US2083081A - Freezing mold - Google Patents

Freezing mold Download PDF

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Publication number
US2083081A
US2083081A US46501A US4650135A US2083081A US 2083081 A US2083081 A US 2083081A US 46501 A US46501 A US 46501A US 4650135 A US4650135 A US 4650135A US 2083081 A US2083081 A US 2083081A
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United States
Prior art keywords
mold
ice
cavities
spherical
water
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Expired - Lifetime
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US46501A
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Harry H Moll
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Harry H Moll
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25CPRODUCING, WORKING OR HANDLING ICE
    • F25C1/00Producing ice
    • F25C1/22Construction of moulds; Filling devices for moulds
    • F25C1/24Construction of moulds; Filling devices for moulds for refrigerators, e.g. freezing trays
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23GCOCOA; COCOA PRODUCTS, e.g. CHOCOLATE; SUBSTITUTES FOR COCOA OR COCOA PRODUCTS; CONFECTIONERY; CHEWING GUM; ICE-CREAM; PREPARATION THEREOF
    • A23G9/00Frozen sweets, e.g. ice confectionery, ice-cream; Mixtures therefor
    • A23G9/04Production of frozen sweets, e.g. ice-cream
    • A23G9/08Batch production
    • A23G9/083Batch production using moulds
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23GCOCOA; COCOA PRODUCTS, e.g. CHOCOLATE; SUBSTITUTES FOR COCOA OR COCOA PRODUCTS; CONFECTIONERY; CHEWING GUM; ICE-CREAM; PREPARATION THEREOF
    • A23G9/00Frozen sweets, e.g. ice confectionery, ice-cream; Mixtures therefor
    • A23G9/04Production of frozen sweets, e.g. ice-cream
    • A23G9/22Details, component parts or accessories of apparatus insofar as not peculiar to a single one of the preceding groups
    • A23G9/221Moulds

Description

i INVENTOR. #4R/Q ,V /VO H. H. MOLL FREEZING MOLD Filed OCT.. 24, 1935 f @al June 8, 1937.

ATTORNEY.

Patented June 8, 1937 NiED STATES PATENT OFFICE 8 Claims.

'I'his invention relates to improvements ln ice molds of the type employed in connection with mechanical refrigerators.

The use `of mechanical refrigerators in ordinary dwellings and apartments has already displaced the ordinary ice boxes to a very great extent. Mechanical refrigerators lend themselves very readily to the artificial production of ice, and molds of different kinds are usually provided for freezing small cubes of ice for use in preparing cold drinks. It has been found by experience, that although the freezing of water so as to form ice cubes of the desired shape and size is an easy matter, it is very difficult toremove such ice cubes from the molds in which they are frozen, particularly when constructed of metal, because the ice will adhere very strongly to the metallic surfaces and make it quite difficult to remove the ice from the mold. To overcome this difficulty, many different kinds of trays have been invented.

It is the object of this invention to produce a mold for use with mechanical refrigerators, of the ordinary household type, and from which the ice can readily be removed.

A further object is the provision of a mold effective for freezing liquid into bodies of spherical shape.

Another object is to provide a mold, for the purpose pointed out, which shall be made in two parts that can be readily brought into operative position, and which can also be readily separated soas to remove the ice therefrom.

The above and any other objects that may become apparent as the description proceeds are attained by means of a construction and an arrangement of parts that will now be described in detail, and for this purpose reference will be had to the accompanying drawing, in which the invention has been illustrated in several specifically different forms, and in which Figure 1 is a top plan view of a portion of a mold which is constructed in accordance with this invention;

Figure 2 is a longitudinal section, taken on line 2-2, Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a top plan view of another embodiment of the invention;

Figure 4 is a transverse section taken on line 44, Figure 3, and shows the mold in closed position;

Figure 5 is a transverse section, similar to that shown in Figure 4, but shows the mold in open position;

Figure 6 is a longitudinal section similar to that shown in Figurel 2, but showing a slightly different form of the invention; and

Figure 7 is a fragmentary sectional view illustrating how the mold can be bent for the purpose of removing the ice.

(Cl. (i2-108.5)

In the drawing, numeral 8 represents the bottom of a metal tray or of an open supporting frame whose ends have been designated by numerals 9. The upper edges of the tray shown in Figure 2 is provided with an outwardly extending flange I0. Located in and supported by the frame or tray, that has just been described, is a mold comprising a single rubber member having inclined end and side walls that engage the correspending inside walls of the tray or frame.

The mold is also provided with outwardly extending flanges I2 that project over and are supported from the flange I of the support. The mold is formed with several parallel rows of spherical openings or mold cavities I3 whose walls are provided with circular openings I4 through which the water may enter the molds, and through which the ice spheres must be removed therefrom.

The walls may be provided with one or more cuts I that will permit the neck of the mold to spread, in the manner shown in Figure 7, so as to facilitate the removal of the ice spheres therefrom, but where the material of the mold is sufficiently elastic, this is not necessary.

When-the support for the mold is a watertight tray, the spaces between the individual molds, which have. been designated by numeral I6, are closed bythe material ofthe mold, so as to preclude the entry of water into the trays when the molds are lled with water, but when the support is merely an open fr'ame, the spaces I6 may be open.

when a tray like that iustrated in Figures 1, e

2 and 'I ,and which has just been described is used, the mold cavities are lled by pouring water over .the upper surface of the mold until the cavities are lled.

After the water has been frozen, the rubber mould is removed from the support, or frame, and flexed, as shown in Figure 7, whereupon the ice spheres will loosen from the sides of the mold, and can be forced out thru the openings I4.

In Figures 3, 4 and 5 a two part mold has been illustrated that can be made entirely of metal or of rubber, either lexible'or hard; of bakelite or of any other suitable material, but which has been primarily designed to be made from metal, such as aluminum.

, This mold is made in two parts, a bottom part A and a cover part B. The part A has a thick bottom Ilsurrounded on its four sides by upwardly extending walls- I8. The upper surface of Athe bottom has a plurality of parallel rows of semi-spherical depressions I9. 'I'he cover B is substantially of the same thickness as the bottom I1, and ts inside of the walls I0 in the manner shown in Figure 4.

The cover has an outwardly extending flange 20 that projects over and beyond the walls I8 in the manner shown in Figure 4. The cover is connected to one wall of the bottom part A by hinges 2| so that it may occupy either of the positions illustrated in Figures 4 or 5. The under surface of the cover has'semi-spherical depressions I9a that correspond in number, and position to the corresponding recesses i9 in the bottom, so that when the cover occupies the position shown in Figure 4, spherical cavities will be formed.

'Ihe cover has a vent opening 22 in communication with each recess. When the mold illustrated in Figures', 4'and 5 is to be prepared for use, water. is poured into the space above the bottom, while the top is in the position shown in Figure 5, after which the cover is moved slowly to the position shown in Figure 4. The presence of the vents 22 permits the water to fill the spherical recesses that result from the closure of the cover. I

After the water has been frozen, the mold can be opened by the application of a spreading force. If necessary, the mold can be slightly warmed by contact with water, as even hot water applied thereto will not produce any appreciable waste, as the ice is completely enclosed by the mold.

In Figure 6 a. still further modification has been shown, in which'the mold is made of metal or other suitable material, and instead of being made in a single piece, like that shown in Figures 1, 2 and 7, is made in two parts. The lower part has been designated as an entirety by reference character Aa, and the top or cover part by reference character Ba. 'I'he bottom part has upwardly extending side and end walls I8a that terminate in outwardly extending flanges Ilia that project beyond the walls 9.

The cover Ba is not hinged to the bottom in this construction, but rests uponthe bottom portion. The two parts have correspondingly positioned semi-spherical recesses I9 and lla that supplement each other to form spherical mold cavities. The top is provided with vent openings 22a, through which the water` may enter, or air leave the mold cavities.

It will be apparent from the above description and the drawing that the ice, instead of being formed into cubes" is molded into substantially spherical form, and this shape has been found to possess several advantages over the usual shapes, as it has no sharp corners or angles. Spherical pieces of ice are also more desirable than' other shapes for use with cold drinks, and since a sphere has the minimum surface for a given volume, the melting will take place slower than for any other shape.

The mold illustrated in Figure 6, although primarily designed to be made from metal, can also be made from soft or flexible rubberfand when so made, the ice can be very easily removed.

Water, as is well known, attains its maximum density at 4" centigrade, and therefore expands when it freezes. Where the molds are made from rubber, this will stretch to take care of any expansion.

In the metallic construction shown in Figures 4 and 6, the parts will simply move apart or separate sufficiently to compensate for the expansion, and the expansion that takes place between 4 and'zero, centigrade, or while the water is still liquid, will merelyl raise the water level in the vents.

The depressions l! and ISa have beenvshown Having described the invention, what is claimed as new is: v

1. A mold for freezing matter in spherical form, comprising a support having upwardly extending walls, a rubber mold positioned in the support and provided with flanges projecting over the tops of the walls, the mold having a plurality of substantially spherical cavities open at the top for the reception of matter to be frozen, the material being elastic, for permitting the frozen matter to be removed fromthe cavities.

2. A mold for freezing matter in spherical form, comprising a support having upwardly extending walls, a rubber mold positioned in the support and provided with iianges projecting over the tops of the Walls, the mold having a plurality of substantially spherical cavities open at the top for the reception of matter to be frozen, the material being elastic and having notches about the opening into the cavities to Afacilitate the spreading of the material when removing the frozen matter.

3. An elastic one-piece mold for forming substantially spherical piecesl of frozen matter, com-y stantially spherical cavities, open at the top, the

openings being smaller than the diameters of the cavities, the material surrounding the openings being notched to facilitate the removal of the frozen matter therefrom.

5. A freezing mold comprising a flexible and stretchable body having an open substantially spherical cavity for the reception of matter to be frozen, the opening being oflesser diameter than the cavity.

' 6. A freezing mold comprising a exible and stretchable body having an open substantially spherical cavity for the reception of matter to be frozen, the opening being of lesser diameter than the cavity, and a relatively rigid support for the body.

'7. A freezing mold comprising a flexible and stretchable body having open substantially spherical cavities for the reception of matter to be frozen, the openings being of lesser diameter than the cavities, and a relatively rigid support for the body.

8. A freezing mold comprising a flexible and stretchable body having a plurality of substantially spherical cavities open at the top for the reception of matter to be frozen, the openings being of lesser diameter than the cavities.

` HARRY H. MOLL.

US46501A 1935-10-24 1935-10-24 Freezing mold Expired - Lifetime US2083081A (en)

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Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2514476A (en) * 1948-08-10 1950-07-11 Copeman Lab Co Ice tray
US2587852A (en) * 1948-10-05 1952-03-04 New Plastic Corp Flexible ice tray
US2796742A (en) * 1953-08-10 1957-06-25 Gilbert G Platt Ice tray
US3322269A (en) * 1965-09-13 1967-05-30 Dome Chemical Corp Holder for cylindrical objects and package thereof
US4417716A (en) * 1982-01-27 1983-11-29 Americo Penna Novelty ice tray
US4527972A (en) * 1984-02-08 1985-07-09 Carlsson Halvard I Machine for producing ice-cream
US4562991A (en) * 1984-11-13 1986-01-07 Gerald Wu Reusable ice mold
EP0326144A2 (en) * 1988-01-29 1989-08-02 Hoshizaki Electric Co., Ltd. Automatic ice making machine
US4854228A (en) * 1986-10-29 1989-08-08 Ferrero S.P.A. Device for the manufacture of food products, particularly confectionery wafer products
US20010005061A1 (en) * 1999-05-13 2001-06-28 Northrop Grumman Corporation Method and apparatus for fabricating composite structures
US6655174B2 (en) 2001-05-29 2003-12-02 Pamela R. Moore Method and apparatus for individual disposable packages for freezable substances and a container thereof
US6761347B2 (en) 1998-06-02 2004-07-13 Pamela R. Moore Shaped ice article and article for making same
US20060266915A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-11-30 Ice Cube, Inc. Tray mold
US20070281303A1 (en) * 2006-06-05 2007-12-06 Dna Security, Inc. Dna storage and display vessel and method
US20080245800A1 (en) * 2007-04-06 2008-10-09 Moore Pamela R Disposable container for frozen liquid
US20120321767A1 (en) * 2011-06-17 2012-12-20 Global Concepts Limited, Inc., dba Global TV Concepts, Ltd. Apparatus for baking food products
US20120326004A1 (en) * 2010-12-23 2012-12-27 Lekue, S.L. Ice tray for making ice cubes
US20130081412A1 (en) * 2011-10-04 2013-04-04 Lg Electronics Inc. Ice maker and ice making method using the same
US8523046B1 (en) * 2012-10-18 2013-09-03 International Business Machines Corporation Forming an array of metal balls or shapes on a substrate
US8561880B2 (en) * 2012-02-11 2013-10-22 International Business Machines Corporation Forming metal preforms and metal balls
US20140182325A1 (en) * 2013-01-02 2014-07-03 Lg Electronics Inc. Ice maker
FR3005152A1 (en) * 2013-04-24 2014-10-31 Laurent Benayoun Glacons mold
US8875978B2 (en) 2012-02-11 2014-11-04 International Business Machines Corporation Forming constant diameter spherical metal balls
US20160187053A1 (en) * 2012-11-16 2016-06-30 Whirlpool Corporation Ice storage to hold ice and minimize melting of ice spheres
US20170016663A1 (en) * 2012-12-13 2017-01-19 Whirlpool Corporation Method of warming a mold apparatus
US9566362B1 (en) * 2013-12-06 2017-02-14 Burton Hanna Poured and/or compressed multiple wax object
US20170056287A1 (en) * 2015-08-28 2017-03-02 Craig Robertson Package for frozen nutrient pill

Cited By (36)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2514476A (en) * 1948-08-10 1950-07-11 Copeman Lab Co Ice tray
US2587852A (en) * 1948-10-05 1952-03-04 New Plastic Corp Flexible ice tray
US2796742A (en) * 1953-08-10 1957-06-25 Gilbert G Platt Ice tray
US3322269A (en) * 1965-09-13 1967-05-30 Dome Chemical Corp Holder for cylindrical objects and package thereof
US4417716A (en) * 1982-01-27 1983-11-29 Americo Penna Novelty ice tray
US4527972A (en) * 1984-02-08 1985-07-09 Carlsson Halvard I Machine for producing ice-cream
US4562991A (en) * 1984-11-13 1986-01-07 Gerald Wu Reusable ice mold
US4854228A (en) * 1986-10-29 1989-08-08 Ferrero S.P.A. Device for the manufacture of food products, particularly confectionery wafer products
EP0326144A2 (en) * 1988-01-29 1989-08-02 Hoshizaki Electric Co., Ltd. Automatic ice making machine
EP0326144A3 (en) * 1988-01-29 1990-12-05 Hoshizaki Electric Co., Ltd. Automatic ice making machine
US6761347B2 (en) 1998-06-02 2004-07-13 Pamela R. Moore Shaped ice article and article for making same
US20010005061A1 (en) * 1999-05-13 2001-06-28 Northrop Grumman Corporation Method and apparatus for fabricating composite structures
US6565351B2 (en) * 1999-05-13 2003-05-20 Vought Aircraft Industries, Inc. Apparatus for fabricating composite structures
US6655174B2 (en) 2001-05-29 2003-12-02 Pamela R. Moore Method and apparatus for individual disposable packages for freezable substances and a container thereof
US20060266915A1 (en) * 2005-05-24 2006-11-30 Ice Cube, Inc. Tray mold
US20070281303A1 (en) * 2006-06-05 2007-12-06 Dna Security, Inc. Dna storage and display vessel and method
US20080245800A1 (en) * 2007-04-06 2008-10-09 Moore Pamela R Disposable container for frozen liquid
US20120326004A1 (en) * 2010-12-23 2012-12-27 Lekue, S.L. Ice tray for making ice cubes
US20120321767A1 (en) * 2011-06-17 2012-12-20 Global Concepts Limited, Inc., dba Global TV Concepts, Ltd. Apparatus for baking food products
US20130081412A1 (en) * 2011-10-04 2013-04-04 Lg Electronics Inc. Ice maker and ice making method using the same
US9335081B2 (en) * 2011-10-04 2016-05-10 Lg Electronics Inc. Ice maker and ice making method using the same
US8561880B2 (en) * 2012-02-11 2013-10-22 International Business Machines Corporation Forming metal preforms and metal balls
US8875978B2 (en) 2012-02-11 2014-11-04 International Business Machines Corporation Forming constant diameter spherical metal balls
US8944306B2 (en) 2012-02-11 2015-02-03 International Business Machines Corporation Forming metal preforms and metal balls
US8523046B1 (en) * 2012-10-18 2013-09-03 International Business Machines Corporation Forming an array of metal balls or shapes on a substrate
US8833636B2 (en) 2012-10-18 2014-09-16 International Business Machines Corporation Forming an array of metal balls or shapes on a substrate
US9677808B2 (en) * 2012-11-16 2017-06-13 Whirlpool Corporation Apparatus for making, storing and minimizing melting of spherical pieces of ice
US20160187053A1 (en) * 2012-11-16 2016-06-30 Whirlpool Corporation Ice storage to hold ice and minimize melting of ice spheres
US20170016663A1 (en) * 2012-12-13 2017-01-19 Whirlpool Corporation Method of warming a mold apparatus
US10605512B2 (en) * 2012-12-13 2020-03-31 Whirlpool Corporation Method of warming a mold apparatus
US9581372B2 (en) * 2013-01-02 2017-02-28 Lg Electronics Inc. Ice maker
US20140182325A1 (en) * 2013-01-02 2014-07-03 Lg Electronics Inc. Ice maker
FR3005152A1 (en) * 2013-04-24 2014-10-31 Laurent Benayoun Glacons mold
US9566362B1 (en) * 2013-12-06 2017-02-14 Burton Hanna Poured and/or compressed multiple wax object
US20170056287A1 (en) * 2015-08-28 2017-03-02 Craig Robertson Package for frozen nutrient pill
US10456327B2 (en) * 2015-08-28 2019-10-29 Craig Robertson Package for frozen nutrient pill

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