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Flooring and method of constructing a floor

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Publication number
US2089075A
US2089075A US58010131A US2089075A US 2089075 A US2089075 A US 2089075A US 58010131 A US58010131 A US 58010131A US 2089075 A US2089075 A US 2089075A
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Prior art keywords
blocks
surface
block
slats
adhesive
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Expired - Lifetime
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Claude T Siebs
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Lucent Technologies Inc
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Lucent Technologies Inc
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F15/00Flooring
    • E04F15/02Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements
    • E04F15/04Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements only of wood or with a top layer of wood, e.g. with wooden or metal connecting members
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S52/00Static structures, e.g. buildings
    • Y10S52/16Roofing with pressure sensitive adhesive, e.g. shingle

Description

Aug. 3, 1937.( K "c T. slEBs FLOORING AND METHOD 0F coNsTRUcTlNG A FLOOR Filed Dec. 10, .19:51

`l-'l '6. 4. Illu! FIG. 5.

' FIG. 8.

FIG. 6.

Patented Aug. 3, 1937 f UNITED STATES FLOORING AND METHOD 0F CONSTRUCT- ING A FLOORk j Claude T. Siebs, Fanwood, N. J.. assigner to West-v ernv Electric Company, Incorporated, New York, N. Y., a corporation of NewYork Application December 10, 1931, Serial No.580,101

. y 1o Claims.

This inventionrelates to flooring .and toy a method of constructing a iioor Yand more particularly to an improved method 'of constructing flooring composed of blocks, slabs or the like.

In the construction of a oor composed'of l blocks placed upon'a supporting surface of concrete o`r the like, it has, in `some instances, been diflcult to obtain a good bond between the adhesive material or mastic with which the concrete surface is coated and the blocks which are applied thereto by reason of the fact that the concrete surface prematurely chills the adhesive' material and the temperaturevof the material is too low, when the blocks' are applied to the surface, to obtain permanent bond.

The principal objectA of the `invention is to provide a method of constructing oors'of blocks in which the chilling of the adhesive material is retarded whereby the blocks may be placed in position before the adhesive material congeals; f

with the result that al strong and permanent bond is obtained. 4

Briefly, inthe preferred embodiment, of the invention a concrete supporting surface is ground and levelled to obtain a smooth even surface.` A coating of hot adhesive material is applied to the surface after which a layer of woven textile fabricr is spread over the adhesive material. The blocks which are to be employedA are thenA immersed in some'of the hot adhesive material and are placed in position ina predetermined pattern upon lthe fabric coveredsurface.

Other features and advantages of the in vention will become apparent from the following cietailed description'of one embodiment thereof by means of which the method ymay be practiced, reference being had tothe accompanying drawing wherein Fig. 1 is a plan view, partly broken away, of a floor constructed in accordance with the inventionj Fig. 2 is a schematic elevational Veiw of vehicle for laying strips of fabric;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of one ofthe blocks;

Fig. 4 is a plan view of one of the fasteners employed in assembling the blocks in pairs;

Fig. 5 in an elevational view of the fastener shown in Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a plan view showing the assembling blocks in pairs;

Fig. '7 is a, sectional view taken on the line 1-1 of Fig. 1,'and' K Fig.l 8 is a plan view of one of the blocks. Referring now to the drawing wherein like method of (C1. i en -6) f reference numerals are employed to'designate like portions throughout' the several Views and refer ring particularly to` Figs. 3 and 8,` the reference numeral I0 indicates one Aof the blocks of'which theoor is constructed, The upper end lower faces Il and l2,l respectively, are substantially rectangular and the blockhas, in general, the contour of a geometrical solidedesignated as an oblique parallelepiped. One side and one end of' the blockv make angles with the 'upper surface which are greaterthan right` angles Iand the remaining side and endmake angles with the upper surfaceY which/are less than right angles.' As shown in Fig. 3, the block lllrnay be provided with `substantially V-shaped grooves 'I4 in any or all of its lateral surfaces. these grooves being positioned near thelower surface of a block and extending longitudinally thereof along the sides and transversely o f the ends`4 of the block. The blocks l0 are preferably of wood, although blocks composed of `'other materials maybe employed.

When wooden blocks are employed it has been found that they may conveniently be applied to a prepared surface in pairs. Fig; 6 shows one way in which rthe blocks may be assembled together in pairs. Any convenient jigor fixture not shown may be vprovided for placing the blocks in the relative positions that they are intended to assume in the licor structure. When the blocks have been placed in the' proper relative positions,y fastenin g members 1 5 may be forced into' the lower sur? faces of the two" blocks so as to engage both of the blocks "and to extend from one to the other. It is sometimes desirable to provide 'expansion clearance spaces betwccn'certainblocks in a floor struct-ure irtorder-that the blocks shallnot become raised vout of position in the event that expansion occurs because of dampness or other reasons. "By assembling the blocks in pairs as shown in Fig. 6, provision may be made for allowing an expansion clearance space lbetween the two blocks and by employing anassembling fixture the clearance may be made uniform between each pair of blocksvassembled.

One form of fastener I5 which may be employed 4 in assembling the pairs of blocks is shown in Figs. 4 andv5. The fastener consists of a strip of metal which has been crimpedtransversely thereof so as to have a zigzag contour `and to provide corrugations in both sides. The fastener l5 may be applied to the blocks by being positioned so as to extend'across from one block to the other and it is then forced or driven edgewise into the two blocks. The corrugations in the surfaces grip the to grind the surface in order to remove irregu-lv larities and to provide a smooth surface on which to apply the blocks. After thefsurfac'e' has been ground, it is thoroughly broom cleaned to re'- move all loose particles of f dirt, concrete, and other foreign matter which may have a deleterious effect upon the adhesive material.

When the concrete surface has been thoroughly cleaned, theadhesive material or mastic may be applied. It has been found` preferable to employ a bituminous substance. It shouldbe understood `that anymof the well-known bituminous adhesive materials which are intended to be applied in a molten state may be employed.

After the adhesive material has been heated un-` til it is in a veryY fluid statc,jit may be applied to the'concrete surface in any convenient manner such as brushing, swabbing or the like. Immediately upon the application of the adhesive and while it is in afiuid condition or after it has cooledito a viscous state the coated surface may be covered with strips of Woven textile fabric such, for example, as iiannelette. A concrete surface is, under ordinary circumstances, rela# tivel, cold and it isgenerally difficult to impart to it sufficient warmth to maintain an adhesive in a plastic condition, long enough to enable blocks to be applied thereto. By applying a layer of fabric between the concrete surface and the adhesive lcoated blocks, the cold surface is prevented from prematurely chilling they adhesive material. The fabric serves as heat insula tion and enables the adhesive material tobe cooled slowly. In Figs.- 1 and 7 the concrete supporting surface 25 is shownwith a-coating of adhesive material26 and a layer of wovenu fabric 21 applied'thereto. n

lIt is essential that'the fabric shall'bey applied to the supporting surface free from wrinkles or` ridges, and in the event that wrinkling of the fabric should occur during its application to the supporting surface the wrinkles may be removed by ironing the fabric with hot irons. The surface is then ready to receive lthe wooden blocks.

y It is desirable to obtain a good adhesive bond between the blocks and the fabric and this may be further ensured by partially immersing -the blocks in hotl adhesive'` material before positioning them upon the fabric impregnated by and embedded in'the adhesive. The blocks are arranged in a zigzag or a herring-bone patterna's shown in Fig; l. The laying of the block floor is accomplished by arranging some of the previously assembled Ypairs of blocksin a zigzag line for a convenient-distance, which line serves as a base line and additional pairsare applied to gradually build the floor away from this base line. As shown in Fig. l, the pairs of blocks are offset a distance equal to the width of one block in order that in the herring-bone pattern the three exposed lateral faces of each block of a pair may be in engagement with faces 'of adja- 1 cent blocks. As previously described, the sides sand ends of each block are oblique to the upper and lower surfaces thereof. It will thus be apparent that one side and one end of each block will extend over and exert a retaining action upon a side of one adjacent block and an end of another and that the remaining side and end will be retained and prevented from lifting by a side ofV one adjacent block 'and an end of another. The fastening members I5 also serve to prevent the edges engaged from lifting so that Y each block will be positively retained and prevented from lifting on two sides and one end.

The V-shaped grooves in the lateral faces of ad jacent blocks also cooperate in retaining the blocks in position byproviding a channel in which the adhesive material which clings to the blocks after emersion may congeal. This cooperation between the grooves in adjacent blocks is clearly shown at 30 in FigQ'l.

An alternative method of applying strips of f fabric to the concretesurface is schematically illustrated in Fig. 2. In that figure a reference numeral indicates a vehicle consisting of a chassis 36 mounted on wheels 31,. The chassis is provided with ,a transversely extending cylindrical rod 39 on which may be mounted a roll IU of vthe fabric. Mounted within the chassis is a tank 42 in which is placed a quantity of the hot adhesive material. A rotatable roll 4,5 is mounted within the tank 42 so that `the lower portion of,y the roll extends well down into the tank and 53 trails the vehicle 35 as it is moved along the floor. In order to keep the mastic in the tank 42 inthe proper liquid state, any of the numerous conventional and well known methods of heating thetank, such, for example, as electrical heating units or fuel burners, may be employed.

In'operation, a roll `of fabric is mounted on the chassis and is fed under `the roll 4B, over the roll`45, under a guide roll 5 5, out through the end of the ychassis and `under the roll. 53. As the vehicle is advanced along thel fioor, the fabric will be drawn from its supply roll and will pass over the roller 45 which will be frictionally rotated by the movement ofthe fabric.` As the roll 45 rotates, its lower portion will be immersed in the adhesive material and some of thatmaterial will Vcling to th`e`surface of the roll andV will be transferred to the fabricas thelatter passes 'over the roll. It is clearly shown 'in Fig. 2 that the fabric will emerge from the vehicle with the side to which the adhesive material has been supplied facing the floor surface and that it will be firmly vpressed to the surface and impregnated by and embedded in the adhesive u nder 'the pressure of the roll 53 which advances as the vehicle advances. 'I'he roll 53 enables the fabric to be applied to the concrete surface smoothly and without wrinkles. If the fabric is applied to the concrete surface in this manner, it willnot be necessary to rst coat the concrete with the adhesive material as sufficient adhesive will be carried by the fabric to obtain a permanent bond. After the adhesive impregnated fabric has been applied to the concrete surface, blocks may be arranged thereon in the manner hereinbefore described. Although a particular `vehicle has been described for applying the fabric and adhesive to the door, numerous other types of apparatus could be advantageously employed for that purpose.

In producing a floor structure in accordance with either of the above described methods, it is preferable to employ as the supporting surface, a floated concrete surface obtained by finishing with a Wooden trowel. A surface so obtained is finely pitted, and a mastic applied thereto adheres particularly well. It is sometimes desirable to prime the prepared concrete surface by applytween the blocks and the supporting surface. It

Cil

is desirable that the fabric be permeable by and capable of absorbing the mastic, and also that it shall have a soft nap upon its surfaces, in order that the mastic may penetrate through the fabric, and that the fabric may provide a bond against lateral displacement as well as a cushioning effect between the blocks and the supporting surface. The use of the layer of fabric, in addition to serving as heat insulation, permits the use of a relatively thin coating of mastic for retaining the blocks in position.

Although the blocks have been described as provided with V-shaped grooves, these grooves may have any suitable contour. While they cooperate to retain the blocks in position, they also to be construed as limited to the particular fea.

tures described and that many changes and modications could be made without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A floor structure comprising a supporting base, a relatively thick layerof a solidified adhesive material, a layer of blocks iltted 'together upon the adhesive material, some of the blocks closely engaging adjacent blocks and others of the blocks having expansion spaces between themselves and adjacent blocks, and fastening members holding the spaced blocks together,in combination with a relatively thin layer of woven textile material completely embedded within andpermeated by the adhesive material.

2. A parquetry floor block formed of a plurality of wood slats with the grain of the wood running lengthwise of the slats and in the same plane as the face of the block, a tie in forced tight contact with the wood for holding the slats normally in secure assembled relationship and a predetermined hair line crack between and lengthwise of the slats of sufficient width at the face of the block to permit lateral expansion 4of the slats independently of each other, due to moisture absorption, transversely of the grain of the wood, without buckling the block.

3. A parquetry door block formed of a plurality of wood slats with the grain of the wood running lengthwise of the slats and in the same plane as the face of the block, a stiff metallic tie in biting contact with the wood for holding the slats normally in rigid assembled relationship and a predetermined hair line crack between and lengthwise of the slats, of suilcient width at the face of the block, to permit lateral expansion of the slats independently of each other, due to moisture absorption, transversely of the grain of the wood, without buckling the block.

4. A block formed of a plurality of wood slats, means for holding the slats in assembled relationship and a crack, between and lengthwise of the slats, of uniform, predetermined hair line width at the face of the block, sufficient to permit lateral expansion of the slats, transversely of the grain of the wood and independently of each other, due. to moisture absorption, withoutl buckling the block.

5. A block formed of a plurality of wood slats, means for normally holding the slats firmly in assembled relationship and in forced tight contact with the wood and a crack, between and lengthwise of the slats, of uniform predetermined hair line width at the face of the block, sufllcient to permit lateral expansion of the slats, transversely of the grain of the wood and independently of each other, due to moisture absorption, without buckling the block.

6. A block formed of a plurality of wood slats held together in assembled relationship with a crack, between and lengthwise of the slats, of uniform predetermined hair line width at the face of the block, sufllcient to permit lateral expansion of the slats, transversely of the grain of the wood and independently of each other, due to moisture absorption, without buckling the block, the finished block having a predetermined overall width, transversely of the grain of the wood at the time of manufacture, which includes the width of the hair line crack between the slats.

7. A block formed of a plurality of Wood slats, a stiff metallic tie for normally holding the slats firmly in assembled relationship and in biting contact with the wood, and a crack, between and lengthwise of the slats, of uniform, predetermined hair line width at the face of the block sufficient to permit lateral expansion of the slats, transversely of the grain of the wood and independently of each other, due to moisture absorption, withoutbuckling the block.

8. A wood iloor panel made of blocks that are formed of a plurality of slats with a crack,'be tween and lengthwise of the slats, of uniform predetermined hair line width at the face of the block, a subfloor, a permanently plastic mastic laid on the subfloor, the blocks as initially laid on the mastic having cracks between them, of hair line width at the face of the block, the cracks between the slats and blocks providing a sufficient clearance to take care of expansion of the wood,

without buckling, due to-moisture absorption.

9. A wood floor panel made of blocks that are :formed of aplurality of slats with a crack between and lengthwise of the slats, of uniform predetermined hair line width at the face of the block, a subfloor, a permanently plastic mastic laid on the subfloor, the blocks being laid on the mastic, with the cracks of adjacent blocks at right angles to each other, the blocks as initially laid having cracks between them of hair line width at the face of the blocks and being free to expand relative to each other, the cracks between the slats and b1ocks|providng a sufficient clearance to Ytake care of expansion of the wood, without buckling dueto moisture absorption.

10. A method of constructing a. floor which comprises the steps of preparing a supporting surface on a base. forming a. relatively thick layer of molten adhesive Vmaterial on the surface, laying s. relatively thin sheet of woven textile fabric on the layer of adhesive material, embedding the sheet within the layer, forming wood blocks from a plurality of slats in spaced relationship to provide a crack between the slats of uniform predetermined haix' line width, tying the slats to- 5 gether and fitting the blocks together on the layer.

CLAUDE T. SIEBS.

US2089075A 1931-12-10 1931-12-10 Flooring and method of constructing a floor Expired - Lifetime US2089075A (en)

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FR2505721A1 (en) * 1981-05-12 1982-11-19 Castagne Jean Panel formed from wooden planks - uses combination of tongues and grooves along edges of planks which are interfitted and retained by corrugated staples
US20060032168A1 (en) * 2003-01-08 2006-02-16 Thiers Bernard P J Floor panel, its laying and manufacturing methods
US20060070333A1 (en) * 2002-04-03 2006-04-06 Darko Pervan Mechanical locking system for floorboards
US20060154113A1 (en) * 2004-12-09 2006-07-13 Fuji Electric Device Technology Co., Ltd. Perpendicular magnetic recording medium and magnetic recording device
US20080005997A1 (en) * 2002-04-22 2008-01-10 Valinge Innovation Ab Floorboards, flooring systems and method for manufacturing and installation thereof
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