, Conn., a corporation oi Delaware Application December 3, 1930, Serial No. 499,771

Renewed March 31, 1937.

is claims. (ci. 22a-3.5)

This invention relates to bottles produced from viscous liquid plastic materials ordopes, including cellulosic derivatives.

binations with cellulose derivatives in various states of viscosity and solution may also be used. Specifically as related to the type of bottle vvhichv forms the subject matter of this invention, I contemplate the productionv of a bottle and a cap whichmay be used for carbonated beverages. Such a bottle may have a durable wall structure or may 4have walls of a softer, collapsible nature to\suit particular requirements and uses. However, the, invention is not limited to bottles for use solely for carbonated beverages; but many Among the objects of the present invention is- Yto provide a bottle formed of suitable plastic material, including cellulosev derivatives, which will be less liable to breakage during use and handling than glass bottles'now in common usev With relation to the manufacture of a' twopart bottle, which is to be assembled by the userY to form a completed bottle, the inventionprovides a way of forming the mouth and neck portions of the bottle on the upper portion, While suitable rims or anges are preferably provided at the adjoining ends of the two portions, which may be rolled together to form a shoulder flange 'and cappingoperations.

' on the co`mpleted bottle, the purpose being to and. the mouth of a bottle that a :suitable en-A 'gaging'portionnmay be provided on the bottle for receiving, the stopper type' of cap herein disclosed.

Innthis connection, it is aspecic object tQ $0 Other substances or comarrange these parts in their relation to one another that internal pressure from a carbonated liquid will serve to produce an intimate seal between the edges and engaging portions of the bottle mouth and an associated stopper cap.

Inmaking a relatively soft or collapsible bottle,` it will be found necessary at times to have a suitable degree of rigidity in the upper portion of the bottle, for which reason and also to pro'" f'vide constructions desired by users, the upper portion of the bottle may be press-formed from paper plastics or many other types of plastic compositions. In such a case, this portion 'of the bottle may be embossed, color-printed or otherwise labeled. However, as in most instances, sufiicient stiffness can be impartedfto the upper portion of the bottle by using cellulose materials, which likewise can be decorated, colored, labeled or embossed at the time of manufacture, such materials may be employed preferably because of their transparency and toughness. Exceptions to this Vrule may, however, be desirable for particular purposes or to satisfy particular users.

A bottle such as outlined in the preceding paraf graph would have a transparent lower body por, tion showing the beverage contained, while the upper portion, which sometimes may be formed of opaque materials, will be slightly more rigid or reinforced by ribbing, for example, as herein; after disclosed relative to other parts of the bottle, Thus a cap may be applied to and -removed from the mouth of the bottle without collapsing the adjacent body wall structure thereof.

It is thus an c-bject Vof this invention to provide a composite bottle in the sense that different materials may enter into the construction oi the walls of itsseveral portions, one portion being made up of several coatings or laminations of diierent materials and having a greater thickness or firmness of structure than the other portion. Also, one part of the bottle may be opaque and the other part transparent, but of greater soft-A4`A ness for certain purposes, so that a user collapse the bottle after consuming its contents. In this connection, it is an object to provide a narrow neck bottle of collapsible structure for use at bail parks and other places where a. glass bottle is undesirable or dangerous.

Another object is to provide conventionally shaped bottles of more rigid structure for -bottling carbonated beverages,I and also to provide `bottles of dierent appearance for the bottling' and sale of other carbonated drinks. While the type of bottle shown has a particular form and structure. the invention is not to enrn plasticmaterials or dopes relative to thelmbodiment as wide-mouth containers and jars mayv be manufactured by the means andmethods herein disclosed.

Among the novel steps of the invention for theforming of bottles in separate parts or as a unitary bottle arethe procedures'of coating externalv or internal faces of molding implements with film-depositing liquid plastic materials or dopes', while negative or positive air pressures are used to control the uid movements of the receiving surfaces ofthe molds.

The invention also includes the forming of the bottle body or any hollow shape, in'as far as its major wall surface is concerned, by a single coating of a molding implement with a viscous liquid plastic material or dope to produce a :dexible wall, which is rendered stiff and serviceable by reinforcements, ribbings or other strengthenin'g portions. In this connection with relation to forming a serviceable bottom wall for a bottle, it is an object of my invention to use vacuum communicated from within a molding element to l the bottom-shaping surface upon which the plaswhich rib will act to buttress and prevent the easy collapse of theadjacent wall portion of the hollow shell-like body of the container. When used with the bottom wall proper of a bottle, the ribs- Will prevent distention or outward bulging when the bottle is lled or `under internal pressure. Thus, this type of ribbing will aid in maintaining the desired shape and rigidity without increasing the overall thickness of the reinforcedwalls.

In another respect, it is the 'purpose of my invention to employ both vacuum action and air pressure in -causing close surface adhesion of viscous plastic materials or dopes to the relatively smooth and polished surfaces of forming molds and in holding or releasing theinceptive lm relative thereto. Also, suction may be used in withdrawing air from molding cavities, so that the coating material or dope may be drawn in to establish uniform contact with forming faces and thereby, for instance, to form the nished upperl ing element and to utilize variations in the fluid or air pressure application to govern the ow of the nlm-forming material and the extent to which it contacts with the lip or mouth-forming surface of the molding element. Such variations in the gaseous pressure over the surface of the liquid plastic material or dope maybe employed tov create alternate advancing Aand receding movements of the body of liquid plastic material or dope 'for depositingA successive coatings or lms on the lip or mouth-forming surfaces of the forming elements, so as locally toincrease the ythickness or general strength and toughness of the wall forming this portion of the bottle.

Aprincipal objectofthe invention is to form frofnorganic Iplastic materials, a bottle body comparable to bottles now being made of glass and to provide in that body of plastic material all the advantages inherent in a glass bottle 4coupled with the additional advantages inherent be produced practically waterproof and odorless. a

The production of bottles in an economical way as is made possible by the processes employed in carrying out my present invention of producing 'hollow containers will afford new uses and open new markets for many plastic materials.

In theaccompanying drawings, there are shown ltwo types of bottles, which are the specific subject matter of this invention, and the means and methods of making both types.

Figure 1 is a view in vertical section of abottle which was formed of t wo separate portions;

Fig. 2 is a view in vertical section of a similar bottle made in one part;

Figs. 3 and 4 are views in central vertical section showing caps or Stoppers suitable for use respectively with the bottles shown in Figs. 1 and 2; A

Figs. 5 and 6 are fragmentary'views in central vertical section showing the bottles respectively illustrated in Figs.^1 and 2 with caps or Stoppers therein;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary view in central vertical section showing part of an apparatus for-making the upper portion of a bottle of the two-part type of construction;

Fig. 8 is a composite fragmentary view principally in central vertical section showing au arrangement of apparatus which may be used for forming the main or lower body portion of a two-part bottle, this apparatus also Ibeing usable in making drinking cups by a similar method,v

the left hand half of this gure showing one construction for controlling the temperatures of the molding implement and the right hand half, another-or modified construction for the same purpose;

Figs. 9 and 1G are views in central vertical section of the upper and lower portions respectively of a bottle, which portions together form a twopart bottle, the relative position of the figures indicating the arrangement of the bottle portions prior to their being assembled as a bottle;

Fig. 11 is a composite fragmentary view substantially in vertical section of an apparatus suitable for uniting the portions of a two-part bottle and illustrating the method empioyed, the left hand half of the iigure illustrating a preliminary step in the process andthe right hand half, the process of uniting the twobottle portions substantialiy completed;

Figs. 12 to 17 inclusive are a series of diagrammatic views in vertical section illustrating process steps and the relationship of a molding implement to a bath of liquid plastic material or dope during the formation of a one-piece bottle;

Fig. L8 is a composite fragmentary view illustrating a preferred method of compacting the shoulder wall formation of the one-part bottle to form a shoulder ange thereon, the left half of the figure showing the compaoting about to begin and the right half, the compacting substantially completed; and

Fig. 19 is a fragmentary assembly view, principally in vertical section, illustrating one type ofr 75 Y arrangement for removing surplus plastic material from the mouth of a bottle.

A bottle I, Fig. 1, is produced from two separate hollow body portions 2 and 3, these portions being united in a manner to produce a water and airtight seal. The preferred way of uniting the two bottle portions is to use a combination of sealing dope or adhesive, local heat treatment and mechanical action as indicated in Fig. 11.

The bottle portions 2 and 3 arev preferably formed by dipping 'suitable formers or molding implements into a liquid plastic material or dope to deposit a film of the liquid thereon, which may thereafter be rigidied in any suitable manner, as by the evaporation of the volatile solvent from a viscous cellulosic dope, while it is spread as a film on the heated vsurfaces of the molding members, generally indicated at 4 and II, Figs. 7 and 8. This film also may be formed from other suitable liquid plastic materials, which are capable of being rigidied by coagulation,` condensation or otherwise, as a. layer or iilm coating on the exterior or interior faces of suitable molding implements.

The several molding implements d used for shaping the upper portions 2 of bottles, Fig. l, are submerged in a bath of liquid plastic material or dope as indicated lin Fig. 7. For this purpose, the liquid plastic material or dope 5 may be bodily elevated to eiect the required amount of submersion or surface contact with one or several molding implements while the latter are or may be kept relatively stationary. Such a method of applying the liquidplastic material or dope is advantageous where several different movements are otherwise to be given to such molding implements, Figs. V'l Iand 8, since by this means the mechanical operating means required may be simplified.

The film-receiving or molding implement t has a tubular passage 6 leading into an air bell cavity 1 at the lower end thereof. When the implement 4 is submerged, the air pressure in the cavity may be controlled to keep the liquid plastic material or dope from rising above a certain predetermined level. In this way, there may be established an artificial level for the liquidplastic material or dope inside the cavity 1, so that only a positing successive coatings of the plastic ma terial on the lower curved end of the molding implement, which coatings, because of being successively exposed to air while being. constantly exposed to heat from within the shell 8, form a much thicker cohesive lm layer containing relatively-less of a solvent, Vif such-is employed, than the film deposited on the exterior surf-ace of the implement.

The implement 4 i's also ,provided with an inner casing 29, which functions as a partitionv wall to divide the space between the tube forming the inner passage 6 and the outer shell 8, so that heating or cooling ulds can be circulated, as indi.

cated by arrows I0. The temperature controlling medium passes down along` the inner side of the outer shell 8 to the lower end thereof, where the lip of the bottle is formed and at which end a greater degree of heat transmission is preferably effected, and thence upwardly along the outer face of the tube forming the inner passage 6. This arrangement for temperature control permits of quick expansion and contraction of the shell 8 during the green period of the plastic film and is an aid in temperature treatment of different plastic materials. It also helps in releasing the i'llm during hot water dipping, if such expedient is used, as the implement body can be chilled and thus reduced in its dimensions relative to the expanding film body thereon.

The molding implement Il, Fig. 8, which is used to shape the lower portions 3 of the bottle comprises a shell I2 having an inner tubular extension I3 for conducting air at desired pressures to a cavity I4 at the lower end of the molding implement. The shell |2 may be heated by electrical resistance means I5 shown at the right in Fig. 8, or by the circulation of a huid temperature-controlling medium passing through suitable spaces or passages I6 and I1 shown at the left in Fig. 8, the latter expedient being preferred for this type of molding implement.

The bottom cavity I 4 of the implement lI shapes the bottom portion of the bottle and comprises a slightly raised wall portion I8 which forms the horizontal bottom wall of the bottle shown at i9 in Fig. l. Intersecting ribs 20, Fig. 1,

at the bottom of the bottle are formed in groovesV 2|, Fig. 8, which extend crosswise into the wall |8.

The procedure of forming the bottom4 wall portionof the bottle will now be described. At the instant of submersion of the molding implement the interior of the tube I3 is evacuated, causing the withdrawal of air from the cavity I4 and the grooves 2| through capillary ducts 22, which connect with the interior of the tube I3, so that the liquid plastic material or dope will be immediately drawn by suction into the cavity Hl and the grooves 2|. The plastic material which `enters the grooves in the-bottom wall I8 of the molding implement will form the reinforcing cross ribs 20 of the bottom wall I9 of the bottle, Figs. 1 and 10. These ribs will attain substantially fixed dimensions during the immersion period of the molding implement |I by lengthwise and lateral shrinkage, due to the suction action on the thin section of the relatively viscous liquid plastic material while it is being exposed to heat through the side walls of the grooves 2|. This early rigidication of' the ribs continues while the molding implement ||.is removed from the 3 liquid plastic material and the film thereon is solidifying or rigidifying. Thus, at the time of disengaging the formed film layer from the implement I I, air under suitable pressure may be caused to pass outwardly through the ducts 22 and thence along each side of each of the ribs formed in the At the widest point of the upper portion 2 of the bottle, there maybe provided an annular rim or flange 2|, Fig. 9, having a depending portion 3| these flange portions being formedat the upper portion 23, Fig. 7, of the implement l. The rim or angefiu is arranged to t over an annular rim 25 of the lower portion 3 of the bottle and to be folded to embrace the rim 25 as indicated in Fig. 11 to form a shoulder ilange 58 for the bottle, Fig. l.

The rim 25 is formed at the upper end 26 of the molding implement ll, Fig. 8. For this purpose, suction is used to withdraw air from an annular cavity 21 throughcapillary ducts 28, causing the liquid plastic material to flow into contact with the inner faces of the cavity 21.

For disengaging the lm layer 3 from the implement Il, heated air or water may be forced through the capillary ducts 28 to release the rim 25 and the adjacent substantially cylindrical body portion. This stripping action should take place 1 at the same time the bottom end of the nlm body is being released or stripped from the cavity I4 as aforesaid.l

The annular rim 25 is normally relatively thick because of the'tendency for the, plastic material to ll the annular cavity 21, which action is to a certain extent independent of and subsequent to the suction action. Thus, the upper edge or brim portion of the hollow body or lower bottle portion 3 is the last portion to solidify.

It will be advantageous to permit the rim 25 to retain a degree of greenness or a greater proportion of the solvent (if such be used) as it aids when sealing this rim to the llange 24.

Instead of the down-turned rim 25 as: shown at the upper end of the bottle portion 3, Fig. 10., the rim may be a-t and the down-turned border ange 30 omitted, in which case the rim should for best results be Wider than that shown and be lnterengaged in such manner with the rim parts 24 and 3l of the upper portion 2 of the bottle as to produce substantially interwoven annular STooves in the shoulder of the bottle. Alterna'- tively the rim portion 3| may be first rolled down 7 and then folded in as shown in Fig. 11. For some uses, however, both rims to be connected together may be formed without depending border portions when'the plastic material used is of such nature as to-be fused, welded or coalesced into one homogeneous body by heat and pressure.

In Figs. 3 and 5, there is illustrated a bottle cap 32, which is adapted for use with a bottle mouth or lip of the type shown in Fig. 1. The cap 32 has a brim 33 which may be grasped to enable one to removey the cap quickly from the bottle mouth. 'Ihe cap 32 also has a stopper portion 35 which is adapted to be gripped at itslower end by the inturned edge 34 of the wall 36 of the bottle neck, which is a part of the thickened lip Wall 9 of the bottle formed as aforesaid. Theedge 34 -of the bottle neck will cooperate with the stopper portion 35 of the cap 32 to form a seat therein, which is the'actual sealing point. The material of which the cap is made should be flexible to permit localcontraction opposite the edge 34 of the bottle neck and should be elastic enough to expand or to be increased in size below the edge 34 by internal pressure in the bottle'. In this vway a good seal is provided between the cap 32 and the entire portion of the lip wall 9,- the lower end of the 'stopper expanding during capping, and spring tension being established by the down- .ward push of the brim 33 on the bottle.

In Figs. 4 and 6, there is illustrated-a stopper cap 31 adapted for use vwith a bottle neck of the the upper end of type show'n for the bottle of Fig. 2, this cap having the additional feature of sealing with an outer lip edge 38 of the bottle which is generally indicated at 39.v The cap 31 is formed with an somewhat in the region of its lower edge.

sure only serves to expand the bottle neck generally indicated at 56, thereby also expanding or thrusting outwardly the annular edge 38 of its mouth, which results in a tighter seal with the wall 51 of the recessed portion 55 of thev brim 33a. of the cap.

'I'hese caps or stoppers thus afford both inner and outer seals with a bottle of elastic material. The material of which the cap is formed may be any elastic stock, preferably of cellulosic composition, which may be pressed or otherwise formed to the required shape. The caps may be yformed otherwise than by the processes here outlined. Also, various compositions of cork with organic plastic materials and in some instances even rubber may be employed in combination with finely divided cork to form the inner contacting layer of the stopper portion of the cap and the recessed walls and brim thereof.

The elasticity of the material of the cap should be chosen in accc'rdance with the elasticity or flexibility of the bottle material with which it is to be engaged. The greater the hardness of the neck portion of thebottle, the` stronger the cap may be made, and vice versa. It is quite possible that a cap of this character may be desired for use with glass bottles if the necks of the bottles are constructed in accordance with the principles herein outlined for obtaining proper cooperation between the cap `corirlguratioi'il and the bottle neck when internal pressure is active on'the cap. A desirable feature of a cap of this type is the brim, which permits easy removal of the cap from the bottle.

bottle must have acertain degree of firmness and the stopper portion 35 of the cap must have some elastic properties. i

At the time of lifting the molding implement out of theplastic material or dope or causing the liquid plastic material to recede, each implement is slightly tipped 'at an angle to the surface level of the liquid plastic material and momentarily kept in light touching contact therewith to drain surplus liquid from'the molding implement lwithout dripping, after which complete withdrawal of the molding implement from the liquid is eected and the molding implement is rotated at a suitable speed to equalize the thickness of the remaining deposit and spread the lm coating At this time air or gas currents, or even steam, may be caused to impinge against the lm body to facilitate removal of solvents (if such be used) from the plastic film forming thebottle. Other processes of film rigidification may be practiced before, during or after rotation of the molding implement as aforesaid, depending upon the composition of the plastic material or dope and on plement.

glass of the -tumbler type, which may be pro- Vided with a curved brim by appropriately shaping the annular cavity 21 of the moldingimplement. Such a drinking vessel is particularly advantageous for use in drug stores and other places where the sanitary features 'and light weight as well as the unbreakable qualities of the cup are ing of the brim or edge of a substantially tubular body ofthe dip-formed variety appears to beentirely novel when accomplished at the same time the body is formed, which of course promotes economy and brings production within practicable limits. It also appears that no one hasso far produced a flat-bottomed article with reinforcing ribs, which feature prevents warping and gives strength to the article.

The bottle 39, Fig. 2, may be formed in one piece from a liquid plastic material or dope, preferably high in solid material content. In some instances, plastic materials which are kept liquid or near liquid at relatively 'high'temperatures may be used.

In FigjlZ is shown a body o f a liquid plastic material or dope and a suction mold 40 during the approach of the latter toward the surface of the liquid plastic material ordope, the upper end or tip of a hollow tube 4I marking substantially the center point of the area of mold contact with the pool of theliquid plastic material. 'I'he tube 4| at this instant `;is in its lower position with its I open end projected slightly above the level of the liquid plasticA material 5 in the pool. As the lower surface 43 of the mold 4D around the opening 112V ducts '45 from a conducting passage 46, Fig. 12,

thereby 'causing the plastic liquid material to move upwardly into the mold cavity as shown in Figs. 13 and 14, the tube 4I also moving upwardly `to about the position shown in Fig. l14. As the mold 40is progressively lled, superficial coagulation or solidication of the plastic material takesl place along the walls 50 of the ymold cavityllll. Theactual depth to which the surface coagulation extends depends of course upon the composition and character of the liquid plastic material.

With a cellulose derivative dope and a heated mold, the vacuum in the mold will promote increased viscosity and skin cohesiveness in the surface layer of plastic material. After a certain time interval required to produce inceptive cohesiveness in the layer of the liquid plastic material in contact with the mold walls, a volume of air may be blown from the tube 4I into the body of the liquid plastic material or dope, causing a separation to take place between the cohesive Asurface layer of vplastic material andthe more liquid central body thereof. Before thisy action takesplace, outside cross ribs 41, Figs 2 and 14, of

the bottle 39 have been formed in recessed grooves 49 of the mold body. This action takes place v,while the air space t8, Fig. 14;, is being expanded as indicated in Fig. 15 and the central body of liquid is being expelled from the mold cavity or returned to its source. The vacuum applied as aforesaid through the mold Walls is instrumental in holding the now relatively rm lm layer to 'the walls of the mold cavity. The combined acexternal ribs. smooth all corners and projectingpoints and ture as to prevent subsequent warping to a. large degree.

As the liquid plastic material or dope is caused to recede downwardly to aV point below theactual lip wall of the bottle mold, the application of air under pressure through the tube 4l, Fig. 16, may be discontinued andthe hollow space within the nlm receptacle thus formed may be partly evacuated, which aids in removingthe solvent (if such be used) from the layer of plastic material on the inner walls of the mold cavity before the liquid plastic material or dope is again introduced into the mold cavity. If the tube '3l is raised to a point close to the upper end of the mold cavity and vacuum .applied therethrough, all portions of the previously formed nlm may again be coated. This second charge of liquid plastic material should be quickly expelled by the application of air under pressure through the tube 4I to prevent an excessively thick lm layer inside the first lm layer. For forming a lm wall of ordinary thickness and an upper portion of the bottle body of an increased thickness, only a partial resurgence of the liquidplastic material or dope up to a point slightly past the annular shoulder wall may be required. For many types of bottles,- such second coating is superfluous, particularly when reinforced vbottle structures are being made. Very strong bottles may be made by this method by a single coating operationyfollowed by externally dipping the formed articles in a suitable coating liquid. This method is desirable in making bottles which are paneled or .provided with The external coating applied will make a good appearing bottle.-

The lip 53 of the mouth of the bottle, Fig'. 2, is the last portion to be formed, as Vindicated in Fig. 16, wherein the liquid plastic material or dopeis shown substantially completely expelled from the mold cavity. Inorder not to disturb the lip wall 53 of the bottle as the liquid plastic material or dope is expelled from the mold cavity by the air pressure action, the entrance cavity 5| is provided, which enables the air to move the liquid plastic material transversely downwardly and outwardly awayfrom the lm layer while the air pressure forces the plastic lip formation against the mold. As the liquid plastic material or dope recedes completely from the mold cavity, a cone-shaped apron of plastic material is formed having the shape of the cavity 5|, lwhich extension may later be trimmed off from the lip portion 53 of the bottle as shown in Fig. 19.

When the mold 40 is removed from contact with the liquid plastic materiaL-Fig. 17, the lm bottle formed therein is still acted upon and held to the inner walls 50 of the mold cavity by the vacuum action through the passages 45. The inner surface of the bottle wall may now be acted upon by circulating air, heated or otherwise, introduced by any suitable blow pipe into the mold cavity-and permitted to exhaust through the lower open end thereof. If desired the tube 4| may be used for this purpose.

Liquid solvent removers or film coagulating means may also be used, depending on the nature of the plastic material employed, in which case the mold may be inverted.

In forming the shoulder flange 60, Figs. 2 and 1 8, on the bottle body 39, heat and pressure are ylo combined during the "green" stage of the lm walls, and the hollow rib formed as aforesaid may be compacted to form the rib 60 as shown in Fig. 18, wherein the preliminary and nal steps of ycon'ipiaicting are shown at the left and right respectively. In many instances,this expedient is notn'eee'ssary as this particular bottle may be oapped'wltliout excessive pressure being brought tobearpn'the shoulder flange, the open form of which as thearticle is made as aforesaid,` being sufficient for many purposes. Also external ribbings may be formed to extend radiallyof the upper portion of the bottle 39 from the shoulder ange 60 to the vicinity ofthe neck portion 56.

Instead of forming the shoulder flange 60 by compacting the hollow shoulder rib on the bottle, a shoulder rim. may be formed at the time of charging the mold in the'same way/as the cross ribs 41 by providing a rim-,shaped recess in the wall 50 of the mold cavity and drawing the liquid plastic material or dope thereinto by suction. Such single ply rim may be `reeniorced by a num,- ber of webbings or' ribs formed in grooves disposed radially in the bottle wall at spaced points above lor below the proposed annular groove of the shoulder rim and at right angles thereto'.

The mold 40 shown in the several views is assembled from`several parts and may be constructed of any suitable metal and heated in any known way, each section thereof, however, being heated (or cooled) individually ina thoroughly enclosed way, and preferably by air. With certain kinds ofglm bottle structures, depending on the nature of the plastic material or dope to be used, it will be advantageous in order to obtain the best results to subject the interior nlm walls to internal iiuid pressure while still in the mold and externally acted upon by the vacuum action' as aforesaid, although vacuum is not always needed for the purpose of equalizing density -factors in the wall structure and in,

removing stresses or their causes.

The procedure involved is to seat a suitable nozzle (not shown) of any suitable pressure conveying means against the film covering or apron in the cavity and then to charge the bottle lin the mold with uid underl suitably controlled pressure to press the walls of the. lm bottle against the walls of the mold cavity.

'Ihe various methods and means described may of course be lused in conjunction with one another or be interchanged, whenever such ar` rangements may be desired, to improve production methodsand'without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention, as for instance,

the suction process may readily-be employed for v making the body portion 3 of the two-part bottle yI or any number of similar shapes.

The differential pressure process described enables accurate and stable formation of thin and heavy wall containers and other hollow objects from cellulosic dopes and other plastic compounds that normally shrink or reduce in volume While being solidified and thus are suscepti- Y ble to warping, by the uniform and eective removal of solvents during the shaping of articles and the fixing of the dimensions by the solvent Y removing means and other expedients applicable to the process and inherent therein.

For trimming olf the surplus lm formed on the walls of the cavity 5|, a simple expedient is illustrated in Fig. 19. The bottle neck is shownas being held in a cutter block 6| while a tubular cutter 62 is caused to descend, the cutting edge 63 thereof engaging a cooperating cutting edge end the wall structure of products and other merchandise can also be manufactured at a relatively low cost with the processes here outlined. A

Claims directed specifically to the two-part bottle shown in Fig. 1 are not included herein, but are presented in a copending application, Serial No. 629,695, led Aug. 20, 1932, which is a division of this case. My said co-pending application also contains claims to'the bottle-part 3, per se, whichr is separately useful as a drinking cup;

Claims directed to the caps 32 or 31, per se, or the combination ofI such caps with a container 4such as the bottle shown in Figs. l and 2 are to be found in another of my 3o-pendingl applications, Ser. No.588,644, filed Jan. 23, 1932, which is a continuation in part of the present case.

Having thus described my invention I desire to claim as new and to secure by Letters Patent:

1. A bottle of cellulosic material comprising a lower portion with a conical smooth integral seamless outer surface to'receive labels or the A-like and an upper smooth integral seamless portion of a generally conical shape but with a wavy outline and terminating in a mouth portion smaller than the body portion and having overturned curved portions around its mouth adapted to fit into a groove around the periphery of a stopper.

2. A bottle having a substantially frusto-conically shaped, one-piece upper portion of pliable cellulosic material and a smaller neck portion made up of curved overturned portions to stiien the material at the neck and shaped to t snugly in a groove extending around the periphery of a stopper.

.3. A bottle having its upper portion of a seamless, one-piece cellulosic material, said portion having a contracted neck portion integral with said upper portion, the opening through the neck portion being bounded by the turned-over curved f portion, said curved portion curving inwardly towards the neck portion and thence outwardly from the neck portion and being adapted to fit into a groove ln a stopper when the groove extends around the stopper between its upper and lower ends.

- 4. A one piece bottle formed of pliable cellu-A being outward both below and above the middle of/,the neck portion to adapt it to project into a groove around the periphery of a stopper.

5. A container having a closed end and an open which is translucent, lightweight, tough and exible and which' together' with ycertain reinforcing features associated therewith has originated from a cellulosic' 2,099,056 solution applied to the surface of a mold, the

open end of the container being constricted and shaped with an outwardly extending reinforcing ange.

6. A container having a'closed end and an open end the wall structure of which is translucent, lightweight, tough and flexible and which together with certain reinforcing features associated therewith has originated from a cellulosic solution applied to the surface of a mold, the closed end being so congurated as to present a transverse diametrical reinforcing rib.

7. A bottle made ofpliablecellulosic material and having an integral neck portion which tapers upwardly from the body portion vto the outer end of the neck portion, the neck portion being turned over in a curve extending rst inwardly thence outwardly to form a turned over portion surrounding the mouth of the bottle to strengthen the pliable material around the mouth, said turned over portion of the mouth being adapted to t into a groove around the periphery of a stopper.

8. A bottle having an upper integral seamless body portion and a. mouth portion, a neck portion between the body and the mouth portion,

said neck portion being smaller than the body 4portion but larger than the mouth portion, the

material of the mouth portion being turnedover to form a smooth circular portion adapted to t in a groove around the periphery of a stopper for the mouth.

9. A container of flexible wall structure and of bottle type havingv an upwardly tapering neck wall with an open mouth which is provided'with a narrowed-in opening formed by a constriction of the vwall at the upper portion of neck, said mouth being provided with a single ply brim that is turned outwardly directly from the narrow point of the neck and mouth, said container having a seamless wall structure which in its entirety has originated solelyfroma layer of soft plastic material collected on to the walls of a mold cavity and solidified thereat.

10. A container having a closed end and closure engaging open end that is provided with resiliently yielding inner and outer Contact areas for automatically obtaining a sealing hold on any closure which is shaped to fit such areas with slight pressure, said container comprising a body wall structure which is flexible and which together with single-ply rib-walls which are set at right angles to the body wall proper, has originated as an integral unit from a coating of plastic material applied to the surfaces of a mold cavity.

11. A bottle having walls of a seamless and flexible structure set directlyfrom material in uent condition into one continuous integral piece with the wall formation at its mouth curved inwardly and thence outwardly to form a funnellike mouth portion for thebottle.

12. A container, the wall structure of which is translucent, light weight, tough and flexible, set

into final shape directly from plastic material in fluent condition and having a reinforcing rib on its outer surface opposite a smooth inner surface and formed of the same material and at the same time as, and integral with, the wall that it reinforces. l A v 13. A container having a closed end and an open end, the wall structure of which is transparent, light weight, tough and flexible, set into final shape directly from plastic material in fluent condition, and having its inner surface smooth, and a rib on its outer surface around it intermediate its ends, said rib being integral with and formed at the same time as the wall which it reinforces.

14. A bottle flaring upward to van intermediate point and then tapering in to a mouth, the wall structure of which is translucent, light weight,

tough and flexible, set into final shape directly from plastic material in fluent condition, there being a reinforcing rib around the bottle at approximately the point where the outward flaring lower portion and the inward tapering upper portion meet, said rib being integral with and formed at the same time as the wall which it reinforces.

15. A container having a closed end and the wall structure of which is translucent, light weight, tough and flexible, set-into nal shape directly from plastic material in uent condition, the closed end of .said container being concave on its .outer side and smooth on its inner side, the outer concave side being provided with reinforcing ribs integral with and formed at the same time with thes'aid end. y

16. The container of claim 13 wherein an additional integral reinforcing rib is provided around the open end of said container. y

17. I'he container of i claim 5 wherein a circumferential rib is provided intermediate said closed end and said open end, said rib serving to reinforce said container. l

18. A container formed of an inherently waterproof, previously unformed plastic material with relatively thin flexible walls in one seamless unit with an open top end surrounded by a brim wall,

said brim wall being thicker in body section than

US2099055A 1930-12-03 1930-12-03 Flexible bottle Expired - Lifetime US2099055A (en)

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US2099057A US2099057A (en) 1930-12-03 1932-08-20 Two part container construction
US2209877A US2209877A (en) 1930-12-03 1937-05-26 Method of forming hollow articles from plastic material

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Cited By (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2477787A (en) * 1945-11-15 1949-08-02 Jr Harold S Cook Silicone insulating paper material
US2538684A (en) * 1948-04-21 1951-01-16 Allied Chem & Dye Corp Container
US2571504A (en) * 1949-09-16 1951-10-16 Pharma Craft Corp Thermoplastic spray bottle
US2688995A (en) * 1951-12-21 1954-09-14 Edmund L Wagoner Liquid container for beer or the like
US2752971A (en) * 1952-12-24 1956-07-03 Earl S Tupper Food shaker
US2808957A (en) * 1955-07-28 1957-10-08 Whirlpool Co Vacuum cleaner
US2991500A (en) * 1954-06-14 1961-07-11 Hagen Norbert Method and apparatus for making plastic containers
US3013310A (en) * 1958-07-08 1961-12-19 Foster Brothers Plastics Ltd Method of forming flanges on the ends of thermoplastic pipe
US3043461A (en) * 1961-05-26 1962-07-10 Purex Corp Flexible plastic bottles
US3050773A (en) * 1958-07-26 1962-08-28 Reinold Hagen Process and apparatus for manufacturing blown articles
US3081481A (en) * 1958-06-25 1963-03-19 Friedrich Hobiger Floor cleaning and polishing device
US3119541A (en) * 1961-12-28 1964-01-28 Celluplastics Inc Hanging cap and container combination
DE1173015B (en) * 1962-09-22 1964-06-25 Mauser Kg Container
DE1182588B (en) * 1954-09-20 1964-11-26 Nat Dairy Prod Corp Packaging made from thin-walled and thermoplastic
US3160999A (en) * 1960-10-26 1964-12-15 Dow Chemical Co Method of sealing and folding flanged edges of containers
US3171458A (en) * 1963-08-06 1965-03-02 Strong Plastics Inc Plastic container
US3220908A (en) * 1962-08-01 1965-11-30 Brown Machine Co Of Michigan Container assembly machine
US3236369A (en) * 1962-11-09 1966-02-22 George W Moore Compartmented package
US3251499A (en) * 1964-07-02 1966-05-17 Rausing Closure means for a container with an opening
US3302813A (en) * 1964-02-03 1967-02-07 Owens Illinois Inc Multi-piece containers
US3405862A (en) * 1966-09-27 1968-10-15 Burghof Engineering & Mfg Co Plastic container
US3417892A (en) * 1964-05-11 1968-12-24 Shell Oil Co Containers with squeezed bottom seam
US3428238A (en) * 1966-05-02 1969-02-18 Monsanto Co Plastic containers
US3433399A (en) * 1966-11-14 1969-03-18 Harry J Gunnink Container
US3434644A (en) * 1966-09-01 1969-03-25 Phillips Petroleum Co Container
US3518803A (en) * 1967-08-17 1970-07-07 Karl Ischinger Method of closing a container
US3680763A (en) * 1970-07-02 1972-08-01 Owens Illinois Inc Container parison
US3779191A (en) * 1972-07-06 1973-12-18 Maryland Cup Corp Method and apparatus for securing a closure member within a container
US3948404A (en) * 1974-11-14 1976-04-06 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Composite package for containing pressurized fluids
EP0893355A2 (en) * 1997-07-24 1999-01-27 Michio Ueda Package container for beverages.

Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2477787A (en) * 1945-11-15 1949-08-02 Jr Harold S Cook Silicone insulating paper material
US2538684A (en) * 1948-04-21 1951-01-16 Allied Chem & Dye Corp Container
US2571504A (en) * 1949-09-16 1951-10-16 Pharma Craft Corp Thermoplastic spray bottle
US2688995A (en) * 1951-12-21 1954-09-14 Edmund L Wagoner Liquid container for beer or the like
US2752971A (en) * 1952-12-24 1956-07-03 Earl S Tupper Food shaker
US2991500A (en) * 1954-06-14 1961-07-11 Hagen Norbert Method and apparatus for making plastic containers
DE1182588B (en) * 1954-09-20 1964-11-26 Nat Dairy Prod Corp Packaging made from thin-walled and thermoplastic
US2808957A (en) * 1955-07-28 1957-10-08 Whirlpool Co Vacuum cleaner
US3081481A (en) * 1958-06-25 1963-03-19 Friedrich Hobiger Floor cleaning and polishing device
US3013310A (en) * 1958-07-08 1961-12-19 Foster Brothers Plastics Ltd Method of forming flanges on the ends of thermoplastic pipe
US3050773A (en) * 1958-07-26 1962-08-28 Reinold Hagen Process and apparatus for manufacturing blown articles
US3160999A (en) * 1960-10-26 1964-12-15 Dow Chemical Co Method of sealing and folding flanged edges of containers
US3043461A (en) * 1961-05-26 1962-07-10 Purex Corp Flexible plastic bottles
US3119541A (en) * 1961-12-28 1964-01-28 Celluplastics Inc Hanging cap and container combination
US3220908A (en) * 1962-08-01 1965-11-30 Brown Machine Co Of Michigan Container assembly machine
DE1173015B (en) * 1962-09-22 1964-06-25 Mauser Kg Container
US3236369A (en) * 1962-11-09 1966-02-22 George W Moore Compartmented package
US3171458A (en) * 1963-08-06 1965-03-02 Strong Plastics Inc Plastic container
US3302813A (en) * 1964-02-03 1967-02-07 Owens Illinois Inc Multi-piece containers
US3417892A (en) * 1964-05-11 1968-12-24 Shell Oil Co Containers with squeezed bottom seam
US3251499A (en) * 1964-07-02 1966-05-17 Rausing Closure means for a container with an opening
US3428238A (en) * 1966-05-02 1969-02-18 Monsanto Co Plastic containers
US3434644A (en) * 1966-09-01 1969-03-25 Phillips Petroleum Co Container
US3405862A (en) * 1966-09-27 1968-10-15 Burghof Engineering & Mfg Co Plastic container
US3433399A (en) * 1966-11-14 1969-03-18 Harry J Gunnink Container
US3518803A (en) * 1967-08-17 1970-07-07 Karl Ischinger Method of closing a container
US3680763A (en) * 1970-07-02 1972-08-01 Owens Illinois Inc Container parison
US3779191A (en) * 1972-07-06 1973-12-18 Maryland Cup Corp Method and apparatus for securing a closure member within a container
US3948404A (en) * 1974-11-14 1976-04-06 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Composite package for containing pressurized fluids
EP0893355A2 (en) * 1997-07-24 1999-01-27 Michio Ueda Package container for beverages.
EP0893355A3 (en) * 1997-07-24 1999-08-04 Michio Ueda Package container for beverages.

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